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Proctor Pulse A Compilation of articles from Proctor’s Journalism Class. Editors: Moriah Keat, Emmy Snyder What do Seniors like most about spring? It’s Coming It's almost summer! Fiona Clerc

Friends on the Water Best part about spring is swimming and hanging out with friends at Elbow Pond. Ryan Glantz

Issue Nº 2 - Spring 2013 Friends by the Water In February, we took our chairs onto the frozen pond for class. Frigid. In the spring, sitting in the sun by the pond on the stone wall is so much better! Super Senior Peter Southworth

Our Final Destination

Graduation! Dan Watts

Slow Down To me the best part of spring is not having to rush from class to class because its too windy or too cold. I like seeing things come into blossom, hearing the birds that have flown in once again, and just breathing in the warm fresh air. Devon Webster

Smells of Spring My favorite part of spring is the smell. The smell of fresh cut grass, or flowers blooming, or the smell of rain on warm pavement. Nichole Adee

Senior Privileges ! Half the time most underclassmen don’t even know who's a senior and who isn’t. All seniors have earned their way here and it is frustrating to me that we don’t get more respect. Being a three year senior I know I should have more authority, advantages, and privileges than the underclassmen but instead I can’t call things based on seniority.

By Jesser Johnston No prom, class equality, not much respect from the underclassmen. How are seniors supposed to feel special or “on top” if we are not allowed to call ourselves the bosses? Seniors are supposed to lead schools, influence underclassmen, make this school a better place. After three years at Proctor Academy I feel I should have more authority over underclassmen. ! Seniors go through many different high school experiences, and every senior’s story is unique. How do seniors feel about the private school senior life versus the public school seniors life? Through interviewing Proctor students, I hoped to learn about the status of senior year. Two year senior Matthew Field noted, “I do not feel like I get priority or privileges over

underclassmen because the school strives to make everything equal, which then makes it harder to be respected.” Another two year senior who spent his first two years of high school going to public school explained to

me how seniors there were looked up to. ! I went to public school for two years back in Chicago and I became aware of the difference in respect and privileges when I enrolled at Proctor. I’m not necessarily saying its a bad thing that Proctor makes everyone feel equal, but seniors are frustrated with the lack of respect.

I have experienced both the public and private school worlds. By observing how seniors are granted privileges here and how they are privileged at public schools, I realize that students who make the transition usually are upset with the way seniors are treated at Proctor. My friends at home tell me they get to make some decisions for the school, they get to decide who does what, they also are only required to take three academic classes. ! Proctor thinks it’s a privilege that seniors don’t have study hall anymore. Really, almost eighty percent of the time we go back to our dorms at eight anyways. Can’t there be more to senior year at Proctor?

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Sugar Shackin’ Nothing signifies the end of a long winter term like a fresh pint of Proctor’s own maple syrup. Walking around campus in late March, you might have noticed the buckets hanging from sugar maple trees collecting freshly tapped sap. If you had checked out the sugar shack next to the Wilson building this past month, you would have seen faculty and students happily boiling down that sap. First, you put the collected tapped sap into a big evaporator (it looks similar to a big aluminum tub). Dave Pilla, our Woodlands Manager, has been one of the many folks dealing with the maple sugaring process. Pilla has been working, teaching, and learning from our woodlot for about thirty years. He said that he most enjoys the culture behind maple sugaring. “Compared to last, it has been a solid maple sugaring year” explains Pilla. However, no matter how the season went, there is still a beautiful culture behind the process of tapping trees and boiling down sap. Pilla explains the science behind it, the cultural and economic aspect, and the environmental parts. “There is science (actually, very sophisticated science!), mathematics, history, business, magic, myth... it goes on and on.” Sugaring traces back to the 2

