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MAY 2018

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PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

Keeping It In The Family • Peninsula Portraits • Martin’s Movie With A Message Somewhere Over The Rainebeau • Our Passionate Supporter Of The Arts • Heavenly Offerings At God’s Kitchen Must Try Dishes • Focus On Mt Eliza • Sport On An Isolated Island


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contents 7. Events 8. Peninsula Style 10. Keeping It In The Family

Writers: Melissa Walsh, Brodie Cowburn, Andrea Louise Thomas, Peter McCullough, Cameron McCullough Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Publisher: Cameron McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au Marg Harrison, 0414 773 153 or marg@mpnews.com.au General enquiries: essence@mpnews.com.au Registered address: 2/1 Tyabb Road, Mornington 3931 Phone: 5973 6424 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

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In the Gjergja household, the dining room table was always the hub of the home. The kids did their homework there, the family ate meals, and it is the place where food and wine brought everyone together. Marco and Melissa Gjergja remember this fondly and, as the owners of Port Philip Estate, the tradition of family and food has followed them throughout their life.

18. Peninsula Portraits

A resident of Rye, Vicki Sullivan is a peninsula girl who is much admired for her outstanding realist works. The winner of many awards in Australia and the UK, Vicki’s 'piece de resistance' has been being awarded the title “Associate Living Master” by the Art Renewal Centre, in the U.S.A. the largest foundation in the world for the promotion and education of realist art.

22. Martin's Movie With A Message

It’s said that sometimes art imitates life, which couldn’t be more the case for filmmaker Martin Copping. Having been hit with his own personal tragedy including alcohol addiction, Martin turned to the camera to raise awareness and highlight some of the issues that have previously affected his life.

28. Food Glorious Food

Steve Owens and his wife Michele are definitely not afraid of a challenge with the couple following their passion for food and travelling from the Mornington Peninsula across the Nullarbor to find fabulous food destinations. The journey is part of the YouTube star’s online cooking show, Steve’s Kitchen. The online following is so big it reached more than 196,000 subscribers since they began just four years ago, with over 2 million regular viewers per video.

34. Somewhere Over The Rainebeau

Creating a plastic-free lifestyle certainly isn’t easy, but it’s a project of passion for Rye entrepreneurs Jodie Read and Sarah Fitzgerald. Rainebeau is a lunchbox company started by Jodie and Sarah that is determined to make a difference.

44. Our Passionate Supporter Of The Arts

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

With her flaming auburn hair, bright red lipstick and multi-coloured spectacles, Kerry Larder just oozes creativity. The bubbly, five foot gem spends her days and weeks listening to her muse as she creates an eclectic body of work and encourages other artists to follow their passion.

49.

Women Getting Things Done

Jan Clarke is a woman who gets things done. After a lifelong career in sales, the bubbly peninsula retiree decided it was time to give back to the community and has now found herself a big part of the Revamped Jewellery organisation.

52. Small Wonders

Noticing the infinite intricacies of the natural world most people overlook is the cornerstone of jeweller, Kate Macindoe’s business.

60. Heavenly Offerings At God's Kitchen

There’s a special ambience the moment you walk into God’s Kitchen with its rich history and modern venue. The Mornington restaurant and bar is situated within a heritage listed church which takes you back in time. William Grover built St Andrew’s Uniting Church in 1876 and since 1984 the church has been converted to a restaurant.

Cover Photo Autumn is a favourite time of year for both residents and visitors of the Mornington Peninsula. The changing colours and the milder temperatures paves a gentle trail, that leads to the cooler months ahead. Picture: Yanni.

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Set on more than 2000 square metres of land, and with views that encompass all from Safety Beach through to Port Phillip Head, this remarkable property must surely rank as one of the most impressive and unique properties on the Mornington Peninsula.

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May 2018

68. Must Try Dishes 70. Crossword 72. Focus on Mt Eliza 78. On Top Of The Bay

Little known, even by those mainlanders who live closest to it, French Island is the largest of the Western Port islands comprising some 16,350 hectares. Surrounded by mud flats at ebb tide, it appears remote, mysterious even. There are vague tales of buried treasure, long-ago escaped convicts from Tasmania, and an island 'spook' which has been pursued at full gallop on horseback.


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May

Peninsula events

MUSHROOMS IN MAY WILD MUSHROOM MEANDER Every Friday, Saturday & Sunday in May @ 11.00am & 1.00pm Begins within the rustic setting of T'Gallant Vineyards in Main Ridge. Ramblers will be enlightened on how to identify the different varieties of mushrooms - palatable and poisonous. T'Gallant Vineyards 1385 Mornington Flinders Road, Main Ridge Ph 5931 1300 www.tgallant.com.au

MORNINGTON RACECOURSE MARKET May 13 Take Mum out for a lovely morning at Mornington Racecourse Market. With plenty of local designers and makers, as well as lots of tasty treats you'll be sure to find a special gift for Mum and enjoy a yummy market breakfast or lunch. Mornington Racecourse Market, Racecourse Road, Mornington. Ph 5976 3266 www.craftmarkets.com.au

SPECIAL OCCASION PHOTO SHOOT

CINE, WINE & DINE AT TROFEO ESTATE

May 31 Come and take photos of your family in a special themed photo display area with animals. Great for family memories or for a special occasion gift card. Rain, Hayne & Shine 490 Stumpy Gully Rd, Balnarring Ph 5983 1691 www.rhsfarm.com.au

May 19 Each month Trofeo Estate transforms its beautiful restaurant into a unique cinema experience. Cine, Wine and Dine is dinner and a movie with a twist! Set in the original 1930's building, join us for our a la carte dinner, then enjoy a movie and dessert on us. Dinner service starts at 6pm, movie starts 8.30pm. Trofeo Estate 85 Harrisons Rd, Dromana Ph 5981 8688 www.trofeoestate.com

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May 25 Take the thrilling 30km event from Koonya Beach to Point Nepean, or the Super 60km event from Cape Schanck to Point Nepean. Mornington Peninsula - From Koonya Beach to Point Nepean (30km event) or Cape Schanck to Point Nepean, Mornington Peninsula, 3944 Melbourne Coastrek Ph 02 8039 3580 www.coastrek.com.au

May 13 We will be showing our appreciation for all that our Mums do by letting them ride for free!! All Mums who are accompanied by their kids will receive a complimentary return trip. Complete this special day out and spoil Mum with a glass of bubbles or a cup of tea on our deck. 1085 Arthurs Seat Road, Dromana Ph 5987 0600 www.aseagle.com.au

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KEEPING IT IN THE FAMILY By Melissa Walsh Photos by Shani Hodson - zoso.com.au

I

n the Gjergja household, the dining room table was always the hub of the home. The kids did their homework there, the family ate meals, and it is the place where food and wine brought everyone together. Marco and Melissa Gjergja remember this fondly and, as the owners of Port Philip Estate, the tradition of family and food has followed them throughout their life. Peninsula Essence visits Port Phillip Estate and talks to Marco and Melissa about the family vineyard that has taken on a life of its own. “It has always been a family business and I became involved with the original property acquisition in 2000,” said Marco. “Originally it started as a hobby business with just 10 acres under vines and where we just grew the fruit. These days we have about 150 acres, a cellar door, restaurant and accommodation.” It was Marco and Melissa’s father, Giorgio who brought the family down to the peninsula with his love of the sea and sailing. Even the symbol on Port Phillip Estate's logo, the 'Blue Peter', is maritime code for 'P' as well as the flag that is used to start a yacht race. continued next page...

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With his Dalmatian/Venetian heritage came a love for sailing and a fondness for fine wine that turned out to be a perfect match for the Mornington Peninsula.

“While we both followed our individual careers overseas we were always on a food and wine journey as well and it just happened to bring us back here eventually.”

“Our mum, Dianne and dad bought the Port Phillip Estate vineyard in 2000 and then Kooyong four years later, and then finally retired from the electrical manufacturing business he had set up decades earlier,” said Marco and Melissa.

With the vineyard becoming more prosperous, and the move of the winemaking contract to Kooyong within a few years, it was decided that it was time to put a building on the property so Marco and his mum started sourcing architects.

While the siblings were off following their own dreams with successful careers overseas, they still maintained a presence in the family business, taking pleasure in helping with their expertise wherever they could.

“We found this parcel of land and the business owner was keen to sell it so we knew this was the perfect location for our restaurant and cellar door. Mum had dabbled in architecture so we started sourcing architects together. We loved the work of Roger Wood and Randall Marsh and their very solid brutalist sculpture style and wanted something that we couldn’t dream up ourselves,” said Marco and Melissa. Ironically, it was their father who ended up encouraging the building once he had seen the plans even though it had taken a while to get him on board.

“I was in my 20s when we started the hobby business, and we spent our time relabelling and rebranding,” said Marco, who has a background in strategic management and design. “We did content and newsletters but it was on a very small scale,” said Melissa, who had a lucrative career in corporate finance.

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Where I belong. OPEN DAY FRIDAY 18 MAY 9.00AM - 11.00AM www.peninsulagrammar.vic.edu.au

Peninsula Grammar’s Open Day provides visitors to our school the opportunity to learn more about who we are. Through our student-led tours, engagement with our experienced staff and time spent in our state of the art facilities there is much to be learnt about the Peninsula experience. Please join us on Friday 18 May to hear more from our Principal and to explore how our school can shape the learning journey of your child. For more information about our innovative programs, visit our website or call to arrange a tour of our School on 9788 7777.

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EVERY THURSDAY AT 9.30 AM Tours depart from the H.A. Macdonald Pavilion. Enter via Gate 2 on Wooralla Drive, Mount Eliza.


“When the plans were revealed, it was not what we had expected. We had seen very rectangular shapes with these architects and this was quite different. My father commented ‘Well you wanted something you couldn’t dream up’ and he was quite correct. It turned out to be even better than we expected,” said Marco. It’s been eight years since Giorgio decided to hand the family reigns to those two family members and the pair still love every part of the journey. “We became hands-on in 2010 when we both returned from overseas at the same time,” said Melissa, explaining that they both

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wear several hats in the business. “Although we must stress that neither of us is a winemaker, and we stay away from the kitchen,” said Marco with a smile. “It is a journey we would never have expected but we are both so thrilled to be part of the family business,” they said. As for Giorgio, he is a regular there for meals and the odd glass of wine and the family still gather around a dining room table when they can to enjoy a meal, a laugh and, occasionally, a heated discussion.

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Surrounded by mounds of native grasses and indigenous spotted gums, the new Port Phillip Estate winery, designed by Wood Marsh Architecture, emerges from the landscape as a dramatic curved sculpture made of rammed-earth. Inside, a large cellar door and tasting room, and a light-filled restaurant open out on to an expansive outdoor deck. Underneath, state-of-the-art winemaking facilities – a barrel room, bottling line, wine processing plant, cellaring and offices – share space with six luxury accommodation suites, complete with private decks. Views across the vines to the sea are panoramic. Port Phillip Estate is at 263 Red Hill Road, Red Hill South. Phone 5989 4444.

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PENINSULA PORTRAITS By Meredith Langmaid

A

resident of Rye, Vicki Sullivan is a peninsula girl who is much admired for her outstanding realist works. The winner of many awards in Australia and the UK, Vicki’s 'piece de resistance' has been being awarded the title “Associate Living Master” by the Art Renewal Centre, in the U.S.A. the largest foundation in the world for the promotion and education of realist art. The Sullivan family have lived on the peninsula since the mid 19th century. Dennis and Honorah Sullivan arrived in Sydney from Killarney, Ireland, with eight children in 1839. They soon sailed on to Melbourne and in 1841 Daniel took up the leasehold of Point Nepean. They erected a small stone dairy, which is one of the oldest buildings in Victoria still standing today. The family made a living as lime burners and self-sufficient farmers. Daniel held a grazing licence covering four square miles from Portsea

to the tip of Point Nepean; an area that is now Point Nepean National Park. During the 10 years they lived there, the father and two of the brothers (John and Daniel) died and were buried at Point Nepean at the Quarantine grounds. In 1852 the ship Ticonderoga arrived with typhus aboard, landing at Point Nepean. The Sullivan family had to leave their houses to shelter the sick and the then Governor Latrobe decided to resume the land as a quarantine station. The Sullivans then moved up to Portsea where daughters Hannah Ford and Margaret McGrath lived. Vicki's great-great-grandfather Timothy Sullivan and his son Spencer were bakers. Spencer’s son and Vicki’s grandfather, Angelo, continued next page...

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was born in the house above Sullivan's Bakery and General Store, which is today Sorrento’s "Just Fine Food". Such strong family connections with Point Nepean led Vicki to become involved in the campaign to save Point Nepean as a National Park. "Through people power, we won the battle and a great victory, but as David Suzuki says, a win is temporary but a loss is forever, so we must always maintain our vigilance.” Vicki graciously showed me her humble abode, full of remarkable paintings that portray an uncompromising truth and accuracy with close attention to detail. Walking down to her art studio, seeing the sun shine through beautiful flowers and a staircase where a

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grapevine grew across the carved doors, I had the impression of walking into an art studio in Florence. The inside was equally appealing, full of amazing artworks, easels, soft furnishings and immaculate brushes, all surrounded by the scent of lavender. Vicki Sullivan has studied art in Australia and at the Angel Academy of Art in Florence, Italy. She believes that, “Art is a wonderful universal vehicle for communication which can capture a moment in time in human life and evoke an awareness of something deeper, something beyond the surface of our everyday existence". continued next page...


"It is always a challenge as an artist to capture a human’s individual features and likeness while revealing the fundamental essence of the sitter’s personality, soul and physical character. My aim is to give a very three dimensional aspect to the work which goes further and reveals something of the inner essence of my subject. I like my portraits to feel present, as if they could almost walk out of the painting. My goal as I approach each painting is to depict a sincere honesty within each of my subjects and capture this within my painterly portrayal.” A finalist for Hidden Faces of the Archibald, (The Victorian Salon de Refuse) for her painting of John Waters, Vicki is now painting a portrait of Sigrid Thornton to enter into this year’s Archibald prize. Vicki and her family have contributed so much to the sustainability of the Peninsula and the Arts. Let’s wish her the very best in her quest for the Archibald Prize; she deserves every success.

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MARTIN’S MORNINGTON PENINSULA MOVIE WITH A MESSAGE By Brodie Cowburn

I

t’s said that sometimes art imitates life, which couldn’t be more the case for filmmaker Martin Copping. Having been hit with his own personal tragedy including alcohol addiction, Martin turned to the camera to raise awareness and highlight some of the issues that have previously affected his life.

