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Pocono Family The Pocono Mountains' Magazines

M A G A Z I N E

• January/February 2020 •

Complimentary


LEADING SHOT Photo taken by Marlana Holsten

2 | Pocono Family Magazine January/February 2020


ST. LUKE’S GENERAL SURGERY The name you know. The surgeons you trust.

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January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 3


POCONO MAGAZINES

Pocono Magazines, LLC PUBLISHING

Pocono Living Magazine© & Pocono Family Magazine© 1929 North 5th Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 pmags@ptd.net www.poconomagazines.com PUBLISHER/EDITOR Larry R. Sebring larry@poconomagazines.com ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES Linda St. John, 570-856-8155 MAGAZINE & WEB DESIGN Smart Blonde Creative Food & Wine Editor Jamie Bowman

PHOTOGRAPHY & ART Veronica Murray Andrei Protsouk David Sandt Lisa Newberry James Chesnick Barbara Hornstra Marlana Holsten Matt Siptroth William McKee Barbara Lewis Linda Zak Nancy Tully Maritza McFaline Vinzon Lee CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Roseanne Bottone Kimberly Blaker Marty Wilson Suzanne McCool John C. Moore Jim Werkheiser

Jamie Bowman Kathy Dubin-Uhler Amy Leiser Amanda Kuhn William M. Williams Janet Mishkin

Allison Mowatt ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Kristen Sebring Linda Spalluto

PROUD MEMBERS OF

Pocono Living Magazine and Pocono Family Magazine, two regional publications filled with articles, features and photography exploring and capturing the real Pocono Mountains living experience. Our publications can be found at many locations throughout the Pocono Mountains region, and are available by subscription.

4 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020

The information published in this magazine is believed to be accurate, but in some instances, may represent opinion or judgment. The publication’s providers do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information and shall not be held liable for any loss or damage, directly or indirectly, by or from the information.© 2016 Pocono Magazines. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the expressed written permission of the publisher.


WHAT’S INSID

WHAT’S

INSIDE 10

EDUCATION 6

• Teach Kids Critical Thinking

HEALTH 10 12 14

• Keep Kids Healthy • Your Weight Loss Goals • Revamping Your Diet

FAMILY 16 18

22

• Refresh your Child's Diet • Maximizing Family Time

PET 20

• Ways to Support Shelters

OUTDOOR 22 30

• Hickory Run State Park • Skiing & Riding in the Poconos

FOOD 36

36

HOME 40 42

46

48

42

• Show Your Heart Some Love

• Decorating Tips & Trends • Warm, Cozy & Eco-Friendly

55+

• Alzheimer's & Dementia

COMMUNITY

• In & Around the Poconos

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 5


6 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020

Photo Courtesy of: Shutterstock

Photo Courtesy of: Shutterstock

Education


How to Teach Your Kids CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS & BOOKS THAT FOSTER OBJECTIVE THOUGHT By Kimberly Blaker

"Too often we give children answers to remember rather than problems to solve." - Roger Lewin Ph.D., British anthropologist and science writer Kids are inundated with information on a daily basis. So how do they learn to distinguish facts from opinion, fiction, and falsehoods? Teaching kids to think critically is the solution. Good critical thinking skills are necessary to assess information and form logical conclusions. Here are a few ways to help your child develop problem-solving skills and foster critical thinking.

Ways to Foster Critical Thinking Ask your child questions. When your kid comments on or asks a question about a situation, turn it into an opportunity. Rather than immediately providing a definitive response, ask your child open-ended questions that require thought. For example, respond with, "What would you do to solve this problem?" or "I'd like to hear what you think." Once your child answers, ask him or her (in a nonjudgemental tone) to defend their answer. "Can you tell me why you think that?" or "What led you to this conclusion?" This provides your child the opportunity to consider how they arrived at their response. The idea is for your child to discover faulty thinking and connect the dots to logical thinking.

Whether or not your kid's thinking is correct or logical, offer praise for their effort to think the answer through. Then, if your child's reasoning is faulty, gently explain what you believe and why to correct false assumptions or misconceptions.

Use play to foster critical thinking Play provides lots of learning opportunities. Encourage your kids to strategize when they play games. Have them think through their next move and also consider what their opponent might do. Building with legos or blocks provides another opportunity. Have your child consider how placing one piece will affect the placement of others and, ultimately, the look or functionality of the structure.

Take advantage of everyday tasks Real-life opportunities to problem solve are an excellent way to hone kids' critical thinking skills. When your child does chores, let your kid do it their way a few times to try to figure out an efficient way to conquer the task. If your kid hasn't figured it out after multiple tries, ask if your child can think of a faster or better way to do it. If necessary, you can offer a tip and ask how that might help.

Encourage outside-the-box thinking Kids have the innate ability to think outside the box. This is known as divergent thinking. As we grow, however, thought January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine Š | 7


Photo Courtesy of: Shutterstock

"Real-life opportunities to problem solve are an excellent way to hone kids' critical thinking skills."

becomes more convergent. A certain degree of convergent thinking is necessary, so we don't give the same weight to all possibilities. But divergent thinking is still crucial to solving problems. When a problem arises, ask your child to think of all the possible ways to solve it. Also, have your kid consider and weigh out the pros and cons of each solution to determine which is best.

Books that Teach Critical Thinking The following kids' books teach and demonstrate how to evaluate situations, examine beliefs, and understand the scientific method. Several of these books also contain activities to help kids hone their critical thinking skills.

8 | Pocono Family Magazine Š January/February 2020

Bringing UFOs Down to Earth by Philip J. Klass. Grades 4 to 7. In this fun book, kids learn fascinating facts about UFOs and how reports of sightings are investigated. Kids also learn about the rational and scientific explanations for UFO sightings and stories. How to Fake a Moon Landing: Exposing the Myths of Science Denial by Darryl Cunningham. Grades 7+. Cunningham addresses eight hotly debated science topics, including details about research and current thought on each issue. Kids also discover how information is manipulated by people on all sides to suit their views. By the end of each topic, kids are armed to draw logical conclusions. An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments by Ali Almossawi. Grades 7+. This beautifully illustrated, handy book introduces readers to multiple faulty arguments. These include ad hominem attacks, the straw man fallacy,


slippery slope arguments, and more. Throughout the book, the characters commit every possible error in reasoning, thereby providing readers clear examples of logic failures. How Come? Every Kid's Science Questions Explained by Kathy Wollard and Debra Solomon. Grades 4 to 6. Kids discover the answers to more than 200 mysteries and phenomena in this fun-filled book. They find out the secrets to why stones can skip across the water, whether they can stay drier in the rain by running or walking to shelter, among other fascinating facts. Logic to the Rescue: Adventures in Reason by Kris Langman. Grades 5 to 9. In this sword-and-sorcery fantasy story, kids learn about logical fallacies. They also learn how to test a hypothesis and set up biology, chemistry, and physics experiments. Flat Earth? Round Earth? by Theresa Martin. When a school teacher passes out clay spheres to the class to decorate, one student crushes his sphere arguing the earth is flat. This leads to a trip to the principal's office where the boy, unwilling to succumb to "common knowledge," poses several arguments. Then the narrator takes on the challenge to prove the earth is round. Through this book, kids learn the value of questioning and not taking things at face value. Philosophy for Kids: 40 Fun Questions That Help You Wonder About Everything by David White. Grades 4+. In this interactive book, kids grapple with philosophical questions discussed and debated as far back as the ancient Greeks right on through today. Philosophy for Kids is filled with fun, exciting activities that teach philosophical concepts. Horoscopes: Reality or Trickery? by Kimberly Blaker. Grades 4 to 8. In this book, kids discover the illusory tricks astrologers use to create horoscopes. Kids can do tests to determine the validity of astrology through seven fun activities and real-life experiments. Throughout the book, kids learn about the scientific process and how to make deductions as they sleuth for the truth.