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By Mickey Sweeney

Native American settlers, included trading between European countries, and ancient techniques have evolved in the boiling down process.“ Sugaring brings the Proctor community, and the greater Andover community together every spring. The process of maple sugaring is not only part of class time, but also part of project period, the afternoon woods team, and plenty of volunteers. All of this pays off in the end when you can walk away with syrup from trees that grow on the land you have a relationship with. Ian Hislop, a four year senior and fellow Wildlife/Forestry peer, talks highly of maple sugaring here at Proctor. He really enjoys maple sugaring while the snow is melting and the sun is emerging. He just loves syrup! He says, “I think the culture behind maple sugaring is that farmers used to do it as a past time because at this time of year there is not as much to keep them busy. It has now turned in to a huge hit because almost everyone loves syrup.” He is certainly right, everyone loves maple syrup, and it is such a beautiful thing that we make it right here from our Proctor sugar maples. Ian also notes, “Having such a great teacher like Dave who taught me the ins and outs of maple sugaring makes it that much

more enjoyable.” We have Dave Pilla to thank, Proctor alum Eric Johnson, and many others that are part of the Proctor community that share the love for sugaring. As the sugaring season has come to a close, Dave is selling some bottles of the precious syrup. So, if you are at all interested in sugaring, I encourage you to take the Forestry class next year. There is also a project period offered in maple sugaring or talk with Dave and see if you can help him out when the sap starts rising. He is always looking for folks to lend a hand in the sugar shack!

Here, the author and Laura DeBlois ’12 get a taste of Proctor’s maple syrup


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Challenges and Expectations for PG’s Odaine Franklin Well yes it is tough being a Post Graduate student at a boarding school - a lot is expected out of the older students. Faculty and staff are always watching you closely, and you have to pay attention to what you’re doing to make sure you don’t screw up. I interviewed some faculty and staff members and coaches such as Head football coach Ben Rulli and also the Athletic Director of the school, Gregor Makechnie. When I asked what is expected out of a PG here at Proctor, Ben’s response was, “A post-graduate has the same expectations as any student at Proctor. I fully expect the student to participate in afternoon activities, be a community minded member, and be in good standing with the school.” Hearing the same expectations as younger kids have here at Proctor made me more relaxed, I came here thinking that us PG’s had to live up to some really high expectations. I asked Ben what he thought were the biggest challenges for PG’s and how some faculty and staff see us as role models on campus. Ben said, “The biggest challenge that I have seen for some post-graduates is that they do not realize how much of an impact that they can have in the Proctor community. They are some of the older students on campus and they are viewed as leaders. Postgraduates are expected to be role models in the community. Some of the post-graduates have become engaged in off-campus programs, plays and musicals, athletics, etc. To me a post-graduate is just like any other student in the school”. I sometimes feel that too much are expected out of us but not all faculty or staff will speak up about that. I also wished I had more freedom but we can’t always have what we want. I got some feed back from my fellow PG’s, Brian Higgins and Gunnar Solberg. 

Live to Learn, Learn to Live

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Athlete Highlights By Ryan Glantz When I asked Gunnar how he feels about the expectations, his answer was similar to Ben Rulli’s. He noted, “I feel as though the expectations are the same as any senior. My goals as a PG were to get better grades and be accepted to better colleges; they have been met. I think it is ridiculous that I am under the same rules as freshman. My biggest challenge has been not having as much freedom as I wish I could. I would have a much better time this year if I was allowed to leave campus on weekdays to get meals....” Even though we have the same expectations as all the seniors, it’s more freedom that PGs want. But we can’t always get what we want. Brian Higgins is another PG that thinks there should be some leeway and tweaks for PGs here at Proctor. “We have high expectations, we are taught to be student athletes which is good, but we are also kids and Proctor is helping us mature. My goals as a PG [are] to play hockey at a high level and be successful doing so. My goals were met as I will be playing hockey at the DIII level next year. No, the rules should be different. There is limited freedom at Proctor or any boarding school, my weekend during my years at public school were a little different, starting with no classes on Saturday. Adjusting to the rules is hard.”  As you can see, a lot is expected out of us here at Proctor but Brian is right, we are still young and by having some pressure and by having eyes watching out for us also helps us mature. However, there are some things that Proctor should change to allow PGs a few more freedoms so we can meet our goals and also be the positive influence the school hopes for.