“Recently I’d also broken up with a girl, and I finally said enough is enough, and instead of turning to negative things to get through all of that I made sure everything I did was really positive and I pushed myself do something that would help not just me, but other people.”

‘The Dunes’ is a psychological thriller directed, written, and shot by Martin, which was taken across the Mornington Peninsula. The film focuses on the topic of alcoholism, which is an issue that hits particularly close to home for Martin.

Martin has taken the tough step of channelling his real life struggles into his film, which he says he has done in hope of preventing others from suffering in the same way that he has in the past.

“The film is a story about an Australian writer who moved out to Los Angeles to pursue his writing career. His life’s not going exactly the way that he hoped and he has to go back to Australia to deal with some personal things and sell his family home in the fictional town of The Dunes. When he goes back a figure from his past comes back into his life, and that sets the story,” he said

“This is a fictional story, but it’s a cautionary tale of what happens if you don’t face your problems and instead choose to mask them with alcohol or drugs. I want to use the film as a platform to start a conversation primarily about substance abuse, which is something that I’ve witnessed firsthand. It can be really difficult for people to speak about their problems sometimes, so I wanted to start conversations where people can share the difficult things they’re going through and share them in an uplifting way rather than turning to destructive solutions like substance abuse. It’s been an incredible experience,” he said.

“I wrote the film after my mum passed away two years ago. She had a severe drinking problem, and I watched her deteriorate more and more over the years; it was a very challenging thing to witness. Obviously growing up with something like that, it has a pretty severe impact on a young kid, and it certainly did for me. I struggled with being a part of that environment, and making the film was a bit of a cathartic exercise.

The process of getting to work on the film is something that certainly didn’t take much time for Martin, who immediately put his head down and got started after the idea first popped into his head. continued next page...

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“Almost instantly after all this happened the idea for a film was born, and I pitched it to a production company and they came on board. I then wrote the script in 10 days, flew back to Australia in 10 days, and shot the film in 10 days. I ran a Kickstarter to help pay for it, and I really wasn’t expecting the response that I got, I’ve been getting messages from complete strangers who finally felt comfortable talking about their issues, and a lot of people became involved with that campaign. I had friends of mine reach out to me to talk about their suffering, and I hope the message keeps spreading and it continues to help people. We raised 50,000 dollars through the Kickstarter in two months,” Martin said. Filming has taken place across Rye and Blairgowrie, and certain scenes have also been shot in Los Angeles. Martin said he was inspired to film the movie around the peninsula after spending time here when growing up. “I spent all of my holidays in McCrae, which was to me one of the most beautiful parts of my childhood. All my friends would come to stay with us and we’d go for all sorts of adventures, so the

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peninsula really was involved with all of my childhood. My mum and dad later separated, but remained best friends and lived close to each other in Rye. After mum died, dad moved to the Village Glen and I bought his house from him. That was the area where the idea was sparked,” he said. “Obviously I go to the beach every day and swim in the rock pools, and I consider it one of the most beautiful coastlines in the world, and I think it’s as good as any beach you’ll find anywhere. I had a house, a quiet spot to film, I could fly drones, the location just ticked so many boxes. There’s something really magical about the Australian countryside that I want to show the world, because anyone who goes there just thinks it’s a paradise. “Filming in Australia took place in early 2017. We shot on the way to the airport, on the plane, as we were leaving, and all throughout the next ten days we were here. After that we shot a portion of the film in L.A. late last year, before I returned to Australia this year to shoot even more footage.” continued next page...


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Among the names set to appear in ‘The Dunes’ are Tim Phillipps (Neighbours, Animal Kingdom), Jacinta Stapleton (Never Tear us Apart: INXS, Shappelle), David Ross Patterson (Frost/Nixon, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), Alexandra Davies (X-MEN Origins: Wolverine, McLeods Daughters), Maria Volk (Wolf Creek 2, The Pacific), and Kate Neilson (Killer Elite). The film will also star Martin himself, who has a long history in the Australian film industry. “I got my start as a kid because my dad was working in the industry. I used to get plucked out of school every couple months to film another commercial because whatever kid they had cast would freak out on set, so that’s how I got started. I grew up with a camera in my face. I moved on to Aussie TV through my teens and '20s. I moved over to L.A. in about 2009, and I’ve been slugging it out there ever since,” Martin said. “My background since moving has been in independent film. I’ve also done a couple of little guest spots on shows like Hawaii Five-0 and Hand of God, but my main roles have been in independent cinema. I did a film called Zombie Hunter, which was the first film I did when I got out to L.A. and it was a lot of fun. I shot another film back in Australia called Battleground that was bought by Lionsgate, and I also shot a film last year called The Last Full Measure which is probably the biggest production I’ve done. It had Samuel L. Jackson, William Hurt and Ed Harris, that was an amazing experience.” Martin is currently considering distribution options for ‘The Dunes’, and he says that he hopes to release the film in early 2019 at the latest.

YOUR FUTURE LOOKS ROSY WHEN YOU ADVERTISE IN

Book into the next issue Call Marg on 0414 773 153

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Take a Break for Cancer this May & June to support your local cancer services at Frankston & Rosebud Hospitals. Raise funds so that everyone has access to fast diagnosis, fast treatment, and the care and support they need, close to home.

Get involved today: • Host a Fundraiser • Donate • Join events across the Peninsula

www.takeabreakforcancer.org.au Proudly supported by


FOOD,Glorious FOOD

By Melissa Walsh

S

teve Owens and his wife Michele are definitely not afraid of a challenge with the couple following their passion for food and travelling from the Mornington Peninsula across the Nullarbor to find fabulous food destinations. The journey, which began in Mornington at the beginning of this year, is part of the YouTube star’s online cooking show, Steve’s Kitchen. The online following is so big it reached more than 196,000 subscribers since they began just four years ago, with over 2 million regular viewers per video. “Our family lives on the peninsula so we spend a lot of time down here and were sitting at a local brewery when we came up with the idea of doing Steve’s Kitchen-Australian Food Odyssey, featuring artisan producers, growers and restaurateurs from throughout Australia,” said

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Steve. “We had travelled all over the world doing food demonstrations and presenting our cooking show but had not really explored Australia. We decided to kick it off on the peninsula as this is where it all began for us.” Steve and Michele have been lucky enough to experience food from around the globe and have met with locals, chefs and food lovers, after packing up and taking themselves off on a world foodie’s tour nearly three years ago. “The kids were all off doing their own thing and suddenly we had time on our hands so thought 'why not?' We travelled to Mexico, the US, then Sicily, France, and South East Asia,” said Steve, who then continued next page...


shared their knowledge and experience with the many followers that were increasing every day. “Then it dawned on us that we had seen these incredible places across the world but hadn’t even explored our own backyard yet.” “In our travels we have learnt about traditional cuisines and then used that knowledge to create wonderful cooking shows demonstrating regional cuisine and food preparation techniques from many parts of the world,” said Steve, for whom cooking has always been a big part of his life. The couple owned and worked on their hobby farm in France for many years. “It was there I got to study French cooking and charcuterie and we used our own farm animals to create authentic European cured meats,” said Steve, who has over 25 years cooking experience. “I am very passionate about educating how food gets from the paddock to the plate and follow the philosophy that recipes do not have to be complicated to make delicious meals.” continued next page...

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Steve’s Kitchen-Australian Food Odyssey showcased a range of peninsula breweries, including Mornington Peninsula Brewery, Jetty Road Brewery, St Andrews Beach Brewery and Red Hill Brewery. “We were delighted to discover there are so many wonderful craft breweries on the peninsula, all with unique offerings and interesting stories to tell,” said Steve, who enjoyed delving into the accounts of how each brewery began and the passion and drive it takes to start their own brewery. “Many of them we discovered were started by some friends getting together and making their own beer and then following their dream, often from very humble beginnings.” For the next few months the couple will be exploring the western side of the country, following the journeys of all sorts of food enthusiasts from wine and cheese makers to bakers and any person with the same culinary passion as them. “We love showcasing Australia and sourcing out those unique food producers to show the world just how diverse our food culture is,” said Steve. Check out Steve and Michele’s fabulous journey across Australia on youtube.com/StevesKitchen or on Facebook at @ StevesKitchen.

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Public Tasting

Tuesday 22 May 2018 Mornington Racing Club 320 Racecourse Road, Mornington Time: 6.30pm to 8.30pm Cost: $30 per person

Bookings: www.internationalcoolclimatewineshow.com/public *Please note you must be 18+ to attend

Includes: • Access to all wines open for the tasting, from around 600 wines entered • The right to vote for the People’s Choice Award • Finger food, tea, & coffee • Complimentary tasting glass to keep

Awards Dinner Friday 25 May 2018 Mornington Racing Club 320 Racecourse Road, Mornington Time: 7.00pm for 7.30pm Cost: $125 per person (10% discount if purchasing 10 or more tickets in one transaction)

Bookings: www.internationalcoolclimatewineshow.com/public

*Please note you must be 18+ to attend

Includes: • Sparkling wine served with canapes on arrival • A tasting platter of Mornington Peninsula gourmet produce • Three-course dinner, served with wine from the International Cool Climate Wine Show • Tea and coffee buffet

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Photos

Peninsula

The bubbles flowed as Kate Walker and friends celebrated the KWD Launch party at their studio in Mt Martha Village last month. While Mt Martha Club golfers enjoyed each other’s company after their regular weekly golf days.

KWD Launch party

KWD Launch party

KWD Launch party

KWD Launch party

KWD Launch party

KWD Launch party

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KWD Launch party

May 2018


Mt Martha golf club

Mt Martha golf club

KWD Launch party

KWD Launch party

KWD Launch party

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Somewhere over the

By Brodie Cowburn

C

reating a plastic-free lifestyle certainly isn’t easy, but it’s a project of passion for Rye entrepreneurs Jodie Read and Sarah Fitzgerald.

Rainebeau is a lunchbox company started by Jodie and Sarah that is determined to make a difference. The company was started with the hope of streamlining the morning rush by creating functional, eco-friendly, and unique lunchboxes, and has since grown to help promote the important cause of helping to cut down on plastic pollution. Co-owner Jodie Read said that the lunchboxes encourage healthy lifestyles, add ease to the busy mornings, and have a positive effect on removing plastic from lunches.

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“As a dietician I was always looking at ways to support healthy eating, and then I had children and that thought process continued. I was always thinking about tools I could use to encourage their healthy eating. My youngest started school a few years ago and they had a wrapper-free policy, and I was really passionate about unpackaged food. I found there weren’t many products on the market that made this easy. Every morning I’d have to pack away lots of different containers into a lunch bag, and it was a total mess,” she said. “When we finally put the product together we tested them out and that was continued next page...


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a very anxious moment. When we started using them I was blown away at how much it changed my mornings. Everything fit perfectly, and it was easy to make packaging-free lunches.” Since their early success, the duo have been able to use their product and their platform to partner with organisations fighting for important causes, such as 'Take 3 for the Sea', an organisation that is dedicated to the cause of cleaning up the oceans and making them free of litter and rubbish. 'Take 3' is an Australian not-for-profit organisation that aims to cut down on the amount of rubbish around oceans by educating schools about the dangers of plastic pollution, and encouraging people to take responsibility by helping to clean up oceans themselves. Jodie said that the work of 'Take 3' aligns with everything she and Sarah believe about their goal of creating a plastic-free lifestyle. “We’re all about sustainable and healthy environments; it’s why we embraced the wrapper free life. We’re real beach people too, I’ve been a surfer and every day above 25 degrees we end up down at the beach with our kids. We see the beauty of the ocean and how important it is to look after it. As part of the product development we wanted to give back to something we were really passionate about, and that’s when we came across 'Take 3 for The Sea',” she said.

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“'Take 3' is not just about getting rid of single use plastic, but also they’re about being really careful not to pollute the ocean. They ingrain in you to help clean up litter. If our oceans are healthy it helps us be healthy, and I want my children to grow up playing in clean water. 'Take 3' are absolutely spot on in educating kids in schools, doing activities, and keeping the message simple. We really like their approach and our partnership is a perfect fit.” The process of getting Rainebeau lunchboxes off the ground was not a quick one. Jodie, a self described “perfectionist”, said that there were many hurdles to overcome. “I started by scribbling the sizes of the compartments I needed and looking into manufacturers. My business partner and close friend Sarah would help me with ideas, and she was really interested as well. Her youngest was about to start kinder and she was passionate about healthy, unpackaged food too. It took about two years for me to get the product finalised and for me to be happy with the dimensions, features, and graphics,” she said. “It looked like I wouldn't be able to afford to do it, but then Sarah and I agreed to be partners in this venture. We both jumped on board and it’s worked perfectly. We have complementing strengths and we’re both on the same wavelength. After that we put our money together and went straight into production.” continued next page...

May 2018


Rainebeau’s bento style lunchboxes come in a variety of different designs, and all hold over a litre of food. The design ensures that all food is sealed within their individual compartments to prevent any leaks or spills. The six designs currently featured in Rainebeau’s lineup of lunchboxes are called Waves, Sunrise, Watermelon, Dragon Fruit, Kiwi Fruit, and Orange. The two owners balance their lives as lunchbox entrepreneurs with parenthood, with five children between them keeping their respective lives busy. Jodie said that her children have also enjoyed using the lunchboxes at school. “I have three kids, two of them are at school. Doing it for them really made sense. Luckily with them being in school it gave us lots of time and a chance to test the lunchboxes out,” she said. Rainebeau are currently expanding their range, and have an insulated bag to keep food cool in production. To find out more information or to purchase a lunchbox, visit www.rainebeau.com.au.

Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

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WESTERN PORT HEROES ASHCOMBE MAZE 7 days: 9am - 5pm P: 03 5989 8387 ELAN VINEYARD 1st w/end of every month or by appointment. Queens Birthday: Sat - Mon P: 03 5989 7209 FLINDERS HOTEL Open 7 days 11am until late P: 03 5989 0201 GEORGIE BASS CAFÉ & COOKERY Open 7 days 7am - 3pm P: 03 5989 0201 MORNINGTON PENINSULA CHOCOLATES Thurs - Sun: 11am - 5pm P: 03 5989 0040 NATURALISTE TOURS 7 days: 7am - 6pm P: 03 5257 4570 NAZAARAY ESTATE WINERY Sat - Mon: 11am - 4pm, Most public holidays and by appointment. P: 03 5257 4570

Western Port Bay boasts a rugged coastline and villages that are rich in history. There are many boutique stores and antique outlets, not to mention picturesque walks. What you may not know is that this region is home to some amazing venues, unique cellar doors and family adventures you probably wished you’d been told about earlier! Dine alongside spectacular sculptures, enjoy ocean inspired dishes in a funky bar, or maybe an overnight stay with uninterrupted views of our coastline in our newest hotel – the choice is yours. Meander down windy backroads to experience quaint wineries and vineyards whose cellar doors are operated by the very people that bring you the wine. If its sweets you’re after, then chocolate bliss is not far away. There’s farmyard fun, a famous hedge maze and lavender garden for you and the family to explore. Sound like a great day out or weekend escape? Why not go wander the Western Port!

OCEAN EIGHT VINEYARD Thurs - Sat: 11am - 5pm Sun: 11am - 3pm P: 03 5989 6471 PT LEO ESTATE Open 7 days from 11am, refer to website for restaurant opening times P: 03 5989 9011 RACV CAPE SCHANCK RESORT Open 7 days, refer to website for restaurant and golf times P: 03 5950 8000 RAIN, HAYNE & SHINE FARMYARD Open everyday 10am - 4pm including public holidays P: 03 5983 1691 WESTERN PORT FERRIES 7 days: 7am - 6pm P: 03 5257 4565

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SECURITYSOLUTIONS SAFE AND SECURE

When you are at home or work, it is important to feel safe and that’s where security companies and some common sense ideas can help. With a common sense approach, following a few standard rules, you can ward off thieves and guard your home or workplace with several different options.

A favourite point of entry for burglars seems to be sliding doors so it is a good idea to fit key-operated locks or patio bolts to all external sliding doors where possible. Sliding doors can also be made more secure by putting a wooden or metal dowel into the track to limit movement.

Security systems such as visible alarm systems are a great tool for warding off intruders as they increase the potential and fear of being caught by the police. With visible signage saying the home or business has an alarm system, this can be an excellent deterrent. With a wide variety of alarms available including back to base alarm systems, sirens and strobes, monitored alarm systems and mobile patrol services, there is a huge range to choose from.

Windows should have locks on them as well, and it is a good idea not to keep windows open while you are not home. Some other window security ideas include metal grills, security screens and key operated single cylinder locks.

Door and window locks are of prime importance as well, with key operated, two cylinder deadlocks fitted to external hinged doors, and security wire doors in place that are also lockable. Make sure external doors are solid and think about adding a security screen.

Sensor lights and exterior lighting can also be a good deterrent, and are a low cost way to help keep your home secure. Motion detector lighting located around your home can deter thieves and boost your feeling of security.

Often simple warning stickers can deter intruders as well, so place highly visible stickers near the front door and windows, indicating an alarm system, dog or membership to the local neighbourhood watch.

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Safecom Security Services provide only the most advanced Alarm Systems and High Definition Surveillance solutions to aid in the protection of your home and business, possessions and family. Our systems will deter and record shoplifting and burglary, assist with staff performance, customer service and stocktake.

MONITORING SYSTEMS

Ask us about Alarm System monitoring via the 4G mobile network or monitoring your Alarm and Surveillance System via your smart phone. We provide long range wireless networks and systems suitable for farms and large properties where cabling isn’t an option.

SERVICES

Alarm Systems, Surveillance Systems (High & Ultra High Definition), 24 Hour Monitoring Solutions, Patrol Services, Wireless Networks & Data Cabling, Access Control (Electronic Door Control), Intercom Systems, In Ceiling Audio Systems, NBN Conversion, Nurse Call/ Panic Button Systems, Personal Locaters.

EXPERIENCE & PERSONALISED If you’re looking for an experienced, innovative and reliable service, we guarantee this with Safecom Security Services.

SAFECOM SECURITY, MORNINGTON PENINSULA

Phone: 0416 633 688

Email: sales@safecomsecurity.com.au

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SECURITYSOLUTIONS

RED FLAG SECURITY SYSTEMS When Matt Clare, the owner of electronic security specialists Red Flag Systems moved to the Peninsula 5 years ago it wasn’t his desire to fight crime that was the draw card, it was the beaches and the lifestyle. However, over the years that’s changed say’s Matt “My first love for the Peninsula was definitely the surf and the coastline, but now I think it’s the people of the Peninsula that make it such a special place to live. But being in the security industry, Matt has seen firsthand how Peninsula’s residents can be badly affected by crime “Yes, we’re very lucky where we live and there is a fairly low crime rate on the Peninsula, however there is always a risk of theft and crime and it can have devastating effects on individuals, families and businesses. And it’s not always the loss of goods or valuables that cause the most harm but it’s the change in people’s outlook and how they feel about where they live that is a lot harder to restore”. That’s why Matt’s passions have changed “it’s meeting people and helping them feel safe in their homes or when away from their businesses, that’s the number one draw card for living on the Peninsula for me now”. Using an innovative range of intruder alarms and CCTV systems, Matt and the team at Red Flag Systems have been helping homes and business throughout the Peninsula raise

the level of their security. “We do this by deterring intruders from committing a crime, alerting security personnel if an intrusion does take place, and recording evidence of the intruders to provide to the police” explains Matt. And for their customers, this security can be simply managed and monitored from a smartphone device. “For us, smartphone technology has been a game-changer in security – whether it’s viewing CCTV cameras remotely or receiving alerts when an alarm has been activated, it’s given our customers control over their security at their fingertips no matter where they are in the world”.. If you want to find out more about how Red Flag Systems can help you take control over your home or business’s security, just give them a call on 1300 685 504.

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SECURITYSOLUTIONS

WOLFGANG SECURITY

“SHATTER!” The sound of breaking glass. Confusion…then Adrenaline.

Terror, Panic,

Woken abruptly, a man confronts a home invader in a leafy south eastern Melbourne suburb. With years of police and physical training the man is able to manage the situation quickly and safely. A drug-affected criminal is apprehended. Unfortunately, many victims of burglary are not so lucky and are left with feelings of violation, fear and in some cases, physical and emotional injury. The man, Andrew Hamer, now Director of Wolfgang Security discusses home security. “It’s a terrifying experience when someone breaks into your home. Some people never fully recover. The best advice I can give is to be proactive. Don’t be a statistic or a victim. Have a security professional assess your home and install quality security doors before it’s too late.” FACT: About 50,000 homes are broken into in Victoria each year. People live in fear of violent crime. The number one deterrent from being a victim of home invasion is to implement an effective home security solution.

Wolfgang Security is about providing this peace of mind for local people and their families. With over 30 years of experience in security and community wellbeing and with a reputation for friendly care and customer service, Andrew is your first contact for home security needs and specialises in the installation of security doors and window grilles. “All Wolfgang Security Doors are manufactured locally to the highest quality with a range to suit any budget. They are custom measured and colour matched to your home.” Settled in Mt Martha with a young active family, Andrew is passionate about community health and the safety of the people within. “Keep an eye out for the Wolfgang Van around town. It has the Wolfgang logo on the side.” says Andrew with a grin. “And for the best deal on quality Security Doors, call us now…”

OFFERS AN EXTENSIVE RANGE OF SECURITY DOORS & WINDOW GRILLES We Install only the very best brands which can be custom measured to suit any size door or window. All our products are proudly Australian made. Something to suit every home and budget Full range of colors. • Contemporary & decorative styles • • Triple locked security doors and sliding doors • Hinge measured and manufactured • Custom security doors for any requirement. For a FREE quote contact Andrew 0407 319 www.wolfgangsecurity.com.au

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1300 844 844 FOR ALL YOUR SECURITY NEEDS For over 40 years Coastcom Security has been a part of the Mornington Peninsula landscape providing a premium security service to business and the many homes of families that enjoy the fantastic lifestyle of the peninsula. Coastcom Security is locally owned and operated by a management team with a combined industry experience of over 80 years. At the core of the Coastcom Security business are the many thousands of residential and commercial alarm monitoring and patrol customers that we service 24/7/365 days. Coastcom Security strives to deliver the fastest possible response times by employing the very best people and the latest proven technologies in alarm monitoring and security management from our ‘A Grade’ Alarm Monitoring Control Room. Our business is supported around the clock by our team of fully qualified security officers ensuring our alarm response times are rapid and effective. At Coastcom Security, we love the peninsula and are proud to be a long-standing supporter of many local sporting clubs, charities and other social groups which are an integral part this great community. Call us now on 1300 844 844 or visit www.coastcom.com.au

RELAX, WE’RE THERE WHEN YOU’RE NOT OUR SERVICES INCLUDE • Alarm monitoring • Alarm response • Alarm system installation • Mobile patrol services • CCTV and video verification

www.coastcom.com.au May 2018

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Arts

By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

W

ith her flaming auburn hair, bright red lipstick and multi-coloured spectacles, Kerry Larder just oozes creativity. The bubbly, five foot gem spends her days and weeks listening to her muse as she creates an eclectic body of work and encourages other artists to follow their passion. Larder finds her inspiration in nature, whether it be at the seaside where she lives now, or in the country from her days of growing up in the rural environment of Camden. And her paintings are a marvellous reflection of the woman herself, with a penchant for the abstract and flair for bright and bold colour. “I see beauty in nature everywhere and my style is a bit all over the place,” says the artist who turned 70 this year. “I just love art, and have so many artists that I admire from local people to international.” continued next page...

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Everything about Larder is bright from her bubbly personality and laughter to her incredible selection of artwork where it is clear there is not one colour preference. “I don’t really have a particular colour or style that I stick to. It depends on what I am painting. I have some quite bright colours and others are more neutral and grey, reflecting what I see in the landscape,” she says. With names to her artwork like Lake Eyre, Jewels of the Sky, The Gorge, Calm Reflections , Rest and Relaxation, much of her work is biographical, inspired by places she has been or lived in, or simply a state of mind. “I learnt a lot from Terrence Hadler and still go to his art classes at Manyung Gallery on a regular basis,” says the artist who loves absorbing all the creative energy around her. “I have been involved in the art community within Melbourne and the Mornington Peninsula for years and feel it’s important to be involved and give back what you can.” Larder has spent years encouraging others in their artistic endeavours, and has a keen eye for new and up and coming artists with potential. “We have a new young lad who is showing a lot of promise with his work and are trying to encourage him with scholarship applications and art contacts,” she says. She has also been fundamental in raising charity money for Frankston Hospital Oncology and Paediatrics wards, and the Bays Hospital Mornington, for the benefits of peninsula locals.

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On a personal level, Larder says she has a great admiration for the work of Arthur Boyd, Tim Storrier, Ken Johnson, Robert Dickerson, and Brett Whiteley. “I guess I am influenced and most renowned in my artwork by the use of earthly rich colours and textures depicting the Australian landscape, but I have definitely developed an abstract style for myself,” says Larder who has exhibited at Frankston Arts Centre, Josephine's Restaurant at The Briars, Artycles and Treasures Gallery, and numerous Rotary Art exhibitions. The bubbly red head lives and breathes art, surrounding herself with works of art in true eclectic style and always paying it forward, supporting local artists and charities. “It is just something that is important to do,” said community minded Kerry. “I have been involved with the Mornington Art Show for years and supporting Rotary. A passionate supporter of the arts, Larder is the true example of a creative soul giving back to the community, a woman who truly understands the connection between the arts, humanities and a healthy community. Her attitude and philanthropic ways are a reminder of Winston Churchill’s quote “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”


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EMPOWERMENT THROUGH ART WITH UNIQUE VIEWS OF CENTRAL AUSTRALIA A

n exhibition that demonstrates the empowerment of Aboriginal artists with disability to develop high level art careers opens at Shoreham’s house gallery Whistlewood this month. Beautiful Art/ Proper Way showcases joyous paintings that offer very different views of Central Australia whose small scale belies their vast subject matter. Artists Billy Tjampitjinpa Kenda, Jane Mervin and Lance James from Bindi Mwerre Anthurre artists Alice Springs are all disabled with restricted mobility, yet their imaginations run free in colour filled paintings that capture the essence, beauty and life of the region with wit, humour and engaging individuality.

Western Arrernte painter Billy Tjampitjinpa Kenda captures the daily activities of the region’s visitors as well as its traditional owners. Kenda’s Central Australia is no static, empty landscape but one in which tourists clamber up rocky outcrops and crowd on to buses and cars, noses pressed eagerly to windows as they drink in the views. Helicopters hover over the MacDonnell Ranges – a quizzical kangaroo peeks from behind a rock while eagles swoop through an intense blue sky. In contrast to Kenda’s populated views, the paintings of Lance James from the more remote Pitjantjatjara community of Docker River offer a wider take on the desert landscape. Having observed the regions’ many wild horses and stockmen since childhood, he portrays them traversing the lands rounding up cattle, mustering, droving or simply galloping through the wide outback.

as flowers, hills and trees, which she paints with quirky vibrancy. The art careers of all three artists are made possible by the social enterprise art studio Bindi Mwerre Anthurre Artists. Established in 2000, Bindi assists disabled Aboriginal artists living in or near Alice Springs to achieve cultural enrichment and empowerment by assisting them to develop a career in fine art. Approximately 6-8 artists with a range of disabilities work regularly in the studio. Their art has developed a distinctive and high profile place in the Australian art world with works in leading collections including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Art Gallery and Museum of the Northern Territory. Bindi Mwerre Anthurre Artists’ Arts Coordinator Sandra Brown is traveling from Alice Springs to Whistlewood to open the exhibition on May 19.

Exhibition opens May 19. Current until June 3. WHISTLEWOOD | CONTEMPORARY AUSTRALIAN ART  642 Tucks Road, Shoreham, Vic, Australia, 3916 OPEN: Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays & Public Holidays 11am4pm E:  info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au T: +61 3 59 898282 | M: 0419 8964

Jane Mervin draws inspiration from birds – especially owls – as well Lance James, “Docker River Cowboy Mustering”, 46 x 20cm

B EAU T I F U L A R T / P R O P E R WAY M a y 19- Ju n e 3 Billy Kenda, Jane Mervin, Lance James Bindi Mwerre Anthurre Artists, Alice Springs The essence, beauty and humour of Central Australia in joyous small works. Opening event Saturday May 19, 2.30pm.

