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October 2015

Journal

MEMORIES OF MEAGHER

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Contents FEATURE

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Memories of Meagher Former Victorian Homicide Squad detective Ron Iddles investigated the Jill Meagher murder and now explains exactly how he and his team caught the killer.


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REGULARS

20 Police Association annual conference

The topics were hot and the conversation forthright, especially when it came to the return-to-work legislation and the SAPOL organizational reviews.

28 Tribute ride reinforces police culture

Police from every jurisdiction used their off-duty time to ride their own motorcycles all the way to Canberra to honour the fallen.

06 POLICE ASSOCIATION 08 PRESIDENT 32 LETTERS 33 Q&A 34 INDUSTRIAL 37 HEALTH 38 MOTORING 41 BANKING 43 LEGAL 44 BOOKS 46 DVDs 47 CINEMA 49 WINE 52 THE LAST SHIFT 58 PLAYBACK

COVER: Police Association Victoria secretary and former Homicide Squad detective senior sergeant Ron Iddles Photography by Steve McCawley

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Jim Barnett Motoring Reviewer

Dr Rod Pearce Health Writer

Publisher: Police Association of South Australia (08) 8212 3055 Advertising: Police Association of South Australia (08) 8212 3055

Design: Sam Kleidon 0417 839 300 Printing: Finsbury Green (08) 8234 8000

The Police Journal is published by the Police Association of South Australia, 27 Carrington St, Adelaide, SA 5000, (ABN 73 802 822 770). Contents of the Police Journal are subject to copyright. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the Police Association of South Australia is prohibited. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the editor. The Police Association accepts no responsibility for statements made by advertisers. Editorial contributions should be sent to the editor (brettwilliams@pj.asn.au).

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Brett Williams Editor (08) 8212 3055

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Level 2, 27 Carrington St, Adelaide SA 5000 T (08) 8212 3055 F (08) 8212 2002 W www.pasa.asn.au


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CONTACT DETAILS Level 2, 27 Carrington St, Adelaide SA 5000 P: (08) 8212 3055 (all hours) F: (08) 8212 2002 Membership enquiries: (08) 8112 7988

COMMITTEE

Allan Cannon VICE-PRESIDENT

Trevor Milne DEPUTY PRESIDENT

Mark Carroll PRESIDENT 0417 876 732

Daryl Mundy Julian Snowden

David Reynolds

Chris Walkley Mitch Manning

Tom Scheffler SECRETARY 0417 817 075

DELEGATES METRO NORTH BRANCH Port Adelaide..................Kim Williams (chair) Elizabeth...........................Glenn Pink Henley Beach...................Matthew Kluzek Holden Hill........................Nigel Savage Gawler..............................David Savage

Kadina...............................Ric Schild Nuriootpa.........................Michael Casey Peterborough...................Nathan Paskett Port Augusta....................Peter Hore Port Pirie...........................Gavin Mildrum Whyalla.............................Michael Ball

Golden Grove..................Simon Nappa

CRIME COMMAND BRANCH

Parks.................................Kylie Slater

Fraud................................Jamie Dolan (chair) Elizabeth ..........................Ben Horley Major Crime.....................Alex McLean Adelaide...........................Dac Thomas DOCIB .............................Dwayne Illies Forensic Services............Adam Gates Holden Hill........................Narelle Smith

Salisbury...........................Mardi Ludgate Northern Prosecution.....Tim Pfeiffer

COUNTRY NORTH BRANCH Port Lincoln.....................Lloyd Parker (chair) Coober Pedy...................Jeff Page

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Intelligence Support .......Kevin Hunt Port Adelaide...................Rebecca Burns South Coast ....................Jason Tank Sturt..................................Brad Scott

METRO SOUTH BRANCH Sturt .................................Michael Quinton (chair) Adelaide...........................Melissa Eason Adelaide...........................Daniel Wray Netley...............................Toby Shaw Norwood..........................Ralph Rogerson South Coast ....................Peter Clifton South Coast ....................Russell Stone Southern Traffic...............Peter Tellam Southern Prosecution.....Andrew Heffernan

Samantha Strange


STAFF

POLICE JOURNAL

INDUSTRIAL Assistant Secretary Bernadette Zimmermann

Editor Brett Williams

MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS

Grievance Officer Matthew Karger

Nicholas Damiani Grievance Officer Nadia Goslino

Jim Tappin

Michael Kent

FINANCE

EXECUTIVE SECRETARIES

Wendy Kellett

Anne Hehner, Jan Welsby, Sarah Stephens

RECEPTION Shelley Furbow

REPRESENTATIVES COUNTRY SOUTH BRANCH Mount Gambier..............Andy McClean (chair) Adelaide Hills...................Joe McDonald Berri ..................................John Gardner Millicent ...........................Nick Patterson Murray Bridge..................Kym Cocks Naracoorte ......................Grant Baker Renmark ...........................Dan Schatto

OPERATIONS SUPPORT BRANCH Dog Ops..........................Bryan Whitehorn (chair) Police Academy...............Francis Toner Police Band......................Neil Conaghty ACB...................................Trevor Rea Comcen ...........................Brenton Kirk

Firearms ...........................Brett Carpenter HR ....................................Peter Stephen HR ....................................Kayt Howe Mounted Ops.................. Melanie Whittemore STAR Ops ........................Wayne Spencer Traffic ...............................David Kuchenmeister Transit...............................Michael Tomney

WOMENS BRANCH Kayt Howe (chair) (no delegates)

ATSI BRANCH Shane Bloomfield (chair) (no delegates)

OFFICERS BRANCH. Alex Zimmermann OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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COHSWAC ......................... Bernadette Zimmermann Housing................................ Bernadette Zimmermann Leave Bank .......................... Bernadette Zimmermann Legacy.................................. Allan Cannon Police Dependants Fund.... Tom Scheffler Superannuation................... Bernadette Zimmermann .............................................. Tom Scheffler


PRESIDENT Mark Carroll

Time police were properly equipped for anti-terrorism THE

impact of terrorism in Australia has united us in grief over the last 12 months. The Martin Place siege in Sydney and the murder of police employee Curtis Cheng in Parramatta showed us that we’re all targets. The federal government recently announced a raft of new legislation, community engagement and counter-extremism programmes. And, while the Police Federation of Australia supports those initiatives, legislation and counter-terrorism efforts alone will not prevent acts of terrorism. Police can’t simply arrest their way out of the threat that terrorism poses. The speed with which the radicalization of youths can occur is alarming, even though it has come about mostly on the eastern seaboard. A critical element in the fight against terrorism is federal government support, which should underpin a unified approach by all state jurisdictions. In the lead-up to the 2007 federal election, the PFA sought commitments from both sides of politics for a single national case-management system together with a range of other initiatives. In the same year, the Parliamentary Joint Committee on an Australian Crime Commission report highlighted the inadequacy of intelligence databases and casemanagement systems and made recommendations to fix them. And a number of inquiries, committees and studies have been conducted since then with no result for police. To make its position clear to the whole of Australia, and to bring about effective action against terrorism, the PFA called a national media conference in October. Leading police unionists from across the country joined me here, in Adelaide, to front the television cameras. And we implored Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to support and fund police intelligence systems to help reduce the risk of another evil act. PFA chief executive officer Mark Burgess pointed out that police had been calling for a national approach to intelligence systems for the best part of a decade.


It’s quite clear that police continue to be a favoured target of terrorists. The PFA, which is concerned for not only its members but also the Australian community, has proposed a three-point plan to help police battle the terrorist: • Funding, especially at a federal level, to build a national case-management system. This is a means of managing a criminal investigation from its commencement, through all stages, to the point of prosecution. A national system means all eight forces, with 18 current systems, could collaborate effectively insofar as dealing with crimes rather than acting as “silos.” This would greatly improve Australia’s crime and terrorism fighting capacity. • A new national criminal intelligence system to bring all Australian police forces’ intelligence data holdings into a single platform. The Australian Criminal Intelligence Database is 30 years old. Its effectiveness in pursuing increasingly hightech organized crime operations, including terrorism, is sorely lacking. And while ever y Australian police force holds its own data on criminals specific to its jurisdiction, these databases operate in isolation. A new system would provide proactive and real-time national alerting, warnings, trend analyses and metrics, giving a national intelligence picture for the Australian Crime Commission and all of Australia’s police forces. • A dedicated interoperable public safety mobile broadband capability. The PFA calls for the allocation of 20MHz of broadband spectrum specifically to crime-fighting and emergency services agencies. They would be

able to communicate across state borders and share video, data, fingerprints, firearms records, geographic information, weather forecasts and other vital information in dealing with missioncritical incidents. This doesn’t require any extra funding – the Commonwealth already owns the available spectrum. And the PFA has campaigned for the broadband spectrum allocation since 2010. Also under the three-point plan would be the requirement for funding of: • A consistent national police station design, including digital surveillance in and around police stations and other law-enforcement facilities. • Appropriate policies for the security of police and police staff as they enter and leave their workplaces. The measures under the three-point plan stand to assist other government initiatives already in place, such as: • Tracking illegal firearms. • P r o v i d i n g a national data collection point for domestic violence orders. • Tackling serious a n d o r g a n i ze d crime. The measures would also assist in imple me nting the National Ice Taskforce recommendations. And it’s not just government funds that could pay for these solutions. Criminals who profit from their illegal activities should also pay, and they will if the government adopts a national unexplained wealth regime – something we’ve also been proposing for many years. For all of this to work, state governments and individual police jurisdictions need to put their parochialism aside. The time for action is way overdue. The federal government must act.

… legislation and counter-terrorism efforts alone will not prevent acts of terrorism.

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RETURN-TO-WORK LEGISLATION For both injured and uninjured police officers, November 18 might be the most important day of the year. It is when the Upper House of the SA parliament will decide whether to pass the Police (Return to Work) Amendment Bill. Family First MLC Robert Brokenshire introduced the bill to the Legislative Council in October. And, on that day, Police Association members and their families, as well as association staff and committee members, showed their support by packing out the Strangers Gallery. Many parliamentarians were indeed shocked to see such a display of solidarity. The strength and commitment of the police family was on display yet again. It’s been well documented how the government’s Return to Work Act 2014 – active since July 1 this year – short-changes injured police. The act stipulates a two-year cap on top-up/ maintenance payments for workers compensation cases, and a three-year cap for most medical and like expenses. A 30 per cent whole-person impairment is the only exception that will supersede the two caps. For police, who are bound by oath to enter into dangerous situations, this is unacceptable. Our parliament desperately needs to rectify it by restoring the compensation conditions police had up until June 30 this year. I encourage all association members to show their support for these amendments by attending parliament on November 18.


MEMORIES OF MEAGHER The barbaric rape and murder of Jill Meagher had Victorian homicide squad detective Ron Iddles on the case from the start. Three years to the day since the crime, he came back to Adelaide where, for him, the investigation began.

By Brett Williams


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Jill Meagher

RON Iddles can recount detail after detail about

the Jill Meagher murder investigation, without a single pause or reference to any notes. For the high-profile Homicide Squad detective and now Police Association Victoria secretary, so much of the highly publicized case still remains indelible in his mind. Even matters on the periphery of the 2012 investigation have stayed with him. There was the surprise phone call he got from the distressed mother of the killer, violent serial rapist and parolee Adrian Bayley. She spoke of the day she gave birth to her now locked-up son and asked Iddles if he thought she should go to visit him. He said: “I think blood’s thicker than water and, if you want to go and see him, you go and see him.” There was the photo controversy two years ago, when Iddles spoke at a Bendigo fund-raiser for prostate cancer. For about one second during his 90-minute presentation, he showed an image of Meagher’s body in the shallow grave where it lay after her murder. In no time he came under attack from eager critics, including then-premier Denis Napthine and 3AW morning radio host Neil Mitchell. Victoria Police assistant commissioner (crime) Steve Fontana accused Iddles of “an unfortunate error of judgement”. What the critics either did not know, or knew but ignored, was that Meagher’s husband, Tom, and parents, George and Edith McKeon, had given Iddles their full backing. OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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There was the intense, spontaneous public reaction to the brutal rape and murder of the innocent 29-yearold Meagher, an Irish national. In part tribute and part protest, thousands marched down Sydney Road, Brunswick just days after the September 22 crime. And on the health of some of the experienced police who worked on the case, Iddles remembers a “massive impact”. Some wound up with post-traumatic stress disorder and have never been able to return to work. Says Iddles: “One of them said to me: ‘Ron, don’t ask me why, but when I got to the (Meagher) gravesite, that was it…’ ” Each peripheral issue sparked the kind of emotion Iddles and his colleagues could never afford to succumb to at the core of the investigation. Every enquiry they made, and every action they implemented, had to be supremely thorough and methodical. A good example was the “brilliant” questioning that accomplished interviewer Detective Paul Rowe undertook of Bayley. That critical exchange took place only after Rowe and Iddles had spent hours pre-planning it. And the three-hour interview brought about the ultimate result: Bayley, then 41, broke down and confessed that he had indeed raped and murdered Meagher. He also exclaimed: “… they should have the death penalty for people like me…” This was the climax of an investigation which had started out with a simple report to police of the missing Meagher. For Iddles, it began – and continued for two days – in Adelaide, where he had come for his son’s graduation from flight school.


He got his first phone call about the job around 1pm on Saturday, September 22. It was Homicide Squad colleague and fellow detective senior sergeant Dave Butler, who outlined the circumstances of the Meagher disappearance. Almost 12 hours earlier, around 1:30am, Meagher had left Bar Etiquette on Sydney Road, Brunswick after Friday-night drinks. The ABC employee had gone there with workmates and was setting out to walk the short distance home to her Lux Way flat. On her way, she made a call to her brother, Michael McKeon, in Perth at 1:32am. He would later describe a male voice he thought he had heard in the background during the call, before the phone line went dead. McKeon called his sister back but got no answer. Around 2am, Tom Meagher fired off some text messages to his wife after he woke to find that she was still not home from Bar Etiquette. He found a text message she had sent him earlier, while he was asleep. It read: “Meet me at the pub.” But, now, she was not responding, and she never arrived home. That prompted a worried Tom to go to the police that day to report his wife missing. Here, from Adelaide, Iddles began to lead the investigation through “a lot of phone conversation”, until he got back to Melbourne. His direction to his detectives was to split up and pursue different lines of enquiry. That meant that some were to knock on doors and take statements and others were to receive and assess incoming information. And, for a third group, the focus would be on Tom Meagher who, for a time, had police curious about him. He and his wife had been through a period of separation; and it concerned Iddles that, between 4am and 8am, Tom had left his phone switched off. “Now, 96 per cent of murders are committed by someone known to the victim,” Iddles explains. “So I said: ‘The bottom line is you’ve got to eliminate him (as a suspect).’ ” And that would happen on the following Tuesday, after police had twice interviewed Tom and forensic examinations revealed nothing suspicious in the Meagher flat. By the end of the weekend, Meagher – who had never before gone missing – had still not turned up at home, and her disappearance was making local news bulletins.

