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Style Religion meets cinema Film school tackles issues Orthodox face

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net november 17, 2011 HESHVAN 20, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 27

Pittsburgh, PA

Behind Bibi’s words

$1.50

Hazon brings 2012 bike trek to Pittsburgh BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

The last time Nigel Savage led a peloton of long-distance cyclists into Pittsburgh, he received a welcome he’s never forgotten. “We had riders of different denominations who spoke in different shuls over that Shabbat,” he recalled. “And Karen [Shapira, then-chair of the United Jewish Federation] hosted an event that brought together a whole group of people to meet the riders and vice versa. Is it any wonder Savage will bring another peloton back here next year? “We are very excited to come through Pittsburgh this summer,” he said Savage is the founder of Hazon, considered the largest Jewish environmental organization in America, and the Official White House photo by Samantha Appleton, via Creative Commons

Please see Bike trek, page 15.

A derogatory exchange about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu between French President Nicolas Sarkozy, left, and President Obama, shown here during the U.N. General Assembly in New York, has sparked debate.

Israeli PM has his defenders, detractors BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

After disparaging Benjamin Netanyahu in what they thought was a private conversation, President Barak Obama and French President Nicolas Sarkozy have been widely criticized, and their allegiance to Israel has been challenged. “I cannot bear Netanyahu; he’s a liar,” Sarkozy reportedly told Obama at the recent G-20 summit at Cannes on Nov. 3. Obama replied: “You’re fed up with him, but I have to deal with him even more often than you,” according to wire service reports. But although this exchange caused embarrassment to both Sarkozy and

Obama, they are not the only world leaders who have questioned Netanyahu’s honesty. “I don’t believe a word he says,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel reportedly said recently, in a private conversation, according to Haaretz. Netanyahu’s truthfulness has been at issue on several occasions since he became a public figure, and the Israeli prime minister even has been caught on tape admitting his own duplicity. For example, in a video taped in 2001, and released in July 2010, Netanyahu admits that he deceived President Bill Clinton into believing he was helping implement the Oslo peace process, according to the Washington Post. Speaking to a group of West Bank set-

tlers, Netanyahu, who did not hold public office at the time, said: “They [Americans] asked me before the election if I’d honor [the Oslo accords]. I said I would, but ... I’m going to interpret the accords in such a way that would allow me to put an end to this galloping forward to the ’67 borders. How did we do it? Nobody said what defined military zones were. Defined military zones are security zones; as far as I’m concerned, the entire Jordan Valley is a defined military zone. Go argue.” “I know what America is,” Netanyahu said in Hebrew, apparently not knowing his words were being recorded. “America is a thing you can move very easily, Please see Netanyahu, page 19.

Sarna opens series

Jonathan Sarna, professor of American Jewish history at Brandeis University, outlined challenges facing American Jews. See story, page 9.

B USINES S 14/C L AS SIFIED 17/O BITUARIES 18/C OMMUNITY 13 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 16/S IMCHAS 12/S TYLE 10

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 4:43 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 5:43 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

NOVEMBER 17, 2011

Metro Satloff speaks

Author, activist rediscovers the history of righteous Arabs BY RON KAPLAN Chronicle Correspondent

Given the tensions today between Arabs and Jews, it’s easy to ignore that Arabs in North Africa befriended, assisted and protected Jews during the fascist occupation of North Africa during World War II. This is the premise of Robert Satloff’s book “Among The Righteous: Lost Stories From The Holocaust’s Long Reach Into Arab Lands.” Satloff spoke at an event sponsored by the Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, Wednesday, Nov. 9, at the Jewish Community Center in Squirrel Hill. Satloff’s research on Arabs who saved

70 years ago, he said, is “essential to understanding the headlines in the Middle East today.” Satloff’s interest in the righteous Arabs stems from his attempt to understand the cultural divide between Arab the world and the West. He noted that the greatest divide between the two is over the history of the Holocaust. “I asked myself … is there something

to bridge the division about the understanding of the Holocaust,” Satloff said. He noted that Arabs’ perspective on the Holocaust is complicated and that the most troubling response is not one of denial. “Far deeper is the problem of relativity,” Satloff said. According to him, the relativists’ argument is “it happens [the deaths of Please see Activist, page 15.

Correction

Israeli diplomat, Ishmael Khaldi, was pictured in a front page story in the Nov. 10 Chronicle about the incident. He was misidentified in the caption beneath his photo.

“If even one, two, 10 people [get the message], that’s a step in the right direction.”

Robert Satloff

Jews in North Africa during World War II is especially topical for the Arab world, which today is largely ignorant of the Holocaust or tries to minimize or deny it outright. How Arabs behaved in North Africa

Julio Pino, a Kent State University professor who disrupted a speech on that eastern Ohio campus by a former


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly

1. It’s our Centennial! 2. No one does Israel like the Jewish F deration 3. June is the perfect time to be in Israel 4. You can t ke the whole family 5. It’s where Jewish history began 6. Exotic J rusalem 7. Bustling, modern Jerusalem 8. You may never get the Mexican War Streets. The program is a celebration of the a other chance like this 9. Choose what you want to do 10. 10th anniversary of the Rodef Shalom Archives, and will pay tribute to its S ecial plans for first-timers to Israel 11. The Gorgeous Galilee archivist, Martha Berg. 1 Activities for culinary aficionados 13. You can travel with old Scientist Arnie Gotfryd, spon- f ends 14. You’ll make new friends 15. Shabbat at the Western sored by Chabad of CMU, will speak to all 16. Amazing museums 17. You’ll see how your donation is Carnegie Mellon University students, Friday, Nov. 18, on “The Conscious Uni-c anging lives 18. Accommodations for every budget 19. Shop verse — Where Science and Faith Meet,” and Saturday night on “Genesis p g on Ben Yehuda Street 20. Special activities for families 21. and the Big Bang — a Look at Cosmoloou’ll be welcomed into our sister communities, Karmiel and gy and the Age of the Universe.” Gotfryd is a writer, educator and lecturer M sgav 22. You deserve a trip like this! 23. Masada 24. Activities who looks at both secular and religious perspectives. In 1985, he earned Cana- f cusing on the arts & architecture 25. We take care of all your da’s first doctorate in applied ecology n eds on a mission 26. Israel will change you forever 27. Cosmo and served as a researcher and lecturer at the University of Toronto, winning p itan Tel Aviv 28. Special adventure & sports activities 29. You’ll academic awards. b nd with the family 30. Floating in The Dead Sea 31. You’re The speeches are open to CMU students only. p ssionate about politics 32. All that history 33. Israel feels like Visit chabadofcmu.com or contact rabbi@chabadofcmu.com for more in- h me 34. Discounts for families 35. You’ll meet fascinating Israelis formation. a d hear their stories 36. Your friends are going 37. Explore Israeli Temple David’s holiday shopping c sine 38. Mystical Tzfat, home of the 16th century Kabbalists bazaar will be held Sunday, Nov. 20, 3 Check out Xtreme Israel 40. Climb rocks, jump from bungees, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 4415 Northern a d shoot the rapids 41. Bike the Partnership 2000 bike trail 42. Pike in Monroeville. Please see Briefly, page 5. S omp grapes at Galilee wineries 43. Walk through Herod’s a cient city 44. The Dead Sea Scrolls 45. From generation to g neration 46. Celebrate Havdalah in the Old City 47. The Chag l Windows at Hadassah Hospital 48. “Dig Israel” in an archeo l ical dig 49. Insider tours of the Knesset and Israel Museum 5 Hike down Masada in the dark 1. It’s our Centennial! 2. No o e does Israel this like the Jewishof Federation 3. June is the perfect During season being grateful, think t e toabout be in Israel 4. You can take the whole family 5. It’s where another country's creation – over J wish history began 6. Exotic Jerusalem 7. Bustling, modern 2,000 ago. we all like need J rusalem 8. years You may neverSometimes get another chance thisa 9. reminder of what inplans our hearts. C oose what you want to dowe 10.know Special for first-timers to I ael 11. The Gorgeous Galilee 12. Activities for culinary aficiona d s 13. You can travel with old friends 14. You’ll make new friends Israel feels like home. 1 Shabbat at the Western Wall 16. Amazing museums 17. You’ll s e how your donation is changing lives 18. Accommodations for e ery budget 19. Shopping Yehuda There are hundredson ofBen reasons to Street go on20. theSpecial a tivities for families 21. You’ll be welcomed into our sister com Jewish Federation Centennial Mega munities, Karmieltoand Misgav You deserve a trip like this! 23. Mission Israel next22. summer. Masada 24. Activities focusing on the arts & architecture 25. W t ke care of all your needs on a mission 26. Israel will change you ever 27. Cosmopolitan Tel Aviv 28. Special adventure & sports Mega Mission to Israel a tivities Centennial 29. You’ll bond with the family 30. Floating in The Dead S a 31. You’re passionate about politics 32. All that history 33. June 19-28, 2012 I ael feels like home 34. Discounts for families 35. You’ll meet AnIsraelis Adventure f cinating and hear100 theirYears stories in 36.the YourMaking friends are going 3 Explore Israeli cuisine 38. Mystical Tzfat, home of the 16th Learn more at c ntury Kabbalists 39. Check out Xtreme Israel 40. Climb rocks, www.JewishFederationPittsburgh.org j mp from bungees, and shoot the rapids 41. Bike the Partnership or contact Becca Hurowitz at 2 00 bike trail 42. Stomp grapes at Galilee wineries 43. Walk bhurowitz@JFedPgh.org or 412.992.5225 ough Herod’s ancient city 44. The Dead Sea Scrolls 45. From g neration to generation 46. Celebrate Havdalah in the Old City 4 The Chagall Windows at Hadassah Hospital 48. “Dig Israel” in a archeological dig 49. Insider tours of the Knesset and Israel Museum 50. Hike down Masada in the dark 1. It’s our Centennial! 2 No one does Israel like the Jewish Federation 3. June is the p rfect time to be in Israel 4. You can take the whole family 5. It’ w ere Jewish history began 6. Exotic Jerusalem 7. Bustling,