W I N T E R S A LO N + A R T PA R A D E S a t u rd a y Ju n e 9

Founding artists and emerging talents of Aboriginal art 642 Tucks Road, Shoreham, VIC 3916 T: 5989 8282 | E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays & Public Holidays, 11am–4pm mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

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Billy Tjampitjinpa Kenda, “People in the helicopter looking at the people in the car looking at people in the helicopter”, 30 x 30cm


WomenGETTING

THINGS DONE

By Melissa Walsh

Photos Gary Sissons

J

an Clarke is a woman who gets things done. After a lifelong career in sales, the bubbly peninsula retiree decided it was time to give back to the community and has now found herself a big part of the Revamped Jewellery organisation. Among an eclectic mix of peninsula women, Jan works every week to raise money for women and families in need by revamping donated jewellery and selling it for charity. “Revamped Jewellery was begun by a group of peninsula women over six years ago to raise money for women and families in need. Since then we have donated thousands of dollars including $12,600 last year to organisations such as The Mirabel Foundation, Safe Steps and Dress for Success, continued next page...

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The Good Sheperd Foundation, Mornington, Hastings and Rosebud Community centres, Clothes 4U Rosebud, and Mothers Supporting Families In Need,” said Jan. “All our funds are raised by revamping and re-selling donations of unwanted or broken jewellery that has been languishing in cupboards.”

donation each week and so all the money raised goes directly to charity.” For Jan and the other women involved it has been important to support women and families in need and give back to the community.

Revamped Jewellery has a small group of dedicated volunteers give their time every Tuesday except school holidays. “We are located in the Activity Room of the Bentons Square Community Centre in Mornington and are open for business each Tuesday from 10.00am to 3.00pm,” said Jan. “Most of our jewellery is priced from $5.00 to $10.00, with some pieces of sterling silver and gold priced at around half the retail valuation. We have no overhead costs only a small fee for the room. We cover this by our volunteers putting in a

APRIL – JULY 2018

WHAT’S ON AT MORNINGTON PENINSULA REGIONAL GALLERY

“The generosity of the public has enabled us to assist eleven women through life changing fistula surgery in Ethiopia, support breast cancer research, donate funds to the CWA to send birthing kits to Pacific Islands, make substantial donations to local charities The Mirabel Foundation, Dress For Success, Safe Steps family violence response centre and make smaller one-off donations to other local charities via pop up style stalls the proceeds of which were donated straight to the host charity. All of this has been made possible by the donation of unwanted or unused jewellery. We happily receive everything from a broken necklace or a single earring

EXHIBITIONS

PROGRAMS

PROPAGANDA: A SELECTION OF POSTERS

THE FATEFUL VOYAGE

FROM THE AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL

Monday 21 May

MPRG and Australian War Memorial exhibition

Artist Andrew Hazewinkel, boat builder Tim Phillips and Curator Danny Lacy discuss the 1892 Mornington Football Club disaster.

20 April – 8 July 2018 The power of information graphics and the use of advertising and communication strategies in eliciting fear, loathing and calls to action.

ANDREW HAZEWINKEL: WHAT THE SEA NEVER TOLD An MPRG exhibition

5 May – 8 July 2018 An epic new moving image artwork which takes as its starting point the local 1892 football tragedy.

JULY SCHOOL HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS Tuesday 3 & Wednesday 4 July Design your own power poster.

FREE FAMILY ACTIVITY Create a poster and add it to the MPRG People’s Wall.

Charles J. Noke, Talk less. You never know (detail) c.1944, Issued by the Ministry of Home Security and printed by James Hawthorn & Brother Ltd. Lithograph, Australian War Memorial

mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au adults $4 concession $2

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right through to a piece of value,” said Jan. “Once the jewellery is donated, we either re vamp, recreate or simply clean and re sell each piece depending on its condition.” Revamped Jewellery has a huge range of rings, earrings, necklaces and bracelets both vintage and contemporary. “There are so many worthy causes and it is a great feeling to be able to help in some small way. We have a lovely time chatting and fixing jewellery to display and sell,” said Jan, who admits to putting her heart and soul into every endeavour. “We just want to be able to raise as much money for our charities as possible and provide lovely pieces of jewellery for people to treasure at the same time.” Phone Jan on 0438271147 or Jo on 0438437519. www.revampedjewellery.com.au

DAYTIME MUSIC + THEATRE

Add a two-course lunch for

“Perfectly pitched between humour and pathos”

$26

DRAMA

The Age

$20

$27–$57

FRANKLY SINATRA WHICH WAY HOME by Katie Beckett

Friday 8 June, 10.30am & 1.30pm

Thursday 14 June, 7.30pm

Philip Gould and Michelle Fitzmaurice sing and dance their way through Sinatra's life story and classic hits like My Way, Three Coins in a Fountain, High Hopes and more.

Tash and her Dad are going on a road trip. Infused with humour and heart, this play draws on Katie Beckett’s own memories of growing up with her single Aboriginal father.

Tickets:

thefac.com.au or 03 9784 1060 May 2018

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Small

WONDERS By Andrea Louise Thomas

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Photos Yanni


N

oticing the infinite intricacies of the natural world most people overlook is the cornerstone of jeweller, Kate Macindoe’s business.

Growing up in Mount Martha, she spent a lot of time exploring the local beaches and bushland. She loved to collect shells, leaves and other ephemera found along the way. With the heart of a biologist and the eye of an artist, Macindoe makes sea and natureinspired jewellery producing one-of-a kind handmade pieces, each with its own story because she can actually remember where she found each natural item on which a particular piece is based. Confidence in pursuing life as an artist did not come easily. While studying at Monash University, she decided to do a double degree in Visual Arts and Primary Education choosing the latter for her professional life, as it was the more practical option. But her heart wasn’t in teaching. She really wanted to be an artist. During her studies in Visual Arts she had the opportunity to explore across a broad range of mediums. She tried sculpture, painting and glasswork before discovering metalwork. She knew then that she had found her passion. “I just sort of fell into jewellery and started making sea-inspired and nature-inspired pieces at uni because I was the only one from the Peninsula. Everyone else was city. We had to create work that reflected our story and because I’ve always lived on the Peninsula and the beach was always my home – that was the point of difference for me. Then a lot of family and friends started asking me for pieces and it was then that I realised maybe it could be something I could do as a part-time job. I never really dreamt or let myself hope that I could do it full-time,” she says. Her coursework at university was very conceptual and it did not prepare her for the day-to-day skills and practical work of being a jeweller. However, in her final year at Monash she was lucky enough to get a job sub-contracting for established Peninsula jeweller, Flick Pope. This was her dream job. Pope was someone whose work she had admired for a long time and in Macindoe’s opinion, she’d really paved

the way for handmade jewellery on the Peninsula. It was very inspiring to work with someone who had turned her passion into a full-time career for so many years and for the first time she thought, maybe this is something she could do one day too. Despite having incredibly supportive family and friends, she still felt a pressure to pursue teaching over jewellery, as it seemed like the much safer and more practical path. Working with Pope was th0e real turning point. She had found a mentor and made a friend. She continued next page...

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learned all of the practical things she needed to know that she had not learned at university, like pricing work, approaching stockists and what it’s like to work in a studio. “I don’t think I’d be where I am today if I hadn’t been lucky enough to meet her. Even now, six years on, I still go to her for advice,” she says. Macindoe now works as a full-time jeweller running her own successful business. She loves having the opportunity to be her own boss, choose her own hours and follow her passion doing something she truly loves. She enjoys meeting the clients, hearing their stories and seeing the joy her creations bring. Every day is different and even with a great set of skills, she still feels there is always more to learn and that keeps her pushing her professional boundaries. One of the best aspects of making the kind of jewellery she crafts is sourcing the materials. Beachcombing, bushwalking, hiking and snorkelling reveal the objects she finds that are the building blocks

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of her creations. Working with nature inspires her practice, but also presents some interesting and complex challenges. Making a casting from something as fragile as a shell or a sea urchin is no easy task, but it gives her work real authenticity. While her jewellery follows the theme of ‘nature-inspired’ work, each piece is original and unique just like nature itself. Macindoe works quietly and confidently away in an intimate studio space within Commonfolk Café in Mornington. Given the sea as a theme in much of her work, it seems fitting that her studio looks a bit like an aquarium with a little window in the front so that people can watch her creative process. This took her some time to get used to, but now she doesn’t think twice about it, unless someone taps on the glass. www.katemacindoe.com


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I

LBIJERRI is one of Australia’s leading theatre companies creating innovative works by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists, and is bringing a Katie Beckett play, Which Way Home, to the Frankston Arts Centre Theatre on June 14. The semi-autobiographical play stars Beckett as she takes her dad on a road trip from Yuggerah country Ipswich, to his birthplace Muriwarri Country Goodooga. As it turns out, it teaches them more about each other. From moments of laughter to annoyances, the molehills become mountains, within the four doors of a car. It’s a long way from the wide streets and big old houses of Tash’s childhood. Two black faces in a very white suburb. Dad still thinks he’s the king of cool, but he’s an old fella now and it’s time for his daughter to take him home.

Pull My Strings; I Will Play for You; Wrong Skin (Next Wave Festival); Winyaboga and To Soothe a Dying Pillow (Andrea James) and her film credits include Oakie's Adventure, One More Time and Blackground. She is also a founding member of the Cope St Collective.

ILBIJERRI Theatre Company tells stories about what it means to be Indigenous in Australia today. Infused with humour and heart Which Way Home draws on writer Katie Beckett’s own memories of growing up with her single Aboriginal father. Beckett lost her mother at the age of five, leaving her dad to raise three children. He also lost his sister, grandmother and mum within the space of a month, and the play is a tribute to her father and all that he has done for her. He was her tower of strength and emotionally in tune.

Which Way Home reminds audiences of every person’s need for family, history and heritage. It is the heartwarming relationship between a father and daughter and a wonderful representation of strong, independent indigenous men.

Katie Beckett was the recipient of The Balnaves Foundation Indigenous Playwright's Award last year for her work, Severed Cord. Her television acting credits include Redfern Now and The Marshes whilst her stage credits include This Fella; My Memory (Moogahlin Performing Arts); Impossible Plays;

Which Way Home is at Frankston Arts Centre Theatre on June 14 at 7.30pm. Phone 9784 1060 or vist www.thefac.com.au

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COOKIN’ LINE UP AT THE MORNINGTON MUSIC FESTIVAL A

fter their recent sell out show at the Victorian Art Centre, Cookin’ on 3 Burners are heading to the Peninsula for a one-night only event as part of the Mornington Winter Music Festival. Sunday 10th June at The Grand, the Burners with Andrew De Silva and Kylie Auldist will pump out classic soul sounds from The Big Chill. A soundtrack that includes the timeless hits of Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, The Temptations, Three Dog Night and more. It’s a show not to be missed. Cookin’ On 3 Burners are Australia’s hardest hitting Hammond Organ Trio – joining the dots between Deep Funk, Raw Soul, Organ Jazz & Boogaloo. Formed in 1997, the band have worked with some of the best artists from across the country and topped the UK R&B Charts

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with their single ‘That Girl’ featuring Kylie Auldist. Their sixth album Blind Bet more than delivers. Described as ‘classic soul sounds with a modern cinematic twist’, it features beautiful string and horn arrangements by Ross Irwin and special guest vocalists Daniel Merriweather, Tex Perkins, Kylie Auldist, Harry James Angus (Cat Empire) and Jason Heerah (Electric Empire). If you haven’t seen Cookin’ on 3 Burners live, you’re in for a treat as they celebrate the future sound of yesterday. The Mornington Winter Music Festival runs from Friday 8th – Sunday 10th June across more than 15 venues and free street entertainment for the whole family. For tickets and the full program visit: www.morningtonmusicfestival.com.au


2018

BITE CONFERENCE

THE DETAILS With a day full of Internationally recognised speakers and exhibitors, we recommend to get there early and enjoy the most out of the conference where you will spend a day working ON your business, not IN your business. There will be keynotes, breakout sessions, full exhibition stands, and free stuff!

PRICE: Standard Tickets $150 Early Bird Tickets until March 31st $125 Your ticket prices the premium meal option to ensure you are well fed during the day and ready to take in all of the information from our speakers. This also includes the post-conference drinks and nibbles too! Want to bring the whole team or invite clients/customers to join - contact us for discounted ticket price. Only 500 seats available. 2017 was a sellout!

10+ SPEAKERS

Andrew Morello

Rachel Powell

Head of Business Development Yellow Brick Road

Chief People Officer XERO Australia

Andy Lark

Lance Burdett

Dianne McGrath

Marketing Innovator Communication, Astronaut Group Lark Negotiation & Resilience Mars One Candidate

Kate Save

Emma Head

Jacki Mitchell

Pippa Hansen

Co-Founder BE Fit Food

Founder Sweet Mickie

Radio Host | Brand Strategist | Media

CEO Sports Injury Clinic

Yolande & Nik Hughes Inspire Tribe Business Coaching

30+ EXHIBITORS

WHAT THEY SAID

FINANCE | TECH | BANKING | CREATIVE SERVICES | RETAILERS | SOFTWARE | PROFESSIONAL SERVICES | DIGITAL SERVICES | BUSINESS & PERSONAL COACHING AND MUCH MORE.

“Brilliant event. Well organised and such a positive feel from all of the businesses that attended. Certainly a must for 2018.” Peter Attard, Ops Manager, Ranelagh Club

MORE INFO?

NETWORK WITH

For more event information or to book your ticket, go to www.biteconference.com.au

- CEOS / MANAGING DIRECTORS - LOCAL BUSINESS OWNERS - KEY DECISION MAKERS - MOVERS AND SHAKERS - ENTREPRENEURS

May 2018

“‘Get a life. Know your purpose.’ Andy Lark, a great place to start!” Nikki Fisher - Local Business Owner, Sorrento “It’s great to be part of BITECON. It’s terrific to see great brands like Xero and Vend getting behind small businesses and offering a great chance to learn and experience new thinking on how to build great businesses.” Andy Lark, Keynote Speaker, BITE Conference 2017, Chairman - Group Lark

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Eat & Drink

Heavenly OFFERINGS AT

GOD’S KITCHEN By Melissa Walsh

T

here’s a special ambience the moment you walk into God’s Kitchen with its rich history and modern venue. The Mornington restaurant and bar is situated within a heritage listed church which takes you back in time. William Grover built St Andrew’s Uniting Church in 1876 and since 1984 the church has been converted to a restaurant. Reverend Caldwell came to Mornington in 1874 and commenced a long tenure with the church and town, eventually becoming one of the most influential citizens in the area. These days the venue is run by owner Dean McHugh who has hired a local chef to create a full menu to suit all tastes. Head Chef Justin Pearce has been enjoying cooking for people for over 20 years and still manages to come up with exotic and mouth-watering dishes.