Austin Nadeau A senior from Walpole, Massachusetts, Austin is the captain of the Varsity Boys Lacrosse team. Austin has been attending Proctor for two years and has made an impact to the lacrosse program as one of the starting midfielders and the reigning leading scorer. His accomplishments last year were a strong start as he received first team all Lakes Region and the Offensive MVP for Proctor.  Training in the summer with lacrosse players on Team USA has prepared him for the next level of play as he recently committed to Gettysburg University, a highly regarded NCAA Division Three lacrosse program.  “Last year, I was being pushed over a lot, lifting was a key in the offseason as I wanted my playing style to be more physical.”  The future college athlete has already set the stage, with 8 goals in the last three games.  Although the team has one win in their last three games, Austin will continue to carry his team in the right direction with his offensive skills and hard work.

Jamie Gaines A senior from Warner, New Hampshire, Jamie is a third year captain of the Girls Varsity Lacrosse team. In her fourth year at Proctor, Jamie has contributed to Proctor as a three sport varsity athlete since her freshman year.  In lacrosse, Jamie has been the leading defensive midfielder, also known as the shutdown defender.  She has received multiple awards during her Proctor career, including the Marvin Award her freshman year and lacrosse MVP   in her sophomore spring.   About this year’s lacrosse team, Jamie observed, “We have very talented players, the only struggle we find is becoming a team, but we have all the potential to become successful, ... the season will soon turn around.”  She has recently been recruited to play at Susquehanna University, a nationally ranked NCAA Division Three women’s lacrosse team as well as Division Three soccer schools. We expect Jamie will continue to succeed on and off the field! 3


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Tricia Austin

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By Kayla Harris

Not many people know Tricia Austin. You can find her behind the window of our athletic equipment room in her role of Assistant Athletic Equipment Manager. Many Proctor athletes have known her as coach of varsity softball and varsity field hockey.

Trish (r) and Kate Smith

! Kate Smith and Tricia Austin attended school together at Proctor Academy. They played sports together and were pretty good friends. They connected in college and married a few years later. They currently live at the Tilton School where they are dorm parents. Why Proctor? ! One thing that is different about Trish is she was a student here at one time. When I asked Trish why she chose to attend Proctor Academy for only two years, she responded, “My best friend at the time, Sarah Hamor, ... was enrolled here.” Proctor Academy became Trish’s school, even if it was only for a short time. ! As a student at Proctor, Trish was lucky enough to have some pretty great opportunities. One of her most memorable times at Proctor was orientation. “It was really the first introduction to what Proctor was all about and it’s kind of like the corner stone of the building process that the Proctor community creates for you. It kind of sets the tone. For only being five days it was a powerful experience and you form lasting

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relationships. I can still name everyone on my orientation group and I’m still in contact with at least half them.” ! Some other memorable experiences at Proctor were project period, being a trivarsity athlete, and off-campus programs. She played on the field hockey team as a goalie, the basketball team, and the softball team. “Junior year on the basketball team was probably my favorite because we were all really good friends and we were all super close because it was a really small team.” ! One of her most favorite experiences at Proctor was Mountain Classroom. She told me it was a great experience and it gave her the opportunity to travel the US and she may never really have that opportunity again. She recalls one of the challenges. “My solo was one of the hardest parts but I was able to get through it and it made me a better person. I remember I took three pieces of paper out of the back of my notebook and ripped them up into 52 small pieces and made a deck of cards. I think I must have played at least 100 games of solitaire within those 72 hours. !

! It takes a lot to come back to your high school but more and more Proctor alum are doing it. “I love being part of this place. I want to try to give back to a community [that] has given so much to me. It’s like an extended family.” Trish continued, “I like the people, the kids and adults alike. I like how the community fosters the individual - how it takes people from all over the world and lets them into the same community even though we are all different. We truly are all different, but that’s what makes this place strong.”