Reason #33:

Israel feels like home

Diane Samuels, a Pittsburgh artist who incorporates Jewish archival material into her work, will speak at Rodef Shalom Congregation, Thursday, Nov. 17, 7 p.m. on the subject, “An Artist in the Archives.” Samuels has had solo exhibitions at the Carnegie Museum of Art; Mattress Factory Museum in the Mexican War Streets; Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Book Arts and the Kim Foster Gallery in New York; the Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; the Municipal Museum of Art in Gyor, Hungary; the Synagogue Center in Trnava, Slovakia; and the Bernheimer Realschule in Buttenhausen, Germany. Perhaps her best-known work is “Luminous Manuscript,” a multilayered mosaic sculpture, designed in the form of a page of Talmud, which is on permanent display at the Center for Jewish History in New York. She maintains a studio at her home in


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011

METRO Time to ‘align’

L.A. rabbi asks Pittsburgh entrepreneurs to reflect on inner life BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

The entrepreneurs had some work to do. Nevertheless, these high-powered men and women, these movers and shakers of the Pittsburgh business community, put away their BlackBerrys and laptops for this day’s task: earnest self-reflection. About 100 members of the University of Pittsburgh Institute for Entrepreneurial Excellence sat quietly in a banquet room in the Duquesne Club Tuesday morning, working on their ethical wills, memorializing for their children and grandchildren the values they wished to bequeath. The exercise was part of a seminar led by Rabbi Steven Z. Leder, senior rabbi at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple in Los Angeles, and the author of “More Money than God: Living a Rich Life Without Losing Your Soul.” A person can be good at a lot of things, Leder said, but he can only be great at one. It is consciously deciding which role in life is most important — and then acting on that choice — that should provide the framework for one’s life, he told the group at his presentation, which was titled, “Time is Money … But Also a Whole Lot More.” In Western culture, people are constantly bombarded by the message that material acquisition equates to success, causing children to be at risk of

Rabbi Steven Z. Leder

“The main problem is that the message that is raining down on our kids of what it means to be successful and truly rich is so perverse, and so corrosive.” learning the wrong values, Leder said. “The main problem is that the message that is raining down on our kids of what it means to be successful and truly rich is so perverse, and so corrosive,” Leder said. “And there is nothing in popular culture to indicate any-

thing to the contrary. That’s why we need parents and grandparents and the synagogues and the churches to weigh in.” “I’m not here to disparage the power of work and the importance of money,” Leder said. “But money should just be a vehicle to express more important values. When you start to believe that your outer life is a reflection of your inner life, you’ve corrupted your soul.” The Institute for Entrepreneurial Excellence presents six to nine lectures a year, according to Ann Dugan, its founder and director. She said Leder’s message was an ideal way to end the year for her group. “Entrepreneurs and business leaders are constantly overwhelmed,” Dugan said. “There is all this stuff they are responsible for, and who they neglect is themselves. I try to end the year by getting them to think a little bit about themselves and their families.” Dugan heard Leder speak at a program in Philadelphia two and half years ago, and knew she had to bring him and his message to Pittsburgh. “His approach really woke me up,” she said. “He takes the business leader to a different place. You have to ask yourself, ‘Why am I working so hard? Why am I building this business?’ You have to look inward.” At the heart of Leder’s program was its interactive component, where each audience member began to prepare an ethical will. “Most people have material wills, but almost no one has an ethical will,” Leder said. “In an ethical will, people bequeath the values they want to leave to their children and grandchildren.” A few of the attendees shared what they wrote with the group, some choking up as they read out loud their hopes and ethical directives to their

offspring. After the creation of the ethical wills, Leder asked the group to think about “alignment.” “In 25 years of being on the inside of other people’s lives, as all clergy are, I have found that the people who are least happy and who get into the most trouble are the people who lack alignment,” Leder said. “Those are the people who profess one set of values, but live by another. The happiest people, the wholest people, are the people who write something like you did, and live their lives in alignment with those values. Those are the richest people.” A graduate of Northwestern University, Leder studied at Trinity College, Oxford, before receiving his master’s degree in Hebrew letters from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati in 1986. He was ordained in 1987. In addition to his work at Wilshire Boulevard Temple, he teaches homiletics at HUC-JIR in Los Angeles, and has written essays for Reform Judaism and the Los Angeles Times. His first book, “The Extraordinary Nature of Ordinary Things,” received national acclaim and brought him appearances on ABC’s “Politically Incorrect” and NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Leder’s aim is to “help people step outside themselves and see the imbalance they live with everyday,” he told the Chronicle. “One of my favorite sayings, attributable to Marshall McLuhan, is: ‘I don’t know who discovered water, but it certainly wasn’t the fish,’ ” he said.

(Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. There will be aisles of crafts, chocolates, clothing, gourmet food, home decorations, jewelry, makeup, purses, skin products toys and more. Contact Lisa Chotiner at lisac@templedavid.org for more information. The Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh is offering its best pre-early bird rates for James and Rachel Levinson Day Camp through Dec. 6. J&R, for children age 3 to grade five, is held at the JCC’s 100-acre Henry Kaufmann Family Park in Monroeville. Campers enjoy full use of the facilities, which include an Olympic-size swimming pool, zero-entry pool with mushroom spray, challenge ropes course, miniature golf course, playground, tennis courts, softball and soccer fields, and wooded hiking trails and shelters. J&R Session One will be held from June 18 to July 13. New this year: Session Two, from July 16 to Aug. 17, will be five weeks. During Session Two, campers can attend by the week and children in grades two to five choose traditional J&R style or try one-week Specialty Camps. Families who sign up during this period will be able to change sessions and/or add weeks at the early bird rate until April 1. Early signup also allows a longer period for payment plans. Registration must be for a minimum of four weeks to receive the pre-early bird discount through April 1. Conact Liza Baron, camp director, at (412) 521-8011 Ext. 241 or at lbaron@jccpgh.org for more information. State Rep. Matt Smith is hosting a free seminar entitled “Avoiding Senior Fraud,” Friday, Nov. 18, 1 p.m., at the South Hills Jewish Community Center, 345 Kane Blvd. This event is geared toward older adults, soon to be older adults, their families. Topics will include identity theft, Internet and credit card scams. Representatives from the Scott Township Police Department will be on hand to give tips to attendees. Call Smith’s office at (412) 571-2169 to register. Refreshments will be served.

The Children’s Institute of Pittsburgh in Squirrel Hill will stage an alternative to the traditional downtown lighting celebration Friday, Nov. 18 — a free, family-oriented event with no parking hassles. “Bright Spot on Shady,” as the occasion will be called, will run from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at The Children’s Institute, 1405 Shady Ave., and will celebrate the founding of the facility — a part of Squirrel Hill since 1902. The setting is The Children’s Institute’s new Nimick Family Therapeutic Garden, a 10,000-square-foot, year-round oasis that opened this past June to help kids with disabilities heal and learn, and to give parents a place to refresh their spirits. The garden features an accessible tree house, an interactive fountain, planting beds and whimsical and entertaining sculptures. The whole area will be decked out with spectacular lighting to inaugurate the holiday season. Jugglers, magicians, face painters and musicians will be on hand. A jazz band from the Hillman Center for the Performing Arts at Shady Side Academy will play at 5:30 p.m., Kelsey Friday and the Rest of the Week will play children’s and alternative music at 6:15, and singer-songwriter Bill Deasy will perform at 7:30. Light refreshments will be available at no charge. Congregation Dor Hadash adult education will hold a session on “Reconstructionism and Social Glue,” Sunday, Nov. 20, from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Professor Lisa Brush, of the department of sociology at the University of Pittsburgh, will trace the origins of Mordecai Kaplan’s thinking about Judaism as a civilization. Professor Bruce Ledewitz, of Duquesne University School of Law, will hold a session on “Church, State, and the Crisis in American Secularism,” Wednesday, Nov. 30, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. and will also discuss his recently published book. Contact Leslie at admin@dorhadash.net or (412) 422-5158 to register. All sessions are held at the Tree of Life building, Shady and Wilkins avenues. Sessions are free and open to the community.

