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Maine is not just an extraordinary place, it is mythic. It’s a place that calls people to come home if they have left, or to find a way, somehow, to move to Maine if they weren’t born here. Whether a Mainer by chance or by choice, those who live here must be adaptable and resilient, because so many of the things that make Maine beautiful and different can also make life challenging and hard. That’s one of the reasons why invention and reinvention figure so prominently in Maine’s history. Now Maine needs to respond to the challenges of a new economy by reinventing graduate professional education. The Maine Center will help transform and grow Maine’s economy and drive rebirth and renewal in all Maine communities.

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It’s a new world, welcome to it. Real GDP (2009 Dollars) Compared to 1997 Levels

145 140

UNITED STATES

ENGLAND The natural resources thatNEW make Maine a wonderful place to live and to visit – the forests, the rivers and the sea – for 135

MAINE centuries also provided jobs and careers in ways that changed little over the course of time. The classrooms of Maine’s high

Index (1997-100)

130community colleges turned out graduates who were ready and well equipped to go to work in good-paying jobs. schools and 125

When a young man graduated from Stearns High School in Millinocket, there was a job waiting for him in the Great Northern 120

paper mill. Young women easily found work as stitchers in Dexter and Waterville shoe factories and as spinners in Biddeford 115 textile mills. Fishermen passed on their lore and their gear from one generation to the next in coastal villages and Lewiston

from Kittery 110to Stonington to Lubec.

Then everything changed. 105 100

1997 1998and 1999 2003away. 2004 Then 2005 the 2006 2011and 2012 2013 2014 First, the shoe factories the 2000 textile2001 mills2002 moved pulp2007 and 2008 paper2009 mills2010 closed, groundfish

began disappearing from the Gulf of Maine. The Maine economy stopped growing, opportunity has been shrinking, and young people are leaving.

60% 50% 40% 140

INDEX Index (1997=100) (1997-100)

135 30%

OTHER NEW ENGLAND REAL GDP (2009 COMPARED TO 1997 LEVELS Real GDP (2009DOLLARS) Dollars) Compared to 1997 Levels MAINE 41.8% UNITED STATES NEW ENGLAND MAINE 26.7%

21.9%

130 20% 125

16.7%

16.2%

14.7% 8.9%

120 10% 115 0% 110 105

HIGH SCHOOL

ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

100 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

6% 5.1% 5% 60% 4

4% 50%

4.5%

4.4%

OTHER NEW ENGLAND MAINE

4.1%

53.0% 3.9%

3.8% 41.8%

3.7% 3.2%

3.1%

2.9%

United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis

145

53.0%


% JOB GROWTH IN NONFARM JOBS BETWEEN JAN. 2001 AND DEC. 2015 JOBS IN THE U.S. HAVE GROWN

MAINE .21% 145

UNITED STATES 7.29% UNITED STATES

140 Bureau of Labor Statistics

Index (1997-100)

135

Real GDP (2009 Dollars) Compared to 1997 Levels

NEW ENGLAND MAINE

35x MORE THAN IN MAINE SINCE 2001

130

Maine is not 125 the only place where the economy changed and where the need to adapt and reinvent became acute, but Maine waited and waited for the old 120

economy to come back. Even though Mainers are accustomed to figuring out new ways 115 when they have to, Maine has been slow to invest anew in graduate and to do things

professional 110 education and in building the skills and competencies that employers need to compete in the new economy. 105

Today there are just about as many openings in Maine that require a postgraduate or professional degree as there are those that100 require an associate’s degree. 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

EMPLOYER JOB POSTINGS BY DESIRED EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE (2014) 60% 50%

53.0% OTHER NEW ENGLAND MAINE

41.8%

30%

26.7%

20%

21.9% 16.7%

16.2%

14.7% 8.9%

10% 0%

ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

BUS

HIGH SCHOOL

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

SS

INE

PO LIC Y

Burning Glass

40%

6%

LAW

5.1% 5%

4.5%

4.4%

5


Ind

0% 115 CT

MA

110

NEW ENGLAND

NY

NJ

VT

RI

UNITED STATES

NH

ME

105

But Maine’s educational profile still looks too much like it did when the economy fit the Pine Tree State

100

as comfortably as an old glove.