How Do You Know It’s True? Discovering the Difference Between Science and Superstition by Hy Ruchlis. Grades 7 to 10. Ruchlis examines a variety of superstitions such as astrology and the unlucky number 13. In this book, kids discover the problem with the nature of superstition is that it's unobservable. They also learn the dangers of magical thinking. By the end, readers walk away with a better understanding of how science works. Sasquatches from Outer Space: Exploring the Weirdest Mysteries Ever by Tim Yule. Grades 4 to 7. Most kids are fascinated by the idea of Big Foot, the Loch Ness Monster, UFOs, and astrology. This book explores these mysteries and others. It also offers hands-on experiments kids can do to determine whether there's any truth to these tales. Nibbling on Einstein's Brain: The Good, the Bad and the Bogus in Science by Diane Swanson and Francis Blake. Grades 3 to 7. In this book, kids learn how to tell the difference between good and faulty science. The author encourages critical thinking through a combination of fascinating fictitious scenarios and real-world examples. Nibbling on Einstein's Brain includes fun activities that help kids develop critical thinking skills. The Magic Detectives: Join Them in Solving Strange Mysteries by Joe Nickell. Grades 4 to 6. Each of the thirty short stories of paranormal investigations in this book offers clues to help kids uncover the mystery. At the end of each story, kids can flip the book upside down to read the 'magic detectives' conclusions. Stories cover such paranormal claims as haunted stairways, the mummy's curse, poltergeists, and more. 

About the writer...

Kimberly Blaker is a parenting and lifestyle freelance writer. She also writes a blog, The Young Gma's Guide to Parenting at www.theyounggma.com

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine ©

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5 Tips

TO HELP KEEP KIDS HEALTHY DURING COLD & FLU SEASON

I

t's here again - that time of year when everyone seems to unwittingly pass colds and other illnesses around. As every parent knows, kids can bring germs home from school and share them with the entire family, spreading illness at warp speed. In fact, 60 million school days are missed every year by children nationwide due to preventable illnesses like cold and flu. What can you do to fight the spread of illness and help keep your kids - and you - healthier during cold and flu season this year? It's all about practicing healthy habits and making sure you have the right tools. Lysol's Here for Healthy Schools campaign is working with schools, educators and parents to help reinforce healthy practices and curb the spread of illnesses in the classroom.

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Photo courtesy of: Shutterstock

Health


As part of the program, Here for Healthy Schools spokesperson, actress and parent Sarah Michelle Gellar shared five tips for keeping your kids healthy during cold and flu season, and beyond:

Model healthy habits "Your children pay closer attention to smaller things than you'd expect," says Gellar. She advises modeling the habits you want your children to follow. Demonstrate how you use a tissue to cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze. And be sure that they see you washing your hands often, especially before eating a meal. Actions do speak louder than words, so practicing what you preach can go a long way to instilling these healthy habits in your kids.

Reinforce healthy habits with caregivers Gellar explains how important it is that caregivers and others who spend time with her children follow the same healthy habits she wants to teach her children.

Get a flu shot Gellar insists that everyone in her household get a flu shot each year, at the beginning of flu season, to help her family stay flu-free throughout the year. This also helps prevent spreading the flu to anyone else who might be vulnerable.

Keep kids home when they're sick "While we want to limit the number of days out of school for children to ensure they're thriving and growing," Gellar explains, "it's important as parents to understand when to keep them home." Because colds, flu and other illnesses are easily spread, sending children to school when they're clearly under the weather will likely lead to more children in the classroom getting sick and missing school. Following these healthy habits will help keep everyone's sick days to a minimum this year, so children can learn, grow and thrive at school. ď Ž

"I truly rely on my village to help me," says Gellar. "This means my children interact with many different people within their day-to-day activities, and inevitably come in contact with even more germs." She makes sure everyone who spends time with her children understands the vital role these healthy habits play in helping to avoid preventable illnesses.

Involve kids in preparing healthy meals

Courtesy of Brand Point

Photo co urtesy of: Shutterst

ock

"Food is so important in our family," says Gellar. "Most of our fondest memories take place in the kitchen." By making her children part of the process of planning, preparing and serving meals, she stresses, they are constantly learning not only how to eat healthy, balanced meals, but also how to create one for themselves.

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine Š

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Photo courtesy of: Getty Images

L

osing weight is a highly personal journey as a wide range of factors can affect a person's ability to do so. There's no one approach to weight loss; rather, the best approach is the one that fits your life and body best.

Get motivated to reach your weight loss goals with these expert tips. Set realistic goals. Most experts agree you shouldn't lose more than 1-2 pounds per week. More rapid loss may shock your system, and chances are you're depriving your body of important nutrients. More aggressive loss is also less likely to be permanent or sustainable; long-term results generally come with steady loss over a period of time. Eat well. Regardless what eating plan you choose, recognize the importance of nutrition in your weight loss program. Weight loss occurs when you burn more calories than you consume, so build your menu around nutrient-rich foods that fill you up. Strive for a well-balanced diet that encompasses

12 | Pocono Family Magazine Š January/February 2020

all the food groups and, if necessary, discuss your goals with a doctor or nutritionist who can help you identify the best foods to enjoy and those to avoid. Consider a supplement. If managing cravings or your appetite hinders your weight loss, a supplement may be a good solution. For example, RiduZone is a patented supplement that gives your body more of a substance it already creates called Oleoylethanolamide (OEA). In essence, OEA tells your brain you are full and it's time to stop eating. Developed and endorsed by Dr. Jay Yepuri, a board-certified gastroenterologist, the supplement is a nonstimulant that may help you feel full faster to reduce caloric intake and boost metabolism to burn stored fat. Get active. Creating a calorie deficit is necessary to lose weight, and increasing your physical activity helps ensure you're burning calories. However, getting active isn't just about playing the numbers game. Physical activity also promotes overall wellness with numerous physical and mental health benefits, including improving circulation and stimulating feel-good endorphins.


Stay committed. It's easy to fall off your weight loss plan when unexpected circumstances arise. Give yourself a little grace and permission for occasional misses so you stay motivated to get back to your program. That may mean waiting for a cold to pass and doing less strenuous workouts at home or making extra healthy choices at mealtime in advance of an indulgent event. To help make keeping your commitments easier, consider an option like RiduZone to boost your body's natural appetite-curbing power. Find more information to help jump-start your weight management program at TryRiduZone.com.



WHAT IS OEA? Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is a metabolite of oleic acid, a naturally produced substance that interacts with appetitecontrolling receptors in the small intestine to signal the brain you are full. It also helps boost metabolism. However, as a result of food choices and excess body fat, naturally produced OEA may require supplementation to achieve the desired effect on appetite or body fat. Created to mimic this naturally occurring metabolite, RiduZone is the only weight management supplement that contains OEA as an ingredient. Its production has been reviewed and is accepted as safe by the Food and Drug Administration.