The Organizations Directory will be running in December Mail, fax or e-mail changes to: The Jewish Chronicle 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Flr. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Attn: Josh fax: (412) 521-0154 e-mail: joshr@thejewishchronicle.net


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle

Opinion

David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Frank David Grubman Carolyn Hess Abraham Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Honor thy children ne of our readers recently approached a member of our staff and asked a question that is well beyond our collective pay grades: Does Judaism teach us to honor our children? OK, we’re journalists, not rabbis, so we didn’t have a ready-to-go answer. But it was an excellent question, nonetheless, especially in light of last week’s decision by the Penn State board of trustees to fire its longtime president, Graham Spanier, and its legendary head football coach, Joe Paterno, for their roles (or lack thereof) in the child sex abuse charges leveled against Paterno’s ex-defensive coordinator, Jerry Sandusky. Paterno, 84, who had hoped to coach for the rest of the season before retiring, had already expressed regret for not doing more when he first heard of the allegations against Sandusky. That wasn’t good enough for the trustees, who correctly understood that the spotlight would not be on the play of the team, but on Paterno’s (and Spanier’s) roles in the ugliest scandal in Penn State history. But back to the question. Again, we’re not rabbis, so we consulted Rabbi Mark Washofsky, the Solomon

O

B. Freehof Professor of Jewish Law and Practice at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati. (Freehof, you’ll recall, was the senior rabbi at Rodef Shalom Congregation for decades and one of the leading Reform scholars of the 20th century.) “Jewish law is like other legal systems in that it presumes minors are incapable of protecting themselves,” Washofsky said. “So it is up to the family, and if the family can’t do it, it is up to the wider community to protect them.” And when it comes to violence and sexual abuse, Washofsky said children fall into the same category as everyone else. “When you see someone being threatened or under attack, then you have a duty as is taught in Leviticus (“do not stand idly by the blood of your neighbor”) to come to the aid of that person and do what you can do to protect any individual,” he said. OK, but what about honoring children? Maybe the law protects our children from predators, but does it teach us to honor our children? After all, one of the Ten Commandments says, “honor thy father and mother.” It says nothing about honoring thy children.

According to Jewish law, Washofsky said, there’s nothing that commands honoring one’s children “in those powerful terms.” Jewish tradition understands that parents are obligated to care for their children, but there is no commandment that children are owed the same honor due one’s mother and father. That may be the hardest lesson from this incident to process. Certainly, children cannot always be honored for their lives’ achievements, since they have most of their lives ahead of them, but can they not be honored for what they represent — the future of the Jewish people, and humankind in general? We think so. We also think that maybe, just maybe, children would be more protected from at least some predators — those whose conscience isn’t completely dead — if they had that status. Protection of children is a matter of law. Honoring them, it seems, is not, though we say it is certainly a moral imperative. If society were to emphasize this imperative in its schools, synagogues, churches, mosques and temples (not to mention its locker rooms and playing fields), wouldn’t our kids be safer around their coaches, teachers and mentors?

Why does Congress want to make us blind in Iran? joel rubin

WASHINGTON — As the world ratchets up pressure on Iran because of its nuclear activities, there’s one key international organization that deserves most of the credit for showing us what Iran is — and is not — doing. That’s the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) of the United Nations. The IAEA is responsible for promoting safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technology around the world, and its work is universally respected. Our efforts on Iran directly benefit from a strong, effective IAEA with robust American participation in the organization. This was most recently demonstrated by a report the IAEA just released on the extent to which Iran was developing a nuclear weapons program before 2003 and the activities that may have continued since then. The report has helped American policymakers on all sides of the political debate on Iran by shedding clear light on these activities. Having the IAEA’s information is critical, as it is directly in the national security interest of the United States to contemplate further action against Iran that is based upon real information, real data and real analysis. The IAEA plays an indispensable role in our ability to understand what is really happening with the Iranian nuclear program. Unlike the United States,

which doesn’t have diplomats on the ground in Iran, the IAEA actually goes to Tehran. It inspects Iranian nuclear facilities. It reviews information provided by governments who know what is happening in Tehran. In short, without the IAEA, we would be blind in Iran. So why is the IAEA on the precipice of losing its funding from the United States? It’s simple. Two decades ago, Congress passed two laws prohibiting U.S. funding for any affiliated organization of the United Nations if that organization grants the Palestinian Liberation Organization membership status. These laws had a major impact just a few weeks ago, when the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) approved a Palestinian request for membership in a 10714 vote. The Obama administration, which does not support these Palestinian moves, promptly withdrew its $65 million contribution to UNESCO, leaving the United States without either voting rights or influence at the organization. So, what happens if the Palestinians take the same route with the IAEA, apply for membership there, and are successful? The United States will have to stop funding the organization. This means that the IAEA would no longer have American support, at just the precise moment that the United States is relying on its work more than ever. But withdrawing our $110 million contribution, one quarter of the IAEA’s budget, wouldn’t just harm the organization’s bottom line and its ability to do its critical work. It would also eliminate our ability to influence the work of the organization, as we would lose our seat at the management table. It’s hard to imagine a more self-de-

structive policy for American efforts to stop an Iranian bomb. Such self-destructive behavior cannot be blamed on the Palestinians, as some would like to do. The Obama administration is opposing the Palestinian moves at the United Nations at every turn, but as witnessed by the UNESCO vote, has a very tough road to hoe. Cutting off funding to the United Nations is a purely American policy decision. This is because Congress has always been concerned about the Palestinians going to the United Nations to seek statehood recognition, knowing that they would get a warm reception for such an effort. So, seeking to create leverage against potential U.N. support for the Palestinians, Congress has chosen to use the power of the American purse to force the world body to block Palestinian aspirations. But this pressure tactic is not working, and in the case of the IAEA, is extremely counterproductive. The irony of this policy is that it will undermine the American objective of understanding the Iranian nuclear program at the precise moment that such information is being disseminated by the IAEA. The Iranian government must be thrilled at the prospect of the United States undercutting the IAEA at this sensitive moment. With clear national security interests at stake, it is time for us to maintain a strong IAEA, not to defund it. The last thing we need is to lose our understanding of what’s really going on inside of Iran’s nuclear program. In fact, we need to know more, to avoid a dangerous military outcome based upon faulty information. This is what happened in Iraq, where we were blind and without inspectors at critical moments in the Please see Rubin, next page.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the Editor Obama’s ‘telling’ failure Those who have asserted that President Obama has a bias against Israel have additional fuel to add to the fire in noting his reaction to French President Sarkozy’s unfortunate comment that Prime Minister Netanyahu is “a liar.” Instead of repudiating the French president’s statement or standing up for Netanyahu in any way, the president said, “You are fed up with him, but me, I have to deal with him every day.” When a colleague makes a derogatory comment about someone that is considered to be a friend and ally of the indi-

Rubin: Continued from page 6. run-up to the war. We don’t need to see a repeat of that disastrous history. Therefore, it’s time for Congress to change the law and to recognize that protecting our national security is its most sacred duty. Congress must find

Check out the blogs at www.thejewishchroncle.net

vidual to whom the remark is addressed, one would expect that the listener would stand up for the friend. Mr. Obama’s response, though, can be seen as tacit agreement with the hostile sentiment. Some of the most revealing comments an individual can make occur when he or she does not believe that they are being overheard or recorded. The failure of our president to defend our only reliable and friendly Middle Eastern ally is telling and unfortunate, and will cause our leader to be regarded with healthy suspicion on matters pertaining to Israel. Oren Spiegler Upper St. Clair

other ways to convince the United Nations to not support Palestinian statehood, if that’s its goal. But undermining our security to get there just doesn’t make sense. (Joel Rubin is the director of policy and government affairs at Ploughshares Fund; the views expressed here are his own and not necessarily those of Ploughshares Fund.)


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011

OPINION Shocked by a child sexual abuse case in Happy Valley? Why not? Guest Columnist ROCHELLE R. SUFRIN The story of our children — our communities’ most vulnerable members, being abused sexually or otherwise, by someone they trusted, someone with intrinsic power and control over them, is not new. The story of those in control who choose not to use their power to help others by calling suspected violators in

question is not new. The story of how abuse can occur from a brother to a sister, a caretaker to an elder adult, a teacher to a student, a parent to a child, a spouse to his/her partner, a clergy member, politician, manager or superior to an underling, is not new. The story of a community within a community, insulated from consequences from the outside world, is not new. The story of witnesses and victims finding the courage to “tell” just to learn it did not bring justice for their pain or protect the innocent, is not new. The story that no amount of good deeds or community standing can take away the physical and psychological pain one person can inflict upon another, is not new. The story of a victim mustering the courage over decades of silence and fear to face his/her offender and the community that will serve as judge and jury, is not new. What is new is the shock and hurt of a story, which brings such shame, as it

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should, to so many at one time, that it provides a crystal opportunity that cannot be ignored. What is new is that one of the largest, most respected universities in the country must be an example for others to learn that no individual is beyond reproach; that crimes must be adjudicated, ignorance must be eradicated and innocence must be protected. What is new is that so many Penn State fans from around the world will learn from this story that abuse is a cycle of behavior inflicted from someone with power and control over someone in a less powerful position and where signs of physical violence is not always present. What is new is that as educators, parents, clergy, business leaders and individuals of all ages we must help create safe environments to communicate and understand the real definitions of abuse and learn ways to identify, stop and prevent it. What is new is that abuse of any kind is not just a family, school or private business matter any longer. It’s everyone’s business. It’s a violation of human rights. It’s criminal. What is new is the tremendous opportunity our business leaders, media, parents and educators now have on the

heels of National Domestic Abuse Awareness Month [October] to raise awareness of the definitions of abuse, how to escape an abusive relationship and where to turn for help. (Rochelle Sufrin, a public relations and marketing consultant, Penn State alumnus and former president of the Penn State Collegian Alumni Interest Group, is a domestic violence advocate. She is a co-chair of Council of Domestic Violence Coalitions for Jewish Women International, former interim director of the Jewish Domestic Abuse Task Force of Pittsburgh and domestic violence prevention consultant for Ladies Hospital Aid Society. She can be reached at rrsuf@aol.com.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 9