CCTV footage of Jill Meagher taken from inside the Duchess Boutique

“There was a view that, if you released the footage, and she was still alive, would that cause the offender … to kill her.” Then, on Monday morning, September 24, police found a black handbag in an alley off Hope St, which runs off Sydney Road. The bag contained Meagher’s belongings but was never in the alley when police searched it two days earlier. It turned out that a local, who came forward, had taken the handbag early on Saturday morning. But he returned it on Monday because news of the Meagher disappearance had emerged and he feared he might end up implicated. On Tuesday, homicide detectives went in search of CCTV footage from business houses along Sydney Road – and scored a breakthrough. An internal camera in the Duchess Boutique, aimed at its front glass door, had captured Meagher walking by the bridal shop at 1:42am. OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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Her blood-alcohol content was .230 and, as Iddles obser ved, she appeared “quite unsteady on her feet”. What made the footage so chilling was that when she first came into view, so too did a man wearing a blue hoodie. And, in this first appearance, both stopped at the southern corner of the boutique (far right of screen) for about seven seconds. The man, standing slightly ahead of Meagher, was clearly directing conversation at her. Then, when they walked on, he continued to talk from a pace in front of her with his head and upper body turned back. After 16 seconds, he had walked out of view of the camera. Meagher, on the other hand, remained within view for several more seconds as she stood on the footpath. She seemed to be checking her phone and, at one point, looked back along Sydney Road. Finally, she too walked off and out of view heading north, as had the man in the blue hoodie. And, in the one minute, 45 seconds before he first appeared in the footage with Meagher, he had twice walked past the boutique, first north and then south.


Says Iddles: “We had that video footage, and there’s always a judgement call as to whether or not to release it. “There was a view that, if you released the footage and she was still alive, would that cause the offender, if it was him, to kill her? If she was already deceased, would it cause him to get rid of his clothing? “So there was a decision made at a fairly high level and it (the footage) was released to the public.” And while the public responded with hundreds of calls, Iddles and his colleagues kept doggedly pursuing answers. One came on Wednesday, September 26, from tracking Meagher’s phone. “We found that, at 4:30, her phone was on the Tullamarine Freeway heading towards the airport,” Iddles recalls. “At 5 o’clock it was on the Calder Highway at Sunbury and, at 6 o’clock, it was at Gisborne.” That tracking information led Detective Jason Wallace to conceive an important plan. It was to check every vehicle which had travelled under the CityLink toll point at Moorland Road between 4:15am and 4:45am. “Something like 286 cars had gone under there,” Iddles says. “So, when we checked all of those, Adrian Bayley’s car came up, which was a 2003 white Holden Astra.” Wallace ran checks on Bayley, whose criminal record showed 17 priors for rape. “That, in itself, didn’t mean that he’d killed (Meagher),” Iddles says. “It just meant that he was out and about at 4:30 when her phone was tracking there (on CityLink). “We were able to identify his phone number and, then, do the same thing (tracking) with his phone. We found out that, at 1:32am, it was in Sydney Road, right beside Jill Meagher’s phone. “And, at 4:30, his phone was hitting the tower at Moreland Road and the Tullamarine Freeway. At 5 o’clock it was at Sunbury and, at 6 o’clock, at Gisborne. “We had a map and we tracked them (both phones) all the way out. Only one phone, which was his, came back to Coburg where he lived. So, then, you’re starting to say: ‘Hang on a minute, this looks like he’s the offender!’ “But you’ve got to prove it. So it was then about building a profile on him.”

THE

detectives found that Bayley was on parole after serving eight years’ jail for five of six rapes he had committed on prostitutes in St Kilda. And he was now living in a rented Coburg room with his girlfriend, radiographer Rameeza Ali. Other intelligence the detectives gathered, as surveillance officers moved in to watch Bayley on Thursday, September 27, was that he frequented massage parlours. “It was quite clear that he had a strong sexual urge,” Iddles says. And, days earlier, Bayley had worn a blue hoodie when he withdrew money from a National Bank. Iddles and his team could see that it was “identical” to the one worn by the man in the Duchess Boutique footage. “By that stage,” Iddles explains, “we were confident. We had his car, we had the phones together (his and Meagher’s), and we had him in a hoodie four days before at a bank. It was looking pretty good.” And, with that evidence, detectives were ready to arrest Bayley on Thursday afternoon. They had abandoned a plan to grab him when he next reported to his corrections officer and instead went straight to his home. There, detectives executed a warrant to search the place and arrested Bayley, whose outward response Iddles says was “super confident”. Although not on the scene, he learned that Bayley had said: “No worries, mate,

happy to come back (to St Kilda Road police station) with you. I don’t know what this is about.” His response to the search of his home was the same: “Go your hardest. You can even have my DNA. You can take anything you like.” At the same time, police were picking Ali up from the Melton clinic where she worked. She would tell detectives that, two weeks before the Meagher murder, Bayley had “raped me, strangled me”. Ali had thought about going to the police but could not bring herself to do it. “And there’s no doubt she’s lucky to be alive,” Iddles says. Back at the station, Paul Rowe would interview Bayley in a contemporary style based on overseas models and used by the Homicide Squad for just a few years. The setting would be contemporary too: no table and just the two men in the room sitting three metres apart. At first, Bayley denied any knowledge of, or involvement in, the Meagher disappearance. So Rowe asked him to account for his movements from Friday afternoon through to Saturday morning, and let him speak uninterrupted for the next 35 minutes. His stor y was that, on Friday evening, September 21, he and Ali had gone to the Quiet Man Irish Pub in Flemington. The occasion was the finale of his work footy-tipping competition, and his boss was covering the bar tab up to $1,000. Around 11pm, the couple left the Quiet Man and headed over to Lounge in Swanston St where, according to Bayley, he argued with Ali and she left him there. He claimed that, eventually, he too left Lounge and went home to Coburg to find no Ali waiting for him. But she was there, in the house, just not in the room she and Bayley rented. Ali had taken refuge on a mattress in another room, in which Bayley never found her – if indeed he went home as he claimed. “We say he never went home at all,” Iddles says. “He didn’t leave the city until around 12:30am, quarter to one. We say he cabbed it to Sydney Road, got out and just walked around.”

“We had his car, we had the phones together (his and Meagher’s)… It was looking pretty good.” OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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Above: rapist and murderer Adrian Bayley; right: the alley off Hope St

“And, then, slowly but surely, he (Bayley) went on and confessed. He broke down…”

But Bayley insisted that he had searched the house for Ali, failed to find her, and had then driven around the city for 90-odd minutes looking for her. He told Rowe that, after that, he had gone nowhere else besides straight back home via Nicholson St. As the interview went on, Bayley kept responding with lies, even when it came to the most damning evidence against him. Rowe showed, and asked, him to explain a photo of his car on the Tullamarine Freeway at 4:30am. “I can’t explain it,” Bayley said. Nor could he explain the phone records that showed his and Meagher’s mobiles tracking in the same places. And Rowe produced an incriminating photo from the CCTV footage. It showed the man in the blue hoodie talking to Meagher outside the Duchess Boutique. Bayley conceded that the man looked like him, but insisted it was not him. After a break in the questioning, Rowe resumed the interview armed with perhaps the most damning evidence of all. Detectives, who had searched the room Bayley and Ali rented, had found a phone SIM card. It was in a shirt pocket – and it belonged to Meagher. “So,” Iddles says, “Paul goes back in and says: ‘We’ve searched your house and we’ve found a SIM card registered to Gillian Meagher. Can you explain that?’ “He (Bayley) just sits there and goes: ‘I don’t want to explain that.’ So Paul comes out and I said to him: ‘Listen, this is what you’re going to have to do…’ ” Iddles advice to Rowe was to say: “Adrian, there’s absolutely no doubt in my mind that you’ve done

this, but I think life’s about choices and you’ve made a bad choice. “I also think you’re a bit like an alcoholic: you can’t stop yourself. You get these sexual urges, and I actually want to understand what’s going on.” Says Iddles: “Paul goes in and he goes for about three minutes but Bayley wasn’t buying it. He just wasn’t connecting, so he (Rowe) came back out. “He was out of the room 30 seconds when the buzzer went off. He went back in and Bayley goes: ‘Don’t you want me to tell you?’ Paul said: ‘Well, yeah, I do.’ “Then Bayley said: ‘Well, I want to cut a deal. I want to see Rameeza and sign my two cars over to her. If you let me do that then I’ll tell you what happened.’ ” Rowe, of course, never entertained the idea of a deal and wisely pressed on with the interview. “And, then, slowly but surely, he (Bayley) went on and confessed,” Iddles remembers. “He broke down but I don’t think it was about what he’d done. It was about him. “He said in one part of the interview: ‘I was even going to come in today and tell you all about this.’ Well, guess what? For the first hour-and-a-quarter he bullshitted.” OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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SO

Bayley was indeed the man in the blue hoodie, which detectives had found during their search of his home. He had spotted Meagher on Sydney Road just after she left Bar Etiquette and approached her. According to him, he thought she looked “lost” and “distraught” and so offered to help her. “I was just walking ahead of her and we’d already interacted on Sydney Road, and that’s when she rang her brother,” he told Rowe. “She was actually telling me about her father.” Bayley claimed he had not intended to hurt Meagher. “She flipped me off and that made me angry, because I was actually trying to do a nice thing,” he professed. “I didn't take well to her response.” U ltimate l y, B ay ley dr agge d Meagher into the alley off Hope St where he raped and strangled her. But, now, he was telling Rowe: “I just don’t wanna go through it in detail.” And he cried as he exclaimed: “What have I done?! What have I done, man?!” S ay s I d d l e s: “G i l l i a n w a s onl y ab out 3 0 0 m etre s from home; and there were about eight people who heard screaming.


“The crew did a good job. And the courts have imposed a penalty which really means he’ll never walk the streets again. So I think we did our job.” One lady said to her husband: ‘Oh, I think a lady’s being raped!’ But not one person picked up the phone and called the police.” Bayley left the murder scene, went home to collect a shovel and drove his car back to the alley. He got there at 4:22am, loaded Meagher’s body into his boot and drove out to Gisborne South. “I cried, man, and I dug a hole,” he told Rowe. “I cried, man, and I didn’t cry for me. You need to understand that. I didn’t cry for me, just like I’m not crying for me now.” Bayley agreed to show detectives where he had buried Meagher’s body off Black Hill Road at Gisborne South. Police and pathologist Matthew Lynch removed it from a 35cm-deep hole; and Lynch would later find Meagher’s thyroid cartilage and larynx broken. It had taken just six days for Homicide Squad Crew 4 to gather critical, overwhelming evidence against Bayley. But it would take nine months for the typically slow justice system to condemn him. In the Victorian Supreme Court on June 19, 2013, Justice Geoffrey Nettle sentenced Bayley to a minimum of 35 years’ jail: life for murder and 15 years for rape. That meant he would not be eligible for parole until he turned 76. “I think it was a good outcome,” Iddles says. “No one had to give evidence. George and Edith, the parents, had come over from Western Australia. Tom was there, too, and it was a good result. “Tom’s a quiet person, somewhat reserved. He didn’t like the limelight and, at times, was very emotional but didn’t want to show it. “George, her dad, was just a lovely guy to meet and talk to, and so was Edith. George was a welleducated businessman but was very sick at the time. “They were just lovely people; and I think Tom and Gillian were back on track and everything was finally going all right for them. But Tom, in the end, made the decision to go back to Ireland. The parents still live in Western Australia.”

In a vile show of disregard for those “lovely people”, Bayley sought leave to appeal against the severity of his sentence. But, in the Victorian Court of Appeal in September, 2013, Chief Justice Marilyn Warren and justices Marcia Neave and Paul Coghlanthe refused him that leave. Indeed, Bayley was to end up with his sentence extended last May. Juries in separate trials in 2014 and 2015 had found him guilty of three other rapes. His victims were two prostitutes and a Dutch backpacker. County Court judge Sue Pullen lengthened his sentence to a minimum of 43 years. But, on June 25 this year, Bayley lodged an appeal against two of the three rape convictions and his extended sentence. Victoria Legal Aid has since refused to fund the appeal, and Bayley has now launched court action against that refusal. Iddles had to be right about Bayley not crying over “what he’d done”. In fact, during his interview with Rowe, he blamed his actions on Ali because she had argued with and left him at the Quiet Man Irish Pub. He even blamed Meagher herself for fobbing him off and therefore making him angry. The weight of public hatred for Bayley is likely incalculable, but Iddles does not buy into the hate fest. “It’s indifference (that I feel),” he says. “I don’t feel sorry for him. The person I feel sorry for, really, is his mother. But for him, I think he got what he deserved. “We did a good job. The crew did a good job. And the courts have imposed a penalty which really means he’ll never walk the streets again. So I think we did our job.” OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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Jill and Tom Meagher on their wedding day


THE GREAT MAN THE stage or screen or both would surely have

beckoned Ron Iddles (right) had he ever chosen to leave police work for acting. With his towering frame, grey crew-cut hair and craggy, character face, he could easily have played the TV detective. And he did, after all, draw his inspiration to join Victoria Police from watching Australia’s most iconic TV cop show, Homicide (1964-1977). “There was John Fegan (who played Detective Inspector Jack Connolly); and the four of them (detectives) would walk up the steps of Russell St police headquarters,” Iddles remembers. “It was just the intrigue of the investigation, I suppose, and they always solved it in an hour.” Of course, Iddles was to end up solving murders himself. He made arrests in about 95 per cent of the 300-odd cases he investigated with the real Victorian Homicide Squad over 25 years. And he gave evidence in at least 150 murder trials. So, ultimately, he did end up on television, and in newspapers – only that was as himself rather than an actor. The media so often sought him out for comment on one murder investigation or another that he became one of the most recognized cops in Australia. And his reputation for brilliance, as not only an investigator but also a communicator and thinker, led his Homicide Squad colleagues to nickname him The Great Man.

“I don’t like the tag. I’ve always said: ‘I’m an average guy doing a difficult job.’ ” “I don’t like the tag,” he says. “I’ve always said: ‘I’m an average guy doing a difficult job.’ I think, at times, there was a lot of pressure because (the thought was): ‘Well, Ron’ll solve it.’ ” But solve it he did, around 300 times; and few murder investigations have ever faded from his memory. One he struggles to talk about unemotionally is the stabbing murder of 16-yearold Michelle Buckingham, who had disappeared from Shepparton in 1983. The case had gone cold until 2012, when journalist Tammy Mills wrote a series of stories about the crime for The Shepparton News . Among witnesses who then came forward was Norm Gribble, the brother-in-law of Buckingham’s now convicted killer, Stephen Bradley. Says Iddles: “I went and met him (Gribble) on OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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the middle of a footy oval, and he said: ‘I know who killed her. It was my brother-in-law.’ “He had held that secret for 30 years; and it took me another 12 months, but I eventually charged Stephen Bradley.” Emotion overwhelms Iddles when he recalls his gut-wrenching interaction with Buckingham’s now late mother, Elvira. He remembers her saying: “You’re here now, 30 years later, telling me you’re going to solve it. How can I trust you? You’ve made the emotion as raw as it was on day one. “Now, if you don’t get there, you’re going to take me up the top of a rollercoaster and you’re going to tip me over the edge.” “But I got there,” Iddles says, in a quavering but triumphant voice. “And she gave me a big hug.”