“If there is anything that Proctor has taught me it’s to embrace the person that I am, if you want something - go get it, and that friendships can really last for a lifetime - be lasting relationships.” --Tricia Austin

Proctor Black Bears?


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Recent hunting trip to Texas

Proctor’s Hunting Roots By Tim Braley !

Most people would not believe you if you told them that at one time, Proctor students were allowed to skip classes to go hunting on opening day. That really did happen - guns and hunting are a huge part of Proctor’s history. Beyond Dave Pilla and Dave Kenney, people at Proctor are getting students involved in the outdoors. ! In Wildlife Science class with Dave Pilla, he teaches the importance of ethical hunting as well as fully understanding mother nature. Dave Kenney is currently running a 3D archery activity in the afternoons for students to participate in and learn the fundamentals of both hunting and shooting. Few schools can match the type of offerings that we have for the outdoors and hunting. ! Recently twelve Proctor students and parents took the first annual hog hunting trip to South Texas with Dave Kenney. Not only was it a great time, but kids who have never hunted before were able to learn how to hunt and how to retrieve and prepare your game. ! Dave summarized archery at Proctor by noting, “The archery team is going on it’s sixth season at Proctor and we started this as a way to get more connected to the outdoors. We have gone to IBO (International Bowhunting Organization) worlds twice and maybe are headed this year again. We just had our first bow-hunt in Nixon, TX. We also have been certifying students in hunter and bowhunter safety for the last seven years during project period” ! Dave Pilla has been involved with the Proctor woodlands for over 25 years. Dave confirmed that indeed the first day of hunting and fishing season could be taken off by Proctor students long ago. Proctor kids used to be able to keep their firearms locked away on campus grounds and hunt on the Proctor woodlands, but a few bad events meant the end of that privilege. When I asked Dave if he would like to bring back the firearms and hunting on campus, he said that he is happy with where the Proctor community is now and believes that Dave Kenney is doing great things to promote hunting.

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One of the many hogs shot on the trip

Stepping Up to Tennis V-Squad By Emmy Snyder “Alright, cuties! Let’s bring it in!” shouts Melanie. Regrouping, the girls approach their new coach and end their conversations. All of them are smiling and giggling as Melanie tells silly jokes and makes them laugh even more. The girls’ varsity tennis team has never seemed this happy. It is a new start for a new season. Over the last four years, Proctor’s tennis team has been a powerhouse with many experienced tennis players. After graduation, only four of last year’s thirteen varsity girls returned. Not only that, but last September, the previous coach, Whitey Joslin, retired. Throughout the 2012-2013 school year, Proctor was searching for a new coach. As the spring season neared, Melanie Maness was promoted to varsity from JV. In the beginning of the season, the most challenging time is the tryouts. While previous members are able to maintain their spots, the tryouts are intimidating for newcomers. Beth Hoy, a four year senior, is one of the few returning players from last year’s varsity team. For the returning seniors, creating a new team was exciting as well as worrisome. Many girls who tried out for varsity took advantage of the numerous openings on the team to try out. ! Fortunately, there were no cuts this year, and eight new members have joined the girls’ varsity. With so many recruits, there is even more excitement about what will happen to the team for the 2013 spring season. “I went into this team with really low expectations,” Hoy says, “but now I am happily surprised by how much fun I am having playing tennis with these girls,” she smiles. Having Melanie as a coach has been a great change from the years before. While