METRO Sarna: This generation of ‘vanishing Jews’ is one of many to come BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

The future of Jewish life in America comes down to a choice, Jonathan Sarna said — between assimilation and revitalization. And which one will prevail? “The answer is, nobody knows,” he told a crowd of some 200 people Monday at the Eddy Theatre on the campus of Chatham University. “That will be determined day by day, community by community, Jew by Jew.” If anyone came to Mon- Jonathan Sarna day’s lecture, the first in a series titled “Conversations for a Jewish Future,” expecting Sarna to outline a road map for Jewish renewal in the United States, they came away disappointed. But Sarna, a professor of American History at Brandeis University and chief historian of the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia, gave the crowd, including several lay leaders, college students, rabbis and senior citizens, some useful historical context for the challenges they face. For much of Jews’ 357-year history in North America, the prominent historian said, they feared that this country may be “a land that’s good for Jews, but bad for Judaism.” As early as the 1820s, he noted, Jews were leaving synagogue life. At the same time, other Jews were searching for ways to draw them back. In other words, the challenges of today are nothing new. Neither are the strategies to meet them: • Emphasizing tradition and modernity (so long as modernity doesn’t interfere with tradition); • Reforming Judaism through innovation (weekly sermons, mixed seating, English readings, less formality); and • Emphasizing peoplehood over religion. And which way works best? “The answer is yes, yes, yes,” Sarna said. “Jews actually cherish all three of these core values,” though the three values have often led to conflict within the Jewish community, he added. The Conversations lecture series, which extends through September 2012, and deals with topics as diverse as philosophy, theology and social sciences, is supported by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh — through its Centennial Fund for a Jewish Future — and the Agency for Jewish Learning. Federation Chair Lou Plung, who opened Monday’s program, said the series is designed to educate Jews as a community. “The future of Judaism is in our hands,” he said. And AJL President Charles Saul, who introduced Sarna, struck an optimistic note, saying in 30 years, “I have never seen the opportunities we see today in [meeting] these challenges.” As for Sarna, he reminded his audience that in every generation, Jews always appear to be a vanishing people.

He said a new era in Jewish geography is dawning, one in which Jews will not be the global people they may consider themselves to be. He noted that the Jewish world of today is contracting with only 37 nations possessing a Jewish population of 5,000 or more. Israel is poised to eclipse the United States as the largest Jewish center in the world (the first time that has

happened since the days of the Bible); Tel Aviv has already surpassed New York as the largest Jewish urban center; and as Jewish life continues to concentrate in large cities, people around the the world grow up having never met a Jew. But the aura of a vanishing people isn’t quite what it seems, he promised. “American Jews will find creative

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ways to maintain Jewish life,” he said. “It may still be possible for the current vanishing generation of Jews to be succeeded by another vanishing generation, and still another.” (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)


10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011

Style ‘Rabbi Santa’ J e r u s a l e m f i l m s c h o o l h e l p s O r t h o d o x f i l m m a k e r s e x p l o r e t o u g h i s sues

Above: Scenes from “A Jerusalem Tale,” the story of a cashstrapped Orthodox Jew who gets a job playing Santa Claus

BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Lazar, an Orthodox American man transplanted to Jerusalem with his wife, is a bit of a schlemiel. He has trouble holding a job. He tries to be a tour guide for English speakers, but no one will hire him after he wrecks his car. It is late December, the season of both Chanuka and Christmas. When he is offered a job posing as Santa Claus at a local hotel — looking the part with his long beard — he faces a dilemma: Did God send him this job to help him provide for his wife, or should he, as an Orthodox Jew, decline the offer? The story of Lazar, and his unlikely stint as Santa, is the subject of “A Jerusalem Tale” (or “Rabbi Santa,” in Hebrew), written, produced and directed by students at the Ma’aleh School of Television, Film & the Arts in Jerusalem. Ma’aleh is the only film school in the world devoted to exploring the intersection of Judaism and modern life, and the unusual films created by its students — mostly Orthodox Jews — are screened regularly at film festivals worldwide, consistently winning top awards.

Right: A scene from “Sister of Mine,” a story of complications a Haredi family faces in finding a match for its daughter

“The school was started 22 years ago by a group of people who saw there must be a film school for Orthodox people,” said Neta Ariel, its director. Ariel was in Pittsburgh this week to address groups at both Duquesne University and Rodef Shalom Congregation, and to screen “A Jerusalem Tale.” Her visit was presented by Classrooms Without Borders, a Pittsburgh-based group that provides experiential, extended term professional development for teachers in the metropolitan Pittsburgh region. A group of local educators visited Ma’aleh last summer as part of a Classrooms Without Borders trip. Eighty-five students are currently attending the four-year program at Ma’aleh, with about 20 to 25 enrolled in each class. The students typically enter the school following their army service. Lectures are conducted in Hebrew, and between 70 and 80 percent of the students enrolled are Orthodox. Each student is expected to complete a short film as his or her graduation project. “We never tell them what to make their movie about,” Ariel said. “The movies cover a lot of issues; they deal with Jewish issues. Some are Israeli issues, some are international things, and

some are human rights.” Ma’aleh is a unique place to learn, even in Israel, according to Ariel. “Ma’aleh is a very special film school,” she said. “There are a lot of film schools in Israel, but most of the students there are secular. At Ma’aleh, the movies are very original. They have a very special point of view. I think we have the right combination between professional filmmaking and original issues.” The school has provided a welcome creative outlet for Orthodox Jews in Israel who might find traditional film schools difficult to navigate given the limitations imposed by their religious observance, such as not working on Shabbat. “I knew from the beginning this is where I wanted to go because I am religious,” said Oshrat Meirovits, a recent graduate of Ma’aleh whose film, “Sister of Mine,” is currently on the film festival circuit. “Sister of Mine” tells the story of a young Haredi woman for whom it is difficult to find a match because she has a sister with Down syndrome. Meirovits believes Ma’aleh provides the support necessary to create films with themes linked to issues in the Orthodox world. “Ma’aleh supports you being religious,

and lets you talk about these issues, and get these issues out,” Meirovits said. Although Meirovits is not Haredi, she spent some time in her Haredi grandmother’s neighborhood when she was growing up. Situations like that explored in “Sister of Mine” are not uncommon, she said. “Things like that do happen; it’s true,” she said of young people being judged by who their family is when it is time to arrange a marriage. “The movie is about the fact that people are judging [the central character], but not by who she is. And people do that — judge you because of where you live, and because your family has this or that. I want people to judge me for who I am.” “I make movies on whatever is burning in my gut, whatever activates me,” she continued. “I guess religious issues are within me. I love being religious, but it’s not always easy.” Yet Ma’aleh’s aim is to make things easier for Orthodox Jewish filmmakers, said Ariel. “If a student wants to do a story based on Jewish culture, we have the staff to help them,” she said. (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 11

BOOKS ‘Stern’ provides fresh look at forgotten, controversial Zionist Book Review

BY MOSHE PHILLIPS For the Chronicle

Tom Tugend, writing in the Nov. 2 edition of The Jewish Journal of Los Angeles, relates the amazing story of a Warsaw Ghetto Uprising: “One early revelation (to me) was that there were two main, separate Jewish organizations — and a couple of minor ones — fighting the Nazis in the (Warsaw) ghetto, based on the left- and rightwing loyalties of the Zionist youth organizations of the time. Apparently, to this day, adherents of these ideologies are loath to credit the “other” side with its contributions to the battle.” The day before Tugend’s words appeared, a book with the title “Stern: The Man and His Gang,” by Zev Golan came out. Tugend’s words apply just as appropriately to the history of the Hagana, Palmach, Irgun and LEHI in their fight against the British in the land of Israel. For decades Israel’s left-leaning academic establishment in Israel, as well as Jewish educators in the United States, have tried to minimize the impact the Irgun and LEHI had on London’s decision to end the British Mandate. The LEHI’s story is finally getting the fair treatment it was denied for far too long.

Book review? “Stern: The Man and His Gang,” by Zev Golan Yair Publications in Israel, 2011, 288 pages.