Far left: Iddles (left) with his parents, Bill and Phyllis, twin brother, Barry, and sister, Nancye, in 1962; above far left: with his parents and brother in 1968; left centre: Iddles (right) with his brother; above: a St Kilda crime scene after Iddles was assaulted by an armed escapee; left: Iddles at his desk at the Homicide Squad office in 2011

A Victorian Supreme Court jury this month found 53-year-old Bradley guilty of the Buckingham murder. But, after all those years, Elvira never got to hear the verdict: she died of a heart attack just days before the trial began. Another case Iddles remembers well is the 1994 disappearance of 22-year-old Elisabeth Membrey. The Manhattan Hotel in Ringwood, where she worked behind the bar, was the last place anyone, besides her killer, ever saw her. In her East Ringwood apartment, the day after she disappeared, Membrey’s parents, Roger and Joy, found carpet blood-stained and blood spatter on the walls. Police searched for but never found Membrey’s body. Assigned to investigate the unsolved case in 2000, Iddles stuck with it for 10 years until he arrested and charged Shane Bond with murder. Evidence suggested that Bond drank at the hotel, had had a romantic interest in Membrey, and had pestered her to go out with him. But, in 2012, a Supreme Court jury, after deliberating for seven days, found him not guilty.

Only three Iddles cases ever ended without convictions, and this was one of them. “I understand you have to prove beyond reasonable doubt,” he says. “The defence ran a case whereby they nominated someone else, so you had competing hypotheses.” Of course, Iddles can still detail the unsolved 1980 Maria James murder – it was the first one he ever investigated. Someone stabbed the 38-year-old wife and mother-of-two 68 times in the Thornbury Bookstore, which she owned, on High St. “I still talk to her son, Mark, 35 years on,” Iddles says. “He still rings me. “We’ve got the DNA of the killer – his blood was on a pillow – but the case is still not solved. It’s one that I would dearly love to solve.”

“All of a sudden, you’re in this environment where you’re dealing with people’s lives, people’s emotions, and you soon learn.” OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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BUT

solving murders dropped off the Iddles agenda in 2013, when he took on his current job as secretary of the Police Association Victoria. Now, after 18 months in the role, he sees a clear need to focus on police-officer welfare. “I think there’s a lot of work to be done around the welfare space,” he insists. “The current stats say we’re losing 22 (members) a month with post-traumatic stress, depression, anxiety… We need to work in that space in terms of early intervention and prevention.” Both policing and unionism have kept – and continue to keep – Iddles in the public spotlight. He has had to live much of his adult life as a public figure. His early life was vastly different. He grew up on a dairy farm in country Victoria with his parents, Bill and Phyllis, his twin brother, Barry, and older sister, Nancye. “I think it gave me a really strong work ethic,” he says. “We used to have to get up and help milk (the cows) in the morning. We had 120 cows, which was the average then for a dairy farm. “So you’d go and help milk, have a shower, then ride your bike up to the bus for school. Weekends I worked on the farm, too. I was 10 and 11 when I was driving tractors and trucks.” After his schooling, Iddles considered a job with the railways and even went to enquire at the local station. When he found out he would have to polish brass taps and fill buckets with sand, he thought: “Oh, that’s not me.”


That was when the allure of the detective work he had watched on TV cop show Homicide kicked in. At the age of just 16, he left the farm for the city to join Victoria Police as a cadet in 1972. And things moved quickly. When he was 17, he met 16-year-old Colleen, who later became – and after 41 years remains – his wife. The couple now has three adult children, Jo, Matthew and Shae, and three grandchildren. By the time he had turned 18, Iddles was working in uniform on the front line out of Collingwood police station. It was a brutal start for a young copper with no experience of city policing, let alone city life. There were 80-odd pubs in his patrol area and many of their patrons belonged to the notorious Painters and Dockers Union. So responding to hotel disturbances was a challenge, as was policing Victoria Park when the Collingwood footy club played its home games there. “That was just a blood bath,” Iddles says. “There was no seating at the eastern-end goals, it was just mud, and they drank. “And if Carlton and Collingwood played, you knew there was going to be such a blue. We would lock 20 or 30 up every second Saturday.” Iddles had to confront the tragedy of suicides, too. The first dead bodies he ever saw were those of people who had leapt from atop high-rise Collingwood flats. “It did start to teach me about life,” he says. “All of a sudden, you’re in this environment where you’re dealing with people’s lives, people’s emotions, and you soon learn.”

Iddles receives the Chief Commissioner's Certificate for Bravery from the now late Dick Knight in 1986

Iddles remained a uniformed copper for five years and, in that time, got to work on the periphery of some homicide investigations in Collingwood and Fitzroy. “The detectives who came out (to investigate) were always professional,” he says. “People would say: ‘They’re from the Homicide Squad.’ They were well respected.” After his time in uniform, Iddles moved into detective work and wound up at Fitzroy CIB. Before long, he got the chance to go to the Homicide Squad to help investigate a St Kilda murder. During his month-long stint with the squad, an old-time bespectacled senior sergeant became something of a mentor to him. “I worked with him for the month and just became fascinated with the work,” Iddles says. “And, to some extent, he probably shaped me.” Iddles went back to Fitzroy CIB and worked there for another 12 months before a vacancy came up at the Homicide Squad in 1980. He scored an interview and got the job, and that was the first of 25 years he would spend catching killers. His time with the squad would have been nearer to 30 years had he not quit policing in 1989 to start a trucking business. OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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But he only stayed out of the fold until 1994. He rejoined the cops, underwent retraining at the police academy, returned to the Homicide Squad, and worked his way back up to detective senior sergeant. Iddles thought about pursuing commissioned rank but figured he was “happy doing what I’m doing”. “I’ve had a great time in the job,” he says. “I’d do it all again.” But he thinks young aspiring cops should “think long and hard” before launching into the police occupation of today. “It’s been fantastic to me,” he says, “but I think it’s got more and more dangerous. The total environment has changed over the last five years, and that’s around (the drug) ice, threats of terrorism, more and more people are carrying weapons… “The whole culture has changed and there is less respect for police. But I still think it’s a fantastic job.” PJ


POLICE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE Family First MLC Robert Brokenshire brought the same passion he had shown on the return-to-work issue a week earlier in the Upper House of parliament. And the Police Association and Commissioner Grant Stevens showed just how differently they define the SAPOL organizational reviews. Nicholas Damiani reports.

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L E

POLICE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

GOVERNMENT WILL TARGET CROOKS THE

community should not be vulnerable to criminal acts for the sake of avoiding “minor infringements” in civil liberties, according to Deputy Premier John Rau (below). Announcing a raft of proposed legislative changes in his annual conference address, Mr Rau said though he cherishes the rule of law, the government must “balance the rights of the many against the rights of a few.” Mr Rau said amendments to the Serious and Organised Crime Bill were aimed at stamping out criminal behaviour. “The government doesn’t tolerate violence, intimidation, extortion or standover tactics,” he told delegates. “The state government stood firmly with SA Police against the violent business model of outlaw motorcycle gangs. “The laws have seen 10 organized crime groups in South Australia declared outlaw gangs.

“It is now an offence for gang members to recruit others to participate in the organization, and for two or more members of a gang to knowingly be present in a public place.” Mr Rau also said members were not permitted to wear gang colours in licensed venues. He acknowledged the new laws had bi-partisan support and said other new laws would regulate the ownership of tattoo parlours in SA. “(That) bill is about cracking down on parlours (involved in organized crime),” he stressed. He also said new firearms legislation had passed the Lower House of parliament. “This bill targets the illegal trafficking of firearms,” he said. “A person who illegally traffics a firearm will be on the hook for any offence committed using that firearm.” Legislation allowing police to compel people to submit to biometric scanning has also passed the Lower House, Mr Rau told delegates. “Police will be able to compel people to submit to scanning if they reasonably believe that a person is committing or about to commit a crime, or if that person can assist with an investigation,” he said. Mr Rau went on to discuss new legislation which enables police and correctional supervision of high-risk offenders after they have completed their sentences. He also said he was undertaking a project to reform the criminal justice system. “This includes greater sentencing powers of courts, and reformed criminal procedure once matters enter the courts,” he said. “It is estimated these reforms will have positive impacts (for police). “Less resources will be dedicated to matters that do not actually run, and police officers will not have to spend many hours photocopying material requested by subpoenas that have been lodged by defence lawyers at the last minute.” Mr Rau said the government will continue to legislate and work with police to ensure criminals do not have an easy ride. “Criminals, by their nature, are wily,” he said. “And they will fight and adapt to maintain their business models and way of life.”


STALLED ROLL-OUT OF VITAL EQUIPMENT A CONCERN TO MARSHALL THE

delay in the roll-out of body-worn video cameras to SA police is a concern to Opposition leader Steven Marshall (below). He has long argued that police should be equipped with the devices. And, in his address to the annual conference, he echoed the concerns of the Police Association by urging the government to finalize the roll-out sooner rather than later. “While I’m glad the government saw fit to make the budget allocation, I now have some concerns about the amount of time it has taken to deliver on this commitment,” he said. He also said he was happy to see the government

change its mind on abolishing the Police Disciplinary Tribunal. “It’s important to retain a specialist PDT, because policing is not like any other job,” he said. Mr Marshall said the current backlog in SA courts and correctional services is having a knock-on effect in overcrowding police cells. “It’s simply not good enough,” he said. “It adds an extra burden of work and security to your roles. “The prison capacity crisis in South Australia has been building for years. It’s a situation we will continue to monitor very closely.” The state Liberal leader also commented on Family First MLC Robert Brokenshire’s Police Act amendment bill, which protects injured cops from financial disadvantage. “The types of injuries – both physical and psychological – that police officers are exposed to are often different from those faced by the community at large in their day-to-day roles,” he said. “We’d like to see a scheme that balances the needs you face, with a long-term sustainable scheme.” Mr Marshall also spoke of the ice drug problem sweeping the nation. “This is a drug that doesn’t just lead to criminal behaviour … it creates criminal behaviour,” he said. “A s l e g i s l ato r s we h ave a responsibility to assist the work you’re doing on the front line to reduce the impact of ice in SA.” The Opposition leader also said he backed legislation currently before parliament which would bring about mandatory blood testing of violent offenders who bite or spit or bleed on police officers.

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PRESIDENT URGES LAWMAKERS TO SUPPORT RETURN-TO-WORK AMENDMENTS


POLICE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

LSA MODEL NO LONGER EFFICIENT INCONSISTENT levels of ROBERT Brokenshire’s bill to protect injured

police should receive all parliamentarians’ support, Police Association president Mark Carroll (left) told the annual conference. The Family First MLC introduced the Police (Return to Work) Amendment Bill to the Legislative Council this month. Mr Carroll told the conference the bill aims to return entitlements that originally existed in the Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Act. “We’ve fought simply for, and ask for no more than, the restoration of the benefits to which our members were previously entitled,” he said. He also warned the government that terrorism was one of the most serious issues currently affecting police. “We’ve already felt its reach and impact here in Australia, particularly in the last 12 months,” he said. “Our members continue to be a favoured target of the terrorist, and of the terrorist movement. “The scourge of terrorism is one we can never expect our members to face with anything short of the highest quality support.” Mr Carroll also used his address to reiterate the association’s long-held stance on SAPOL’s organizational reviews. “We continue to see these reviews as a result of government budget cuts, rather than servicedelivery gains,” he said. “The disruption to the EB process has gone on way too long, and caused way too much uncertainty to our members and their families.” Mr Carroll also commented on ICAC Bruce Lander’s recent review recommending the repeal of current police complaints legislation. “Given the impact and consequences police complaints can have on our members, we would hope to see the parliament respond to the Lander recommendations as soon as possible,” he said.

service between LSAs justify the SAPOL organizational reviews, according to Commissioner Grant Stevens (below). He told conference delegates that the LSA model is outdated, and that the review would examine core police duties. Commissioner Stevens said part of the review would involve “holding other agencies to account” for “miscellaneous” duties that do not involve core police work. He also explained that centralizing the communications centre would form a major part of the review. “The Communications Group – as it will be referred to – will take on a centralized command - and - control function,” he told delegates. “It’s going to provide investigative support to the front line as well. “We’re also expanding communications from simply call-taking and dispatch, to a support function.” Commissioner Stevens also said civilianizing triple zero call-centre workers was on the agenda. “Leaner management structures” would also feature in the review, according to the commissioner. “And we’re introducing a new role known as the district duty inspector,” he said. “Each of the districts will have four of these who’ll be working a 24/7 roster, which means we’ll have front-line police available to support and assist patrols and CIB.” The commissioner also said dividing general duties patrol officers into two groups – response teams and district policing teams – would provide better service. “The focus of the response teams will be to respond to grade one and priority grade two taskings, and not just to patrol,” he said.

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He said the district policing teams would have an enhanced capacity and flexibility which would enable them to focus on community engagement and problem-solving at a “local level”. “When we have to provide police to an event, they’ll come from the district policing teams, not the response (teams),” he explained. New responses to instances of domestic violence would also be implemented, the commissioner explained. “We’re increasing the level of supervision and we’re making larger teams that can share the workload, to close the gap that currently exists between (LSAs),” he said. With his final remarks, Commissioner Stevens referred to the association’s concerns about budget-cutting as “the elephant in the room”. “The answer is emphatically no,” he said. “We are not doing this for budget-saving reasons. Having said that, we do have budget-saving targets.”


PROTECTING INJURED COPS MP’S PRIORITY PASSING

the workers compensation amendments to the Police Act would stand as a watershed moment in the career of Family First MLC Robert Brokenshire (below). Speaking on day two of the annual conference, Mr Brokenshire said the current Return to Work Act – in effect since July this year – wrongly dictated that police should have the same workers compensation conditions as the rest of the community. “(Parliament) has made a very bad mistake with this,” he told delegates. “Policing is the only occupation, other than armed forces, where the individual is bound (by oath) to enter a dangerous situation.

POLICE MOST AT RISK OF PTSD “Every other occupation can choose not to enter a situation where their personal safety could be placed in jeopardy.” M r B r o ke n s h i r e s l a m m e d t h e argument that budget constraints meant the government could not move on this issue. “Bunkum,” he argued. “The pressure on the budget was still there last year (when previous workers compensation conditions for police were in place). “This is a small cost component, so don’t let them get away with the argument that they can’t afford it. “This bill doesn’t ask for anything more than to give police officers back what they had on 30 June, 2015.” Mr Brokenshire said the next key date for the amendments would be November 18, when the Legislative Council will decide whether to pass the bill. “I would love to see the chamber packed on that day with police officers and their families,” he said. It seemed that Legislative Council members certainly noticed the strong showing of Police Association members, committee and staff at the bill’s introduction in early October. Mr Brokenshire said: “Some of them came up to me after that and said: ‘Wow, they’re pretty serious about this, aren’t they?’ I said: ‘You bet they are.’ ” He urged members to register their support for the bill with their local MPs. “And take the (August) Police Journal with you,” he said. “Show them what has happened to Brett (Gibbons) and Alison (Coad) and others, and ask them if they think it’s right and fair. “Ask them what would happen if that was an MP.”