“I have always loved cooking and started out doing my apprenticeship in Mornington,” said the chef who has lived on the peninsula for years. “I began learning French style cooking but, over the years, have evolved into Asian style dishes like the Beef Tataki.” continued next page...

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While God’s Kitchen has always been renowned for its fabulous cocktails, local wines and beers, as well as supporting independent musicians, Dean and Justin are making sure the food is one of its highlights. “We are in the process of creating an even better menu and have specials each week,” said Justin. “We have a huge variety of share plates and tapas for those wanting a nibble of different tastes with a glass of wine but we also have a full menu with steaks and seafood for those wanting to dine on something more substantial in the atrium for example.” The truly diverse menu offers everything from tapas, a la carte, gourmet pizza and the best steak in Mornington, and the cocktail and wine list is to die for.

LOOKING FOR MORE CUSTOMERS? YOU NEED TO ADVERTISE IN

Book into the next issue Call Brooke on 0409 219 282

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“We have something for everyone here, with vegan and vegetarian dishes, catering for coeliacs, and great seafood,” said Justin. “The venue has been known for its drinks and music and we are determined to place equal focus on our food.” In the process of evolving the menu, God’s Kitchen will have more tapas, and share plates, and hearty dishes for winter like the famous Beef Cheeks. God’s Kitchen is at 53 Barkly Street, Mornington. Phone 5976 8666 www.godskitchen.com.au


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945 Moorooduc Hwy, Moorooduc Ph 03 5978 8049 www.barmahparkwines.com.au info@barmahparkwines.com.au

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A JOURNEY OF FOOD & WINE

By Melissa Walsh

I

t’s been ten years since Joe and Giselle Padula bought the Canadian Bay Hotel and Mt Eliza couldn’t be luckier to have such a dynamic duo who bring good old fashioned service and decades of hospitality experience to the area. With Joe having been in the hotel industry for over 44 years and Giselle working alongside him in various capacities, the couple are switched on when it comes to their trade. Peninsula Essence visits the couple at their corner pub, the Canadian Bay Hotel, to find out all about their hospitality adventures. A Brunswick lad, Joe became a Mt Eliza person in 1988, after meeting the love of his life, Giselle and marrying two years later. “I had been in hospitality for years and met Giselle when she came in looking for part time work at the Riversdale while studying at university,” said Joe, who has also managed the Half Moon, The Blarney Stone, Zagames and the Bridge Hotel to name a few. “She had always been a Mt Eliza girl so I quickly followed her down here and bought the Royal Hotel.”

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It wasn’t long before the couple made their mark on the peninsula, having owned The Royal and Kirks, and creating a family life with their three children. As with all the most interesting stories, Joe’s career in hospitality started by default. “I was only a youngster and someone rang me saying they needed a fill in person for the night at a pub. I just loved it and, from the first night, was immediately hooked. I learnt the trade as I went and did a bit of everything from managing to dishes, and in the middle did a bit of study,” said Joe, of the business he describes as “in his blood”. As for Giselle, she has dabbled in their hotel business while raising their three children. Buying the Canadian Bay Hotel was their first official joint venture. “I had my babies so didn’t have to work which was lovely, but once the youngest went to school and when this came about we decided we might as well do it together. That was ten years ago and we are still loving every minute,” said Giselle who is now one of continued next page...

May 2018


the managers of the hotel. “Even our youngest who is at university works here part time.” It’s no wonder the Canadian Bay Hotel has such a warm and welcoming vibe with owners like Joe and Giselle, who believe the pub scene is going back to the old days when it was more a family environment. “It used to be quite a sports bar and night club here but we did away with that, and concentrate on food and quality drinks. We do lots of functions but it’s very much a family venue where you can come and watch the footy in the bar, have a meal in the bistro or book the function room for special occasions or conferences,” said Joe.

“When we ran The Royal and Kirks back in the day, you would see these young people coming in and now, years later, they bring their families in to see us and have a meal. It is an absolute pleasure to think we have evolved with the people of the peninsula too.” The Canadian Bay Hotel is at 35 Ranelagh Drive, Mount Eliza. Phone 9775 2331. www.canadianbay.com.au

The couple agree it is lovely to see all the different family members together from kids to grandparents, and everyone is made to feel welcome. “Our food has been a big focus for years now with a chef that has been with us the whole journey. Susie, the head chef, is part of the family now, as is Paula, a manager for ten years, and my PA who has been with me for 30 years,” said Joe, who still goes to the market every Tuesday to check the produce. “I get up bright and early and head into the city to look at what’s in and what’s out, check the quality and see what is the freshest on offer,” said Joe, who loves to cook. “Coming from my Italian background food was very big and it’s all I have ever known.” Over the past four decades, Joe says he has seen enormous changes and growth in the food and wine industry and is so proud of what Australia produces. “When I started probably there were half a dozen Australian wines on the market and now there are thousands so it’s been a journey of wine and food,” he said. “I’m so proud of our Australian wines and especially the peninsula. We have 80 wines on our wine list and you can have them all by the glass. Being part of the evolution of the Australian food and wine industry has been an incredible experience.” And it’s not only been the food and wine industry that has evolved. For Joe and Giselle have been fortunate enough to watch the journey of others on the peninsula as well. May 2018

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Recipe

GOD’S HEAVENLY BEEF CHEEKS INGREDIENTS:

METHOD:

Beef Cheeks Red Wine Port Thyme Brown Sugar Salt and Pepper Oil Sweet Potato Root Vegetables

Season the beef cheeks with salt and pepper. Heat a heavy medium casserole pot or dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add a dash of oil and then the beef cheeks and cook for about 10 minutes, or until brown on all sides. Remove the beef cheeks from the pot. Add the wine, port and thyme to the casserole pot or Dutch oven, cover with a lid and bring to the boil and then reduce to a medium heat. Add

God’s Kitchen is at 53 Barkly Street, Mornington. Phone 5976 8666 www.godskitchen.com.au

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back the beef cheeks and simmer for approximately 3 to 4 hours or until cheeks are really tender. Remove cheeks from liquid, add brown sugar and reduce until sauce has a thick consistency.

SERVING SUGGESTION: Serve on a bed of sweet potato mash and roasted root vegetables, with the sauce poured over the top.


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Dishes

Must try

Free Range breast of Chicken wrapped in Proscuitto and served on a blue cheese and sweet potato mash with Salsa Verde

Lemon and Pepper Crumbed Rockling soft tacos with an Asian slaw and harissa mayonnaise with crunchy chips,

The Dubliner

Canadian Bay Hotel

23 Octavia Street, Mornington Phone 0419 130 139 www.thedublinermornington.com

1/277 Point Nepean Road, Dromana Phone 5981 0685 www.monkeybusinesscafe.org

King Dory with Diamond Clams, Sofrito & Romesco Nero

Vegan Vegetable Lasagna

Monkey Business

53 Barkly St, Mornington Phone: 03 5976 8666 www.godskitchen.com.au

1/277 Point Nepean Road, Dromana Phone 5981 0685 www.monkeybusinesscafe.org

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Gods Kitchen Mornington

May 2018

Vegetable cous cous with tempura vegetables (dairy free, vegan) Barmah Park Restaurant & Cellar Door 945 Moorooduc Hwy, Moorooduc Phone 5978 8049 www.barmahparkwines.com.au

Wagyu Australian Beef Burger with bacon, double cheese, pickles, fired onion rings & BBQ lager sauce. St Andrews Beach Brewery 160 Sandy Road, Fingal Phone 5988 6854 www.standrewsbeachbrewery.com.au.com.au


PERFECT, IF YOU HAVE A TASTE FOR FINE WINE

T

he International Cool Climate Wine Show (ICCWS) is again proud to share a rare opportunity to assess the styles, characteristics and latest trends of inspirational cool climate wines entered in the 2018 show with everyone!

with a passion for exploring terroir and the true expression of the grape. This is a show where like is judged against like, where elegant wines with restrained fruit are seen at their best, and where diversity is encouraged and rewarded.

With more than 600 entries received this year, from over 135 wineries from the cool climate wine regions of Australia, New Zealand, Italy, and France, you will be able to taste wines from many classes, including Sparkling wines, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Riesling, Pinot Noir, and Shiraz. Sample vintages from current and older vintage classes, compare wines of the same grape variety from different regions, focus on wines from specific regions or vineyards, or taste styles you’d like to know more about.

The ICCWS Public Tasting is being held at the Mornington Racing Club (MRC). It’s designed for wine enthusiasts keen to find new wines for their cellars; for winemakers, educators, retailers and sommeliers wanting to identify trends and discover some real cool climate gems; and also for those who just love a glass of wine!

The depth and breadth of the wine on show is vast. Many wines come from boutique vineyards producing small commercial quantities, so this is your chance to seek out some outstanding but lesser known labels. Some wines are from vineyards where grapes are hand picked and wines handcrafted by winemakers

Also, don’t miss the ICCWS Awards Dinner at the MRC on Friday 25 May - an amazing opportunity to enjoy a sensational menu showcasing local produce and featuring the wines of the 18th ICCWS. Places limited - book now online at www. internationalcoolclimatewineshow.com/public.

Now, for the best bit! The People’s Choice Award is up to you. Vote for your favourite wine and show the winemaker your appreciation!

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- We have onsite car parking 71 B A R K LY S T R E E T M O R N I N G TO N, V I C 3931 (03) 5977 2020 | D H S U P P L I E S.C O M. A U

May 2018

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Corner

Puzzle

ACROSS 1. Supplant 5. Sundae 9. Crisscross weave 12. Covetous 16. Windscreen cleaner 17. Car crash 18. Non-barking dog 20. Arctic chipping tool (3,4) 22. Hickory nut 23. Railway traffic controller 24. Rope loops 26. Committed to memory 27. Reply 28. Red seasoning powder (7,6) 31. In vain, to no ... 32. Coves 34. Oblique 36. ... chi (1'2) 37. Disdainful manner 40. Restless, ... at ease 42. Flower jars 43. Greek fable teller 45. Marijuana 47. Reduce, ... down 49. Pre-Soviet emperors 50. Triangular flags 52. Wanderer 54. Turn outwards 55. Female zebras 56. Baby sheep 58. Pickle preservative 59. Parish minister 60. Boat's spine 61. Over-beautify, gild the ... 62. Banana casings 63. Cult hero 64. Equine complex 67. Nervous, on ... 68. Deciduous trees 69. Ignoramuses 72. Gall 74. Waking-hours fantasies 78. Zodiac sign 79. Alphabet (1,1,1) 80. Sergeant, Senior ... (1,1,1) 81. Raising agent 82. Gumleaf-eating animal 85. Adhered 87. Thrust forward 88. Droops 90. Formally endorsed 91. Knocks softly 92. Ragamuffin

93. Whereabouts excuse 94. Transfer sticker 95. Wildebeests 96. Nimble 97. Overstate 100. Brand of sneakers 102. Great Wall of ... 103. Donkeys 104. Document, Magna ... 106. Mystified, all ... (2,3) 108. Vintage 109. East-northeast (1,1,1) 110. Hollywood is there, ... Angeles 112. Removes jockey's seat 116. Mum & ... 118. Mixed (of salad) 120. Ferrous metal 121. Ku Klux ... 123. Hiring fee 125. Observatory roof shape 126. New Zealanders 127. Jam pastry 128. Dutch cheese 129. Sacred song 130. Magnified map section 131. Pull 132. Openings 134. Concave marks 136. Nasal bone cavity 139. Forgiven 141. Represented, ... for 142. Duchess of York 144. Good 146. Waistline 147. Rekindled 148. Throw out, get ... of 149. Deports 151. Short-lived trend 152. Conundrum 155. Gigolo (3,3) 158. W Australian city 159. Rough equivalent 162. Pushes (shirt in) 164. Gives speech 165. Indigenous 166. Overused 170. Sat for artist 171. Barge in 172. School tunic 173. Milk coffee style 174. Recluse 175. Earn 176. Observable 177. As a whole (2,3) 178. Mocked

DOWN 1. Hip-hop vocalist 2. Tea farm 3. From Buenos Aires 4. Involve (in quarrel) 5. Doubt innocence of 6. Focusing glass 7. Cotton on 8. Obvious 9. Priggish 10. Prayer ending 11. Chauffeurs 12. Indonesian capital 13. Limb removals 14. Paid profession 15. Summer shoe 19. Dance to jazz 21. Complain 25. Cummerbunds 26. Charters 29. Irritate 30. Writer, ... Hemingway 33. Able to be rubbed out 35. Spotted felines 36. Unsubtly 38. Took to the air 39. Herring relatives 41. Apathy 42. Vitality 44. The P of RPM 46. Steam generator 48. Inspired 49. Daze 51. Dame ... Melba 53. Area for repairing ships (3,4) 55. Incapacitating 57. ... & brace 60. Water-garden fish 65. Ghosts 66. Dumb waiters 70. Barbie playthings 71. Indisputable (4-3-4) 73. Jumping marsupials 75. Wheel shaft 76. Meditated 77. Drone bee's sex 78. Pinpointed 83. Corrosive fluids 84. Opera solos 85. Public (duty) 86. Goat mammary gland 89. Sneaky 91. Treat (cow hide)

92. Cricket fielder 96. Paintbrush hair 98. Horse restraint 99. Mentally sound 101. Scent, ... cologne (3,2) 103. Postal inscription 105. Charges with gas 107. Said "sorry" 111. Likeliest to win (4-2) 112. Undress 113. Complied, ... by the rules 114. Goes with flow 115. Body cosmetics 117. Sherlock Holmes creator, ... Conan Doyle 119. Mobile phone's ... card 120. Obstructing 122. Birth of Jesus, The ... 124. Bushranger, ... Kelly 132. Occupant 133. Table part 134. Legendary kingdom, El ... 135. N African desert 137. Louse egg 138. Spinner of yarns 140. Robins 141. Belts 143. Actor, Charlton ... 145. Presided 150. Being tops, ... supreme 153. Envisage 154. Virtuoso 156. Experiencing a run of luck (2,1,4) 157. Overflowed 158. Burst 160. Use book 161. Next 163. Savvy 166. Massive 167. Irishman 168. Cosmonaut, ... Gagarin 169. Prima donna