Less fat A clinical study published in the "Journal of Lipid Research" shows higher blood levels of OEA, which is derived from oleic acid-rich olive oil, correlate to lower amounts of body fat. This means weight loss results may be more visible.

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Fewer calories A prominent research study published in the journal "Food & Function" shows higher circulating levels of OEA can result in a significant reduction in calorie intake. Over time, OEA users become satisfied with smaller, healthier-sized portions. 

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Courtesy of Family Features January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 13


Photo courtesy of: StatePoint

"Don’t let your busy lifestyle get in the way of ensuring you’re getting all the nutrients you need to feel your best."

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Are You Getting All Your Vitamins? REVAMPING YOUR DIET IN 2020

Getting all the vitamins and nutrients you need each day is one of the most important things you can do to feel your best. The good news is that you don’t need to devote hours each week to meal prep to ensure you’re healthfully getting essential vitamins. As you make your 2020 plans to revamp your diet, here are a few things to keep in mind:

• Don’t follow fads When it comes to your wellness, it’s best to rely on basic science, not the latest fad diets or sports drinks and supplements that rely on added sugars, fillers, preservatives, artificial flavors, sweeteners, dyes, and negatives. Look for products that transparently list all their ingredients.

• Drink your vitamins Did you know that liquids are the most bioavailable form for your body to absorb nutrients? For complete health on-thego, consider drinking your vitamins. One effective solution is Drink Nutrient, which offers single-serve stick packs that make it easy to get the essential vitamins you need. Among its offerings is Vitamin Coffee, a natural sustained energy booster made from 100 percent Colombian Arabica coffee that offers 50 percent of your daily essential vitamins in each serving. Served hot or cold, it’s a good choice for anyone who needs a caffeine boost without the crash. Or, to get 100 percent of your daily essential vitamins and 610 mg of electrolytes in one go, consider Vitamin Booster+, which contains real fruit juice, less than one gram of sugar, and is only 15 calories per serving.

• De-stress Too much stress can compromise your body’s ability to absorb nutrients. So, take steps to relax and unwind. Whether it’s through meditation, journaling, cooking or jogging -- discover what hobbies and wellness activities help you reduce your stress levels and be sure to make time for them.

• Refuel wisely If you hit the gym frequently, you likely have tried one or two sports drinks and know how important it is to refuel quickly and wisely after a workout. For optimal high performance, consider upgrading your drink of choice. With double the electrolytes of leading sports drinks, Liquid Nutrient has a potassium-to-sodium ratio intended for highquality hydration, as well as amino acids for mental focus and muscle repair.

• Maximize meals To maximize meals, make sure the bulk of the calories you consume are not “empty.” Empty calories, such as added sugars and solid fats, contain little to no nutritional value. Fill up on dark leafy vegetables, berries, nuts, seeds and good-for-you fats like avocado and salmon, while avoiding chips, cakes and other junk foods. Don’t let your busy lifestyle get in the way of ensuring you’re getting all the nutrients you need to feel your best. This new year, resolve to revamp your diet for optimal nutrition.  Courtesy of StatePoint

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 15


Family

Refresh Your Child's Diet with Low-Sugar Options

M

any families look to the new year as a time to reset their eating habits and focus on making healthier choices. However, adults aren't the only ones who could use a menu refresh as children may also need to focus on healthier food choices. A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed children consume an unhealthy amount of added sugar every day. Researchers found nearly all of the toddlers in their study ate an average of 7 teaspoons of added sugar daily - the equivalent of a candy bar. Additionally, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, excess sugar consumption can lead to an increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. "Small children have small stomachs," said Courtney Hines, a nutritionist for KinderCare Learning Centers, which care for more than 165,000 children around the country every day. "You want them to fill up on nutrient-dense foods, not empty calories in the form of added sugar. When children consume lots of sugar, their palates get used to overly sweet flavors. They may not accept other, less sugary flavors or learn to appreciate the natural sweetness of a piece of fresh fruit." The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends against the consumption of added sugar for children under the age of 2. Children ages 2-18 should aim for less than 25 grams, or 6 teaspoons, of added sugar per day.

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For families that want to cut down on the amount of added sugar in their diets, Hines recommends cooking more at home, relying less on processed, packaged foods and serving only water or milk for beverages. Consider these low-sugar ideas for meal and snack times to help control the amount of added sugar you and your family consume.

Dip Smart Herbs, spices, citrus and fresh fruit add flavor without relying on the added sugars found in many popular sauces and dips. Consider making your own low-sugar alternatives at home so your family can still enjoy favorite flavors like these:  Ranch Dressing - In a bowl, combine mayonnaise, buttermilk, parsley, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper for a kid-tested, nutritionist-approved take on a favorite dip. Serve over salad or as vegetable dip.  Honey Mustard - Popular on a variety of sandwiches and as a dip or salad dressing, combining plain yogurt with milk, honey and regular or Dijon mustard can create a more family-friendly version.  Teriyaki Sauce - Perfect for serving with healthier options like lo mein, chicken wraps or fried rice, a homemade version can be created using water, soy sauce, honey, ginger, garlic powder and cornstarch slurry.


Photo courtesy of: Shutterstock Photo Courtesy of: Family Features

Swap Out Syrup

Snack Sweet

Pancakes are a popular breakfast option at KinderCare centers and in many homes, but even the healthiest wholegrain pancake becomes a plateful of sugar if it's doused in syrup. Hines recommends these toppings that are sweet and savory without the added sugar:

Opting for less added sugar doesn't mean avoiding sweet snacks altogether. These alternatives can still help satisfy those cravings:

 Nut butter or seed butter (such as peanut, almond or sun) and banana slices  Warm fruit compote (mix of warmed berries)  Applesauce (no-sugar-added variety) and cinnamon  Nut butter swirled into plain yogurt; mix in 1-2 teaspoons vanilla extract to add a sweet flavor For more ideas to introduce your children to healthy habits from a young age, visit kindercare.com

 Applesauce with baked cinnamon pita triangles for dipping  Toast topped with nut or seed butter, smashed banana and sprinkle of cinnamon  Frozen fruit smoothies  Plain yogurt topped with granola, nuts, seeds or fruit  Apple slices with nut or seed butter Courtesy of Family Features January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine ©

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Photo courtesy of: Shutterstock

Maximizing Family Time

5 tips for spending more time with loved ones 18 | Pocono Family Magazine Š January/February 2020


Now as much as ever, close family ties can make a significant impact on young lives. Constantly emerging technology sometimes limits personal interaction, while many school-age children experience unprecedented stress levels.

You," from bestselling author Colleen Hoover, explores a tumultuous relationship between a mother and her daughter who must turn to one another when a tragedy shatters their lives. Find more information on the novel at amazon.com.

Building strong connections with trusted adults can give kids a sense of security and a better foundation for achieving their potential. Make spending time together a priority with these engaging activity ideas that allow the whole family to get in on the fun.

Cook Meals Together

Plan a Movie or Game Night Kids thrive on routines and clear expectations, so a regular special event like a movie or game night can give them something to anticipate each week. Watching TV at home may not be a novelty, but you can make it an occasion to celebrate by adding special touches like dimming the lights to mimic a theater, pulling out cozy blankets and preparing popcorn or other treats. If you opt for game night instead, keep the enthusiasm strong week after week by creating long-range tournaments or allowing kids to rotate game selection privileges.