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POLICE are the group in society most at risk

of suffering post-traumatic stress disorder, according to retired major general John Cantwell (right). In an address on day two of the annual conference, Maj Gen Cantwell – who suffers from clinical PTSD – said police and their families were even more at risk of the disorder than military personnel. “You guys never know what’s on the end of that radio call, what’s behind the door in that domestic (dispute), what you’re going to find in that car wrapped around the tree,” he said. Maj Gen Cantwell, whose links to police include three police-officer brothers and a grandfather, told delegates of his horrific experiences during almost 40 years as a military man. He described the insidiousness of PTSD to delegates. “You see terrible things (in war), but you’re busy at the time,” he explained. “That image gets imprinted in your mind, and the other part of your mind parks it, secure. “Then, later on, your mind says: ‘I forgot about that imprint, I’ll process it now.’ “And your mind doesn’t care when it does that. It often does it while you’re asleep. But it’ll do it at any damn time it likes. “That’s why the intrusive memories, emotions and images can come at any time. “The more imprints you lay down, the more opportunities your mind has to say: ‘It’s process time. I don’t care what you’re doing. I’m going to process that terrible memory right now.’ ” But Maj Gen Cantwell said any sort of reaction to a traumatic event is not only normal, but expected – even if a person doesn’t suffer from PTSD. “Otherwise you’re either a robot or a sociopath,” he said. “So don’t judge, and don’t stigmatize. Speak out, and make sure people understand. Offer support where you can. “Make sure there’s an easily accessible and non-judgemental system.”


POLICE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

SAFETY-MINDED PAGE UNCOVERS RADIO BLACK SPOTS POLICE Association member

Retired Major General John Cantwell AO, DSC, joined the Australian Army as a private in 1974. He served in three wars: in combat duty in Operation Desert Storm in 1991; as the director of strategic operations of the multi-national forces in Iraq in 2006 (where he was awarded the United States Legion of Merit) and as the commander of Australian forces in the Middle East in 2010. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, and was inducted as a member of the Order of Australia in 1990 and an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2007, in addition to two commendations for superior performance. In 2009 he was appointed chief of operations of the Victorian Bushfire Reconstruction and Recovery Authority.

Sgt Jeff Page won the coveted StepUp safety award for highlighting the compromised safety of members who work solo in isolated regions with scarce communications options. As Sgt Page received the award on day one of the annual conference, delegates learned he had notified SAPOL of such radio black spots as: • A 110km black spot on the Stuart H i g hw ay b e t we e n M a r l a a n d Coober Pedy. • A 200km black spot on the Stuart Highway south of Port Augusta. • A 50km black spot on the Kempe Road to Oodnadatta. He argued the removal of highfrequency radios from mobile units and base stations exposed members to considerable risk on a daily basis. He also emphasized the inability to conduct welfare checks on members responding to emergency taskings, stressed the potential for members to be injured, and continued to agitate by notifying the association. T he mat te r was liste d on the COHSWAC agenda. Eventually, a review recommended the reinstatement or retention of mobile HF radios in 20 Far North and West Coast fleets initially targeted for removal. All vehicles in these regions have now been refitted (or marked for a refit) with HF radio sets, enabling members patrolling these communities to communicate with each other, either in the cars or through the base stations. This in turn has secured the safety of members working the extensive blackspot areas.

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Sgt Jeff Page receives the Step-Up safety award from Police Association president Mark Carroll


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LIFE MEMBERSHIP BESTOWED UPON OUTSTANDING FOUR THE Police Association made history on day one

of the conference with committee and delegates endorsing four key figures for life membership. Vice-president Allan Cannon had moved a motion to bestow the honour upon Secretary Tom Scheffler, Deputy President Trevor Milne, Assistant Secretary Bernadette Zimmerman and President Mark Carroll. Delegates unanimously supported the motion.

TOM SCHEFFLER Tom began his service to the association as a delegate for Port Lincoln in April 1999 and continued through to July 2000. He was elected to the committee of management in August 2000 and served in that role until August 2001. In September 2001, he served as the member liaison officer and, in January 2003, he became the assistant secretary. He held that position until April 2013, when he was elected secretary.

TREVOR MILNE Trevor first served the association as a delegate for G4 division from January 1987 until December 1991. He was the delegate for Berri BA and crime scene from May 1998 to October 2002. Trevor was elected to the committee of management in November 2002. He was elected deputy president in August 2013 and remains in that position.

Allan Cannon (second from left) with new life members Trevor Milne, Tom Scheffler, Mark Carroll and Bernadette Zimmermann

BERNADETTE ZIMMERMANN Bernadette began her service to the association as a committee member from October 1998 to April 2005. She was elected as vice-president in April 2005 and as deputy president in October 2011. Bernadette became the association organizer in June 2013 and, in June 2015, rose to the position of assistant secretary. She has also served on the Police Superannuation board, first as a deputy in 2012 and then a full board member in 2008. Bernadette is the first female life member of the association.

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MARK CARROLL Mark first served the association as a delegate for Bank Street from June 1991 to January 1992. After winning election to office as committee member he remained in that role from April 1992 to June 1997. He began full-time service to the association in the role of organizer in July 1997. In May 1998 he was acting secretary and, in July that year, became assistant secretary, a position he held until he was elected president in April 2008. Mark became president of the Police Federation of Australia in November 2014. PJ

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Delegates listen to an address during conference

POLICE ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

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1. Dwayne Illies and Adam Gates 2. Shane Bloomfield and Michael Casey 3. Mark Carroll, John Rau and John Gardner 4. Brett Cottier (NT) Graeme Macey (WA) and Mick Kelly (WA) 5. Michael Ball and Peter Stephen 6. Mark Carroll, John Rau, Steven Marshall and Tom Scheffler 8 10

7. Grant Baker and Wayne Spencer 8. Service award winners Peter Hore, Jeff Page, Allan Cannon, David Savage, Michael Quinton and Peter Clifton 9. Bryan Whitehorn and David Kuchenmeister 10. Narelle Smith and Frank Toner

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xx

Top: riders arrive in Canberra; above: Retired sergeant John Murray (NSW Police Force) and Hazel Murray after laying a wreath; above right: Snr Const Mick Klose (SA) places a baton; right: riders arrive for the memorial service


Tribute ride reinforces police culture By Nick Damiani

AROUND

2 ,0 0 0 police officers converged on Canberra as they came to the emotional end of the annual Wall to Wall Ride for Remembrance last month. The officers, who had again ridden their own motorcycles all the way from their respective jurisdictions, assembled at the National Police Memorial in tribute to their fallen colleagues. Family members and friends of the fallen, along with supporters of the event, joined the riders. The ride not only honours the service and sacrifice of Australian police officers but also raises money for police legacy groups and promotes motorcycle safety and awareness. A rider from each state carried a handmade wooden baton bearing the names of officers who had made the supreme sacrifice. Fixed to the National Police Memorial wall are hundreds of brass plates; and engraved

on them are the names of 757 Australian police officers. Senior Constable 1C David Reynolds, Detective Snr Sgt 1C Peter Hore and Inspector Matt Nairn served as Wall to Wall committee members for South Australia. Each drew accolades for the 100-plus SA riders who took part in the event. It was the state’s highest-ever participation rate. Police Federation of Australia president Mark Carroll addressed the gathering, stressing that the sacrifice each fallen officer had made would never be forgotten. “Australian police have been sacrificing their lives in the line of duty for more than two centuries,” he said. “And one of the great things (this day) does – by bringing us together in tribute – is represent and reinforce the values of police culture. “The unbreakable bonds, the unconditional support, the special mateship and camaraderie, the black humour that helps get us through dark times. “These are qualities which are inherent in police culture. “As long as that remains strong, and as long as we resist its critics, the 757 named on this wall are no chance of being forgotten. “Their families and descendants are no chance of being abandoned – not by us, the police family.” PJ

“And one of the great things (this day) does … is represent and reinforce the values of police culture.”

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Top: batons laid in honour of the fallen; above: Police Federation of Australia president Mark Carroll addresses the riders

For the full speech by Mark Carroll, go to PASAweb (pasa.asn.au).


LETTERS

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR CAN BE SENT BY: Regular mail Police Journal, PO Box 6032, Halifax St, Adelaide SA 5000 Email editor@pasa.asn.au Fax (08) 8212 2002 Internal dispatch Police Journal 168

Researching police resilience I write as principal supervisor of Andrew Paterson, a PhD student from Flinders University, to invite police officers to participate in a research project focused on policing and resilience. The purpose of the research is to explore resilience among police officers: how they have dealt with the challenges of policing. Retired officers are also invited to be interviewed. Andrew is researching how exposure to the trauma encountered in the day-to-day events of policing is handled by members and the organization and how members might stay healthy on the job. This research is based on an approach where police officers tell the story of their experience and their attitude to their work in terms of dealing with the stresses of the job. The interviews will be relaxed and completely confidential in a location either at the Police Association offices, Flinders University or a place of their choice. Participation in the interviews will not be disclosed to SAPOL management or colleagues. Andrew has an extensive history of working with SAPOL members since the 1970s, when he established the original Crisis Care Unit which worked closely with patrols.

He was CEO of V ictim Suppor t, general manager of Mobilong Prison, a crime prevention consultant and, most recently, has been employed at Flinders University. Andrew is basing his research on post-traumatic growth theory which, unlike post-traumatic stress disorder, has hopeful messages around realizing how career-confronting trauma might also contribute to growth as a professional law enforcement officer as well as a partner, parent, friend and colleague. The research will examine ways that police officers can be encouraged to stay healthy and what police organizations can do to support this objective. Police organizations and associations in Australia are aware of issues like these. Andrew can be contacted on his mobile (0434 187 249) or by e-mail (andrew.paterson@flinders.edu.au). With sincere thanks Professor Fiona Verity Social and Policy Studies

CRITICAL INCIDENT RESPONSE Industrial staff on call 24/7 and ready to support you

WORKING FOR YOU Police Association of South Australia

pasa.asn.au | 08 8212 3055 OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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Q&A

Should a majority, rather than a unanimous, jury verdict apply in murder trials? From top: Detective Brevet Sgt Michael Newbury, Detective Snr Sgt 1C Mark Boileau, Detective Snr Sgt Tracey Murphy.

Detective Brevet Sgt Michael Newbury

Detective Snr Sgt 1C Mark Boileau

Detective Snr Sgt Tracey Murphy

Major Crime Investigation Traffic

Eastern Adelaide Crime Management

Confiscation Section

A unanimous verdict for murder would be appropriate if the death penalty was still an option. But if it’s adequate to find a person guilty by majority for child sex offences, manslaughter, aggravated robbery, home invasion, or arson, there is no obvious reason that should not also apply to murder. It cannot be argued that murder is a special crime simply because it carries a 20-year non-parole period. A number of offences carry the possibility of life imprisonment yet a majority verdict is permissible. Majority verdicts recognize that juries might sometimes contain a person who is obstinate, irrational, or otherwise unsuitable for jury duty. By allowing a majority verdict, a hung jury becomes far less likely – which is particularly important in murder trials given their cost, seriousness and complexity. This would also remove pressure from dissenting jury members to conform to the majority, as dissention would no longer automatically cause a hung jury and mistrial.

The short answer is unequivocally yes. South Australia is one of a few remaining states that permits majority jury verdicts in most criminal cases but not murder. Section 57 of the Juries Act reflects this piece of legislation. This inability for courts to allow a majority verdict from an archaic piece of legislation does not take into account the prosecution witnesses and, most important, the family members of the victim or victims who might have to undergo retrials from hung juries. This is at odds with the principles of victims’ rights. Having been an investigator on murder cases where juries have been hung because of the inability of the court to hear a majority verdict for murder is difficult to say the least. Telling the next of kin that they have to live through this again through another trial is not a job that I enjoy.

Majority verdicts should apply in all trials, not just those for murder (and treason) in a manner that would be consistent with other Australian jurisdictions and many international practices. A majority verdict is acceptable in South Australia for other major or serious offences and this works effectively. The possibility of life imprisonment for serious offences can result from majority verdicts. Murder no longer attracts a death penalty and the same standards of jury decisions should apply to this offence. Increased complexities involved with many trials today mean that not every juror may be able to fully understand all of the evidence presented and a majority verdict would allow for this to occur without a detrimental not-guilty finding. The diversity of views within society might preclude a jury from obtaining a unanimous verdict in even the strongest prosecution case. Even when the decisions of learned judges are divided in appeal courts, they are accepted on a majority basis.

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INDUSTRIAL Nick Damiani

Traffic and CSI disputes end with gains for members

commitment from SAPOL,” he said. For traffic members, the “They’ll monitor and “They’ll monitor and assess CSI outcomes include: assess CSI workloads • Two additional traffic teams of a outcomes with SAPOL and the state government workloads and conduct reviews from the metropolitan traffic and CSI disputes. based on the findings.” tactical nature consisting of one and conduct reviews Nearly a year after SAPOL first released its Mr Carroll said the lengthy sergeant, a designated secondbased on the findings.” controversial traffic and crime-scene investigation dispute talks were necessary, owing in-charge position (attracting a review papers, dispute talks ended in the Industrial to the lack of detail in the original classification of brevet sergeant) Relations Commission early this month. SAPOL review papers, released last November. – together with 10 other traffic members – will Police Association president Mark Carroll said “We maintained from the outset, and be introduced. • With the introduction of the two additional traffic the association was able to deliver a number of throughout, that the reviews lacked academic significant outcomes for its members. rigour and needed to be tested,” he said. “I said teams, the six traffic response teams (three “One of our big concerns with the restructure was at the time the reviews were cost-cutting measures north, three south) will remain. These teams will masquerading as service-delivery gains. the proposed span of control for traffic members, also consist of one sergeant and a designated “And we were able to support that assessment and we’ve been able to reduce that,” he said. second - in - charge position at tracting a “We’ve also increased the number of promotional when we commissioned the Australian Workplace classification of brevet sergeant, together with sergeant positions in the new traffic policing structure. Innovation and Social Research Centre to analyse 12 other traffic members. • The response teams will work a three-week day “We’ve secured a commitment to allocate the data sets in the traffic review.” and afternoon shift roster (roster code 027). brevet sergeant classification for second-in-charge With the dispute resolution process now complete, • The tactical teams will work an approved fivetraffic members on both response and tactical teams. SAPOL will begin implementation of the restructures. “And we’ve extended wage maintenance week roster. • Base starting times for day shift will be for affected Snr Sgt 1C traffic members. “One of our big concerns with the restructure Mr Carroll also explained that CSI 6am and 2pm. Staggered starts will be workloads would be monitored across the worked according to SAPOL’s operational was the proposed span of control for traffic state via the forensic register. needs, and to allow employees to balance members, and we’ve been able to reduce that.” “For CSI members, we’ve secured that family and personal commitments.