varsity teams tends to be more challenging, intimidating and focused, Melanie also brings in a fun vibe. Hoy says, “ I think [Melanie] is charismatic, focused, driven, fun, and hilarious. I honestly love her as a coach.” Melanie is also known for her continuous and undying support for the team members. Even when one is in doubt and discouraged, Mel makes sure she would kill them with constant encouragement and inspiration that will motivate them to do better. “I expect honesty, respect, and compassion for each other and our opponents,” Melanie notes. “I expect to witness agonizing tests and great moments of glory.” The team members hope to bring in more team spirit as well as improve their game throughout the season. Although only two weeks into the season, many have already shown signs of improvement. Another difference this year is the structure. Although Melanie runs the show, she gives everyone on the team a chance to be a leader. She is open minded to any suggestions that may help the team to be productive during practices. She has also given the captains opportunities to talk to the team and advise them on their strokes. What Melanie seems to be doing here is giving the team more time to act like a team. Allowing that freedom to speak up has allowed the team to talk and plan practices amongst themselves. Melanie will still contribute to discussions and add her ideas, but many times, she will give everyone responsibility. What may be the most enjoyable part about this team may be their ability to “jell together.” Each member appears to be open minded to different ideas and drills and each has contributed in designing their warm-up drills before a match. Without complaint or hesitation, they all accept any suggestions. If a drill does not work out, they simply laugh it off and scrap the ideas.

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Spring Transformation By Nicole Adee ! Every year, spring rolls around to Andover and completely changes the atmosphere on campus. The sun comes out, the river warms up, and energies among both students and faculty sky rocket. The spring also brings new families to campus to observe the many gifts that Proctor has to offer. With the spring Revisit Day, campus goes through a 24 hour, 360 degree transformation. The admissions team stands up in assembly, smiling, and says,“Just be yourselves! Be honest, be real..” Recently, Proctor students are crying “Fake!” ! Revisit day is frantic. Everyone is dressed to impress. The dining hall is over flowing. Campus is cleaned up, the best food is served, and everyday classes seem to be just a little bit more exciting. Assembly, one of the most memorable parts of the day, is wild and full of activities including the popular project period flash mob. ! The new families come, and yes, fall in love with Proctor. How could you not? After seeing these scripted events, students are beginning to question the school’s authenticity on revisit day. What Proctor are they actually falling in love with? Is this the real Proctor? ! The average day at Proctor is far from what the visiting families see. Assembly announcements are not filled with dancing and roller skating skits, they are filled with announcements about staying out of trouble, or not throwing bikes into bushes.

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You Could Be Better Off

! “It’s a show” Nick Solley comments. “It shows our community at its finest but a lot of it isn’t real. I remember sophomore year when it had been announced to the community that project period was no longer going to happen and then three days later on revisit day, we showed a slide show and promoted project period when we were just told it wasn’t even going to happen.” ! Although Proctor does change immensely in this 24 hour period, it is all for the best of the community. Once the campus is cleaned and posters are hung up, they remain there for the rest of the year. It is human nature to want to put on the best face possible for the observing public. ! There are several other issues we need to take into account as we start to critique Revisit Day. Along with being our school and our home, Proctor is also a business. It is the schools job to advertise and promote themselves in the best way possible, just like any other successful business. We also need to realize that Proctor is not necessarily false advertising. Although we have a tendency to put on another face when we are put in the spot light, the face we choose is just the best for of ourselves. ! The community specifically pinpoints its best qualities and exploits them to the fullest. Yes, we may not have a roller skating arena set up every weekend, but that is not the point that the school is trying to make. After years of watching these changes occur, I have realized that the school is celebrating certain aspects of who we are. Revisit day is simply a day where students and faculty are allowed to show off our special traits. On these days we celebrate our passion, dedication, creativity, charisma, and heart. In my four years here I have learned that along with being kind, devoted, and hardworking, Proctor students are also proud. On Revisit Day, all the best qualities of the school are exploited, especially the pride of our talented students.

By Devon Webster

Tennis V-Squad, cont. Having Melanie as a coach has definitely affected the overall atmosphere of the team. Each member of the team seems much more relaxed, much less intimidated, and much more motivated. With Melanie’s expectations, the girls feel more determined and prepared for their matches. With a much more spirited team, this tennis season is going to be great, win or lose. “It’s early in the season,” Melanie says, “but I see unlimited potential in this bunch.”