Read Together Sharing books together not only creates an opportunity for bonding, it's a way to give your child an academic boost outside the classroom. Studies show that daily reading promotes literacy, helps kids build their vocabulary and improves overall academic achievement. Also, the benefits don't end with elementary-age children. Parents can connect with older kids through books that carry important lessons about life and relationships. Reading books individually then coming together to discuss them, similar to a book club, can provide the chance for thoughtful talks about difficult topics. For example, "Regretting

Eating together is a goal for many families, but preparing meals together takes those benefits even further. Engaging kids in meal preparation creates a sense of cooperation and instills pride for a successful project. It's also a chance to share family traditions and pass on recipes that have traveled through generations.

Enjoy a Craft Day Kids need the chance to let their imaginations soar, and arts and crafts projects can provide the perfect outlet for creative expression. An art session may be as simple as enlisting everyone's help to make decorations for an upcoming event. Another thoughtful way to channel all that creative energy: have little artists make cards to deliver to a local senior or retirement community.

Take a Trip Discovering new places is an exciting way to create shared memories. A trip need not be costly or even far from home. Even a day trip to explore a new community nearby can provide a natural setting for the whole family to connect and form lifelong memories. No matter what activity you choose, investing in time together strengthens relationships so kids can flourish with the confidence of a support system behind them. ď Ž Courtesy of Family Features


Photo courtesy of: BrandPoint

Pet

Ways to support shelter animals if you're not ready to adopt

he winter months, which are often considered some of the busiest for animal shelters, are approaching. According to the ASPCA, approximately 6.5 million companion animals enter shelters every year. Adding a shelter pet to your family can be fulfilling, but what if you're not ready or able to adopt?

T

Hartz Loving Paws is committed to supporting companion animals in shelters through product donations and volunteer events. Hartz is partnering with the Humane Society of the New Braunfels Area in Texas to share opportunities for you to give back to pets in need if you're not ready or able to adopt.

Donate money or product.

Many animal shelters and rescue organizations have direct donation links posted on their websites. Monetary donations go toward pet food, medical attention and vaccines for the animals. Animal shelters and rescue organizations also 20 | Pocono Family Magazine Š January/February 2020

often create Amazon wish lists with desired products. Shelters typically ask for pet treats, toys and grooming supplies. Sarah Hammond, executive director of the Humane Society of the New Braunfels Area in Texas, said she is grateful for donations from Hartz Loving Paws, which has given more than $2 million worth of product to shelters and organizations, including her own, since its inception in 2016.

Provide a temporary home

An increased number of animals placed in shelters need foster care before they are ready to find their forever homes. Foster needs range from post-op surgical care to puppy growth care and medical support. Food, medication and other supplies are typically provided when fostering, and the length of time a foster pet may stay in your home varies depending on the animal's needs. Contact your local shelter to fill out an application. Once approved, your local shelter will work closely with you to find the right foster pet for your household.


Volunteer at your local shelter or rescue organization

Animal shelters and rescue organizations offer numerous volunteer roles, such as dog walkers, adoption support and training support. Many positions don't require prior experience and can be applied for on your local shelter or rescue organization's website. Volunteer positions vary in expectations and demand, so there is a position for everyone. You can also volunteer to participate in a shelter rebuild project. Hartz Loving Paws renovates shelters twice a year in partnership with GreaterGood.org's Rescue Rebuild program. These teams work with shelters to create playful and welcoming environments for animals.

Take photos of adoptable pets

Help animals find homes sooner by taking adoption photos for local shelters. Many people search for adoptable pets online, and with a great profile picture, animals have a greater chance at being adopted. If you're new to photography, there are free training videos available on the One Picture Saves a Life website that show how to take better photos of shelter pets.

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Become an advocate

Follow animal shelters and rescue organizations on social media and reshare their content. Talk to your family and friends about the importance of caring for shelter pets while they await their forever homes and share how they can help. Courtesy of BrandPoint

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine Š | 21


Outdoor

22 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020


HIKES & OUTDOOR ADVENTURES WITH POCONO LIVING By Amanda Kuhn Photos courtesy of the Hickory Run State Park Facebook page

HICKORY RUN STATE PARK & BOULDER FIELD


O

ver 40 miles of hiking trails, streams full of wild brook trout, three natural park areas, and an 18-acre field of rocks known as Boulder Field - Hickory Run State Park is primed for exploration. Regardless of the season, Hickory Run State Park’s diverse habitats and unique geological formations draw visitors year-round. Whether you’re hoping to traverse the Boulder Field or cross-country ski your way through Sand Spring Trail, a trip to this impressive park will surely keep you interested. Located in Carbon County at the western foothills of the Pocono Mountains,

24 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020


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“One of the most notable features of this park is Boulder Field which was designated as a natural national landmark by the National Park Service in 1967.”

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Comprised of boulders ranging in size, the rocky terrain appears fairly level with the tops of the rocks being nearly the same height, but watch your step! While there are different explanations for how the Boulder Field was formed, most suggest that the rocks were deposited over 20,000 years ago as a result of glacial melting. Theories on how the rocks were arranged, shaped and broken down are taught by the environmental education specialists at the park and can leave you in awe of nature’s power.

are marked strictly for hiking, others are available to crosscountry skiers and snowmobilers as well. Biking, however, is prohibited on all trails at Hickory Run State Park. One of the most well-known trails is the Shades of Death Trail. Despite it’s frightful name, this rocky, 1 mile trail includes some of the park’s most majestic views. In addition to different rock formations, you’ll meander through rhododendron thickets, and the remains of old logging mills and dams that date back to the 1800s.

The vast trail system winding throughout the park includes trails that vary in length and difficulty. While some trails

With winter on it’s way, there is still plenty to do at Hickory Run State Park. Ice skating, snow-shoeing and crosscountry skiing are just a few of winter’s perks. White-tailed deer, turkey, black bear, and gray squirrels are game that

26 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020


“In addition to different rock formations, you’ll meander through rhododendron thickets, and the remains of old logging mills and dams that date back to the 1800s.

can be legally hunted with additional opportunities in the surrounding state game lands. During the warmer months visitors can fish, swim, picnic, and even enjoy some disc golf. There are also a number of hands-on activities, guided walks and presentations on the natural and historical resources given by the environmental educations specialists at the park. 

SHOP NEW. SHOP VINTAGE .

SHOP LOCAL .

It’s not just a day of shopping here in the Pocono Mountains—it’s an experience. Wander our historic streets. Explore our art galleries. Find unique local goods. And stop for a bite at one of our top-rated neighborhood restaurants along the way. Discover all of our shopping and sights now at PoconoMountains.com.