Yair (Avraham) Stern was the founder and leader of the Stern Group (Gang), which is remembered in Israel as the LEHI (Fighters For the Freedom of Israel.) The LEHI Museum’s publishing arm released the new English book by Golan — a historian. Golan is well-known as the author of the 2003 book “Free Jerusalem: Heroes, Heroines and Rogues Who Created the State of Israel” (Devora Publishing), which is available in English and should not be missed by those who want to know more about the Zionist underground before Israel was a modern state. Golan’s “The Shofars of the Revolt,” which was published only in Hebrew, is about the men who from 1930 to 1947 bravely ignored British regulations against sounding the shofar at the Western Wall at the conclusion of Yom Kippur services. Golan also produced a He-

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brew book about the first hero to sound the shofar titled “Awake O’ Israel: The Life and Thought of the Late Rabbi Moshe Segal.” Golan is an American-born Zionist historian and “Stern: The Man and His Gang” is full of important lessons from Zionism’s untold history. It seems like a culmination of sorts of all of his previous output. Some of the features that make this six-chapter softbound book so engaging are: • The story of Stern’s life, which is presented as it has never appeared in English, with anecdotes, translated Stern poems and a full portrait of the leader, his ideas and his motivations; • A full chapter of biographical sketches of over a dozen famous and not-so-famous LEHI soldiers — an exceptionally inspiring portion of the book, over 60 pages long — which is organized in a very readable way with large amounts of information that have never been available before to English readers; • A comprehensive timeline of LEHI’s operations, again something that was never published in English before; and • A well thought out question-and-answer section that teachers would find especially useful for classroom use. The book is a compelling narrative and even readers with a limited knowledge of the larger subject of Israeli/Zionist history will both enjoy it

and find it accessible. With this addition to his prior body of work, Golan has done more to safeguard the history and ideas of the heroic soldiers who fought to create a modern, independent Jewish commonwealth than any other writer of this generation. Golan’s work over the last eight years has had the intensity of a man on a mission. And his readers are the true beneficiaries of the fruits of this mission. The soldiers of the LEHI were passionate Zionists who understood the higher ideals for which they fought. Their words and deeds of long ago are continuing to inspire many young people in Israel today. These young Israelis understand that knowledge and appreciation of LEHI’s history and philosophy are critical to the future of the Jewish State. With Golan’s book, American readers can be inspired as well. (Moshe Phillips is the president of the Philadelphia Chapter of Americans for a Safe Israel — phillyafsi.com. His blog can be found at phillyafsi.blogtownhall.com and he Tweets at twitter.com/MoshePhillips.)


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011

Simchas Benjamin Eric Rosen, son of Brad and Lisa Rosen, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Nov. 19, at Chabad Fox Chapel. Grandparents are Mark and Carol Gray and Jack and Myrna Rosen.

B’nai Mitzva Benjamin Littmann, son of Karen and David Littmann, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Nov. 19, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Constance and William Taylor and Geraldine and Robert Littmann, all of Pittsburgh. Julie Missry, daughter of Ellen and John Missry, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Nov. 19, at Congregation Beth Shalom. Grandparents are Alan and Sally Greenwald, Helen Barnett Missry and

Deadline for Simchas is Thursday, 4:30 p.m. Announcements are free to subscribers; there is a $12 charge for each photo. The nonsubscriber rate is $45 for announcement plus $12 for the photo. Send announcements in the body of an e-mail and photo attached in JPEG format to announcements@thejewishchronicle.net. Call Angela at (412) 687-1000 for more information.

Seymour Missry.

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Real estate DiRectoRy. call Donna to reserve your space 412-687-1000.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 13

Community A C L O S E

SOS Pittsburgh receives grant to help those in need

J

ewish Family & Children’s Service of Pittsburgh received a $10,000 grant from Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield in support of its SOS Pittsburgh emergency assistance program. SOS Pittsburgh is a resource for individuals and families who traditionally fall through the cracks within the social service system. This includes those who are getting by on their own, but if they were to experience an unforeseen incident or expense, not being able to resolve it could be the difference between remaining selfreliant and a lifetime of hardship. The program was established in 2005 with the help of Edgar and Sandy Snyder, who previously established similar programs in Russia. The Snyders realized that there was also a need for the program throughout the Pittsburgh area, so they approached JF&CS about creating an SOS program to assist those living in our local community. According to SOS Pittsburgh committee chair Barbara Shapira, the program is a “safety net of last resort” for people facing crisis who simply JF&CS Photo have no place to turn. An SOS Pittsburgh social service and critical needs coordinator works in- Pictured from left are SOS Pittsburgh founders Edgar and Sandy Snyder; Mary Anne Papale, director of community affairs, Highmark; Becky Abrams, director, Squirrel Hill Community Food Pantry & SOS tensively with each individual or family to understand the issues they are facing and to come Pittsburgh; and Aryeh Sherman, president and CEO, Jewish Family & Children’s Service. up with a plan for helping them. The coordinaand then make funding recommendations — for need has grown considerably and people who tor then connects them to any and all applicable a one-time grant in an effort to avert crisis. thought they would never be in need of assistance community resources and when no other re“Even in the best of times, there will be people are now turning to us for critical aid.” source is available, petitions the SOS Pittsburgh who are struggling,” said Aryeh Sherman, JF&CS The Highmark grant will provide funding for committee — which is composed of a group of president and CEO in a prepared statement. these one-time client grants, which average community volunteers who evaluate each case “However, with the recent economic crisis, the around $1,100 per case.

Blessings in a backpack

Jew’colades COMPILED BY ANGELA LEIBOWICZ Community/Web Editor

R L O Adat Shalom Preschool photo

O K

These Terrific Threes in Adat Shalom Preschool are bringing tzedaka in each week to provide food for hungry children through the Blessings in a Backpack program. In the back row are Charlie Hill, Olivia Koumpouras, program coordinator Linda Lafferty, Samantha Dinh and Max Gordon. In the front row are Josie Stanczak and Phoebe Charlson.

The Chronicle Cooks Will Return Next Week

Community Day School graduates have been named as semifinalists in the 57th annual National Merit Scholarship Program. These academically talented students have the opportunity to continue in the competition for some 8,300 National Merit Scholarships, worth more than $34 million, that will be offered next spring. There are approximately 16,000 semifinalists nationwide. Community Day School semifinalists are Josh Ascherman, Thomas Brusilovsky, Alex Josowitz, Melanie Levine, Maya Rosen, Elan Rosenfeld, Benjamin Schwartz and Judah Sklan. These students were among more than 1.5 million high school juniors who took the 2010 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT), which served as an initial screen of entrants. The nationwide pool of semifinalists, which represents less than 1 percent of U.S. high school seniors, includes the highest scoring entrants in each state. To become a finalist, semifinalists must have an outstanding academic record throughout high school, be endorsed and recommended by the principal/school head and earn SAT scores that confirm the qualifying test performance. The semifinalist and a school official must submit a detailed scholarship application, which includes an essay and information about participation and leadership in school and community activities. Approximately 15,000 semifinalists (90 percent) are expected to advance to the finalist level. Finalists compete for one of 2,500 National Merit $2,500 Scholarships, as well as 1,000 corporate-sponsored scholarships and 4,800 college-sponsored awards. The National Merit Scholarship Corporation is a not-forprofit organization that operates without government assistance. The organization awards scholarships to honor the nation’s “scholastic champions” and encourage the pursuit of academic excellence.


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 15

METRO Bike trek:

have an amazing experience and be transformed in many ways.” Since the last time Hazon organized this trek, he noted some of the riders met and later married. Others reconnected with their Jewish community, including one gay rider who for the first time became active in Jewish life as a result of the experience. Which is why Savage is reluctant to describe Hazon merely as an environmental group. He said such a narrow description misses the point. “Sometimes, when you say you’re an environmental group, people’s eyes glaze over,” he said, “but the reason why we’ve grown in the past 11 years is because we are engaging [people] in new and exciting ways.” Founded in 2000, Hazon strives to create “healthier and more sustainable communities in the Jewish world and beyond,” according to its mission statement. It does so through “transformative experiences” (bike rides in the United States and Israel), “thoughtleadership” (writing, speaking, teaching and advocacy); and “capacity building” (supporting great people and projects in North America and Israel). Hazon hopes to attract at least 20 riders for the complete trek, Levine said, but other riders are welcome to do specific legs of the trip. For instance, she said Pittsburgh cyclists might want to join the peloton in Chicago and ride to Pittsburgh, or start in Pittsburgh for the final push to Washington. “I think people would enjoy the fanfare of what happens when you arrive and people are there cheering you on,” she said.

Continued from page 1. Savage is the founder of Hazon, considered the largest Jewish environmental organization in America, and the event is the second Cross USA Bike Ride to Raise Awareness for Healthy, Sustainable Communities in the Jewish World and Beyond — the first cross-country ride Hazon has led since 2000. The 10-week cross-country trek will start June 7, 2012, in Seattle, and end 72 days and 3,600 miles later in Washington, D.C. Along the way, there will be nine Shabbat rest days and five community service days. All the meals will be kosher and mostly vegetarian. But of particular interest to Pittsburghers is that the city will be one of the major destination points of the ride. A two-day stay is planned, during which the riders will take part in one of its five service days. The riders will arrive in Pittsburgh Wednesday, Aug. 8, and depart Friday, Aug. 10, for Ohiopyle State Park, where they will follow the Great Allegheny Passage to Washington — their final destination. “Pittsburgh is a city we’re insanely excited to go to,” said Wendy Levine, director of Cross USA, noting the evolution of the biking community here over the past 10 years, including the trail development and other sustainability projects. “It will be an educational opportunity for us as well as the community,” she said. But Savage sees the ride as a chance to foster Judaism, both inside the synagogue and outside. “We hope to visit many different synagogues and speak, and maybe we’ll have a fun ride,” he said. “We want people to

(Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

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Activist: Continued from page 2. innocent Jews], war is hell, what’s the difference.” If Arabs learned how the Holocaust profoundly impacted Arab nations, he reasoned, they “would have to face the realities of their own past. If Arabs saved Jews, that would be something to be proud of. And it would prove that Jews were saved from something.” Except for mass exterminations, every aspect of the Holocaust that occurred in Europe also occurred in North Africa, including the roundup of Jewish communities and the creation of slave labor camps. Satloff’s quest to find righteous Arabs turned out to be more difficult than he anticipated. Arabs responded to the Holocaust the same way Europeans did: most were bystanders, some supported it and some bravely hid Jews from their tormentors. Satloff learned that Arab political leaders and ordinary Arab citizens protected and assisted Jews. Some Arabs went to great lengths to protect Jews by hiding large groups of men and women on their property in the shadow of Nazi

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occupiers. “The stories are there, the stories are real,” he said. “They are like the stories of Wallenberg and Shindler.” Since the publication of his book, Satloff learned of many more Arabs who assisted Jews in North Africa. He asserted that the number of North African Arabs who assisted Jews during World War II is “as proportionate as the number of gentiles who assisted Jews in Europe.” His research will not change Arabs’ views on the Holocaust overnight or dramatically improve Jewish-Arab relations, he said. His research has produced some small victories, however. “I am very proud to say that there are cracks in the wall. … I have given this lecture in four dozen different Arab schools,” Satloff said, and the students were as receptive to his research as Jewish audiences were. In Israel, a Palestinian woman told Satloff that his lecture was “the most empowering talk I’ve heard. … If Arabs could act for the good, maybe we could have a free choice for good today.” “If even one, two, 10 people [get the message],” Satloff said, “that’s a step in the right direction.” (Ron Kaplan can be reached at ronkap205@yahoo.com.)