MT ELIZA OPTICAL Shop 5 / 89 Mount Eliza Way (Ritchies Centre) Mount Eliza Ph 9775 2922

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Mt Eliza on

Mount Eliza is a bustling seaside village nestled between Frankston and Mornington 46km south of Melbourne. The town centre is known as Mount Eliza Village, and is the main shopping area for the suburb. The population is17,200. and the median house price in Mount Eliza is $950,000. The coastline around Mount Eliza consists of jagged cliffs featuring scenic walking tracks above stretches of secluded sandy beaches in small bays and coves below. Access to most of the beaches along the coast is via residential streets which offer small car parks at their end points. Those residential streets feature upmarket dream homes and weekend retreats, many of which have spectacular views along the coast. Mount Eliza has many great cafes specialising in breakfast and lunches and some fantastic restaurants. The attractive commercial centre of Mount Eliza is located about one kilometre inland along Mount Eliza Way and Canadian Bay Road, and features supermarkets and a number of specialty shops. The Mount Eliza Regional Park, accessed via Two Bays Road, incorporates the former Moorooduc Quarry and offers views across the surrounding plains. At the southern end of the park is a lake with picnic areas and a playground. The Mornington Tourist Railway, which offers steam train rides, has its Moorooduc station located adjacent to the Mount Eliza Regional Park. Mount Eliza was named in 1836 by Captain William Hobson after either Eliza Elliott, his wife, or Elizabeth Callaghan, the wife of John Batman. Prior to large scale subdivision, Mount Eliza was mainly a location for holiday homes. This began to change in the early half of the 20th century when many old estates were subdivided. One such subdivision was Ranelagh Estate, designed by Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin in 1924 in tandem with the surveyors Tuxen and Miller. Mount Eliza Post Office opened on 15 November 1920. There are several beaches and bays located in Mount Eliza, which include Canadian Bay,

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Daveys Bay, Half Moon Bay, Moondah Beach, Ranelagh Beach and Sunnyside North Beach. Daveys Bay was named after James Davey who constructed a jetty in the 1840s to ship his produce to Melbourne. In 1909 the Daveys Bay Yacht Club was established, and there is a walking track overlooking Mt Eliza Beach on the shores of Canadian Bay, which was named after three Canadians who owned a sawmill in the area in the 1950s. In 1928, the independent girls school Toorak College was built and is one of the oldest independent girls schools in Victoria.

COFFEE SAFARI Fresh brewed coffee is a must have for weekends away and Mt Eliza is a must visit destination with great coffee haunts around the town. Here are a few to check out when heading to this trendy township.

CAFE ON THE MOUNT 2/87 Mount Eliza Way

Hollywood glamour came to Mt Eliza in 1959 when movie stars Fred Astaire, Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner arrived to shoot the Stanley Kramer film, On the Beach, based on the novel of the same name by British novelist Nevil Shute who had lived at nearby Langwarrin.

Homey café with good food and great

Adjacent to Sunnyside beach sits a historical property Morning Star Estate which has also been in a number of films, including a threemonth location shoot around the mansion for the movie Partisan, starring French actor Vincent Cassell. The mansion was the location for the Kath & Kim movie spin-off Kath & Kimderella.

8/87 Mount Eliza Way

The Mount Eliza Cricket Club is one of the most successful cricket clubs on the Mornington Peninsula with ten First Eleven premierships and a total of more than 55 including the Juniors. During the 1980s the club was heralded as the largest cricket club in Australia with nine senior teams and eight junior teams. Mount Eliza has its fair share of celebrities. Deborah Lee Furness and Hugh Jackman, have been spotted visiting. Real Housewives of Melbourne star, Gamble Breaux and her husband, Rick Wolfe, live in Mount Eliza.

coffee in a relaxing chilled atmosphere

SHOP ATE CAFÉ Great place for coffee and the best breakfast and lunch

POP'S CAFÉ 34 Ranelagh Drive Great serving portions for meals and perfect for coffee and cake as well

DEGANI MT ELIZA 89 Mount Eliza Way Excellent coffee and great food with choice of indoor or outdoor seating


MtEliza

on

You’re welcome!

THE RANELAGH CLUB TO MANAGE AND OPERATE FULL CATERING SERVICES The club is delighted to announce Caitlin Hall as the new Ranelagh Club's Catering & Events Manager. A Mount Eliza local and passionate foodie with 15 years in the hospitality industry, Ranelagh Club is that Special place where you can celebrate and be active in style. You can relax on the clubhouse deck and sit in comfort inside the clubhouse and or 3 beach boxes, and store your kayak, SUP or Power boats securely and under cover. The six-tennis mod grass tennis courts have lights for night tennis and all courts offering the best views of the bay and city skyline. Also with private car park access to the beach the club offers a range of activities including Sailing, Open Water Swimming, Wine Club, Golf, Cycling, Tai Chi and Book Club. The club is great value starting with an Adult membership fee per annum of $410 plus the once off joining fee $420. Contact the Ranelagh office on 9787 0265 or admin@ ranelagh.com.au or www.ranelagh.com.au We welcome you to inspect before applying.

3 Rosserdale Crescent, Mt Eliza Membership enquiries: 9787 0265 www.ranelagh.com.au 3 Rosserdale Crescent, Mt Eliza Membership enquiries: 9787 0265 www.ranelagh.com.au

TENNIS | EVENTS | SAILING BEACHBOXES | BAR & DINING TENNIS | EVENTS | SAILING BEACHBOXES | BAR & DINING

3 Rosserdale Crescent, Mt Eliza Membership enquiries: 9787 0265 www.ranelagh.com.au

WHAT TO DO?

Mount Eliza is a bustling seaside village nestled between Frankston and Mornington, offering a range of cafes, fabulous restaurants and | EVENTS | TENNIS galleries galore. The town centre is known as Mount Eliza Village, BEACHBOXES | BAR and is the main shopping area for the suburb, with cafes of all kinds offering as wonderful assortment of choices for every taste and budget. Relax in the main Mount Eliza Village as you wander along looking at an assortment of boutique and retro shops, with galleries offering an eclectic variety of art and sculptures. Home to the Morning Star Estate, the Manyung Gallery and the lush gardens of the award-winning Linton’s, Mount Eliza is a wonderful place to stop and smell the roses. Take a walk down to the beaches where the horizon stretches for miles across the bay and discover the history of the township that has been home to film stars and celebrities for years.

SAILING & DINING

Photography: Yanni

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dently an Express.

ravel

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on

LOVE LUNA LOVE LUNA is reminiscent of Collin’s Street, Melbourne’s, iconic ‘House of Merivale’ – an eclectic treasure trove of exclusive & incredible items. Step beyond the bright pink, glossy door, into LOVE LUNA and immerse yourself in the wonderful aroma of leather from Italy, Morocco and Spain; glorious, fresh scents from Tasmania; Australian cow-hides in caramels, silver and gold; leather shoes from Portugal; handmade leather jackets for both men and women, in fabulous colours, designed by LOVE LUNA’s Owner and Creative Director, Louine Shaw. There are numerous ‘one-off’ items that LOVE LUNA is fast becoming renowned for and despite the vintage feel of the store – all product is brand new, interspersed with classic, sophisticated antiques & antique furniture As soon as items come in the door, they walk out…never to be repeated – this is on purpose. From the handmade feather lampshade (made to order), to the sumptuously soft leathers, At LOVE LUNA, you will discover a endless range of exclusive, unique and exotic items from every corner of the globe, all gift wrapped to perfection! Louine has carefully selected every item to reflect the LOVE LUNA philosophy of exclusively ‘Luscious & Luxe’. She also provides home and personal styling, for that special occasion.

0417 717 517 56 Mount Eliza Way, Mount Eliza

TRISH STAMP TRAVEL

Trish Stamp Travel Trish Stamp Travel

Trish Stamp Travel Trish Stamp Travel

70 Mt Eliza Way, MT ELIZA VIC 3930 T: +61 (3)3930 9787 5437 I E: trish@tsttravel.com.au y, MT ELIZA VIC 5437 I E: trish@tsttravel.com.au

Malahide Pty. Limited trading as Trish Stamp Travel is independently owned and operated under licence from helloworld and American Express. ed trading as Trish Stamp Travel is independently under licence from helloworld and American Express.

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After being in the travel industry for four decades, Trish Stamp certainly knows her business and has been helping Mt Eliza locals plan their holidays for many years. With a reputation as the ‘go to’ travel agent, people come from near and far to have Trish Stamp Travel organise their holidays with the local icon receiving many awards along the way. “I have been in Mt Eliza for 36 years and am very passionate about travel and enjoy sharing our knowledge with clients,” said Trish. “We offer superior service, attention to detail and personally tailor-make customised itineraries for each and every client - whether it is for a 5 star ocean or river cruise, or a budget adventure based trekking get-away. We can also help organise air tickets, coach touring, and independent travel, visas, travel insurance and cash passport cards. We even have a bridal registry for honeymoon trips.” As an associate Hello World Travel member, Trish Stamp Travel received Diamond Achievement awards in 2015 and Platinum in 2016. “We encourage anyone looking to book a holiday or for travel advice to come in and speak to our professional and experienced staff. People are under the false impression that travel agents cost more and we don’t. The fact is if you don’t have a travel agent you are on your own,” said Trish. Trish Stamp Travel is at 70 Mt Eliza Way, Mt Eliza. Phone 9787 5437. www.trishstamptravel.com.au

May 2018


CANADIAN BAY HOTEL Situated in the heart of Mt Eliza Village on the Mornington Peninsula, Canadian Bay Hotel offers a truly unique dining experience with live entertainment on Saturday evenings starting around 9pm. Follow us on facebook and instagram to see what is coming up or happening RESTAURANT Check out our lunchtime special which includes a glass of house wine Monday to Friday, (excluding public holidays). Also browse over our Daily Specials Board which offers fresh seafood, innovative ideas and lovely desserts. We pride ourselves on the fact that we have nearly 80 wines available by the glass and bottle. CBs BAR Our bar is the place to go in Mt Eliza, with its modern décor, of warm chocolate and bronze coloring – couches and chic lighting to suit. Meet for that after work drink with the girls, or after dinner, come and listen to the music and chat in our comfy bar with all of your friends. FUNCTION ROOM The Canadian Bay Hotel boasts a beautifully presented function room, in charcoal grey, red and black tones, the perfect stylish atmosphere for hosting those milestone birthdays and also engagements and weddings, We can cater for corporate work lunches / dinners and meetings. We have projectors screens, TV and speaker with microphone. Our in house catering looks after all dietary requirements such as gluten free, vegetarian, etc. The room can cater for a standing room function of 120 people, or a sit down catered meal for up to 80 people.” Dance floor, private bar also tea and coffee station available on request.

C A N A D I A N B AY LO U N G E

BAR

R E STA U R A N T

Open 7 days per week from 12pm till late

Bistro Hours Lunch 12pm – 3pm Dinner 5.30pm – 9pm * BAR OPEN ALL DAY * LIVE MUSIC SATURDAY NIGHTS * FOXTEL LIVE * FUNCTION ROOM 35 Ranelagh Drive, Mt Eliza 3930 Phone 9775 2331 info@canadianbay.com.au www.canadianbay.com.au

HERBACEOUS FLOWERS H OUSE

&

FLOW ER S

* Fresh Flowers and foliage * Wedding and Event Specialist * Gorgeous giftwares * Delivery available Mornington Peninsula and beyond

Our passion lies in fresh flowers. Organic floral designs for weddings & events. We source fresh blooms from the markets and support our local growers and have a natural freestyle of artistry and thrive in exploring all four seasons. Weddings No matter how grand or intimate your wedding we work closely with you to create beautiful florals for every aspect. Bereavement Touching tributes are individually created for the ones we love dearly, their families and friends. We can design beautiful casket displays, wreaths and sympathy bouquets to remember our loved ones, in a personal way. We offer local delivery throughout the Mornington Peninsula.

46 Mount Eliza Way, Mount Eliza

9787 4955

hello@herbaceousflorist.com.au www.herbaceous.com.au

Workshops & Floral Parties We love to provide the opportunity to come in store and learn the skills to create a floral display all of your own. We run workshops randomly though out the year or you can tailor a custom design one with a group of your closest friends, family or colleagues. The workshops can be designed for a catch up, bridal shower, baby shower or birthday parties. Call us on 9787 4955 or visit our website www.herbaceous.com.au for further details about costs etc for the workshops. Herbaceous Flowers are located at 46 Mount Eliza Way, Mount Eliza.

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FITNESS ON THE WAY PERSONAL TRAINING FOTW was established in September 2000 fulfilling a dream for Michelle & Len of owning their own Personal Training Studio. Their commitment to help people live a happier, healthier life through regular exercise and good nutrition is still as strong. Both have worked in the Fitness Industry for over 30 years. It was their mutual passion for Health and Fitness that brought them together. Now into their 3rd year as a gym…..Michelle & Len with their 100% committment and extensive experience , set out to create a friendly, nonthreatening environment where both members and clients would receive care, support and undivided attention. Both Len and Michelle began their careers in the Fitness Industry teaching group fitness classes, then added Gym Instructor to their resume and in 2000 added Personal Trainer to complete their skills and opened Fitness On The Way. A Dream Come True..!!!! There are still a handful of clients that they have been training from the beginning…. a testament to their knowledge and many years of experience. They have seen many changes and trends in the industry over the years. They believe that ….Fads in training may come and go but to change the shape of your body and gain lean muscle you can’t go past good old - fashioned weight training, combined with cardio exercise and a bit of motivation..!!!! As Fitness Professionals they cannot stress enough how crucial resistance training is in attaining your fitness goals and staying healthy. During their 17 1/2 years of business one of the highlights was in 2002 when Hugh Jackman and Deborah -Lee Furness walked through their doors. Over the years when they come to town to visit they always come back to FOTW to train with Michelle and Len.