> For more information and tips on how to explore this landmark, visit the PA DCNR website. Hickory Run State Park 3613 State Route 534 White Haven, PA 18661 hickoryrunsp@pa.gov

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 27


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Multi-use Trail: Hiking, Snowmobiling 00 18

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Pocono Mountains Airport - 188 Airport Drive, Tobyhanna, PA

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HICKORY RUN STATE PARK

00

1-800-321-5890

MoyerAviation.com

16

TOP ACTIVITIES AT HICKORY RUN STATE PARK 1. Walk across Boulder Field 2. Check out the waters below Hawk Falls 3. E njoy the solitude of Stametz Dam along Shades of Death Trail 4. View the Lehigh Gorge along Fireline Trail 5. Pull a wild brook trout from Hickory Run or Mud Run 6. Cross-country ski Sand Spring Trail

*Top activities provided by the PA Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 29


SKIING AND RIDING IN THE POCONOS Courtesy Pocono Mountains Visitors Bureau 800POCONOS.COM

BIG BOULDER

8 LIFTS ~ 15 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 475’ Winter fun for everyone offering 15 slopes, 7 terrain parks, 100% snowmaking and great grooming! Snowsport Learning Center for Kids! Night skiing and riding. Snow tubing with 12 chutes, 5 lifts including a conveyor lift. P. O. Box 1539, Blakeslee, PA 18610 570-443-8425 (Snow Report and Phone Number) Web Site: jfbb.com ~ Email: info@jfbb.com

BLUE MOUNTAIN SKI AREA 12 LIFTS ~ 37 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 1082’

Ski or Ride PA’s highest vertical with 37 trails (3 new for this year including Glade skiing and a children’s learning trail)! Blue has the regions only BigAirBag (a huge air-filled pad cushions the landing for aerial maneuvers) and six and four passenger high speed lifts. Five awesome terrain parks for all abilities. 21 tubing slides. Groups welcome. 1660 Blue Mountain Dr., Palmerton, PA 18071 610-825-7700 Web Site: skibluemt.com ~ Email: information@skibluemt.com


THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE

THE MOUNTAINS FOR THE HOLIDAYS.

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Celebrate the holidays surrounded by great company and even better cuisine in the Pocono Mountains. From romantic dinners by candlelight to farm-to-table experiences, our local chefs are serving up something for every palate. Visit PoconoMountains.com to see all of our mouth-watering dining options and make your reservation.

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 31


Photos courtesy of Pixabay

CAMELBACK MOUNTAIN RESORT 15 LIFTS ~ 34 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 800’

Two high speed quads, only halfpipe in area; 100% snowmaking. 100% Night Skiing; two terrain parks. Groups welcome. Snow tubing with single and double tubes. One Camelback Road, Tannersville, PA 18372 570-629-1661 Web Site: skicamelback.com ~ Email: sales@camelback.com

32 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020


733 Main Street Stroudsburg, PA Cupcake Shop & Nostalgic Candy

JACK FROST

Exciting “How-to” Culinary Classes

Winter fun for everyone offering 30 slopes, 1 terrain park, 100% snowmaking, and great grooming! Snowsport Learning Center for Kids! One park terrain park and glade skiing and riding. Snow tubing with 5 chutes and 2 lifts. P O Box 1539, Blakeslee, PA 18610 570-443-8425 (Snow Report and Phone Number) Web Site: jfbb.com ~ Email: info@jfbb.com

www.Kitchen-Chemistry.com

Photo Courtesy of: Family Features

10 LIFTS ~ 30 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 600’

570-730-4944 ldiemer@ptd.net

SHAWNEE MOUNTAIN

11 LIFTS ~ 18 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 700’ Family and Beginner Friendly. Shawnee is also the closet ski area to Metro NYC and New Jersey. With 23 trails, New High Speed Quad, Terrain Parks and Snow Tubing, Premier Learning Center and 100% Snowmaking. Shawnee is Winter Fun. Minutes Away. 1-80, Exit 309, Shawnee On Delaware, PA 18356

William H. Clark Funeral Home, Inc. The Caring Professionals

1003 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-9000 | www.wmhclarkfuneralhome.com Gary A. Raish, Supervisor

Snow Report: 800-223-4218 Phone: 570-421-7231 Web Site: shawneemt.com ~ Email: info@shawneemt.com

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 33


SHAWNEE MOUNTAIN

11 LIFTS ~ 18 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 700’ Family and Beginner Friendly. Shawnee is also the closet ski area to Metro NYC and New Jersey. With 23 trails, New High Speed Quad, Terrain Parks and Snow Tubing, Premier Learning Center and 100% Snowmaking. Shawnee is Winter Fun. Minutes Away. 1-80, Exit 309, Shawnee On Delaware, PA 18356

Dr. William Martin

Snow Report: 800-223-4218 Phone: 570-421-7231

It’s Easier to Stay Well than to Get Well Maintain your Health through Chiropractic

1015 Congdon ave. Stroudsburg, pa 18360

570-421-2977 Adjusting to the Flow of Health

Air Tours

of the Poconos

Charter Flights Flight Training Other Air Services

Gift Certificates Available

Pocono Mountains Airport - 188 Airport Drive, Tobyhanna, PA

1-800-321-5890

MoyerAviation.com

34 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020

Photos courtesy of Pixabay

ChiropraCtiC

Web Site: shawneemt.com ~ Email: info@shawneemt.com


SKI BIG BEAR

6 LIFTS ~ 18 TRAILS ~ VERTICLE 650’ Make memories at Ski big Bear at Masthope Mountain. Offering skiing, snowboarding and tubing. On-site rental shop and lessons available. Eighteen trails, six lifts, terrain park and 100% snowmaking makes sure there is something for the whole family to enjoy. HC 1 – 1A353, 192 Karl Hope Blvd., Lackawaxen, PA 18435 570-685-1400 (Snow Report and Phone Number) Web Site: ski-bigbear.com Email: bigbear@Ltis.net January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 35


Show Your Heart Some Love 36 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020

Photo Courtesy of: Family Features

Food


While heart disease is a leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, many of the risk factors associated with the condition can be controlled with dietary and lifestyle changes. By centering your meals around better-for-you ingredients and recipes, you can show your heart some extra love. Consider walnuts, which are a hearthealthy food certified by the American Heart Association. More than 25 years of research shows walnuts may play a key role in heart health. In fact, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved one of the first qualified health claims for a whole food, finding that eating 1 1/2 ounces of walnuts per day as part of a low-saturated fat and low-cholesterol diet while not increasing caloric intake may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Additionally, walnuts are the only nut significantly high in omega-3s, with 2 1/2 grams of alpha-linolenic acid per ounce. Walnuts can add this essential nutrient to dishes like these American Heart Association Heart-Check Mark certified recipes for Greek Cucumber Walnut Bites and Banana Bread Overnight Oats. Find more information and heart-healthy recipes at walnuts.org/heart-health.

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine Š | 37


Greek Cucumber WALNUT BITES Recipe courtesy of Beth Stark, RDN, LDN on behalf of the California Walnut Board Prep time: 25 minutes Servings: 6

• 1/2 cup walnuts, chopped • 1 English cucumber, ends trimmed • • •

(about 14 ounces) 1/2 cup roasted red pepper hummus 1/2 cup reduced-fat crumbled feta cheese 5 cherry tomatoes, quartered

Heat oven to 350 F. On small baking sheet, arrange walnuts evenly. Bake 8 minutes, checking frequently, until toasted. Slice cucumber crosswise into 3/4-inch thick slices. Using small spoon, gently scoop out and discard center of each cucumber slice, leaving bottom and sides intact. In small bowl, stir 6 tablespoons chopped walnuts and hummus. Spoon walnut-hummus mixture into each cucumber slice and top with reserved chopped walnuts, feta cheese and quartered tomatoes.