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011

SPORTS For Chuck Greenberg, losing the Rangers, and two World Series, still stings JONATHAN MAYO

The Chosen 1s

He sat, watching what was once, literally, “his team,” make another run to the World Series. And his emotions, to say the least, were all over the place. “For it to be any other way would go against human nature,” said Chuck Greenberg, the one-time (briefly) owner of the Texas Rangers. “I have such affection for so many people in the organization. I was happy for all their success during the year. I was rooting them on and I was disappointed they weren’t able to get that last strike. “At the same time, it was difficult not to be a part of it,” he continued. “I was proud to play some role, but as much as anything, I was proud to have foreseen the opportunity before the current success was apparent. All the people told me why the Rangers wouldn’t draw and I just wouldn’t believe it. To get involved early, see it to a conclusion, go through that long process, then see the success, was a very rewarding feeling.” Of course, the plan was for Greenberg to still be sitting in the owner’s box or alongside Nolan Ryan in the stands. Greenberg, the Pittsburgh area attorney who owns a pair of Minor League teams — the State College Spikes and the

Chuck Greenberg is still a Rangers fan.

Myrtle Beach Pelicans — had put together a group to purchase the Rangers from Tom Hicks. In August 2010, the sale was finalized and Greenberg was on hand to watch the Rangers go to the World Series for the first time that fall. It seemed like a wonderful start to a long, harmonious relationship. Greenberg’s group came in to solidify the stewardship of the team which had floundered under Hicks and the team seemed poised to be competitive for a long time.

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It didn’t turn out that way. No one knows for sure why the relationship turned sour so quickly; most of what has been written is conjecture. But by March 2011, Greenberg was out, forcing him to watch this second straight run to the Fall Classic from afar. “When I left, I agreed not to talk about the circumstances,” said Greenberg, who still maintains a house in Pittsburgh but now calls Westlake, Texas, home. “It was an unfortunate situation that was very disappointing because it was

something I had really put my heart and soul into for 22 months. As I look back, I have no significant regrets or instances where I would have done anything of any significance differently. Everything I did was about doing the right thing and treating people the right way. I’m proud of the platform for long-term success the Rangers are now operating from. “I think everything about the experience with Texas was a success, other than the disappointment that I’m not involved with it on a daily basis,” he added. “I couldn’t have been more pleased with everything with the experience other than that it ended.” Greenberg didn’t take too much time to lick his wounds. He still has the two Minor League teams and his consulting company. He came close to being part of a group to buy the Dallas Stars. But when he couldn’t get a TV deal in place — something he did accomplish with the Rangers — he decided it wasn’t quite right. “We came very close,” Greenberg said, who would have been buying the team from the same ownership group (Hicks) had he gone through with it. “We realized we couldn’t put [a deal] in place to give the franchise the security it needed. Sometimes you have to know when to walk. “I’m enjoying myself,” he added. “I’m open to new opportunities, but I’m going to take it slow and see what presents itself.”

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 17

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TORAH In circle of life, loved ones come and go Portion of the Week RABBI BETH JACOWITZ CHOTTINER, TEMPLE SHALOM, WHEELING, W.VA. Chaye Sarah, 23:1-25:18

We are all familiar with the phrase “circle of life.” I couldn’t help but think of this idea in relation to this week’s Torah portion, for life and death are intertwined. As Jews, we have a wide range of rituals to mark our various life cycle events, including ones for death and mourning. I mention this because this week’s Torah portion, Chaye Sarah, begins with the death of Sarah, even though it is called “the life of Sarah.” The opening verses of the parsha say, “Sarah’s lifetime — the span of Sarah’s life — came to one hundred and twenty-seven years. Sarah died in Kiryat Arba — now Hevron — in the land of Canaan; and Abraham proceeded to mourn for Sarah and to bewail her.” With such an opening, why isn’t the Torah portion called, “The Death of Sarah?” Perhaps it’s because it’s the life of an individual, rather than the circumstances surrounding one’s death, that deserves our focus and attention. While death and loss cause pain for the living, our rabbinic tradition offers a comforting perspective — one that suggests death is not the end — rather, just the end of one chapter of our life. In Pirke Avot (The Ethics of Our Fathers), we read, “This world is like an antechamber before the World to Come.” In other words, when we lose a loved one, he is not gone — rather, he lives on — just in another realm. An American Jew, Colonel David Marcus, helped Israel defend herself during the 1948 War of Independence. A poem about a cargo ship sailing out to sea was found in his pocket after he was killed in battle. It reads:

I am standing upon the seashore. A ship at my side spreads her white sails to the morning breeze and starts for the blue ocean. She is an object of beauty and strength and I stand and watch her until at length she hangs like a speck of white cloud just where the sea and sky come to mingle with each other. At that moment some one at my side says, “There! She’s gone.” Gone where? Gone from my sight. That is all. She is just as large in mast and hull and spar as she was when she left my side, and just as able to bear her load of living freight to her destined port. Her diminished size is in me, not in her. And just at the moment when someone at my side says, “There! She’s gone!” There are other eyes watching her coming, and other voices ready to take up the glad shout, “Here, she comes!” This poem captures the essence of what our Jewish tradition teaches about death: while one’s physical presence — the body — may no longer be visible, the essence of a person — the spirit of an individual, his values and teachings — remains intact and live on. In a manner of speaking, our deceased relatives are like the ship in the poem — no longer in view, but still there. After Abraham mourns the loss of Sarah, he looks forward to the next generation and focuses his attention on the task of finding a wife for his son Isaac. Abraham understands the circle of life, and he finds the strength and courage to move forward, and keep living. When we are faced with the loss of a loved one, may we, too, remember the circle of life. And may we find comfort in the image of the ship sailing across the ocean, being seen by those on the other side. (This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

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18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011

OBITUARY ACKERMAN: Jeannette L. Ackerman loved her family. Jeannette L. Ackerman, 86, passed away early Friday morning, Nov. 11, 2011, at Southmont, Presbyterian SeniorCare, Washington, where she had lived for the past year. Mrs. Ackerman was born April 25, 1925, in Donora, the middle of three daughters to Mano and Fannie Weiss Lichtenstein. She lived most of her life in Donora. She graduated from Donora Senior High School, where she played in the band, and attended New York University. She moved back home planning to attend Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University), from which her daughters later graduated. She worked in the office of the Zinc Works of Donora for a short time, and instead of returning to school, decided to marry her high school sweetheart, the love of her life, Allen Harry Ackerman, on April 22, 1945. They were married 45 years when her husband passed away in 1990. Together they had two daughters, Marilyn A. Posner of East Washington

and Sherrie L. Schlecker of Chesterbrook, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Ackerman were longtime owners of Ackerman’s Market and later, of J&B Import, both in Donora. After her husband passed away, Mrs. Ackerman ran J&B Import. Mrs. Ackerman was very active in the Jewish community in Donora as a member of Ohav Sholom Congregation, and continued with her commitment to Judaism as a member of Beth Israel Congregation when she moved to Washington, following the death of her husband. She was known for her lovely singing voice at synagogue services and later at Southmont. She had a good sense of humor and was a wonderful baker, noted for her chocolate chip cookies. But mostly she loved her family. Deceased, in addition to her parents and her husband, are her two sisters, Esther Andrews and Sylvia Kuper. Surviving are her daughters and sonsin-law, Marilyn and David Posner, and Sherrie and Paul Schlecker; two grandchildren, Morton J. Posner and wife, Blaise Scinto, of Arlington, Va., and Jennifer Napier and husband, David Napier, of Chicago; and four great-grandchildren, Elias Aaron Posner, Eve Adriane Posner, Brooks Allen Napier and William Beckett Napier. Surviving are her daughters and sonsin-law, Marilyn and David Posner, and Sherrie and Paul Schlecker; two grandchildren, Morton J. Posner and wife, Blaise Scinto, of Arlington, Va., and Jennifer Napier and husband, David Napier, of Chicago, and four great-grandchildren, Elias Aaron Posner, Eve Adriane Posner, Brooks Allen Napier and William Beckett Napier. Services were held at the Piatt and Barnhill Funeral Home with Rabbi David Novitsky officiating. Interment will follow in Ohav Sholom Cemetery, Donora. Memorial contributions may be directed to Beth Israel Synagogue, 265 North Ave., Washington, PA 15301. Condolences may be expressed online at www.piattandbarnhillfh.com. Arrangements by Piatt and Barnhill Funeral Directors, Inc., 420 Locust Ave., Washington, PA 15301-3329.