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I glance at my phone. No texts, no calls. It’s 5:07. I will reach my destination in forty-three minutes. I have been on the bus for what feels like an hour, bored, and I have nothing to do but observe my fellow travelers. A businessman sits a few rows ahead of me, tapping away at his keyboard. I imagine he is probably writing emails. A teenager is occupied by his iPhone, and a woman by her iPad. Every person on the bus with me is on some piece of technology, except for the occasional person reading a rare paperback book. Every time I ride the bus from Boston’s South Station, this is what I notice, and the only reason I notice this is because I’m bored. Because unlike the majority of the people around me, I don’t have a smart gadget to fiddle with. Surprisingly, I enjoy this boredom. Why is everyone so obsessed? It’s just a phone! All year I have been incredibly indecisive about whether I should upgrade to an iPhone. Right now I have a plain old phone and I like it. iPhones are really cool. They look cool, and you look cool having one. You can do fun things on them. However cool and fun iPhones may be, is there something more to these gadgets? Do they have any substance? Does it go deeper than the applications you can download? A recent study from the British Telegraph show that per day, the average smartphone owner spends over two hours on their device. The study showed that out of these two hours or more, the person was only using their gadget for calling or texting 16% of the time, and spending the remaining 84% on social media, the internet, games and various apps. I have heard people say that their iPhone is like a safety blanket, that it saves them from social situations. If someone they don’t want to see is walking by, they can just look down at their phone. My friend told me that if she is with someone and they walk up to a group of people she doesn’t really know, instead of standing there looking awkward, she will just whip out her phone. Everybody has had that feeling of social awkwardness, but the more I thought about it, the more crazy it sounded.

Proctor Panthers!


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at a screen really give you permission to ignore people standing right in front of you? Senior Ryan Glantz observes, “I notice that everyone is on their phone all the time—just looking at it—and I’m sitting there cause I don’t have an iPhone.” All over the world, eye contact is a sign of respect showing one is actually listening. When did it become okay to pick up your phone in the middle of a conversation, or pick it up so you don’t have to have a conversation at all? Everybody has heard about those people who hide behind their computer screen and only feel confident enough to say certain things online, but this is a whole new level. Technology is taking away our social skills, as well as the physical eye-contact and conversations that are so important and allow you to develop relationships and friendships. Senior Mickey Sweeney groaned, “I HATE IT when I am walking the paths around campus, to and from classes by myself, and a person coming from the other direction is approaching and their face is buried in their phone, completely avoiding eye-contact and the simple ‘hello’ and a smile that makes me happy!” Have you ever gone to the Wise and been really disappointed? Everyone is just sitting around looking bored. The other night, I started off sitting at a table with a few people, and as time passed the same thing happened again and again; people would get up and say, “Alright I’m gonna go back to my room.” This is something that I, like many other students, have said a thousand times. There you are sitting at a table with friends and you want to go back to your room because you’re bored. The only thing in your room is your computer. You’re saying that facebook, netflix, instagram, or stumbleupon will entertain you more than the people, friends, and peers that are sitting right in front of you. What an insult. Imagine just for one second that you didn’t have a laptop in your room; you’d be bored and you’d go to the Wise. You’d talk to people and engage with the world. Imagine just for a second that you didn’t have a cell phone. You might be forced to look up into the face of someone that isn’t that familiar to you and say hello. Just imagine for a second, that you didn’t have a laptop, an iPad, a cellphone, that all you had was you and your wandering mind. Would you twiddle your thumbs?

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Self Sacrifice & Devotion By Michelle Holmes Division Two NEPSAC Player of the Year Kelcey Crawford dedicates most of her time and energy towards becoming a better hockey goalie. There’s no doubt that Kelcey is one of the most selfsacrificing student-athletes around. Kelcey began playing hockey when she was six and became a goalie at eight years old. At that age, she sacrificed many things such as sleepovers, dances and parties. Those things may not seem all that important, but to a kid her age, they were. In order to become a better goalie, she knew she had to give those things up, and even though it wasn’t fun at the time, it has definitely paid off. Freshman year at Proctor Academy, Kelcey had more talent than most goalies her age. She split games with the senior goalie, Taylor Weaver. The summer after her first year at Proctor, she trained and worked hard, and when the team saw her sophomore year, we were all shocked. Kelcey wasn’t the same goalie she was freshman year; she was strikingly improved. It was amazing to see how hard work really paid off for her, and that motivated all of her teammates to work harder too. ! That year, Kelcey was given the Coaches Award, which was impressive as she was only a sophomore. As a junior, she was elected captain and led the team to win the Division ll NEPSAC Championship. She was awarded the HNIB MVP, along with the Coaches Award for the second year in a row. Carrying over to her senior year, Kelcey was captain again and earned the MVP award, was named to the All-Scholastic Team in the Boston Globe, Lakes Region MVP, and impressively named the Division ll Player of the Year. When asked, Kelcey’s teammates describe her as, “fun, dedicated, hard working, smart, positive, energetic, a team player, and motivated.” Sophomore Fallon Adair explained why she believes Kelcey is dedicated. “She spends time