38 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February September/October 2020 2019

Banana Bread OVERNIGHT OATS Recipe courtesy of Crowded Kitchen on behalf of the California Walnut Board Prep time: 15 minutes Servings: 4

• • • • • • • •

3 ripe bananas, sliced 2 cups old-fashioned oats 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla 3/4 cup chopped California walnuts, divided 1 tablespoon maple syrup 3 cups skim milk


www.farmers-basket.com

GARY’S Photo Courtesy of: Family Features

MEAT MARKET Good, Old Fashioned Quality Meats Fresh Cut Daily

Famous for Our Homemade Ring Bologna & Kielbasi. Fully Stocked Deli with Everyday Reasonable Prices!! Phone: 570-420-9764 | M-F 9am-6pm, Sat 9am-5pm 1411-B Chipperfield Dr, Stroudsburg, PA 18360

Fruit Pies, Burgers, Pot Pies, Sandwiches, Pastries, Gifts, Jams & Jellies

In large container with lid, add sliced bananas. Use potato masher or fork to mash bananas until smooth.

www.VillageFarmer.com

1/2 mile off of Rt. 80 exit 310 GPS Broad St. Delaware Water Gap 570-476-9440

m -8p m ! a ! n 8 day Ope ever ting! Sea ide s ek Cre Hot Dog & Slice of Apple Pie always $2.95! Over 30 Flavors of pies baked fresh daily No High Fructose Corn Syrup!!!

Add oats, cinnamon, salt, vanilla, half the chopped walnuts, maple syrup and milk. Combine thoroughly and refrigerate overnight. To serve, divide among four canning jars or glass containers with lids. Top each with remaining walnuts before serving.

Courtesy of Family Features January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine Š | 39


Photo Courtesy of: Pixabay

Home

decorating tips & trends: AFFORDABLE STYLISH IDEAS FOR A FRESH LOOK By Kimberly Blaker Are you tired of your dated, dull, or well-worn interior? If so, you may want to consider an update. Fortunately, there are many ways to create a new look without breaking the bank. With the following tips, you can create a fresh look by combining some of your existing furnishings with a few new or new-used pieces to achieve the atmosphere you desire.

PAINTED FURNITURE. This trend has come and

gone and come around again. That's excellent news for creating a whole new look without the expense of all new furniture. Several styles of painted furniture are currently popular, so there's something to fit every personality.

40 | Pocono Family Magazine Š January/February 2020

Painted styles include the worn look, matte finishes, and ceruse style. Colors range from the newly-popular earth tones and muted hues to bright and bold color paints

TOSS THE VERTICAL BLINDS. These lack appeal

and have gone to the wayside. The trend is for windows to add to the beauty of a room. When windows are ignored, they make a room feel dull and uninviting. Look for elegant fabrics in solids or prints that compliment the colors and styles in your room. Another popular choice is bamboo shades, which add texture.


MIX PATTERNS. At one time, this was a strict no-

no, but it's become increasingly popular. There are several tricks to make it work, though. First, use patterns of various sizes. Use a large, medium, and small pattern to bring them together without conflict. Also, use patterns in odd numbers. For example, rather than 2 or 4 different patterns, use 3 or 5. Be sure to balance the patterns throughout the room rather than cramming them all in one area.

EARTHY IS IN. Warm, earthy tones are back in this

year, and cool is out. For a larger room, you could paint it in a darker earthy shade. For smaller rooms, choose lighter warm shades of paint. White window casings and doors are also out. So consider stained wood, a color that complements the walls, or the same color as the walls.

ADD PLENTY OF TEXTURE. Modern and contemporary is the in-thing. But too much of it makes for a dull, sterile look. This problem is easy to solve by adding texture, which creates dimension and makes a room more interesting. Add tufted or fur pillows to a sofa. Also, add a few objects with a rough finish and a shag rug to a hardwood floor. Don't forget to bring in elements of nature with a couple of real plants or a stack of logs near the fireplace. AVOID MONOCHROMATIC COLOR. Rooms

with monochromatic color schemes are out, whether the colors are pale, earthy, or bold. Choose a primary color, and then accent colors that are not in the same color family as the primary.

MIX & MATCH FURNITURE. Nothing says boring

more than a living room full of matched seating and ottomans. Create contrast with complementary colors and patterns. If your sofa is solid beige, try adding a chair with a red, beige, and brown pattern.

COMBINE STYLES. Gone are the days when

everything in a room had to be of a singular style. Today, people are combining two or three of their favorite styles to create character and uniqueness. It's merely a matter of choosing the right pieces from different styles that complement each other.

MINIMAL IS MORE. The decor is essential to any

room. It adds personality and creates intrigue. But overdone can feel overwhelming and makes it difficult to notice anything. A few scattered pieces to create focal points is better.

AVOID 'FAST FURNITURE.' The era of throwing

a room together with cheap, disposable furniture is over and for obvious reasons. Opt instead for quality pieces that will last and add value to a room. If the cost of new quality furniture isn't in your budget, watch Craigslist and estatesales.net for like-new quality pieces at a fraction of the cost.

MIX METALLICS. People commonly use only gold or

only silver tones in a room. But the two combined can be very attractive.

The era of throwing a room together with cheap, disposable furniture is over and for obvious reasons. MIX TABLEWARE. This is a great way to save money

while adding interest to your table. One option is to choose one pattern for dinner plates, another for salad plates, and another for bowls that compliment each other. Alternatively, select several different place settings, each in different colors or patterns. These can be had for practically nothing at thrift stores, estate sales, or on clearance.

THE RIGHT SIZE ART FOR YOUR WALL.

When choosing artwork, it should be proportional to the size of the wall. Large pieces go on large wall spaces, and small go in small areas. Also, hang art at the right height. An average height person's head should come to the center of the art piece.

ADD HEIGHT. There are several ways to make a ceiling appear higher. First, choose a ceiling color that's light and at least a shade or two lighter than the walls. Use short furniture to make a room look taller. Finally, order extra long drapes so you can raise the curtain rod 5" to 7" above the window casing. ď Ž

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine Š | 41


Warm, Cozy and Eco-Friendly EARTH-FRIENDLY HOME IMPROVEMENTS

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

for winter...

42 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020


B

lustery winds raging outdoors may leave you struggling to find a balance between making sure your family stays warm and maintaining an earth-friendly home. Keeping your home cozy and honoring your sustainable sensibilities can actually go handin-hand. Making green upgrades to your home can add value, too. These sustainable home improvements can go a long way toward boosting your comfort, so you have an inviting oasis to linger where you're well protected from the elements.


Photos courtesy of Getty Images

"Carpet can act as an insulator and help keep a room warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer."

Carpeted Floors The sleek, clean look of wood or tile flooring is in high demand for many homeowners. However, carpet can actually provide help with climate control that goes beyond a softer, warmer surface for your bare feet to tread. Carpet can act as an insulator and help keep a room warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. If carpeted flooring isn't consistent with your style or budget, consider adding substantial area rugs to rooms that could use some extra warmth.

Energy-Efficient Heating Systems An efficient option like Mitsubishi Electric's Zoned Comfort Solutions uses energy smartly by actively heating specific areas of your home where you need it. The system monitors the conditions in each room and adjusts automatically to

44 | Pocono Family Magazine Š January/February 2020

maintain the desired temperatures. The system's ductless indoor units offer reusable, long-life, washable filters to improve your indoor air quality while minimizing impact on landfills. Plus, advanced filters on some models offer enhanced odor control to help ensure fresher air during winter months when air tends to stagnate inside due to closed windows and doors.