THE Police Association has negotiated key

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• Current rostering guidelines in the enterprise agreement will apply. • Two existing Snr Sgt 1C members who take up the Snr Sgt positions within the traffic support branch will have their Snr Sgt 1C classification “grandfathered”. This means two members will be paid at Snr Sgt 1C level until they leave these positions or through natural attrition. • The remaining four Snr Sgt 1C members will be placed on the employee management register and managed according to the redeployment policy. In the first instance, vacancies at the Snr Sgt 1C level will be sought and offered. If none is identified, alternative positions at Snr Sgt level will be identified and offered to those members. • Those four members will be wage-maintained at the classification of Snr Sgt 1C for 12 months from the date that the new road policing section takes effect. • SAPOL has provided the association with information regarding proposed works at the Parks and Sturt police stations. To address the association’s concerns about the works, SAPOL engaged a certifier to review the building documentation in respect of the Parks and Sturt complexes. • All furniture and fittings will comply with relevant Australian standards and codes. • Audits of toilet facilities at the Parks and Sturt complexes have been conducted in accordance with the Building Code of Australia guidelines. • Staffing numbers at Parks will increase from 327 FTE to 361 FTE. • Staffing numbers at Sturt will increase from 304 FTE to 330 FTE. • SAPOL will provide further detail regarding plans for the Parks and Sturt police stations.

CSI members can expect: • Attendance rates at STCs will be monitored by the manager of CSI section (Snr Sgt 1C). • Workloads across the state will be monitored via the forensic register. • Post-implementation reviews regarding workload will be conducted at six- and 12-month intervals. • SAPOL has provided a copy of the ANZPAA End-to-End Forensic Identification Process Project (Volume Crime report). • SAPOL has provided a copy of the CSI assessment guidelines. • SAPOL advises expected workload impacts for members represent one additional case per week, per FTE. • In addition to the proposed establishment, two additional CSIs will form part of the implementation team and be available to assist if workload predictions do not eventuate. • If, at the end of the implementation period, the anticipated workload savings are not realized, those two members will be available to return to the establishment on an ongoing basis. • CSI investigators and evidence-desk personnel will work a three-week rotating roster (171). • Sergeants attached to the evidence desk will work a two-week day and afternoon shift roster. • Staff rotations through the proposed evidence desk/relief pool will occur at intervals not less than two years. • Members attached to the evidence desk will rotate through the desk in accordance with organizational need – but with consideration to personal circumstances. Length of time at the evidence desk will be for a period of six months; however, this is not firm and will be determined through consultation with the affected workforce.

• Members working from the evidence desk might be required to attend scenes across the metropolitan area and provide a surge capacity to other CSIs. They will start and finish from the evidence desk using fleets and equipment allocated to the desk. • All supervisors, regardless of their work location, will have access to fleets. • The quality assurance officer (crime scene) PID (classified at Snr Const 1C rank instead of sergeant) will be reviewed owing to the concerns raised by the association. • SAPOL will provide employees with the proposed CSI locations and the corresponding numbers of staff. • It is proposed that the sergeants at Eastern Adelaide, Sturt and Holden Hill will administratively manage the staff at their respective locations but will provide a broader supervisor role across the metropolitan area on a shift basis. If required, field supervision can be supplemented by two sergeants attached to the evidence desk. SAPOL will soon provide more detailed information to CSI and traffic members directly affected by the restructure.

SUPERANNUATION LEGISLATION Superannuation legislation which allows police to make compulsory membership contributions on a pre-tax basis is now in effect. The new laws will also increase the shift-work loading from 10 per cent to 11 per cent, as recognized under the Police Superannuation Act 1990. Members should now have received a combined after-tax/salary sacrifice application form either in the mail or via e-mail from SAPOL. Online calculators are available on the Super SA website and members can also seek independent financial advice from the Police Credit Union.

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HEALTH Dr Rod Pearce

Old diseases eradicated or still a threat? Most of us probably thought killers like the plague were snuffed out long gone, but…

If any disease occurred in this magnitude now it Ebola is an example of a disease that affects humans would kill 2 billion people worldwide. more severely at certain times as it changes in the animal community. in the United States since June this year. Two resulted We can work out how to stop transmission in the deaths of a woman and a teenager. In the because we know how the infection is spread and Rickets occurs in children who get too little vitamin third case, a child is recovering. why it hangs around. It hides in populations other D. Of course, the sun is essential for normal vitamin Hundreds of cases of rickets have shown up in than humans. Fleas are the culprits, D production but, with warnings against England in the last decade. who jump the infection to humans. sun exposure – in order to prevent skin Our knowledge cancer – the incidence of vitamin D We have not been able to eradicate The fight between humans and killer diseases goes on. The humans have scored a few wins but the disease with vaccines because deficiency in Australia has increased. of diseases is years of evolution allow the infections to fight back. they are not effective. And the disease Scarlet fever, which causes an improving but The biggest win for humans was the vaccine for allergic reaction and red rash, once disappears from the humans to the killed hundreds of people. It can be animals before reappearing. Also, smallpox – the only disease we have been able to evolution still eradicate intentionally. Changing the environment the infection is not always lethal now spread easily, particularly by children puts us at risk. might remove others but that is by accident rather because of new antibiotics. with little regard for hygiene. than design. TB is now an old disease coming Perhaps because simple handAs we try to analyse our victory over the back in a similar way. It was killing thousands of washing is a good means of prevention we simply smallpox virus we are constantly reminded that people in Australia 50 years ago but we intervened forget to tell people – or remind ourselves – to do it. Once diagnosed, Scarlet fever is easy to treat but infections can fight back, and not be eradicated. with isolation of infectious cases, nationwide simple hygiene is more important. screening programmes and early treatment and Polio was going to be eradicated 10 years ago but politics and religion have interrupted vaccination vaccination. Gout, once known as the scourge of English programmes, so that fight goes on. But it has continued in animals, regrouped and kings, came about from drinking and eating red meat Old diseases like the plague and tuberculosis come back to kill more humans because it is now causing uric acid build-up and severe arthritis. It is easily treated but medication needs to be taken for (TB), which we think have disappeared, come back resistant to antibiotics; and our vaccines are weak. life and people forget to take their tablets. or reinvent their attacks on us. Possibly 2 billion people (one third of the world’s There was the bubonic (swollen groin glands) population) are infected with Mycobacterium (M) Diphtheria made a comeback when Russia plague, septicaemic (blood infection) plague and tuberculosis. Each year about 9 million people stopped vaccinating after the fall of the USSR. Now, pneumonic (lung infection) plague. become sick with TB, and almost 1.5 million deaths we include the vaccine in all our tetanus vaccines; The pneumonic plague was commonly believed are attributed to it. and, in Australia, you cannot get a tetanus shot Leprosy is like TB but grows a lot slower and can to be the cause of the Black Death, which swept without having the diphtheria one at the same time. through Europe in the 14th century and killed an actually be treated. It is likely still around because Our knowledge of diseases is improving but estimated 25 million people, or up to 60 per cent of of human complacency and social and political evolution still puts us at risk. We have only had one the European population. issues but, theoretically, humans could eradicate it. true eradication success but there are many reasons Other diseases diseases change and continue to challenge us. mutate in the animal Humans have the slight upper hand at the moment We can work out how to stop transmission because we world and can affect but, in our complex, ever-changing world, there are know how the infection is spread and why it hangs around. humans for the first time. probably more surprises to come.

THREE cases of the plague have emerged

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MOTORING Jim Barnett

One hot hatch It not only sets the pulse racing but also comes at a reasonable price

THE European-built Astra hatch is back, this

time sporting a Holden badge. Its previous stint here was under the Opel banner.

DESIGN Of the three variants on offer, the top-spec VXR, is one very hot hatch. Its 2.0-litre turbocharged petrol engine belts out in excess of 200kW and drives the front wheels through a six-speed manual transmission. Holden claims Astra’s new HiPer Strut front end helps manage torque steer while VXR’s FlexRide tuning system offers three drive modes. These alter ride, steering and handling and, in VXR mode, provide more responsive throttle.

Selecting VXR drive mode transforms the car into a twitchy sports machine that hugs the bitumen.

Electro-hydraulic steering, 20-inch low-profile tyres and front Brembo brakes ensure VXR handles and brakes confidently. Driver and front passenger are accommodated in superb eight-way adjustable sport seats with heaters and black leather trim. No doubt drivers will relish the chunk y leather-bound flat-bottom sports steering wheel. While rear-seat access is a little tight, the seats offer reasonable legroom and headroom for adults. Boot space is generous but comes at the expense of a spare wheel – its replacement is an inflation kit. VXR looks the part with a low stance, wide tyres, bulging rear guards, dual rectangular exhausts, a lip spoiler and a shark-fin antenna.

VALUE FOR MONEY Given its standard features and performance, the $39,990 price tag is reasonable. Features include: • Alloy sports pedals. • Dual-zone climate control. • Trip computer. • MyLink infotainment system with seven-inch colour display. • Integrated apps for Pandora, Stitcher and Tune in Radio. • Digital radio. • Satellite navigation. • Bluetooth phone and audio streaming plus USB and auxiliary input jacks. • Cruise control with speed limiter.

SAFETY Standard items include: Six airbags. Tyre-pressure monitoring system. Rear park assist. Auto headlights. Stability and traction control. Performance Brembo brake package with cross-drilled rotors. • ABS. • • • • • •


VALUE FOR MONEY

Nothing to dislike • Two ISOFIX child seat anchorage points. The absence of a reversing camera is disappointing, as is advanced features such as blind-spot and lane-departure monitoring.

STATS The 2.0-litre turbo four produces 206kW of power and 400Nm of torque. Combined fuel economy is 8.0 litres/100km. Zero-100km/h is achieved in around 6.4 seconds.

ON THE ROAD Around the suburbs VXR is smooth, easy to drive and relatively quiet, except for the throaty exhaust note. Plant the foot and power comes from 3,000rpm all the way to redline in a rush. The clutch is light and the gearbox delivers smooth shifting. S e le cting V X R dr i ve mode transforms the car into a twitchy sports machine that hugs the bitumen. The only trade-off is that you will notice every bump. But, now, it is really sharp enough to set the pulse racing.

VERDICT VXR is a hot, well-priced, rewarding hatch. Drawbacks for some will be manual-only gearbox, two-door configuration and no reverse camera.

Except perhaps the absence of a common safety feature

SUBARU has finally introduced an auto transmission on diesel variants in its popular Forester line-up. It comes as part of the 2015 upgrade.

DESIGN The diesel’s new paddle shifter-equipped CV T transmission has the ability to swap between step-less CVT mode and (seven-speed) step shifting, depending on throttle opening. This results in quieter, more efficient operation, particularly at higher revs. Auto diesel variants also benefit from X-Drive, which includes hill-descent control and improved drivability at low speeds in slippery conditions. Minor tweaking has brought the addition of daytime running lights, a shark-fin antenna and tailgate lip spoiler. Increased insulation under the bonnet improves sound absorption. Inside is a seven-inch touch-screen infotainment system with Pandora radio. The cabin delivers comfortable seating for five, a reach- and rake-adjustable steering wheel with audio and cruise function buttons and a height-adjustable driver’s seat. Rear 60/40 seats can be easily dropped from the cargo bay, which features a security blind and a full-size spare wheel surrounded by storage space. OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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All MY15 Foresters are price-reduced by up to 8.2 per cent. The two manual diesel variants have been slashed by up to $3,500. D-L manual now costs $33,490 and upmarket D-S manual $39,490. The new CVT transmission adds $2,000 to these prices. Standard features on D-L diesel include: • Touch-screen audio with six speakers. • Bluetooth connectivity and voice-recognition. • Dual-zone climate control. • USB (two) and auxiliary inputs. • Three 12-volt power sockets. • Roof rails. • Seventeen-inch alloy wheels. • Multi-function display with trip computer. The $6,000 premium for D-S diesel adds: • Power tailgate. • Electric sunroof. • Heated front seats. • Leather trim. • Auto lights and wipers. • Satellite navigation. • Power driver’s seat. • Eighteen-inch alloy wheels.

SAFETY Forester holds a five-star safety rating with inclusions such as seven airbags (including driver’s knee airbag), reversing camera and symmetrical all-wheel-drive system. Subaru’s Eye-Sight driver-assistance package is not available on diesel variants and, oddly, parking sensors are not on its specs list.

STATS Diesel Forester features a 2.0-litre four-cylinder horizontally-opposed turbocharged diesel engine linked to either six-speed manual or seven-step CVT transmissions. Power output is 110kW while there’s impressive torque of 350Nm. The engine, which meets Euro 6 emission requirements, has combined fuel economy of 5.9 litres/100km (manual) and 6.3 litres/100km CVT. Braked towing capacity is 1,800kg.

ON THE ROAD There is absolutely nothing to dislike about new Forester diesel auto. It is spacious, comfortable and offers excellent visibility. The diesel delivers power effortlessly along with smooth, quiet operation. The new CVT transmission is superb. Forester drives well, even on rough roads, and offers sufficient ground clearance for the more adventurous.

VERDICT New Forester diesel remains a front runner in this class. Pity about the parking sensors.


WE VALUE OUR PARTNERS AND THAT MEANS GREAT VALUE FOR POLICE ASSOCIATION MEMBERS

HOLDEN PARTNER PROGRAM Our GM Partner Program gives valued Police Association members access to special offers and discounts on a wide range of Holden vehicles. It’s a great way to find a new Holden that suits your budget and your lifestyle. For more information, simply call the GM Fleet Customer Service Centre on 1300 559 696 or email us at gmfleetenquiries@gm.com. Vehicles and colours shown are correct at time of print.

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Part of the Police Association team Grievance officer Matt Karger came to the Police Association in 2013 with a wealth of union experience. A born problem-solver, he’s right at home taking on association members’ issues – and he does it with infectious enthusiasm. If you have a grievance, you can expect the best in representation, support and information from Matt.