outside of practice to work out, always thinks of things she can do better that will help her improve, and she always takes the opportunity to get on the ice whenever she can.” Coach Christina Dotchin explained, “She is a very dedicated student-athlete. She is extremely hard working, coachable, and has been an outstanding captain for us the last two years. She always puts the needs of the team before her own, which makes her an incredibly valuable player. Kelcey is also a very talented goaltender. She is quick in the net and helped lead the defense against many tough opponents this season.” In Kelsey’s words, “Dedication means putting everything you have into whatever you’re doing. You do everything you can to get better, and you are always striving to get to the next level no matter what stands in your way.” Coach Dotchin continued, “Kelcey has dedicated a lot of her life to hockey, but she also works just as hard in the classroom. Her dedication to hockey shows through all of the summer clinics and goalie training she has done with her goalie coach. In previous years she would travel after classes every Monday to train with her goalie coach, then get back in time to participate in our late evening practice. She would never complain about being tired and seemed to never get enough ice time. She just loves the game and her team!” Kelcey works hard in everything she does, not only in hockey, but also during the fall playing soccer, playing lacrosse in the spring, and she is committed to her academics. All of this hard work will soon pay off for her, as she has her hopes set high, “My future goals would be to ... maybe play on the USA Olympic team.” Everyone believes she can do this, there are no doubts in anyone's mind. She has worked hard for many years, and deserves every opportunity she is given.

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Contributing Authors All authors are in Journalism class with Peter Southworth Jesser Johnston Jesser, from Lake Forest, Illinois, is a three year senior who enjoys playing the lacrosse, staying active, and having a good time.

Odaine Franklyn Odaine is a post graduate student at Proctor. Why follow a path when you can make your own?

Mickey Sweeney Mickey is a five year senior who seriously enjoys a full thermos of coffee in the morning, sun, water with lemon, Cape Cod bagel's, veggie cream cheese, and everything in between.

Ryan is a two year senior who plays a Canadian sport.

Ryan Glantz

He is a ‘Cali kid.’ Tim Braley Tim is a four-year day student at Proctor who loves to hunt, fish, golf and hang out with friends and family.

Devon Webster Devon is a four year senior at Proctor Academy who enjoys quilting and wandering in the woods.

Emmy Snyder Emmy Snyder is a New London, NH resident. Music is an important influence in her life, especially since she has endless music running through her head. She plays piano, loves Nicole Adee Nicole Elisabeth Adee is photography, and she usually has a smile on a four year senior from her face. beautiful Marblehead Massachusetts who thoroughly enjoys a hot Mchelle Holmes Michelle is a senior cup of joe and a fresh from Goffstown, NH bagel with some garlic and herb cream cheese who knows something courtesy of Bagel about being dedicated World. to ice hockey.

Kayla Harris Kayla is a four year senior who has participated on varsity soccer, hockey, and softball. She’s been lucky enough to experience learning skills, living in a dorm, and she’s had amazing courses and learned new skills at Proctor. Proctor has definitely prepared her for college.

Editors Emmy Snyder Moriah Keat

Proctor Academy 204 Main Street Andover, NH 03216

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Proctor Pulse Spring #2 '13  

Proctor Academy Journalism