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 POSTSECONDARY DEGREE ATTAINMENT (Maine vs. U.S. adverage)

60% ASSOCIATE’S

17%

53.0% OTHER NEW ENGLAND

50% BACHELOR’S

-0.7%

MAINE

U.S. Census Bureau

40% MASTER’S

41.8%

-6.7%

30%

26.7%

PROFESSIONAL 20%

21.9%

-9.1% 16.2%

DOCTORATE 10%

16.7% 8.9%

-6.9%

0% -20%

-15%

-10%

HIGH SCHOOL

14.7%

0%

-5% ASSOCIATE’S DEGREE

5%

10%

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

15%

20%

GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL DEGREE

ADVANCED DEGREE ATTAINMENT (% of population aged 25 and older with a professional or doctoral degree – e.g. MBA, PhD or MD) 6% 5.1% 5%

4.5%

4.4%

4.1%

4%

3.9%

3.8%

3.7% 3.1%

UNITED STATES

NH

3%

2.9%

2% 1% 0% MA

6

CT

NEW ENGLAND

NY

VT

NJ

RI

ME

U.S. Census Bureau

3.2%


Maine cannot reinvent its economy and begin to grow again until it first reinvents higher education. Today Maine’s biggest challenge – bigger than taxes, bigger than energy costs – is to change the composition of a workforce that is increasingly ill suited for jobs in Maine’s new economy, which looks very different from the economy that blessed the state for several hundred years. Mainers are now competing in a much faster-paced economy, marketing goods and services in a much smaller world. Those who lead, manage and advise Maine’s private and public enterprises need to be better and more broadly educated, or else Maine will fall further and further behind in the race for jobs and prosperity.

“My generation needs to be much more broadly educated than any before us. 21st-century technology allows me to lead practitioners toward solutions that were beyond the imagination twenty years ago. But these solutions are inherently more complex. I find myself needing to grapple with concepts outside of what is taught in a traditional public health program. I need to be grounded in the principles of public health, business and law all at the same time; and I also need to know how to act on them.”

JAY KNOWLTON

Student in the Muskie School’s Master in Public Health program and Data Coordinator at the High Value Healthcare Collaborative.

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Griffin Hall, College of Informatics, Northern Kentucky University

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The Maine Center for Graduate Professional Studies is a strategy for reinvention. The University of Maine System has begun to reinvent higher education in Maine from what has been a loose confederation of seven independent campuses: the Board of Trustees and the Chancellor are fashioning One University serving all of Maine. With other reforms, the Maine Center will be at the leading edge of the One University and will take the reinvention of higher education a giant step further. The Center will bring together under one roof in Portland the University of Maine System’s single, merged MBA program, the Maine Law School and the Muskie School of Public Service, along with a conference center and an incubator/ accelerator that will make innovation itself a classroom. The new building will be exciting, path-breaking and designed to help break down walls and silos in the graduate programs that already are vanishing from the real world of work. With a greater emphasis on experiential education the Maine Center will knit Maine’s academy and Maine’s workplaces – Maine’s faculties and employers – closer together.

“A model of academic integration and innovation, the Maine Center will make graduate education more relevant, enhance the quality of the graduate experience, broaden students’ career prospects and advance economic development.

The Center will be transformative for our institutions and for the state of Maine.” CHANCELLOR JAMES PAGE

Graduate of the University of Maine at Fort Kent and Chancellor of the University of Maine System since 2012.

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The Maine Center

“It’s a great idea! The interdisciplinary focus is the new way to do business, and the Maine Center is truly revolutionary: nothing like it exists anywhere else, and it will provide a competitive edge for Maine.” DANA CONNORS

10

President and CEO, Maine State Chamber of Commerce


will break the mold. 21.9%

14.7%

What will the Maine Center produce? Lawyers who better understand balance sheets and who better appreciate the public policies at the root of laws and regulations. MBAs who already have learned on the job and have acquired informed instincts about where regulations are headed and why. Public managers who can run a town or city with the skills of an entrepreneur

GRADUATE OR FESSIONAL DEGREE

and the careful diligence of a lawyer. Professionals

who start and grow businesses that create opportunity

for all Mainers.

SS INE BUS

the Maine Center will spawn the analytic,

collaborative and creative talents that are

highly valued in the workplace. 3.1%

different and disruptive, in classrooms and leaders and public managers come together,

PO

workspaces where future lawyers, business

LIC

Y

Amidst physical surroundings that will be

LAW

2.9%

Maine’s revolution in graduate professional education will be felt nationally. The Maine Center breaks the mold and will help transform the way America prepares students for careers in law, business and public service.

NH

ME

“The Maine Center has already helped us grow Muskie’s relationships with Maine Law and the business schools so that, for example, MPH now has two cross-listed courses with each school, and we currently have students who are pursuing dual degrees across all three schools.

17%

Now we want to develop and explore other creative ideas to help attract and build a new and stronger workforce for Maine’s future.” 17%

ASSOCIATE’S

-0.7%

BACHELOR’S

PROFESSOR ELISE BOLDA -6.7%

MASTER’S

PROFESSIONAL

-9.1%

“The challenges that we face don’t know or respect the categories of law, public policy, and business; they transcend them.” 20% DOCTORATE

15%

Chair of the Graduate Program in Public Health at the Muskie School of Public Service.

-6.9%

PROFESSOR ANTHONY MOFFA

Received his J.D. from Yale Law in 2012 and is a Visiting Associate Professor at Maine Law.