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BANKING

Time to invest in your future Paul Modra Executive Manager – Member Value and Distribution, Police Credit Union And world-leading research is at hand to put you in the best position to do it

BUYING a home or investment property

can be one of the biggest and most expensive purchases you will ever make. Without a doubt, you want to make sure you are making the right choice. Whether you are a first home buyer or thinking about starting or expanding your investment portfolio, knowing where to buy and when to enter the market can always be challenging. If you’re considering a home or investment loan, now is the time to talk with Police Credit Union about what we have to offer. Over the last few months, the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APR A) has increased its surveillance and monitoring of home loans, especially to investors. In fact, a 10 per cent per annum limit has been set for banks and the growth of their residential investment loan portfolios, effectively to slow the speed of investment loans and house prices. As a result, the major banks have now started to make significant changes to their lending practices to investors. These changes include: • Increasing interest rates for investment loans compared to owner-occupied loans. • Restricting the maximum loan-to-valuation ratio (LVR) in some instances to 80 per cent. • Decreasing rate discounts and increasing fees. • Tightening their lending criteria. This means that investors will need to come up with bigger deposits and might not qualify for an investment loan with a major bank. Police Credit Union has always had its members’ financial needs as its priority and, unlike the bigger banks, our loan products and

We want to help members achieve financial lending practices remain unchanged. success for the future. At Police Credit Union, investors still enjoy We are not only here to help get you get started, competitive rates for investment loans with a but Police Credit Union can support you throughout 90 per cent LVR. your whole property journey. We also offer additional support to Platinum We offer a wide range of variable and fixed home Advantage members with no application fees on and investment loan products which are tailored to our exclusive Advantage loan, and no monthly or suit the needs of individual members. annual account-keeping fees on loans. If you need any questions In addition, we can supply Platinum Advantage members answered, our personal bankers Doing the research, are always happy to sit down with free property reports and and chat at a time and location research from the world’s largest using tools such as to suit you. They can discuss property data and analytics RP Data, puts you in our various loan options and the provider, CoreLogic RP Data. features and benefits of each, to From buying and selling to a great position for help make your buying decision renting and investing, CoreLogic securing a property at that little bit easier. RP Data offers superior and valuable information when it And with official Reserve the best possible price. comes to purchasing a house Bank interest rates currently at an all-time low, there’s never or unit. been a better time to consider investing in a new Finding the right property requires more research home or investment property. than simply showing up on auction day and putting So if you are thinking about purchasing your in a bid. Doing the research, using tools such as first home, refinancing, or looking to buy an RP Data, puts you in a great position for securing a property at the best possible price. investment property, contact Police Credit Accessing our RP data reports is easy. When you Union to take advantage of your Platinum Advantage programme combined with a Better come into a branch for loan pre-approval or simply to Banking experience. enquire about our various home loans, we can offer free property reports on the spot. This means you can have access to a vast range of reports covering suburb statistics, sales history, rental comparison and auction clearance results for thousands of houses across each state. AFSL/Australian Credit Licence 238991 Knowing all this information puts you way ahead of the crowd, and can further increase your chances of finding the right property to suit your needs. OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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Free Legal Service for Police Association Members, Their Families & Retired Members. Leading Adelaide law firm, Tindall Gask Bentley is the preferred legal service provider of the Police Association, offering 30 minutes of free initial advice and a 10% fee discount. To arrange a preliminary in-person or phone appointment contact PASA on (08) 8212 3055.

Have you or a family member been injured in a car accident? Tindall Gask Bentley acts in more motor vehicle accident claims that any other law firm in SA. Gary Allison & Richard Yates can provide free preliminary legal advice on your entitlements to compensation. They can also help with Workers Compensation, public liability & medical negligence claims.

Family Law Matrimonial, De Facto & Same Sex Relationships • Children’s Issues • Child Support matters

• Property Settlements • “Pre Nuptial” style Agreements

Appointments with Wendy Barry (Accredited Family Law Specialist) & Dina Paspaliaris.

Commercial Law • General business advice • Real estate & property advice

• Business transactions • Commercial disputes & dispute resolution

Appointments with Giles Kahl & Michael Arras.

Wills & Estates • Wills & Testamentary Trusts • Enduring Powers of Attorney • Enduring Guardians

• Advice to executors of deceased estates • Obtaining Grants of Probate • Estate disputes

Appointments with Michael Arras & Rosemary Caruso.

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Adelaide • Reynella • Salisbury Mt Barker • Port Lincoln • Whyalla (08) 8212 1077 tgb.com.au


LEGAL

Make a will, not excuses Tom Mead Consultant, Tindall Gask Bentley Lawyers Avoiding the task could leave your assets with someone you didn’t want to have them

The cost of preparing a valid will is Unfortunately, the assets often end up going quite minimal, especially when compared to persons who the deceased probably excuses for not making a will. Some of the more with the alternative of leaving your common ones are: family and loved ones to bear the cost would not have chosen. • “I do not have time to visit a lawyer.” once you’re gone. • “It costs too much.” It might cost a little more if your affairs are a bit expensive than if the deceased had taken the • “I have a blended family and I really do not know more complicated or, for example, if you are in a trouble to make a will. where to start or how to decide how my assets “blended family” situation. But, even then, the cost Unfortunately, the assets often end up going should be distributed upon my death.” is miniscule compared to the enormous costs to to persons who the deceased probably would not • “Once I have gone, I do not really care what have chosen. your estate which can be incurred if you die without I really cannot stress enough the importance of having made a will. happens to my assets.” The last excuse, that you do not really care what As to the third excuse which, in effect, is: making a will, and taking the time to update your happens to your estate, is probably the only really “My personal circumstances are way too will from time to time and as circumstances change in your life. sensible reason not to make a will. complicated and I wouldn’t know For the vast majority of people, where to start.” I am able to take most instructions I need by … if your affairs are however, it is very important how The answer is that, no matter how e-mail or over the phone. And, if you really cannot simple, it could be get to a TGB office, arrangements can be made for their estates are distributed after complicated your circumstances the documents to be e-mailed or posted out to you their deaths. are, there is always a solution. as little as 50 You have worked hard to I was admitted to practice as a so that you can execute them at a time and place accumulate those assets during lawyer in December 1985. I have convenient to you. minutes for you to spent a good proportion of the your lifetime. Why wouldn’t you get your will done. want to spend a little bit of time time since in preparing wills, and money making sure that your handling deceased estates and Owing to changes in South Australian wishes are made clear as to how the assets are to handling estate litigation. regulation, it is important that you doublebe distributed after your death? In my experience, if you devote the time to talking check any existing enduring guardianship As to the excuse about not having enough time, through the client’s circumstances, and presenting documents in order to ensure they are for most people with simple estates it takes the various options available, you will always end still valid on January 1, 2016. Contact somewhere between 30 and 60 minutes for a up with a solution, even in situations in which the TGB or your lawyer for more information. lawyer to obtain your instructions and advise you personal circumstances of the client are very complex. how best to arrange the provisions of your will. On the other side of the coin, it is a terrible There is then usually a return appointment for the situation to be in to be taking instructions from the purpose of executing the will in the presence of two family of a deceased person who failed to make a will. Tindall Gask Bentley Lawyers provides free initial independent adult witnesses, and this can take as I have to break the news to them that applying advice through a legal advisory service to Police little as 20 minutes. for letters of administration in the estate, and Association members and their families, and retired In other words, if your affairs are simple, it could subsequently administering the estate, is likely to members. To make an appointment, members should contact the association (8212 3055). be as little as 50 minutes for you to get your will done. be a lot more complex, time-consuming and thus

IN my experience, people give many and varied

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BOOKS

The Trial: Principles, Process & Evidence The Fighter

No Cure for Love

Close Your Eyes

Author Paul Warren Publisher Allen & Unwin RRP $29.99

Author Peter Robinson Publisher Hachette Australia RRP $29.99

Author Michael Robotham Publisher Hachette Australia RRP $29.99

Authors Jill Hunter, Terese Henning, Gary Edmond, James Metzger, Mehera San Roque Publisher The Federation Press RRP $125

Paul “Warlord” Warren was an Australian Muay Thai kick-boxing champion, who was used to the physically punishing world of martial arts at its highest level. But nothing could prepare him for the torment he would face in the Australian army. One month after he arrived in Afghanistan, an IED exploded, tearing off his right leg. His battalion got him a helicopter within 16 minutes for surgery. He was flown to Germany and then back to Australia, where he received treatment for his injuries in Brisbane. His partner, Dearne, moved to Brisbane to assist his recovery. War re n s tr ug g l e d w ith th e shattering effects of PTSD. At his lowest ebb, he thought about taking his own life. The discipline and toughness he’d learned from his martial arts and the fierce love of Dearne helped him mend.

In Los Angeles, the beautiful star of a hit TV cop show is being sent strange letters. At f i r s t , S a r a h B r o u g h to n dismisses them as the ramblings of a lonely fan. But, when they take on a disturbing tone, and Sarah discovers a body outside her Malibu beach home, the experts are brought in. LAPD Threat Management Unit detective Arvo Hughes has seen it all before: stalkers, love obsessionals, erotomaniacs. He knows the language they use and the patterns they follow. But there is no pattern to follow here. Dealing with a highly unpredictable but extremely violent killer, Hughes feels certain Sarah’s stalker must have met her before. But with the squeaky-clean star doing all she can to keep memories of a shady history locked away, Hughes must delve into her past himself.

A mother and her teenage daughter are found brutally murdered in a remote farmhouse, one defiled by multiple stab wounds and the other left lying like Sleeping Beauty waiting for her prince. Reluctantly, clinical psychologist Joe O’Loughlin is drawn into the investigation when a former student, calling himself the “Mindhunter”, has jeopardized the police inquiry by leaking details to the media and stirring up anger. With no shortage of suspects and tempers beginning to fray, O’Loughlin discovers links between these murders and a series of brutal attacks where the man and women are choked unconscious and the letter “A” is carved into their foreheads. As the case becomes ever more complex, nothing is quite what it seems and, soon, O’Loughlin’s fate, and that of those closest to him, become intertwined with a merciless, unpredictable killer.

Written by leading evidence law scholars, combined with practitioner contribution, The Trial examines procedural and evidentiary law under the uniform Evidence Act. The Trial places the criminal jury trial centre-stage. This is where the law of evidence and procedure is commonly hotly contested, where major defining evidentiary case law arises and where the cut and thrust of advocacy, crucially shaping the trial, are classically on show. It is also where rapid change has an impact on expertise and, through law reform, creates pressures on fundamental accusatorial principles in an increasingly complex justice environment. In Australia, no evidence book presents doctrinal analysis s o c o m p re h e n s i ve l y w ith i n a humanizing context.

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Ex-cop Darian Richards did whatever it took to solve a crime. But after 16 years as the head of Victoria’s Homicide Squad, he’d had enough. He had to walk away to save his sanity. Now Commissioner Copeland Walsh has tracked Richards down. He needs him to help clear an old case – the death of Isobel Vine. The coroner gave an open finding, and doubt remained over four young cops who were present the night Vine died. Twenty-five years later, one of those cops is next in line to become commissioner. So to Walsh, Darian Richards is the only man for the job. Richards is going back to stir a hornet’s nest. But once he is on a case, he won’t back off tracking down evil, no matter who he has to take down.

Bertie is a young boy growing up in Adelaide. He loves his family and especially his dog but he hates his brain. Bertie feels he has challenging behaviours which prevent him from making friends and learning. He sets off on a journey to swap his brain for a new, more intelligent one. What Bertie doesn’t realize is that his brain is not his enemy; it is actually his greatest ally. His search for a new brain will introduce him to a myriad of characters who teach him far more about himself than he ever realized. They teach him how truly unique he is. “Words are like precious jewels: you place them delicately in your sentences and every now and then you use a diamond word and your conversation will sparkle.”

Changes to the return-to-work legislation will mean injured officers will be stripped of their entitlements. Every day South Australian police officers like Brett put their lives on the line to protect us. This new legislation will penalise them for doing so. After being shot in the face, this is a kick in the teeth. Go to protectourcops.com.au for more information and to sign the petition to get this unfair legislation amended.

LET’S PROTECT THOSE WHO PROTECT US.

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WIN A BOOK! For your chance to win one of these books, send your name, location, phone number and despatch code, along with the book of your choice to giveaways@pj.asn.au

Senior Constable Brett Gibbons was shot point-blank in the face while on duty. He will carry the scars for the rest of his life but now the Weatherill Government wants him to carry the financial burden of ongoing medical expenses too.

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Author Tony Cavanaugh Publisher Hachette Australia RRP $29.99

Author Karyn Prior (illustrated by Julia Blanka) Publisher Diamond Words Publishing Pty Ltd RRP $15 (plus p&h)

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Kingdom of the Strong

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My name is Bertie Poshkza

AFTER BEING SHOT IN THE FACE, IT’S A KICK IN THE TEETH.

T H AU S T R

POLICE ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA


DVDs

The Rewrite

Life Story

Wentworth Series 3

Magic Mike XXL

SRP $29.95 1 disc

SRP $39.95 2 disc

SRP $39.95 1 disc

SRP $39.95 1 disc

Once upon a time, Keith Michaels was an award-winning Hollywood screenwriter, but divorce and a string of unsuccessful films have left him with nothing but bad debts and blank pages. So, after his agent arranges a job as guest screenwriting professor at a remote university on the East Coast, a desperate Michaels can’t say no. He initially hopes to give minimal effort to actual teaching – so he can focus on his next script – but he unexpectedly becomes invested in the lives of his students. Indeed, he falls for one of them: Holly, a single mum looking to start her own new chapter.

This captivating series follows the journey from birth to parenthood. Each episode focuses on one stage of life, starting with those crucial first few days and moving through the challenges of the grownup world – from power struggles to the search for a suitable mate – and, finally, parenthood where survival of their own offspring, their legacy, becomes life’s purpose. Every day, these animals face triumph, tragedy, humour and joy. Life Story brings their experience to the screens in minute detail, showcasing their strength and fascinating ingenuity and bringing the drama and tension of the natural world to life.

Four months have passed since Bea Smith’s bold escape and ruthless murder of Brayden Holt. Having returned to Wentworth Correctional Centre following her successful campaign to kill Holt, Smith has assumed the mantle of Top Dog, hailed by all – including Franky Doyle herself – as a worthy successor. But things are set to heat up with Joan “The Freak” Ferguson realizing Smith has played her, but she is determined to win the end game. Smith, meanwhile, has only one goal in mind – to bring The Freak down. To achieve this, she will need the help of the women and, ultimately, some of Ferguson’s trusted officers. Unlikely alliances will form and have serious consequences.

Picking up the story three years after Mike bowed out of the stripper life at the top of his game, Magic Mike XXL finds the remaining Kings of Tampa likewise ready to throw in the towel. But they want to do it their way: burning down the house in one last blow-out performance in Myrtle Beach, and with legendary headliner Magic Mike sharing the spotlight with them. On the road to their final show, with whistle stops in Jacksonville and Savannah to renew old acquaintances and make new friends, Mike and the guys learn some new moves and shake off the past in surprising ways.

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WIN A DVD! For your chance to win one of these DVDs, send your name, location, phone number and despatch code, along with your choice of DVD, to giveaways@pj.asn.au


CINEMA

Spectre Hot Pursuit SRP $39.95 1 disc In Hot Pursuit , an uptight and bythe -book cop, Cooper (Reese Witherspoon), tries to protect the sexy, outgoing Columbian Daniella Riva (Sofía Vergara) from a drug boss. Cooper is thrilled about the assignment – to escort Riva from San Antonio to Dallas so both she and her husband can testify against the drug lord. Plans go awry when Mr Riva gets ambushed, leaving his wife a widow. Cooper and her witness must now use their wits to escape from crooked cops and murderous gunmen, while not killing each other in the process.