Ceiling Fan Adjustment You may naturally turn off your ceiling fans when winter arrives, but the same fans that provide refreshing cool air in the summer can actually help keep your room warm, too. Simply switching the fans to run clockwise helps draw warm air upward and distribute it throughout the home. This little circulation-boosting move can reduce your energy bill by as much as 10%.


Tankless Water Heaters Make leaving the warmth of your bed each morning more appealing with the assurance of a steaming hot shower that doesn't needlessly burden the environment. Traditional water heaters run a continuous power cycle to maintain a tank full of hot water, regardless if you're using it or not. However, a tankless version heats what you need when you need it. It's important to ensure your tankless unit is sized with the proper gallons-perminute rating to handle demand for multiple simultaneous uses, like a load of laundry and a shower at the same time.

Smart Controls The wide range of smart-enabled home products, appliances and entertainment devices make life more convenient and enjoyable, but they can also play a role in managing your environmental footprint. Helpful tools, like Mitsubishi Electric's kumo cloud mobile app, ensure you're not wasting energy to perform functions when you're not even home. These programs allow you to schedule your daily routines and even make adjustments remotely when your day gets off track. For example, it allows you to program and adjust your heating and cooling system from a smartphone or tablet so you won't come home to a house that's freezing cold.

Better Lighting Winter isn't just cold; it's often dark and dreary, too. That means you're more likely to rely on energy to illuminate

your home, especially since an alternative like throwing open the curtains to let in natural light can have the unintended consequence of allowing cold air to seep in. You can curb your energy reliance and the impact on your energy bills by swapping out your bulbs for light emitting diode lights, compact fluorescent lamps or energy-saving LED lights, which can reduce your energy needs by up to 80%. Find more tips for heating your home at mitsubishicomfort.com.

Use Zones to Reduce Energy Heating your home zone-by-zone can be much more energy efficient and serve as a better means of maintaining your home's temperature and comfort level. Consider these benefits: • A zoned system allows you to control each area in your home independently and even turn off ones that are not in use. This means you're only using energy where you need it. • Conventional HVAC systems are either on or off. An option like Mitsubishi Electric's Zoned Comfort Solutions compressors ramp up or down based on the needs of each room to maintain comfort and conserve energy.  Courtesy of Family Features January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 45


Alzheimer’s and Dementia:

Photo courtesy of: Alzheimer's Association

55+

The 10 Warning Signs You Need to Know Recognizing and taking steps to address the warning signs of Alzheimer’s and other dementias can be extremely challenging -- especially in the early stages. It’s easy and common to dismiss cognitive changes in oneself or a family member as “normal aging.”

To help families identify signs early on, the Alzheimer’s Association offers 10 Warning Signs and Symptoms, a list of some common signs that can be early symptoms of Alzheimer’s or other dementias:

“Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging,” says Dr. Keith Fargo, director, scientific programs and outreach at the Alzheimer’s Association. “With normal aging, you may forget where you parked your car -- that happens to all of us. But if you get in your car and get lost coming home -- that’s not normal.”

1. Disruptive memory loss.

Alzheimer’s is a fatal progressive disease that attacks the brain, killing nerve cells and tissue, affecting an individual’s ability to remember, think, plan and ultimately function. Today, more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. By 2050, that number is projected to skyrocket to nearly 14 million. 46 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020

Forgetting recently learned information, asking the same questions over and over and increasingly relying on memory aids.

2. Challenges in solving problems.

Changes in one’s ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers, such as having trouble following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills.

3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks. Difficulty completing daily tasks, such as organizing a grocery list or remembering the rules of a favorite game.


4. Confusion with time or place.

Losing track of dates, seasons and the passage of time.

5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships.

Vision problems, which may lead to difficulty with balance or trouble reading.

6. New problems with words in speaking or writing.

Trouble following or joining a conversation or a struggle with vocabulary. For example, calling a “watch” a “handclock.”

7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps.

Putting things in unusual places and being unable to go back over one’s steps to find them again.

QualityCare 40 Providing

for over

years.

8. Decreased or poor judgment.

Changes in judgment or decision-making when dealing with such matters as money and grooming.

9. Withdrawal from work or social activities.

Changes in the ability to hold or follow a conversation can result in a withdrawal from hobbies or social activities.

10. Changes in mood and personality.

Mood and personality changes, such as confusion, suspicion, depression, fearfulness and anxiety.

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To learn more about Alzheimer’s disease and to find resources, visit alz.org, the website of the Alzheimer’s Association or call its 24/7, free Helpline at 800.272.3900. It’s important to note that exhibiting one or more of these 10 warning signs does not mean someone has Alzheimer’s. In fact, these signs may signal other -- even treatable -conditions. However, it’s important to talk to your doctor to understand what is driving cognitive changes so you can better manage the condition -- whatever the diagnosis.  Courtesy of StatePoint

6683 Route 191 in the heart of Mountainhome, PA • Alzheimer’s & Dementia Memory Cafe - New Program • Music Therapy for People living with Dementia Call for • Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group ails!

det These FREE programs are offered in partnership with: Pocono Mountains Community Fundraiser 570.481.4330 • www.thefriendlycommunitycenter.org

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 47


Photo courtesy of Pixabay

Community

In & Around the Poconos A Tribute to George Gershwin January 3 - January 5 the Shawnee Playhouse

Rebel Stages presents... A musical revue in tribute to the legendary George Gershwin. Featuring Gershwin’s “I’ve got Rhythm,” “Summertime”, and “Fascinating Rhythm” this is sure to be a toe tapping tribute when Broadway meets Gershwin. theshawneeplayhouse.com

Opening Artist Reception: Featuring artwork by Pocono Photo Club Thursday, January 9 – 5:00pm - 7:00pm Brodhead Creek Heritage Center

Pocono Heritage Land Trust is a proud recipient of a public arts grantawarded by PA Council on the Arts and Pocono Arts Council.

48 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020

Join us as we celebrate the completion of our grant project, a gallery in Brodhead Creek Heritage Center,

creating space for local artists and the community to enjoy nature themed artwork.

A collection of Pocono Photo Club members photography

will beautifully adorn the walls of Brodhead Creek Heritage Center, kicking off a quarterly rotating exhibit.

Light snacks and refreshments will be provided. www.phlt.org/events

Sherman Winter Craftfest

Saturday & Sunday, January 18 & 19 - 11am - 4pm Sherman Theater

The Sherman Theater is bringing back the Winter Craftfest, over two days in January! The theater will be entirely flat floored with over 70 plus craft vendor spaces and FREE

admission! See website for details. shermantheater.com.


Shawnee General Store Eagle Watch

Sunday, January 19 – 9:00am-3:00pm PEEC

Since 1859

In the heart of Shawnee on the Delaware! (570) 421-0956 542 River Road, Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA

$20

Join us on a trip north in search of eagles and other rare wintering birds. Visit the Mongaup Reservoir, the Delaware River, & the Delaware Highlands

Conservancy to look for winter residents and nesting pairs. Bring a lunch, camera & warm clothes. Call to reserve a seat in the van – Maximum of 18 spaces. www.peec.org

2020 Student Exhibition: Artists’ Reception

Friday, January 24 - 5:00-7:00pm Pocono Arts Council

Monroe County Students, Grades K-12

Exhibition: 10am – 5pm Weekdays/Weekends by appointment through February 28

The

Reception: Friday, January 24, 5-7 pm

AGENCY

Drop-Off: Tuesday, January 21, Noon-6pm (Awards Presentation, 6 pm)

Pick-Up: Tuesday, March 3 or Wednesday, March 4, between 2-6pm

Cross Country Skiing

Saturday, January 25 – 9:00am-12:00pm PEEC

$20 adult / $10 child

Because the world keeps turning Insurance since 1942

Serving the Poconos for over 70 years CHOOSE DREHER BECAUSE WE CARE! BUSINESS & PERSONAL INSURANCE Theodore G. Butz, CPCU

551 Main Street, Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-421-6141

www.dreherinsurance.com

Enjoy the winter woods with beginner ski lessons.