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Jindal School of Management, The University of Texas at Dallas

What happens inside the building will be as innovative as the building itself.

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Students will gain competencies that extend beyond their particular areas of professional focus

Maine Center Ventures will support the Center’s demand-driven business model with new incentives

as they explore more flexible degree pathways, new

and rewards, investing in new academic and

certificate programs, integrated cross-curricular

executive education initiatives and helping faculties

course offerings, and vastly expanded experiential

respond quickly to changing student expectations

learning possibilities that introduce students directly

and the evolving needs of Maine employers.

to employers while they learn in Maine’s workplaces.

In preparation for a working world in which

The schools in the Maine Center consortium will

employees are expected to understand and

maintain an unrelenting focus on developing Maine’s

communicate fluidly with each other, the new

competitive advantages, fostering Maine’s economic

Maine Center building will engender intended

growth and meeting Maine’s employment needs.

and meaningful interaction, where students and faculty repeatedly encounter ideas and practices from other disciplines.

“If the Center existed now, we would – today – make a commitment to have interns come into our company for a program in business management. We would work with professors to tailor the work experience to what the student needed to learn. We would help pay their tuition, pay them directly for the work they do, and we could even house them in Guilford while they learned with us. We would do this because we need people up here who can think differently about wood, medical and diagnostic products and how to use them differently in the new economy. It’s the only way Hardwood and Puritan have survived in central Maine for nearly 100 years, and it will be even more necessary in the next 100.”

TERRY YOUNG

General Manager of Hardwood Products Company and Puritan Medical Products Company in Guilford, Maine.

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I founded a law firm and represent several area businesses. Having an MBA in addition to a law degree has been crucial in both operating a business and helping other businesses succeed.

In order to be prepared for this workforce, individuals need to be educated in ways that prepare them to work across disciplines. That is exactly what the Maine Center will accomplish, and that is why I support it so strongly.�

TAMLYN FREDERICK

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2013 graduate of Maine Law who received her MBA from the University of Southern Maine School of Business in 2016. She is a co-founder and partner at Frederick, Quinlan & Tupper in Portland.


The world in which I work demands versatility.

My job at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau requires that I understand the businesses that we regulate, the policies that drive those regulations and the laws that put those policies into effect.�

MARPHEEN CHAN

Dual-degree student in Public Policy and Law at the University of Southern Maine who spent the summer of 2016 as a legal intern at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in Washington, D.C.

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The Maine Center is a pivotal opportunity for Maine’s economy and a big leap forward for professional education in America. The Maine Center will strengthen and transform graduate and professional education in Maine and beyond. The Center will be a place with law, business and public service programs so exciting and compelling that students will look at it and say, “I want to go there!”

So many faculty members see in the Maine Center an exciting model for crossdisciplinary and experiential education. Graduate students will learn by doing, directly addressing the complex needs of Maine’s public and private enterprises.” PROFESSOR DEIRDRE SMITH

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1994 graduate of Maine Law who is Director of the Cumberland Legal Aid Clinic, one of the oldest continuously operating law school clinical programs in the country.


As the Center attracts more and more young people to a state that needs them, the chill will begin to come off Maine’s demographic winter. As the Maine Center graduates more broadly educated professionals, growing businesses will continue to grow in Maine, and the damaging shortages of lawyers and public managers across most of the state will begin to ease, helping rural economies rebuild and grow. The Maine Center is a bold and innovative initiative that will broaden professional opportunities for Maine citizens, attract entrepreneurs and businesses to Maine, help drive statewide economic growth, and dramatically change for the better graduate professional education in America. The Maine Center is a big jump forward for America and a huge chance for positive and lasting change in Maine.

We can’t afford not to act. The Maine Center is designed to be financially self-supporting, but we all know that with any change comes risk. There is risk in being the first-mover, and there is risk in moving too fast or too slow. There is financial risk in failing to meet revenue goals, and there is execution risk in not having the right people in the right places. The biggest risk of all for Maine – and a missed opportunity for America – would be not to build the Maine Center.

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The Center concept is so attractive to students like me because it is grounded in an interdisciplinary approach, which more closely mirrors real life. I am so excited about the Maine Center’s objective because – quite honestly – had it been available when I was researching business schools, I would have applied.

In the course of working as a Global Category Manager and in project management at John Deere, I constantly ran into issues requiring legal consideration. The importance of understanding the legal parameters of a business opportunity became so apparent to me that I decided to get a law degree and now I’m about to begin my third year at Maine Law.”

KRYSTAL WILLIAMS

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Currently a student at Maine Law in the class of 2017 who spent the summer of 2016 as a legal intern at WEX Inc. She received her MBA from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth in 2003.


The Maine Center will bring positive and lasting change to Maine... ...and will be a big jump forward for education in America. 19


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