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* Michelle & Lens focus when Personal Training is to provide their clients with full body workouts, incorporating functional exercise. They never want you to be bored. Sessions are kept fun and varied but still challenging. A variety of equipment is used ranging from cardio machines, free weights, machine weights, fit balls, medicine balls, boxing gear and pilates equipment. * Michelle & Len like to get results from their clients so they keep the workouts challenging but will also train people within their limits, particularly working around injuries or tailoring programs around more mature adults. * Michelle & Len want their members and clients to live a longer life and enjoy it with a stronger, fitter, healthier body. They think it is important to work healthy habits into a lifestyle without feeling restricted or deprived and they still get excited to share the progress and success people achieve when they consistently do the right thing for a healthier lifestyle. * Fitness On The Way’s longevity and Len and Michelle’s experience and reputation speak volumes. If you are looking for a Personal Trainer, Michelle and Len look forward to training, inspiring and guiding you on a journey to a healthier and happier life. If you are looking for a 24 hour gym then look no further we aim to make you feel welcome in an environment that is comfortable clean and safe. Equipment is always well maintained and cleanliness is paramount. * So if you want to feel better, have more energy and perhaps even live longer with a better quality of life - you need look no further..!!! Still not motivated to get moving …… maybe you need the motivation of a Personal Trainer. A Personal Trainer will get the best out of you, inspire and guide you to help you be the best you can be..!!! The Best Way To Get Things Done Is Simply To Begin


0414 703 777 www.fitnessontheway.com.au SUITE 5/7 DAVIES AVE, MT ELIZA

FITNESS

ON THE WAY Chester has been lucky enough to accompany Michelle & Len to the gym every morning since he was a puppy for the past 7 years. He is very much loved by the members and completely spoilt by them.

WHATEVER YOUR GOALS ARE WE CAN WORK TOGETHER TO ACHIEVING • WEIGHT LOSS

• INCREASED ENERGY AND VITALITY

• MUSCLE BUILDING

• IMPROVING OVERALL HEALTH AND FITNESS

• DIET & NUTRITION

• CORE STABALISATION (STRENGTHENING BACK AND ABDOMINALS)

• CARDIO • TONING STUDIO

Fitness On The Way is a boutique 24hr fitness club fully equipped with modern training equipment. You will never be bored with a variety of equipment ranging from cardio machines, free weights, machine weights, fit balls, medicine balls, TRX bands and pilates equipment. BENEFITS Joining a 24hr fitness club is affordable, convenient and fun. Our centre is open 24/7 which means you can schedule training around your lifestyle and enjoy the flexibility of a full time facility with state of the art strength training and cardio equipment. PERSONAL APPROACH At Fitness on The Way you will also have the added value of owner operators, Len and Michelle’s combined experience of over 30 years in the health and fitness industry to draw on.

NO LOCK-IN CONTRACTS

24/7 FITNESS CLUB

$14.95 GREAT VALUE

JOIN NOW - 24/7 SOMETIMES LATER BECOMES NEVER


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Real Estate

ON TOP OF THE BAY By Melissa Walsh

80 Bradford Road Mt Martha

S

et on more than 2000 square metres of land, and with views that encompass all from Safety Beach through to Port Phillip Head, this remarkable property must surely rank as one of the most impressive and unique properties on the Mornington Peninsula. Wrapped in imported ancient Indian limestone, professionally cut, polished and laid, the resulting exterior provides a luxurious robust look that will stand the test of time. The stone includes fossils that are visible on an internal feature wall, and as you move from ground level to upstairs you will be instantly drawn to the two large living areas that overlook the solar and

gas heated infinity pool and spa out on the tiled terrace. Breathtaking 3 metre high ceilings showcase floor to ceiling windows that literally flood the home with natural light that gleams of the handsome black butt timber floors that sweep throughout this spacious upper level. Incorporated into the space is a magnificent kitchen demonstrating a stylish yet highly practical design with an inviting 6m island bench, multiple ovens, induction cooktop, dual sinks, and an attractive feature marble tile wall. Three bedrooms include the opulent master suite which opens out to the terrace, there is a separate study and a luxurious main bathroom

Discover the true value of your property.

WE PROVIDE FREE

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plus powder room. A hydronic heating system throughout the home keeps everyone and everything comfortable, and for added ambience there is a gas log fire to the formal lounge and dining room. The master bedroom and study have air-conditioning with the remainder of the upstairs zone featuring evaporative cooling. The air-conditioned lower level offers fully self-contained two bedroom guest accommodation that includes a kitchen, living area, bathroom and laundry. This flexible area also enjoys the bay view, and is accessible from

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the lower level terrace, internally from the garage, and also via the massive games room. The high-span garage will comfortably house up to four vehicles and in addition there are excellent storage options throughout the property with two store-rooms, sub-floor basement and a workshop with three phase power. Substantial off-street parking will also cater to several vehicles and there is secure storage for a boat or caravan.

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SPORT ON AN ISOLATED ISLAND

By Ruth Gooch

L

ittle known, even by those mainlanders who live closest to it, French Island is the largest of the Western Port islands comprising some 16,350 hectares. Surrounded by mud flats at ebb tide, it appears remote, mysterious even. There are vague tales of buried treasure, long-ago escaped convicts from Tasmania, and an island 'spook' which has been pursued at full gallop on horseback. One old map has the name 'Bushranger Point' marked on the south coast, but how the name originated, of course, is not now known.

The island is 'unincorporated territory', meaning it does not form part of any municipality, its inhabitants do not pay rates, and the island is administered directly by the Victorian Government's Ministry of Transport, Planning and Local Infrastructure, in consultation with an island committee. The population has never consisted of more than a few hundred, the comparative isolation and difficult terrain defeating most of those who attempted to settle there. However, a handful of families did succeed and descendants of 1890s settlers are among the current resident population of about 100 people. Cricket This has always been the main game, although it has had a chequered history. The first club was formed about 1898 with selector George Harrop as captain, and another selector, Rowland Peck as president. Peck loaned a piece of his land so that the club could have a ground to play mainland teams, although early matches were amateurish. The Westernport Times reported a

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game between the island and Bass played at the Corinella ground on 22 December 1899, although most of the 'French Island' team came from either Corinella or Bass, because the island did not have enough men to make up the numbers. The game bordered on a debacle with 'French Island' scoring 24 runs and Bass 31. The top score was 8. The lack of runs was explained by the 'exceptional roughness of the pitch'. The island wag, Fred Bond, who was working at Corinella in 1899, had earlier written a poem and sent it back to the island in order to try and inspire island men. After some verses of admonition, he continued: So stick on your hats and pick up your bats On the ground that was lent you by Peck And if money is short and tools must be bought Just ask some kind gent for a cheque So clap on your pads and at it my lads, To say you're not able is 'rich', Not heeding the bumps just stand to the stumps, And slog the old ball round the pitch... Apparently the cricket lapsed, for in 1909, Fred was recording that he and islander Frank Broderick were 'always getting up some new craze in amusements. At one time it was bezique [a card game for two, played with a double pack of 64 cards], then high jumping, now it is draughts, they are fair dotty on draughts'. An impetus was given to cricket when a Mornington businessman who had an allotment at Fairhaven on the island's west coast donated a piece of his ground to be used as a recreation ground.


History

It and an adjacent hall were officially opened in October 1914 and after a speech by the President of the Fairhaven Progress Association, the Union Jack was raised by Mrs De La Haye Senior and Mrs Cheeseman. The Fairhaven flag (design now unknown) was then raised by Mrs Rue De La Haye and Mrs E. Bennetts. Not to be outdone, the rival French Island Progress Association called a working bee for October 4 in order to create a recreation ground in a corner of Bennetts' allotment at Tankerton. About 20 workers came with mattocks, slashers, and Trewhalla jacks. Scrub was cleared by lighting a fire. The men did such a good job, said a newspaper report, that it was expected only one more day would be required to clear the entire ground. A concrete pitch was laid and a sports pavilion subsequently erected. Island men's cricketing ability skilled up and the Peninsula Post described a match in February 1915 against Grantville, the story beginning at the point where island men left home at 7 a.m. and caught the motor boat which left Stockyard Point at 8 a.m. After 'a most pleasant bay trip' the players landed at Tenby pier. From there, it was a two and a half mile walk to Grantville where they arrived at 11.15 a.m. Dinner was provided for them at the Grantville Hotel after which 'the islanders felt in great form for cricket'. French Island proved to be the superior side, as Grantville, who batted first, were all out for 46 runs. Frank Broderick, bowling

for French Island, was reported to be 'unplayable at times'. French Island closed their innings for 74 with a loss of 5 wickets. Tea was provided at the hotel with much 'barracking', and the islanders left for the return trip at 7 p.m. The First World War put a temporary end to cricket, for 30 French Island men enlisted, an extraordinary number for such a small community. But after the war, the island was fielding two teams which played teams from around the bay. The sports pavilion at the recreation ground at Tankerton was re-built in 1922 and the concrete pitch re-laid. The white-ant infested Mechanics Institute Hall in the centre of the island was partly demolished (the flooring was saved) and re-built at the Tankerton location in 1930. The entire complex was gazetted in 1933; among subsequent regulations, no person was to 'enter or remain in the Reserve who may offend against decency in dress, language or conduct'. Nor was any person permitted to climb or jump over the gates or fences. At some stage the concrete cricket pitch was abandoned so as to be in keeping with other grounds, but a commentator described the alternative pitch as 'very rough'. And after a heavy rain, the ground would become sodden. Fairhaven gradually faded away and is now only a campsite. continued next page...

Top left: The French Island football team, pre World War One. Henry De La Haye (fifth from left, top row), Bill Ratford (second from left, top row), Bob McGuigan (second from left, middle row), Edmund Thompson (far right), Frank Broderick Senior (far left, front row), Peter Davon (fourth from left, centre row).

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Football The origins of the football club are unknown, but the island was fielding a team before the First World War. A 'Leisure Hour' held regularly at the Mechanics Institute Hall had Fred Bond writing a report in an exercise book after one such occasion and noting that Tim Whyatt and Jack Ratford had argued the point about a match which French Island had lost against Phillip Island the previous Saturday. Whyatt insisted that if Ratford had only passed the ball to him instead of being selfish with it and going for free kicks which the umpire did not allow, then in Bond's words, 'Tim could have turned round twice, dodged Barney Brown and four others, ran 72 yards 4 inches and kicked a whole six points and thereby saved the French Islanders from the demoralization of defeat'. According to Bond, Ratford 's response was to tell Whyatt that 'the correct thing to do with his face was to fry and then boil it'. As with the cricket team, the football team almost certainly disbanded due to the war. Fred Bond joined the army and as a corporal, was killed in action at Gallipoli.

Above: "Ed playing footer". Ed (presumably Edmund Thompson) drawn by Fred Bond in one of the exercise books which contain his poems and prose pieces. The book was handed around for comment and unknown artist/s were responsible for the other drawings. About 1910.

External football matches probably did not resume until the 193840 season when the island played in the Phillip Island competition, a vacancy having been created by the withdrawal of the Cowes club which had difficulty in fielding 18 players. That left the Rhyll team at the east end of Phillip Island and Ventnor at the west end. But French Island too was always handicapped by insufficient players. Nor, due to farm commitments, were the customary players always available Even so, French Island won an occasional game. If a football match was at 'home' there was the disadvantage of

Below: French Island Football Team, circa 1937-8. Back row, l to r: Henry Pegram, Peter Davon Senior, Bruce Livingstone, Ernie Thompson, Jack Guy, Jack King, George King, Jack Jones, Monte King, Jack Todd, Bob Thompson, Cecil Duscher, Joe North, Peter Davon Junior. Front Row, l to r: Bert Duscher, Ted Matthews, Charlie Meade, Bob North, Bill Guy, Tony Davon.

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the poor ground at Tankerton which would not grow grass, and if the game was 'away', there was always the difficulty of transport. The cost of the big ferries was prohibitive, and because football is a winter sport, most fishermen had their boats out of the water (to say nothing of the fact that they were not licensed to carry passengers). Some islanders travelled in Jack Ratford's boat, but the rest went with a Phillip Island boatman who was not experienced with the fact that cross-currents near Tortoise Head (off the south-west tip of French Island) can be quite dangerous and that had a near disastrous consequence. One winter evening after a football match, the boatman left Cowes with about 28 French Islanders aboard. It was almost dark and the boat set off 'in the teeth' of a howling north wind and an ebb tide. 'The motor was slow and so was the progress'. As they approached the Tortoise Head buoy at the south-west corner of French Island, water came over the stern of the boat and put out the motor. At the same time, some of the passengers looked back and saw a wave about nine metres high pass close to the stern of the boat, only narrowly missing it. But luckily, on the first turn of the engine, the boatman succeeded in getting it going, and despite a very rough sea, the islanders were safely landed at Tankerton where 'the jetty felt good'. Jack Ratford had passengers in his boat also, but he moored safely at his own berth on the south coast and did not have to negotiate the 'horror stretch' near Tortoise Head. After the Phillip Island boatman had delivered his passengers at Tankerton that night, he put up his sail and headed back to Rhyll, his home port, but on arriving, he jibbed his sail, and the force of

the wind took the mast out of the boat, and he had to swim into the Rhyll channel. After that, there were many less French Island football supporters. The competition lasted for about three years, the shortage of men during World War 2 bringing it to an end. Eighteen French Island men enlisted, again a significant number from a very small population. In the latter 1940s, when the island no longer had a football team, islander Cecil Duscher who was a good player, joined the Hastings club on the Mornington Peninsula, one of his team mates being the legendary John Coleman who went on to become a star player with the city club, Essendon. Duscher was a great story teller and one of his yarns concerned the occasion when the team visited a country town and while walking down the main street, Coleman, with his legendary leap, jumped up, swung from a sign and broke it. The boys very quickly disappeared into nearby shops. Tennis School children in the early 1920s played on a tennis court marked out on the ground near the school, but by the latter 1920s, the island had a 'fine asphalt tennis court', laid by island volunteers. The 'Garth Challenge Cup' (presumably donated by Garth Bennetts, although using his first name seems a bit odd) was inaugurated in 1932, with Elsie Thomson (later, that well-known old island lady, Mrs Cox) winning the ladies event three times: 1936, 1938, and 1939. The event seems to have been discontinued after that date, again, presumably because of the war. continued next page...

Below: Group of school children with teacher, Peter Davon (towards right), 1926. Ten of the children hold tennis rackets, which suggests that the rackets may have been donated.

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Above: Members of Redbill Creek Swimming Club, 1933. Left to right, Jock Lovie, Bruce Livingstone, Charlie Meade, Joe North, Colin Livingstone (?), Bob North, Teddy Lovie, Bill Lovie stretched out in front. No records remain of the Redbill Creek Swimming Club; only this photograph has survived.