Season commences November 12 www.Facebook.com/ JamesBond007AUS A cryptic message from the past sends James Bond (Daniel Craig) on a rogue mission to Mexico City and eventually Rome, where he meets Lucia Sciarra (Monica Bellucci), the beautiful and forbidden widow of an infamous criminal. Bond infiltrates a secret meeting and uncovers the existence of the sinister organization known as Spectre. Meanwhile, back in London, Max Denbigh (Andrew Scott), the new head of the Centre for National Security, questions Bond’s actions and challenges the relevance of MI6, led by M (Ralph Fiennes). Bond covertly enlists Moneypenny (Naomie Harris) and Q (Ben Whishaw) to help him seek out Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux), the daughter of his old nemesis, Mr White (Jesper Christensen), who may hold the clue to untangling the web of Spectre.

Hotel Transylvania 2

The Night Before

Season commences November 26 www.hoteltransylvania2.com.au

Season commences December 3 www.sonypictures.com.au

Dracula’s rigid monster-only policy at Hotel Transylvania has finally relaxed, opening up the hotel doors to human guests. But behind closed coffins, Drac is worried that his adorable half-human, half-vampire grandson, Dennis, isn’t showing signs of being a vampire. So, while Mavis is busy visiting her human in-laws with Johnny, “Vampa” Drac enlists his friends Frank, Murray, Wayne and Griffin to put Dennis through a “monster-in-training” boot camp. But little do they know that Drac’s grumpy and very old, old, old school dad, Vlad, is about to pay a family visit to the hotel. And when Vlad finds out that his great-grandson is not a pureblood – and humans are now welcome at Hotel Transylvania – things are going to get batty.

Ethan (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), Isaac (Seth Rogen) and Chris (Anthony Mackie) have been friends since childhood; and, for a decade, their yearly reunion has been an annual night of debauchery and hilarity. N ow t h at t h e y ’r e e nte r i n g adulthood, the tradition is coming to an end. With one last chance to get together, and determined to make tonight the most memorable night of all, these three friends endure a series of outrageous obstacles, trials, and misfortunes in their effort to find the Nutcracka Ball – the Holy Grail of holiday parties.

WIN A MOVIE PASS! For your chance to win an in-season double pass to Hotel Transylvania 2 or The Night Before, send your name, location, phone number and despatch code, along with your choice of film, to giveaways@pj.asn.au


JUDGE OUR STAR RATING SYSTEM

esigned with one thing in mind: d guide on wines to our readers. procedures in an activity that criticisms of wine shows and e approach our tastings.

MEMBER EVENTS NOVEMBER 2015 HONG KONG - 5-7 November 2015 Boutique Wines of Australia JANUARY 2016 PERTH - 15 January 2016 Best of the West Perth Hyatt Regency Hotel PERTH - 18 January 2016 Wines of South Africa Perth Hyatt Regency Hotel

their choice to advertise if they wish. The judges’ decisions are final and these are published according to the judges’ scores, whether advertising is taken or not.

APRIL 2016

The judges We take care in selecting our judges. But remember: judges are human and their own preference will influence their scores. We use judges with complementary backgrounds and a three-person panel for each flight will include winemakers with technical expertise and often a marketing/retail expert who knows consumer tastes. Often one or more of the judges are masters of wine with vast international experience, and most judges have experience at major australian wine shows. We are also aware of expertise. If we are judging a region, for example, we will have a winemaker judge from that region because that person knows the local style. We balance that with a judge from outside the region and generally someone with broad and mature experience.

ITALY - 10 April 2016 Best of South Australia vs Italy Veronafiere, Verona - Italy

Police Wine Club members (Winestate subscribers)

are entitled to a ticket to 100 Point System request. 18.5 - 20each event 93upon - 100

national 20 nt System

18 - 18.4

90 - 92

17 - 17.9

85 - 89

6.5 - 16.9 Go to www.pasa.asn.au 83 - 84 5.5 - 16.4 78 - 82 for details or call the Police Association ccordingly, Winestate uses the star rating(8212 3055) evel of accuracy that simply does not exist. to join.

ADELAIDE - 8 April 2016 Cabernet & Bordeaux Blends Tasting National Wine Centre - 6pm – 8.30pm (Tickets available early 2016)

MAY 2016 ADELAIDE - 27 May 2016 Mainfreight International World’s Greatest Shiraz Challenge XI National Wine Centre, Adelaide - 6pm – 8.30pm (Tickets available early 2016) JUNE 2016 ADELAIDE - 30 June 2016 NASAA Organic Wine of the Year Tasting & Awards National Wine Centre, Adelaide - 6pm – 8.30pm (Tickets available March 2016) JULY 2016 SYDNEY - 9 July 2016 Luigi Bormioli 'Winestate Wine of the Year 2015' Tasting Trenton International, St Peters - 5.30pm – 8.30pm (Tickets available April, 2016) SEPTEMBER 2016 ADELAIDE - 2 September 2016 Winestate 'Wine of the Year 2016' Subscribers Tasting National Wine Centre Adelaide - 6pm – 8.30pm (Free tickets available for subscribers in June 2016)

JOIN US TODAY! By becoming a Winestate Member you will receive one complimentary ticket to all of our events listed above!

The W ine & Spirit IN


WINE

Grampians Estate Great Western, Victoria grampiansestate.com.au

2012 Streeton Reserve Shiraz

2013 Grampians Grenache

Screw cap 13.5% alc $75

Screw cap 13.5% alc $25

The 2012 Streeton Reserve Shiraz is a single-vineyard Shiraz from the Mafeking Vineyard in the southern parts of the Grampians wine region. The wine was aged in new and old French oak for two years. Black and spicy fruits dominate the nose. Black bean and hoi sin sauce coupled with cigar box and some concentrated black tar linger subtly in the background. The palate is full, textural and rich, and abounds with blackberry and mulberry fruits. Balanced acidity and soft integrated tactile tannins provide this wine with superb balance, power and elegance. Cellar for up to 20 years.

The fruit for this wine was sourced from the Arrawatta Vineyard just outside Great Western. Matured in old oak, it has a superb cherry nose and a wonderfully soft food-friendly palate. This cool-climate style has attracted many admirers and looks to be a great addition to the region’s stable of cool-climate reds. Try it with a lamb dish.

Winestate magazine: “Vibrant light red hues and quite a Rhone-like nose, like blue cheese and raspberries. Palate is rich and sweet without being over the top with good length and … balance of fruit.” James Halliday’s Australian Wine Companion: “From Great Western. Light, but bright hue; it has a highly fragrant red berry bouquet and an intense palate, obviously Grenache, but with a freshness, zest and firm grip different from the normal profile of Grenache. Jam-packed with interest. Rating 94.

2011 Rutherford Sparkling Shiraz

Winestate magazine: “Perfumed dark fruit fragrances with powerful peppery characters and a distinctively cool climate palate perfectly balanced, complex and peppery with excellent grippy tannins. 5 stars.” Trophy: Royal Agricultural Show of Queensland Wine Show 2015. Vic100: Top 100 wines of Victoria 2015.

Crown seal 14% alc $35 | Screw cap 13.5% alc $75 The 2011 Rutherford Sparkling Shiraz is an elegant and fulfilling wine that consumes the mouth with good fruit and effervescence. The palate is dense, spicy and rich with good fruit flavour and some varietal spice on the nose. This Methode Champenoise sparkling has balance, length and style. The 2011 Rutherford Sparkling Shiraz follows previous vintages which have collected 15 trophies, including the 2006 vintage which was Winestate magazine’s Sparkling of the Year for Australia and New Zealand. Vic 100: Top 100 wines of Victoria 2015.

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THE POLICE CLUB HAPPY HOUR 4.30pm till 6.30pm every Friday

Christmas at the club Book your Christmas function at the Police Club!

Only two-and-a-bit months to go! Book a lunch, organize a function or select a package to suit.

Call the club on (08) 8212 2924 or visit www.policeclub.com.au

BOOK NOW

PoliceClub@pasa.asn.au | (08) 8212 2924 27 Carrington Street, Adelaide | www.policeclub.com.au


CIB Reunion Luncheon Police Club, September 21, 2015 Top: Keith Reichstein, Graeme Barton, Bill Newman; above left: Deane Paynter, Bill Hanson; above right: Peter Averis, Ian “Butch” Grose; below: Jim Langmead, Trevor Dyster, Greg Bollmeyer

Free WiFi | Private function rooms available | Free entry into weekly meat tray OPENING HOURS Mon – Wed 10am till 3.30pm | Thurs 10am till 5pm | Friday 10am till late HAPPY HOUR 4.30pm till 6.30pm every Friday


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The Last Shift PHIL BETTS (1) BRIAN BLECKLY (2) MICHAEL BRISTOW (3) GREG DALY (4) REX DE LAINE (5) PETER DREWRY (6) JEFF ECKERT (7) COL ELSON (8) MICHAEL FOSTER (9) PAUL GROSS (10) GEOFF KEYNES GERRY MANGAN (11) GLENN MATTHEWS DAN McLUSKEY JOE MENSFORTH (12) DAVID MODRA BRYAN MORDEN (13) DENNIS MULRONEY (14) WAYNE PALMER (15) GREG RAMM (16) TOM RIENIETS (17) BRIONY SCHRADER (18) JOHN SCHRADER (19)

SENIOR CONSTABLE MICHAEL FOSTER Christies Beach Police Station 39 years’ service Last Day: 11.07.15 Comments… “I have fond memories of Mounted Section, Speed Detection, Breath Analysis Section and Christies Beach Traffic and station. “I wish the members I leave behind all the best for a safe and successful life with SAPOL. “To the Police Association, thank you for all your support and ongoing work for the pay and conditions for current members.” SERGEANT BRYAN MORDEN Prosecution Services Branch 43 years’ service Last Day: 12.07.15 Comments… “I thank the Police Association president, along with his present and past colleagues, for the support and advocacy provided to the membership over my career. “I have enjoyed my time with SAPOL, particularly the opportunities, experiences and friendships formed along the way.”

PETER SCHULZE (20) PAUL SHELDON (21) GREG THOMPSON (22) MG “FRED” TRUEMAN (23) MARK WILSON (24) PHILLIP “FLIP” WILSON (25)

SERGEANT BRIAN “BLEX” BLECKLY Mount Barker Operations 39 years’ service Last Day: 22.07.15 Comments… “I leave with many happy memories and, alas, some battle scars, which I hope will fade quickly and just leave the happy memories. “To all the remaining members of Course 53 and all I have met along my journey – thank you all for enriching my life. “To the Police Association, keep up the excellent work. It was always a comfort to know you had my back.” OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT MG “FRED” TRUEMAN Regional Operations Service 43 years’ service Last Day: 22.07.15 Comments… “Three experiences warrant specific acknowledgement for the historical record. “First, Peter Alexander for his unyielding support and expertise in establishing transit policing within SAPOL. Peter’s magnificent responsiveness was inspiring and resolved one critical element in the equation. “Second, Peter Alexander, Mark Carroll and Andrew Dunn, in respect of Police Health’s transformation into a national police health insurer. A strategic change in direction was inevitable and financially necessary, and there were many options on the table. “Acting as the conscience of those who had established the joining SAPD/PASA employee health fund, they were significantly influential in shaping the strategic transformation and have been very practically helpful since. “Third, Michael Oertel and Brian Marks from Police Health. Together, but in different respects, they professionalized Police Health within South Australia and now as a national insurer. “Finally, my appreciation and respect to the many fine women and men I have worked with. Their tireless energy, loyalty and support, leadership and teamwork, to a nebulous ideology of ‘making our community safe’, is worthy and admirable.” CONSTABLE GREG THOMPSON Police Escort Section 35 years’ service Last Day: 22.07.15 Comments… “I thank Mark Carroll and the association for the professional way they have conducted business with SAPOL and the government in the past years. I wish them every success with the current rounds of negotiations for a fair EA. “To all the members I have had the pleasure of meeting in my 35 years with SAPOL I say thank you for making my career so enjoyable.”


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SENIOR SERGEANT GERRY MANGAN Audit & Risk Management Section 41 years’ service Last Day: 23.07.15 Comments… “I thank everyone I have worked with over the past 40 years, having learnt something from each and every one of you. To all I wish the very best for the future.” SENIOR CONSTABLE 1C PHILLIP “FLIP” WILSON Traffic Support Branch 43 years’ service Last Day: 24.07.15 Comments… “It has been a long and interesting journey. It is now time to enjoy life and spend more time with my family, go fishing and train the horses. “Thank you to all the members I have worked and associated with over 43 years. Special thanks to all my ‘friends’ at TSB and I wish them well. “There is life after SAPOL and, to all the old-timers, do not stay too long. Money is not all there is in life.” SERGEANT MICHAEL BRISTOW Berri Police Station 39 years’ service Last Day: 26.07.15 Comments… “Lifelong friends, experiences like no other and, ultimately, the opportunity to meet my wife and raise a family as proud police officers in a rural community, will be cherished forever. “My late wife, Caroline, and I were thankful for the support provided to us through both individuals and services that I suspect would be unrivalled in another occupation. We were indeed very fortunate.”

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SERGEANT PETER DREWRY Call Centre 31 years’ service Last Day: 29.07.15 Comments… “I thank all of the Police Association staff for their combined efforts over the last 31 years of my service. “The conditions of service and rate of pay has improved markedly as a result of their untiring efforts. “I have enjoyed, as all do, many good times, which definitely outweighed the not-so-good times. “I will be spending my days with my wife travelling this wide, brown land. “The best of luck with your fight for improved conditions in the future.” SERGEANT PHIL BETTS APY Lands 43 years’ service Last Day: 29.07.15 Comments… “I have had a fantastic journey within SAPOL and wouldn’t have missed it for quids. “There were sad times, of course, and no sadder than burying members killed in the line of duty. There were too many of those, but they are still remembered in my heart. “There were highlights as well, and those too will be remembered. “I am one of the few who has remained a front-line uniformed patrol officer for his entire career.

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It’s what I joined the job to do and it’s what I leave the job doing. “I thank all I have had contact with in my career. “To the association and its staff, thank you for my final pension amount. It’s only in the final years that you really appreciate the work done to secure wages which, for us old fellas, has a direct effect on the rest of my retired life.” BREVET SERGEANT REX DE LAINE Forensic Services Branch 40 years’ service Last Day: 30.07.15 Comments… “I consider it a privilege to have represented so many victims from the crime scene and through the judicial process. “It was also a privilege to have worked alongside other members of the various sections within the Forensic Services Branch for the majority of my career. I will miss the banter and the black humour. “I thank the association for its efforts negotiating the members’ wages and conditions. Keep up the good work for the entire membership.” Continued…

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The Last Shift SENIOR SERGEANT BRIONY SCHRADER Human Resource Management Branch 34 years’ service Last Day: 14.08.15 Comments… “I have spent the last 20 years of my career at HRMB, working with a dedicated group of sworn and non-sworn, motivated, professional people. “It has been very rewarding, especially when I have been able to assist members with issues surrounding transfer, their conditions or other HR-related matters. “I have thoroughly enjoyed the last 34 years and will always remember my time with SAPOL. “I thank all of the past and present Police Association officials for their commitment and hard work, and for ensuring the welfare of members is their highest priority. “Thank you also to all of my colleagues and friends.”