CAPLAN: On Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011, Evelyn Rose (Wolk) Caplan, 85, formerly of New Kensington; wife of the late Aubrey G. Caplan; daughter of the late Jacob and Mary Wolk and sister of the late Albert Wolk; mother of Robert B. (Svetlana) Caplan, Linda C. Raden; grandmother of Jill (Adam) Goetz, Stephanie (Michael) Ames, Debra (Michael) Richards and five great-grandchildren. Services and interment were private. Contributions may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com COHEN: On Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011, Lawrence Cohen; son of the late Hyman H. Cohen and Sylvia Murman Cohen; cousin of Michelle Murman Zeff, Jon Murman and Neil Murman. Services and interment were held at Shaare Torah Cemetery. Contributions may be made to American Heart Association, 777 Penn Center Blvd., Ste. 200, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 or Down Syndrome Association of Pittsburgh, 5513 William Flynn Hwy, #400, Gibsonia, PA 15044. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com ELLIOTT: On Sunday Oct. 30, 2011, in Lake Monticello, Va., Melinda Lichter Elliott, 56; after an extended battle with breast cancer. She was born Melinda Gale Lichter, the third of four daughters, on April 1, 1955, in Pittsburgh to Dr. William S. Lichter and Lillian Gottlieb Lichter Jacobson. After graduating with a bachelor’s degree from University of Arizona, Melinda volunteered for several years at Innisfree Village, a community for mentally challenged adults in Crozet, Va. She received her master’s in anthropology from the University of Virginia; she married Leo Hamilton Elliott who preceded her in death. She became a certified occupational therapy assistant and worked in various hospitals and nursing homes in Virginia and Florida. In addition she was the director of the former Academy of Re-Remembering, a therapeutic arts and living foods program in Ivy, Va. She is survived by two sons, Krishna Meister and Forrest Elliott, stepdaughter, Hannah Elliott, sisters Shelly Benjamin (David), Wendy Lichter and Amy Harrington, stepbrother, Peter Jacobson, as well as grandson, Kyle Meister, and nieces, nephews, extended family, and a wealth of friends. A memorial service was held at Teague Funeral Home. Contributions may be made to Innisfree Inc., 5505 Walnut Level Rd., Crozet, VA 22932. Arrangements by Teague Funeral Home, 2260 Ivy Rd., Charlottesville, VA 229034977. www.teaguefuneralhome.com KLEIN: On Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011, Donald A. Klein; beloved husband of Natalie W. Klein; loving father of Steven (Elisa) Klein of New York City and Jill Klein (Steve Matthiasson) of Napa, Calif.; brother of the late Andrew Klein; brother-in-law of Richard and Suzanne Wagner; adored grandfather of Samantha, Olivia, Harry and Kai; also survived by devoted nieces and nephews. Services were held at Congregation Beth Shalom; interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to The Donald & Natalie Klein Young Readers Collection c/o Holocaust Center of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, 5738 Darlington Road., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by

Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com LEVINE: On Friday, Nov. 4, 2011, Claire (Laufer) Levine, 93; wife of the late Murray Levine; devoted mother of Judith Weintraub, Stephen Levine and Marc Levine; loving grandmother of Linda, Susan, Trevor, Lisa and Rebecca; dear great-grandmother of Claire and Jack; adored mother-in-law of Laverne Dagras; devoted friend of Heidi Asmussen; also survived by five step grandchildren and five step great grandchildren. Contributions may be made to the Jewish National Fund, 42 East 69th St., New York, NY 10021-5093, for the Yaacov Ardon Garden Project #HN103039. A memorial service will take place Friday, Nov. 25. Arrangements by D’Alessandro Funeral Home, Ltd., 4522 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201-3063. www.dalessandroltd.com LIGHT: On Friday, Nov. 11, 2011, Ernest Light; beloved husband of the late Sarah Stein Light; beloved father of Cheryl Light of Phoenix, Ariz., and Erica Light; brother of Eugene (Racille) Light; grandfather of Noah, Cheyenne, Henry and Milan; also survived by many nieces and nephews. Services and interment were held at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Holocaust Center of Greater Pittsburgh, 5738 Darlington Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or Jewish Association on Aging, 200 JHF Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com MORITZ: On Monday, Nov. 14, 2011, Ronald E. Moritz, 71; beloved husband for 50 years of Shirley Karpas Moritz; loving father of Faith Moritz and Janet Jones of Portland, Maine; Steve and Tammie Moritz and Sarah and Andrew DeWitt of Squirrel Hill; son of the late Louis and Clara (Keilly) Moritz; brother of Edna Lehman of Squirrel Hill; Grandpa to Benjamin and Lucy Moritz-Jones of Portland, ME; Hannah, Jennifer and Adam Moritz and Collin, Evan & Jackie DeWitt of Squirrel Hill. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Beth El Congregation, 1900 Cochran Road., Pittsburgh, PA 15220 or Community Day School, 6424 Forward Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com SIMON: On Friday, Nov. 11, 2011, Isabel N. Simon, 93; Mrs. Simon was a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh in 1939. Loving wife for 57 years to the late Charles Simon, and beloved twin sister of the late Florence Nydes. Fun, generous, devoted, mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother and dearest friend to all. Her life is joyously remembered by her children, Donna, Jimmy, Janie and Marty; Grandchildren Lauren and Scott, Ali and Matt, and Perry and Laurel; great-grandchildren Taylor, Maddie and Evan. Also survived by dearest cousin and friend Maxine Rothman and devoted caregiver and friend Eileen and many other relatives and friends. Services and interment were held at West View Cemetery of Rodef Shalom Congregation. Family suggests memorial contributions for “Art On Gist Street” payable to Uptown Partners of Pittsburgh, 710 Fifth Ave., Suite 1000, Pittsburgh, PA 15219. (412) 325-2723. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011 — 19

METRO Netanyahu: Continued from page 1. move it in the right direction. They won’t get in their way.” Gideon Levy, a columnist for the Israeli newspaper Haaretz said the video was “pathetic and outrageous.” “The man in the video betrays himself in his own words as a con artist, and now he is again prime minister of Israel,” Levy wrote. “Don’t try to claim that he has changed since then. Such a crooked way of thinking does not change over the years.” Netanyahu also has seen his share of scandals over the years. In 1998, he faced allegations that he was complicit to an assassination attempt on the founder of Hamas, Sheikh Ahmed Yasin in Jordan, although he was later cleared of those charges by an official enquiry. In 1999, Netanyahu faced another scandal as he was questioned by the police in connection with a probe into corruption related to gifts from a government contractor during his first tenure as prime minister. And this past April, the Israel State Comptroller, Micha Lindenstrauss, announced an investigation into Netanyahu’s travel at the expense of private businessmen, and allegations that Netanyahu illegally obtained campaign donations. But Netanyahu has his defenders as well. “Netanyahu does have an image of one who changes his mind and is susceptible to pressure,” said Michael Feige, visiting professor in the Schusterman Center for Israel Studies and the departments of Anthropology and Near Eastern & Judaic Studies at Brandeis University, in an e-mailed response to the Chronicle. “I think that this is a wrong view of him as a politician and a statesman. Netanyahu has a strong ideological core and deeply held beliefs regarding the future of Israel, the nature of international relations and his role as Prime Minister, and he is quite willing to compromise on matters

that are not of value to him.” “Netanyahu believes that as a custodian of Israeli security (which for him is the most important component of his job), he should not seek compromise with the Palestinians,” Feige continued. “However, his relations with the U.S. and Europe force him to make concessions, such as declaring his support for a twostate solution. Since then, he has done nothing to prove that his declaration was sincere, and in Israel everyone knows that it probably was not.” Feige said “it is no surprise” that foreign leaders such as Sarkozy and Obama see Netanyahu as a liar. “One can be critical about Netanyahu’s policies on various subjects, including his pessimism toward the chances of negotiation and peace, but he has an ideological backbone, and I find him very consistent through the years,” Feige said. “He may be a liar on the tactical level, but strategically he is very dogmatic, with the right-wing ideology that he brought from home, and preached for his entire life.” Although Feige said that he personally does not agree with many of Netanyahu’s polices, “I would not say that he is a liar.” Writing for Israel Hayom, Elliott Abrams, a senior fellow for Middle East Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, considered it ironic that Obama and Sarkozy made their remarks so soon after Netanyahu signaled his intent to remove unauthorized settler outposts on the West Bank. “If this were only a matter of personal relations between Obama and Netanyahu, it could be left at that,” Abrams wrote in Hayom. “But this is far more consequential, for with this comment — and especially as it was made in private and can be interpreted as his actual view — Obama has joined the chorus of assaults on the Jewish state. The U.S. only has one president at a time and Israel only has one prime minister. To treat the prime minister of Israel in this way is disgraceful.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

A Life Worth Remembering is a Life Worth Sharing The Jewish Chronicle’s new Extended obituary is a thoughtful way to honor your loved ones. In addition to Standard* obituary, the extended obituary offers: • Black and white photos (1.25 wide x 1.5 inches high @ $12 per photo) • Color photos (1.25 wide x 1.5 inches high @ $25 per photo) • Unlimited words ($0.25 per word beyond the Standard format) A life is greater than the sum of those it touched...it’s full of images, stories, laughter and tears. Let the Chronicle help you tell the tale that should be told. As every life has a natural length, so too does the story of that life.