Annual Sports Meeting The big event on the French Island calendar in the 1930s was the New Year's Day sports at Tankerton, followed by a dance in the evening. The day before the event there was a 'working bee' to prepare the ground and peg it out for the races, the pegs consisting of tea tree sticks about a metre long. Little coloured flags were attached to the top of the sticks and it all looked 'very exciting' when the children and adults arrived next day. The sports were preceded by a lunch which both men and women had prepared the previous day: Mrs Josie Duscher would cook a large piece of silverside beef and that evening, the committeemen would arrive to cut the sandwiches. They sliced by hand 12 large loaves which were about half a metre long, minced the silverside, shredded cheese, and sliced Strasburg sausage to use as fillings for the buttered bread. As a prank, they always made a couple of 'bodgie' sandwiches made with a slice of brown paper and silverside. Island ladies made cakes and pastries which they brought in baskets, and additional fare was ordered and supplied by the Hastings bakery on the mainland. On the day, four-gallon kerosene tins with attached wire handles, were filled with water and boiled on an outside fire, and a big bag of tea was plunged in. If anyone complained that the tea was too weak, the bag was given an extra squeeze. Summer visitors to the island were able to attend free of charge, but when discreetly asked for donations, they were not remembered as 'ever having loosened their purse strings to any great extent'. After lunch, the sports began. William Duscher (Josie's husband) with a handful of notes, would announce the races: 'Children under Three', he would call out, and so it went on, with separate races for boys and girls up to the age of about 16 years. That would be followed by a 'young ladies race', a 'married ladies race', sack races, and Siamese races for various ages. Siamese races were common to sports meetings everywhere and consisted of the right leg of one

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contender being tied to the left leg of the other participant, but running tied together was so difficult to accomplish that a pair of contestants usually fell and rarely made it to the finish line. Then there was the women's driving the nail competition where a competitor would get down on her knees and attempt to drive a big round headed nail into a red gum post. That always attracted spectators, and some newcomer ladies were so nervous that they would take an unfortunate swipe at the nail with a hammer and the nail 'would fly off like a missile'. One particular lady usually won the competition attracting comment that she must have practiced at home. With a very full programme, Duscher would push ahead with the men's races: the 100 yards, 220 yards, 440 yards and the one mile race were all 'watched keenly'. Most islanders, men and women, rode horses, so there were events like flag and barrel, and walk, trot and gallop. At the conclusion of the sports, there were some 'fairly grubby kids', who would get a freshen up with a face cloth, combed hair, and any extra clothes which 'Mum' had on hand. The new hall, opened in 1930 at Tankerton, had to be kept clean for the dance, so both lunch and tea were served outside under the gum trees, seating being provided by wooden forms which the young men would take out from the hall. The Prison The Crimes Act of 1915 embodied the principle that outdoor life afforded the opportunity for character building, and prison rehabilitation farms were subsequently established at French Island and Castlemaine. An area for the French Island prison was selected on Brella Creek at the south-east, and duly proclaimed on 26 July 1916. It was developed as a farm and afforestation nursery, a government pine seedling nursery having already been established in 1913.


Above: A group of men at New Year's Day sports, 1935. Don Guy, seated right, is holding the block from the "Ladies Driving the Nail" competition. Joe North, seated centre front, is holding Guy's dog Manly.

Initially, there were only a few prisoners housed in tents. Their requests were heard by members of the Indeterminate Sentences Board when they visited every two months. Permission was given in May 1917 for a sports meeting to be held to celebrate the King's birthday, and for residents on the island to attend. A football ground was subsequently laid out at the prison and matches were held with islanders, but because there were more prisoners than islanders, teams were selected from both groups and 'enjoyable matches held'. A cricket pitch was also laid down by the prisoners, and the Minutes of the Indeterminate Sentences Board note that on 11 January 1922, approval was given by the Board for 14 prisoners to contribute one shilling per head so as to entertain the French Island Cricket Club later that month. Permission was also given for the men to spend one shilling each on cricket balls (the money taken from the allowance allotted to the men by the Forests Department). Alf McLean was transferred to the Forests Department on French Island in 1920, and he recalled that, "Through the winter months teams of footballers would come to the island to have a game against the prisoners. I used to play rover for the prison team; we were never beaten. Wonthaggi would come over [and] a good number of visitors, and what a supply of food etc. they would bring! No liquor as this was not allowed. It was always a great day when they came. On the days when the Church of England minister came, we would arrange swimming matches etc. for amusement. Among the prisoners the favourite prize was a one ounce plug of tobacco. Their tobacco issue was only thin plugs of 'flap jack', a very dark tobacco. They said it was from the sweepings of the factory, and it was certainly pretty rough for smoking, but had a pleasant odour. Any other better tobacco was a real treat for them". When Dr Appleford from Lang Lang paid his quarterly visit in December 1925, he brought a cricket team with him, and 'victory rested with the camp'. The men were subsequently permitted to play

mainland teams, and the annual report on Victorian prisons 1928, for example, noted that on the whole, French Island prisoners had worked willingly and well, and that, 'They were given the privilege of playing five cricket and three football matches with visiting clubs from the mainland'. The annual report for 1930 noted: 'Several football and cricket matches were played with visiting teams, and the Wireless allowed at appointed times was appreciated by the prisoners' The thirteen members of the Bayles Cricket Club who visited in January 1931, were impressed with the well-laid-out flower gardens, well-kept lawns and vegetable gardens. The Bayles men took their own food for dinner, and in the afternoon, played the cricket match; predictably the prison team won. The prisoners, wrote the reporter with the Bayles team, 'tell us that it is a red letter day when teams come over, and they talk about it for days afterwards'. After tea in the dining room, the Bayles men donated their left-over food and cakes to the prisoners, which 'perhaps remind them of home and mother'. The evening ended with all of the men singing 'For they are Jolly Good Fellows', the reporter concluding that, 'Wet through and tired, but very happy, it was the best day we had for a long time – the day with the King's guests'. The annual prison report for 1935, noted: 'In their spare time they [the prisoners] play cricket and football, fish and swim, and generally lead the life of men in camps'. The same comment was made the following year with the additional remark that, 'Matches are arranged with visiting teams and on these occasions, the conduct of the prisoners is exemplary'. The visits were all the more appreciated because the prisoners were not permitted visits by family or friends, a policy which had been implemented when the prison opened in 1916 and it continued for several decades. continued next page...

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subsequent meeting, one resident said that he had armed his 12 year-old son with a rifle to guard the farm when he was away. He had instructed his son to shoot any strangers who refused to stop after being called on at 50 yards.

Above: Aerial view of the prison with playing fields at right.

Although not officially remarked on, islanders continued to play cricket and football at the prison in the 1930s, despite the fact that the prison had plenty of men to choose from and the island residents did not. One former islander also remembered that the vegetable and flower gardens at the prison were always in 'top condition' and that 'it always seemed a rather pleasant place to be, that is, if one could put aside the whole reason of it. Mostly, the inmates used to be bubbling at the thought of the Islanders coming over. They'd always have plenty of jokes and when visitors came they were allowed to wear their own clothes, which made them feel good.' One prisoner was said to sport a Scotch College cap. ('Scotch College', it was said, with a shake of the head). Island men would take a case of oranges for the prisoners at football matches – doubtless a change from the 'home brew' which the deprived devised ways of making: plums did not always find their way into a pudding. Pumpkin also had an alternative use. Island people always seemed to know these things, although how they knew is uncertain: the warders, perhaps, looking for a chat to relieve the tedium of isolation. But island good-will towards prisoners gradually evaporated, for an increasing number of escapes made islanders feel they were at risk. A 'posse' of angry island men armed with shotguns, recaptured three escaped prisoners hiding in a haystack in July 1953. This escape 'brought a renewed outburst from islanders who want the penal settlement removed', according to a press report. At a

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Prison authorities apparently ignored island concerns, and facilities at the prison continued to improve. It was noted in 1961 that, 'A second tennis court has been completed and outside teams have visited and played tennis, table tennis, basketball and football'. A nine hole golf course was opened in 1962 ('undulating with natural hazards') designed by a long-term prisoner. With tighter security, there were no escapes or attempted escapes that year, and the official report noted that the prisoners 'appreciate the good living conditions and the general atmosphere of harmony and progress. They have a sports committee to organize sporting activities and a general committee which works hard for the general betterment of the prison'. The following year, as well as the team sports, 'Athletics meetings were held at Christmas and Easter.' Next year, there was a similar report and 'competition was keen'. In 1965, football matches were played against teams from Sunbury, General Motors Holden, the Apprentice Butchers, and Saint Bedes. One of the mainland teams in 1966 came from as far away as Fish Creek in Gippsland. A former 1967 prisoner has recalled that football matches could be fierce games with the casualties being wheeled off in the 'French Island Ambulance' (a wheelbarrow) and that those with the most severe injuries were taken across to a mainland hospital. A new large boat for transport proved a great asset in 1967. Family visits were inaugurated and prisoners were permitted to receive their visitors 'on the lawns affronting the institution, weather permitting, or otherwise within the precincts of the Prisoners Mess'. Loosely translated, that meant 'conjugals' took place on the foreshore. Prisoners that year made and repaired toys for children in the Gippsland area, and in 1969 it was reported that toys were made, repaired, or repainted for the Blind Institute and the Children's Hospital. But the press in the sixties ran feature articles glamourising the prison, one journalist describing it as a 'Country Club', or a 'glorified motel', and listing all of the sports available: tennis, golf, football, cricket, badminton, fishing, and swimming', and 'often on Fridays, TV sets are allowed to stay on after 10 p.m. so prisoners can watch a late movie'. However, the prison was operating at less than half capacity by the 1970s and morale had deteriorated. A decision was made to close, one of the official reasons being that, 'The participation by prisoners in sporting, recreational, educational and hobby interests is not much in evidence and is minimized by the difficulties of isolation and access...' The prison duly closed on 30 April 1975.


Island Sport to the Present Day In the 1960s, French Island men were playing cricket in a Mornington Peninsula association, the entire team made up from the Thompson family whose members were then half of the island population. There was also a football team which had only seven island members – the rest of the team consisted of mainland relatives and friends; they played seven or eight social games each season. 'Our players are old men and kids', laughed a rotund Jack Norgate at the time. 'We train each Wednesday and have a niner after each game. If we win it's an excuse for a pie night and another grog up'. The rifle range was on Norgate's property, and cattle were driven off prior to a shoot. Notices were posted on the ramp road behind the rifle butts, and at the entrance to the range before the

bullets started flying. Island sport these times is played on an irregular basis as numbers and enthusiasm permit. In the 1980-1990s, there was a darts and pool team that travelled to Corinella to play in pub competitions. Cricket has always been popular and until 2012, there were two cricket teams, although about half of the players were friends and relatives who went over to play for the island. Now, I am told, they are down to one team and struggling to keep that going. A new tennis court was built in 2006 with funds from the French Island Community Association and a grant from the Victorian Government Department of Sport and Recreation. The annual New Year Sports meeting, however, continues to be held.

Below: French Island Cricket Team, circa 1958. Back row, l to r: Eric Easy, Len King, Percy Thompson, Mal Curran, Ernie Thompson, Henry Thompson. Front row, l to r: Cyril Thompson, Arnold Thompson, Robert Thompson, Cec Duscher, Arthur Tulk.

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Above: French Island Cricket Team, last premiership, 2011-12. Back row, l to r: Jake King, Peter Hatton, Ben King, Mark Cox, Jason Matthews, Scott Matthews. Middle row, l to r: Michael Thompson. Front row, l to r: Michael Hoskins, Tom Sullivan, Matthew Spark, Noel Thompson. Š Ruth Gooch 2018 Ruth Gooch has published a number of books and peer-reviewed papers. A list of her publications is on her web site www.ruth-gooch.com. Her books, Frontier French Island, and her history of Cape Schanck, The Wildest Bit along the Coast can be purchased at the Hastings newsagency and Petersen's Bookshop. The author acknowledges, with gratitude, the use of manuscript material provided by the Hyett family. Personal communications, the late Merl Le Barry. Personal communication, George and Colleen Robinson. Personal communication, Terry C. Official Sources: Australian Archives, Series B 24 55/1. Annual reports on Victorian Penal Establishments. The name of the Department responsible was changed a number of times over the years. Victorian Department of Justice files. Victorian Government Gazettes. Newspapers and Periodicals: Frankston and Somerville Standard. Herald (Melbourne). Hesperus. Koo-wee-rup Sun. Neptune News. Peninsula Post. Powlett Express. Victorian Foresters Newsletter. Wonthaggi Express. Book: Joshua Gliddon (comp.) Phillip Island in Picture and Story, Cowes, 1958.

Dianne Spark

T

he cricket photographs have been supplied by French Island resident Dianne Spark. She has been the scorer for French Island cricket team for 53 years and in 2000 received the Australian Sports Medal in recognition of her contribution. Dianne succeeded her father, Robert, one of the Thompsons in the c.1958 team and who was a member of the M.P.C.A. country week team for approximately 15 years. He was later manager of that side. The medal for best

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player in the Sub-District 1sts in the M.P.C.A. is named after Robert Thompson.

May 2018

Cec. Duscher

F

rench Island has produced more than its share of characters; one of them was Cecil Duscher. Born in 1918, Cec. was one of five children of William and Josie Duscher, both of whom featured prominently in the early years of the New Years Day sports meeting. Cec. played football for French Island in the 1930's and can be seen in the photograph with one of his brothers. He must have decided, at the age of 29, that his football career was unfulfilled for in 1947 he ventured across to the mainland and played two games with Hastings. This was during the Coleman era (1946-1948) and so Cec's frequently made claim to have been a team mate of John Coleman was valid, if only just. After a two year spell (1948 and 1949) Cec. resumed playing with Hastings, finally retiring in

1954. All told he played 40 games with Hastings, 16 of them in 1951. On the Island Cec. worked on the family property and for a time this included the collection and baling of sea grass. In the 1950's he provided the French Island taxi service; this consisted of a well worn panel van which, passengers were informed, served as a hearse, mail van, grocery delivery van, and wedding car. Cec. was a greatly loved character both on the mainland and French Island. He particularly enjoyed catching up with his old teammates from his football days in Hastings, although in his latter years he suffered from narcolepsy. This would cause him to drop off to sleep in the middle of a conversation, a practice which only increased the number of Cec. Duscher stories.


Peninsula Essence May 2018  

Peninsula Essence May 2018

Peninsula Essence May 2018  

Peninsula Essence May 2018

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