Superintendent Tom Rieniets Metro Executive 48 years’ service Last Day: 31.07.15 Comments… “After 48 years in the job, seeing both the best and worst aspects of policing, I have no regrets and have on balance thoroughly enjoyed my time. I would certainly do it over again. “It would be remiss of me not to mention the strong support of the association to me personally, and my family, over that time, when events called for association support.

DETECTIVE CHIEF INSPECTOR JOHN SCHRADER South Coast CIB 38 years’ service Last Day: 14.08.15 Comments… “I have been fortunate to work with many great people during my career within the patrol, CIB, specialist investigation and prosecution environments. “I spent the last four years of my career as the officer-in-charge of the South Coast CIB. There I have worked with a highly motivated, professional group of people who, across the South Coast LSA, consistently provide an example of team work and mutual support at the highest level. “I have always found the job to be very rewarding, especially when I have been able to provide positive outcomes for victims of crime. “I am sure that the satisfaction derived from helping victims and others in need is what keeps many of us motivated in the job. “I thank all past and present Police Association officials for their contributions towards improving remuneration and working conditions for members and for taking a genuine interest in the welfare of police officers across the state. “Thank you to all my friends and colleagues for your support over many years.”

“I cannot over-emphasize the fact that a strong association, supporting the membership in times of need, remains the hallmark of a healthy institution. “I have had the privilege of being president of the association during a period when industrially there were some real challenges. The support of all our members at those times was excellent and really showed what can be achieved if we all pull together. “Likewise, I have had the privilege of working with some wonder ful people throughout SAPOL and I will certainly miss the camaraderie not to mention those people with whom I have worked closely.” OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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SERGEANT WAYNE PALMER Training and Officer Development 41 years’ service Last Day: 19.08.15 Comments… “I thank Mark Carroll and the association for the great work you have done so that we can enjoy the working conditions and salaries that we have today. “I also thank all those members who I have had the privilege of working with over the past 41 years.” SERGEANT JOE MENSFORTH Berri Police Station 42 years’ service Last Day: 02.08.15 Comments… “I sincerely thank all of the fine people I have worked with, especially those in the Riverland where I have spent the last 23 years. “I particularly thank all those who were part of my team for sharing all the special and interesting moments, the good times, and for making sure we had a smile on our faces at the start and at the end of the shift. I will miss the camaraderie.”

From left: Rieniets as an investigator with Crash Cars (Major Crash) in 1976; as a prosecutor in Angas St police headquarters in 1978; as OC STAR Force undertaking counter-terrorist training at Echunga in 1993; diving near Mt Gambier to recover four drowned divers from Sydney


SERGEANT JEFF ECKERT Major Fraud Investigation Section 43 years’ service Last Day: 05.08.15 Comments… “I sincerely thank the committee, staff and representatives of the Police Association (past and present) for their tireless efforts in helping to achieve better working conditions and wages for all members. “To my CIB colleagues, thank you for your camaraderie, friendship and assistance during my career. I will treasure the memories. “I am also very grateful for my wife and family who have supported me along the way.” SENIOR CONSTABLE GLENN MATTHEWS State Tactical Response Group 11 years’ service Last Day: 11.09.15 Comments… “I have been accepted into the MFS. I thank everyone I have worked with over the last 11 years, especially everyone at Salisbury patrols and State Tactical Response Group.”

DETECTIVE SERGEANT DAVID MODRA Sturt CIB 41 years’ service Last Day: 04.09.15 Comments… “I thank the executive and representatives, past and present, for the diligence and professional manner in which the association has protected and fought for its members over many years. “It was always comforting to know that the association was there to protect the rights of members and to stand up for justice for those it represented.” SERGEANT PETER SCHULZE South Coast LSA 40 years’ service Last Day: 06.08.15 Comments… “I’m proud to have worked in a job that offered camaraderie, great satisfaction and security. “I thank the people who I’ve worked with, especially those whom I leave now at South Coast LSA. “I’d urge all who remain, to learn about and understand the work that the Police Association (officials, delegates and staff) have done for more than a century now, and to value the wages and conditions which have been hard-won over that time. “Future security in our job appears threatened and the association remains a vital instrument to ensure secure and dignified employment. “I thank my whole family for their unwavering support over the many years.”

DETECTIVE BREVET SERGEANT MARK WILSON Holden Hill CIB 33 years’ service Last Day: 26.08.15 Comments… “I thank the past and present staff of the association for its work in securing good pay and working conditions for the members, and the support it provides in times of need. “I leave with great memories and the greatest of respect for the job and those who work within it.” SERGEANT DENNIS MULRONEY Emergency & Major Event Section 43 years’ service Last Day: 03.08.15 Comments… “I leave with no regrets. I will always treasure the opportunities I was given, the good times and the wonderful people. “To the members of Course 41, speedies everywhere, the members of EMES (past and present) and the wider network of emergency management practitioners across the state who accepted me as a collaborator – thank you. It has been a privilege to work with you all. “I also thank both present and past members of the Police Association for their continuing commitment to improving pay and working conditions for all sworn SAPOL members.” SERGEANT PAUL SHELDON Forensic Response Section 41 years’ service Last Day: 09.09.15 Comments… “I thank the Police Association staff, executive and delegates for all that has been achieved in improving members’ conditions over the years. “I have honestly had the pleasure of working with many wonderful people over the years. It has been an honour. “In particular, I thank everyone in the Forensic Ser vices Branch for the camaraderie and professionalism. I think we had a great time and hopefully we have had more than our fair share of successes.”

Continued… OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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The Last Shift Senior Constable Greg Daly Victor Harbor Police Station 41 years’ service Last Day: 08.09.15 Comments… “Forty-one years with SAPOL, with many good days and also many sad days and the various interesting incidents experienced. “I thank all those members I have worked with at all my postings. “I thank all Police Association staff for their hard work and dedication which has always been in the best interests of the membership. “My now late father and former senior sergeant Clive Daly served for 22 years and my wife, Paula, for seven. I’m very proud of my family’s 70-year contribution to policing.”

SENIOR CONSTABLE 1C PAUL “GROSSY” GROSS Communications Branch 44 years’ service Last Day: 31.07.15 Comments… “After working in Nuriootpa for eight years, and on city patrols for a few years, I moved to the Coroner’s Office. It later changed to the Coronial Investigation Section, where I spent the next 23 years. “I was privileged to work with and for some of the most compassionate, professional and dedicated SAPOL investigators and Courts Administration members of my career. I thank all of the coroners for their guidance, advice and friendship. “My last six years have been spent at Police Communications Branch. This has been one of the most enjoyable places I have worked. “When I first arrived I was blown away by how skilled and professional these people are. “I especially thank my team 3 colleagues for their support and the fun times we have shared in these last six years. “My special thanks to my team leader, Sgt Kath McLeod, who has managed to gently transition me into retirement. “I also thank all office bearers from the Police Association, both past and present, for the long hours and hard work which has brought about all the pay rises, working conditions and other benefits for all members. I am now fortunate enough to enjoy those benefits.” SERGEANT COL ELSON Western Adelaide LSA 43 years’ service Last Day: 16.09.15 Comments… “I appreciate the commitment of members of the association staff who have enabled police to enjoy a financially secure work life. “I particularly thank the delegates out in the suburbs who assist members on a daily basis, quite often with no accolades. “I acknowledge the assistance, support and advice provided by Mitch Manning which enabled me to be supported by Injury Management Section during the latter years of my career.” OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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DETECTIVE SERGEANT GREG RAMM South Coast CIB 38 years’ service Last Day: 16.09.15 Comments… “I have worked mostly at Christies Beach patrols and Christies Beach CIB, later called South Coast CIB. “I enjoyed the company and the good times with the people I have worked with over the years. “To all my current and past Investigation and Response team 3 members over the years I say thank you for your commitment and support.” SENIOR CONSTABLE DAN McLUSKEY Kangaroo Island 10 years’ service Last Day: 16.09.15 Comments… “I thank the association for all work done for members and hope it continues. “I also mention all of the wonderful people who work at South Coast LSA, where I spent the most of my time. I hope to keep in contact with as many as I can. “Special thanks to John Tulloch, Mike Smith, Natasha Smith, Heath Suskin, Andy Minnis and Robert Scurrah.” SERGEANT GEOFF KEYNES Freedom of Information Unit 41 years’ service Last Day: 06.10.15 Comments… “I thank members of the association executive for their tireless work in achieving so much for members over the years. “After 41 years and nine months’ service in Port Pirie, Peterborough, Elizabeth Traffic, Elizabeth CMU and the Freedom of Information Unit, it is time to retire. “I thank Senior Sergeant Tracy Gentgall and the staff of the FOI Unit. Farewell.”

For the full version of The Last Shift, go to PASAweb at www.pasa.asn.au


POLICE ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA

GOING OVERSEAS? YOUR COVERAGE MAY BE AFFECTED The group life insurance cover provided by the Police Association covers members 24 hours a day, seven days a week, regardless of the cause of death while members remain in Australia.

GOT SOMETHING TO SAY? Got a comment about a story you’ve read? Do you have strong views on a police issue? Is there someone you want to acknowledge? Know of an upcoming social or sports event? Whatever the subject, put it in a letter to the editor. Regular mail Police Journal, PO Box 6032, Halifax St, Adelaide SA 5000 Email editor@pasa.asn.au Fax (08) 8212 2002 Internal dispatch Police Journal 168

The insurer may specify certain geographical exclusions and restrictions on the coverage due to increased risk. If members travel to areas of the world considered to be at increased risk, an increased insurance premium may apply or coverage may cease entirely. Members who intend to go overseas for six months or longer, or who are travelling to or via a war zone are advised to contact the association beforehand to confirm whether or not coverage will be affected.

WORKING PART-TIME? Are you currently working part-time? Are you commencing or ceasing part-time work? If your hours change, it is important that you advise the Police Association. Your subscriptions may be affected. Please phone (08) 8112 7988 or e-mail membership@pasa.asn.au to advise of a change in hours.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS The Police Association of South Australia needs your change-­of-address details. If you have moved, in either the recent or distant past, please let the association know your new address. Its office does not receive notification of changed addresses by any other means. The association will need your new address, full name, ID number, telephone numbers (home, work and/or mobile). Members can e-mail these details to the association on pasa@pasa.asn.au or send them by letter through dispatch (168).

OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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GROUP LIFE INSURANCE BENEFICIARY NOMINATION FORMS Owing to a Supreme Court decision, the Police Association no longer uses the GLI beneficiary forms. Existing forms held at the association have been destroyed. Now, in the case of the death of a member, the GLI benefit (currently $300,000) will be paid to his or her estate. Accordingly, the association’s strong advice is that you ensure that your estate is well-administered. This is best achieved by having a valid will. Tindall Gask Bentley Lawyers provides a free legal advice service to Police Association members and their families, and retired members. To make an appointment to receive free preliminary legal advice covering all areas of law, particularly families and wills, members should contact the Police Association (08 8212 3055).


TINA-MARIE HEWKIN

Senior Constable First Class Dog Operations Unit

Playback STORY Tina & Hooch POSITION Front cover ISSUE October 20 08 THEN

ale to become the first fem had crashed through , it her to d, She was the cop who An it. Un s Op r histor y of the Dog yea 33the in ler the and ing dog-h equalit y or advanc hting issues of gender was never about highlig feminist cause. dth,” ale there or the hundre er I was the first fem ue iss ale em “I wouldn’t care wheth ered it a male-f rnal. “I’ve never consid she told the Police Jou gs…” just happy to be at Do or any thing like that. I’m on te: “Hewkin … set out tion, Brett Williams wro lert e-a siv Of her start in the sec pas t firs SAPOL’s as a handler of one of furry her new career path r days later came her fou t jus life her And in to drug-detector dogs. .” new par tner … Hooch

NOW “I had a very positive reaction to the story, mostly in relation to Hooch. But I got lots of calls and e-mails from people who weren’t aware that there was a female in the dog unit. So the story raised awareness as far as that was concerned. And a lot of girls came up to me to say that they wanted to join as well. “I hoped, first, that the story would promote the unit. And, second, that it would assure anyone who wanted to go for a position that anything was possible. I never thought I’d get in but I kept trying. I thought if the story could inspire one person to keeping pushing for their goals, they’d get there. “I had Hooch for three-and-a-half years and handed him over to a new handler in 2009. It was very hard emotionally, and I thought he wouldn’t want to work with anyone else but he was fine. Then I got my first general dog, Ella, and worked with her for five years, but she had to retire early. She got arthritis in her spine. “Three years ago, Ella tracked two guys who were breaking into cars. One of them came at me and she bit him on the leg. I rugby-tackled him to the ground but he started choking me with the tracking line. Ella bit him on the back and I was able to push him off. If it wasn’t for her I might not be here. “After Ella, I had a couple of dogs that got sick. I had Rowdy for three months but he got a food intolerance. Then I got Roxy, and I’ve been working with her since December last year, but now she’s retiring due to hip dysplasia. The new one I’ve got is Marley, who’s hopefully starting a course at the end of this month. “I certainly don’t have any regrets about joining Dog Ops. I’ve been unfortunate where I’ve had dogs that have got injured and sick, and I find it emotionally challenging when those things happen. But I’m so passionate about what I do. I absolutely love it. And, even after nine years, I’m still amazed at what the dogs can do.” To read the story Tina & Hooch, go to PASAweb at pasa.asn.au OCTOBER 2015 POLICE JOURNAL

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“Police Journal is one of the best … magazines that I have seen in a long time.” Trade, Association and Business Publications International judge’s comment

Police Journal

Winner of six international awards in the last two years Gold for Best Single Issue (Tabbie Awards, USA, 2015) Gold for Best Focus/Profile Article (Tabbie Awards, USA, 2015) Gold for Front page (International Creative Media Awards, Germany, 2014) Silver for Best Single Issue (Tabbie Awards, USA, 2014) Silver for Cover and Cover Story (International Creative Media Awards, Germany, 2014) Bronze for Opening Page or Spread (Tabbie Awards, USA, 2014)

TO ENQUIRE ABOUT PREVIOUS ISSUES, ARTICLES OR PHOTOS, contact editor BRETT WILLIAMS on (08) 8212 3055 or by e-mail (brettwilliams@pj.asn.au)


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Police Journal October 2015  

The Police Journal is published by the Police Association of South Australia every two months and distributed to members. The journal provid...

Police Journal October 2015  

The Police Journal is published by the Police Association of South Australia every two months and distributed to members. The journal provid...