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BERNARD L. FREEMAN.......SIDNEY FRIEDMAN BARBARA E. KELLMAN ..........BESS. R. ESCOTT EVELYN K. REBB .......................JOSEPH BILDER JOEL SMALLEY ........................MARY SMALLEY MARC J. TEPPER........................HARRY TEPPER NORMAN M. WESOKY ...............LENA WESOKY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20: BERNARD BERKOVITZ, DOROTHY M. BRILL, JAMES COHEN, SIDNEY H. EGER, SIDNEY H. EGER, EPHRAIM FARBER, JACOB J. FISHER, HOWARD JOSEPH GREEN, CHARLOTTE R. GREENFIELD, JULIUS GUSKY, SAMUEL HACKMAN, SOPHIE HAUSMAN, MAX HOFFMAN, DELLA R. KANT, JACOB KRAVITZ, HARRY KWALL, ROSE K. LEVIN, ISRAEL LIEBMAN, ALBERT S. MAR, HARRY L. MAY, GEORGE D MIRKIN, SOL OSTROW, LILLIAN PAZER, SALLIE KAMENS REICHART, HERMAN RIMETZ, MOLLIE SCHAFFER, JACOB SEDER, TEMA G. SHAW, DR. HARRY M. SIGAL, MORRIS SMITH, GITTLE TUELSKY, SARAH J. WALSH, HERMAN WEISS, EDWARD WITT, EVA YOUNG. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21: MEYER R. BOCHNER, ELLIOT BOROFSKY, MAX COHEN, REBECCA COHEN, HERMAN ELIASTAM, ANNIE CHOTINER ELLOVICH, MILDRED FLANICK, ANNA GUSKY, MILDRED HAHN, MORRIS BERNARD MARCUS, FREDA MILLER, SIMON MILLER, JOSEPH PATZ, MAX PICKHOLTZ, BENJAMIN RAKUSIN, JUANITA ESTHER RICKLER, RICHARD S. ROSENFELD, FANNYE SCHWARTZ, LOUIS SCHWARTZ, GEORGE SCHWIMMER, JACOB SPEER, MILTON E. STEINFELD, ABRAHAM STEVENSON, FRANK STRICK, LOTTIE TANZER, FANNIE WEINHAUS. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22:MOLLIE ADLER, MAYME ALTMAN, SELMA BERGER, HERMAN A. BRODY, SAMUEL C. BROIDA, ESTHER L. CARVER, SALLY CHUDACOFF, EVA DIZENFELD, JACK A. ECKERT, ABE HERMAN EMAS, MAX FEINBERG, WILLIAM FINKEL, STANLEY GLASSER, LILLIAN HARRIS, MAX HOROVITZ, DORA SOLOMON KWAL, HELEN LAUTMAN, LOUIS A. LEVIN, AARON LEVINE, ROSE LUBITZ, JOSEPH MARGOLIS, MORRIS MARKOVITZ, SARAH BELLA MAZER, JACOB S. MILLER, JULIA MOSES, HELENE MUELLER, MAX S. NEIMAN, MEYER PAZER, BESSIE FINKELPEARL POCHAPIN, ANNA B. RACK, ISRAEL W. REISER, ANNA M. ROM, NATHAN ROTHSCHILD, BERNARD SAMUELS, ALFRED SAUL, SAM SEMINOFSKY, MORRIS B. SHAPIRO, ISAAC M. TEPLITZ, ESTHER TRIFF, NATHAN WEDNER, MAX WEINTRAUB, HARRY WERTHEIMER, ROSE WINKLER, LEON ZIMBLER, HARRY ZISKIND. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 23: DORIS LIBBY BENNETT, JOSEPH BILDER, MAX COHEN, HERMAN A. DONOFSKY, LEAH FIRESTONE, MILTON N. FREED, PHILLIP FRIEDMAN, MORRIS GLASSMAN, BETTY GRAYER, JENNIE ISKOWICH, HARRY JACOBS, ABRAHAM JOSSELSON, BERTHA KLEIN, MORRIS D. LANDAY, ESTHER LANG, MINNIE MOLL, LEON MORRIS, NORMAN NOTOV, POLINA NOVAK, ETHEL SPIEGEL PERILMAN, BESSE PAULINE ROGALINER, ESTHER FRANCES ROSENBERG, DAVID MORRIS ROTH, DR. SIMON SEEGMAN, MEYER SEIAVITCH, IRWIN SIDLER, ROSE SKIRBLE, FANNIE G. SKIRBOLL, SIDNEY STEIN, SAM STERN, SAM STONE, MARVIN TACHNA, BELLA R. TEPLITZ, JOSEPH THOMPSON, FANNIE TUCH, MILDRED WEINBERGER, HELEN WEINERMAN, MILTON ZAKOWITZ. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24: DAVID H. AMSTEY, BESSIE LOTTIE AZEN, SYLVIA BRAUN, HARRY CUKERBAUM, CELIA FEINBERG, ANNE FIRESTONE, JULIA GOLDSTEIN, LOUIS GREENBERG, ZELDA GUTMACHER, ISAAC KLEIN, FRIEDA KLINE, WILLIAM KOGUT, SARAH YEHUDIS KOIDANOV, ADOLPH LANG, BENJAMIN IRWIN LEVINE, JACOB LEVINSON, WILLIAM LEVY, FRANCES GOULD LEWANDO, JOSEPH LUSTIG, FRANK MANDELBAUM, ISRAEL MANDELL, ESTHER S. MARGOLIS, JACOB S. MILLER, JANE MILLER, MORRIS MOSKOVITZ, GERTRUDE R. NACHMAN, ELIJAH NADEL, RUBEN NADLER, ROSE CAUFF NEIMAN, MIRIAM S. NYDES, MAX PERR, ALICE PICOVSKY, MICHAEL RATKOYSKY, CLARA RITT, ANNA ETHEL ROSENBERG, CHARLES DAVID ROSENBERG, MARY RUBENSTEIN, PHILIP RUBENSTEIN, SHANA SERGIE, JULIUS SHERMER, HARRY SIEGAL, FAY G. SILVERSTEIN, HARRY SILVERSTONE, ESSIE SOLOMON, IDA SUSSMAN, NETTIE TOUBER, MEYER WALK, FLORENCE WEINSTEIN, HARRY L. WIESENTHAL, ROSE WOLOVITZ. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25: JEANNETTE TAFEL ALMAN, SYDNEY J. BENNETT, CHARLOTTE GINSBURG, ANNIE GOLDENSON GOLDSTEIN, REBECCA HARRIS, HYMEN L. KAPLAN, BENJAMIN KLAWANSKY, GITTEL LANDIS, BENJAMIN LAZER, HILDA LENCHNER, BEN LEVENSON, LOUIS LEVINE, MORRIS MANELOVEG, BETTY MARCUS, DAVID ISAAC MILLER, DAVID MONSEIN, BESSIE MORRIS, LAFE B. MURSTEIN, MARY PECHERSKY, LEONARD PRICE, SADIE ROSSEN, FANNIE RUBEN, CHARLOTTE L. RUBENSTEIN, LEAH W. SCHLESINGER, HELEN G. SHEINBERG, LENA FRIEMAN SIEFF, MARY SIEGEL, HARRY B. STEIN, MICHAEL STONE, GAZELLA TENOR, MEYER TENOR, REBECCA TILLMAN, JACOB ZABRENKO, JOSEPH ZUCKERMAN. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 26: SAM BENOWITZ, ESTHER BERSCHLING, SAUL CABIN, ANN C. EDESON, FANNIE FLEISCHER, HYMAN GOLDENSON, MEYER HELFER, BELLA KALSON, WILLIAM KLEVAN, ESTHER KRAM, KATE KREMER, SAUL H. LANDAU, MATTHEW LEEBOV, IDA LEMELMAN, FANNIE ESTHER LEVINE, ISMAR SOL LEVY, DAVID LONDON, JOHN CASPAR LUDIN, MAX MAR, FANNIE MARCUS, ALVIN MEYERS, CHAYE LEAH MOSCOVITZ, LENA MARTIN NETLER, JACOB NEWMAN, DAVID OPPENHEIM, JOEL ORTH, LENA CABIN PERSKY, DAVID PUDLES, ELLA RABINOWITZ, IDA RADBORD, HENRY RAUH, AARON H. REICH, JOSEPH RUBEN, SAUL RUBIN, JENNIE SCHEINHOLTZ, REUBEN SCHERMER, ANNA SHAPIRA, EDWARD I. SOLOMON, REUBEN SOLTZ, BELLE STAMAN STARSMAN, WALTER S. STERN, JACOB STOLMAN, JACK PHILLIP SUSSMAN, SYLVIA COOPER SWARTZ, HARRY EDWARD TRAUB, ABRAHAM WEISS, EDWARD I. WOLF.

Call DeeAnna Cavinee at 412.521.1975 or e-mail donations@jaapgh.org for more information or to make a contribution to the Jewish Association on Aging.


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE NOVEMBER 17, 2011


The Jewish Chronicle Nov. 17, 2011  

The Jewish Chronicle Nov. 17, 2011

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