Learn the basics of cross country skiing and practice

on our campus. Skis, poles & boots provided - register

733 Main Street Stroudsburg, PA

w/shoe size to guarantee a spot. Mad Science will be

an alternative program in the event of no snow only on January 18th date. *Lead support is provided by the William Penn Foundation.* www.peec.org

Cupcake Shop & Nostalgic Candy

Exciting “How-to” Culinary Classes

570-730-4944 ldiemer@ptd.net www.Kitchen-Chemistry.com

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 49 March/April 2019


PEEC into the Kitchen

Saturday, January 25 – 1:00-3:00pm PEEC $10

PEEC in the Kitchen is a new cooking class series that

will offer participants a peek into the PEEC Dining Hall’s

Kitchen for a fun and creative cooking experience with Chef Erin Taylor. Participants will learn basic kitchen skills, tips and tricks of the trade, and make easy, delicious, family

friendly meals to satisfy the gourmet culinarian, pickiest eaters, or even strictest dietary concerns. Each class will

Stroud Television & Appliances

include an informational hands-on cooking demonstration,

recipes for participants to take with them, and a family style meal of the items prepared in class. www.peec.org

219 N. 9th Street Stroudsburg, PA

Pocono Winter Wine & Food Festival January 26 - 12:00pm - 4:00pm

570-421-7700

The Sherman Theater

www.StroudTVandAppliances.com

$40/person

The Pocono Winter Wine & Food Festival returns to the

P&S GARAGE Servicing the Poconos since 1975

Scott Dreisbach owner

570-223-8874

9080 Franklin Hill Road East Stroudsburg, Pa www.psgaragepa.com

Sherman Theater this January! The Festival is designed to introduce attendees to a wide variety of local wines produced in and around the Pocono region. The event

includes complimentary samples of local wine and fine

cuisine from featured area restaurants, wine-related vendors and other artisan crafts, mini paint-n-sip classes, and

more. The primary purpose of the event is to raise money for the non-profit Sherman Theater, to help preserve and

enrich arts in the Poconos by providing a variety of shows from international acts to community theater to the newly developed Kids’ Series. In addition to complimentary

samples of wine and food, all attendees receive a souvenir wine-tasting glass. shermantheater.com

Intro to Snowshoeing

Sunday, January 26 – 10:00am-12:00pm PEEC

$10 adult/ $5 child Learn the basics of snowshoeing and enjoy a winter walk

through the woods. No experience necessary – we provide 50 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020

the equipment and teach you everything you need to know.


Register early to reserve a pair of snowshoes & guarantee

a spot. Winter Ecology Hike will be an alternative program in the event of no snow only on January 19th date. *Lead

support is provided by the William Penn Foundation.* www. peec.org

Mad Science

Sunday, January 26 – 1:00-3:00pm PEEC

Put on your lab coats and prepare to conduct some crazy experiments! We’ll get to create your very own slime,

oobleck, and attempt to launch a rocket into space. All ages welcome. www.peec.org

Death of a Salesman

Schisler Museum of Wildlife & Natural History

McMunn Planetarium East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania

February 14 - February 23 The Shawnee Playhouse

post-World War II optimism. An American classic that

Wildlife exhibits and planetarium shows for explorers of all ages!

Fluid Acrylics Pour & Sip Fundraiser

Hoeffner Science & Technology Center

Rebel Stages presents... Arthur Miller’s Death of a

Salesman, is about the death of the American dream after resonates with today’s audiences. theshawneeplayhouse.com

Led by local artist and PHLT board member, Elaine Madere

Friday, February 21 – 5:45 - 9:00pm Brodhead Creek Heritage Center

You will learn 3 different techniques for pouring fluid

Normal Street & Ransberry Avenue East Stroudsburg, PA 18301

570.422.2705

esu.edu/museum

acrylic paint to create beautiful, unique works of art. Elaine

will guide you step by step through the preparation of paints and the pouring of the paint onto canvases. You will leave

with 3 completed canvases and a decorative tray poured in colors of your choice. Absolutely no prior art experience required.

Cost is $40 with a portion of proceeds benefiting the Pocono Heritage Land Trust. The price includes all that is needed to

complete four projects, artist instruction, a glass of wine and light refreshments. Registration is required to attend. Please

mullins i n s u r a n c e

570-421-6400 AUTO - HOME - LIFE BUSINESS - BONDS 811 Monroe Street Stroudsburg, PA 18360

Serving the Pocono Mountains for over 50 Years We specialize in finding the ideal combination of policies and companies to meet your needs at the best price.

www.MullinsInsurancePa.com

register by calling 570-424-1514 or visit phlt.org/events.

January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine © | 51


PARTING SHOT Photo taken by Jude Porter


January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine Š | 53


Theatre Year Round in the Poconos

SHAWNEE ON THE DELAWARE, PA

• A Tribute to George Gershwin Jan 3 - Jan 5, 2020 Rebel Stages presents... A musical revue in tribute to the legendary George Gershwin. Featuring Gershwin’s “I’ve got Rhythm,” “Summertime”, and “Fascinating Rhythm” this is sure to be a toe tapping tribute when Broadway meets Gershwin.

• Death of a Salesman Feb 14, 2020 - Feb 23, 2020 Rebel Stages presents... Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman, is about the death of the American dream after post-World War II optimism. An American classic that resonates with today’s audiences.

(570) 421-5093 www.theshawneeplayhouse.com

Pocono Art & Design The Pocono’s best artists & designers helping you build your business!

• Logos • Business Cards • Print Ads • Brochures • Websites • & More New Business Starter Kits from $495 Business Growth Kits from $695 Credit Terms Available

Barrett Paradise Friendly Library Cresco, PA 570-595-7171 www.barrettlibrary.org

Pocono Mountain Public Library Tobyhanna, PA 570-894-8860 www.poconomountpl.org

Clymer Library Pocono Pines, PA 570-646-0826 www.clymerlibrary.org

Western Pocono Community Library Brodheadsville, PA 570-992-7934 www.wpcl.lib.pa.us

Eastern Monroe Public Library Branches Hughes Library (main branch) Stroudsburg, PA 570-421-0800 www.monroepl.org Pocono Township Branch Tannersville, PA 570-629-5858 Smithfield Branch Marshalls Creek, PA 570-223-1881 Bookmobile 570-421-0880 x49

54 | Pocono Family Magazine © January/February 2020

You know your business better than anyone else... we know how to market it! 1929 North Fifth Street,  Stroudsburg, PA 18360 570-424-1000 Visa / Mastercard


January/February 2020 Pocono Family Magazine Š | 55


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Profile for LARRY SEBRING

Pocono Family Magazine January/February 2020  

Pocono Family Magazine January/February 2020