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MAY 2017

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

The Beauty of Burlesque • Pushing the Boundaries • Her Next Wave is Waiting • Kate Walks Tall Fort Framework • The Call of the Music • Man Up and Get Waxed • The Legacy of Art Lives On Wine Travellers • If It Aint Baroque Don’t Fix It • Henry Howard’s Journey • Focus on Mount Eliza


SEE US IN ACTION OPEN DAYS 17 May 2017 16 August 2017 18 October 2017

Years 5 and 6: smaller class sizes 2018 In Years 5 and 6 at Peninsula Grammar our smaller class sizes are targeted to meet the individual needs of each and every child. Come and hear more at our Open Days from 9.00am to 11.00am. Register at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/T217OpenDay Enter via Gate 2 and we’ll point you in the right direction to start the tour.

www.peninsulagrammar.vic.edu.au Peninsula Grammar 20 Wooralla Drive, Mt Eliza, VIC 3930


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contents 7. Events 8. Peninsula Styles 10. The Beauty of Burlesque

Is standing up on stage in your underwear as scary as it sounds? Corset’s not. Just ask burlesque beauty, Gemma Sheree, a burlesque teacher, hair and makeup artist, and founder of Gloriana Burlesque.

Writers: Melissa Walsh, Keith Platt, Peter McCullough, Cameron McCullough Creative Director: Maria Mirabella Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Publisher: Cameron McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au Marg Harrison, 0414 773 153 or marg@mpnews.com.au General enquiries: essence@mpnews.com.au Registered address: 2/1 Tyabb Road, Mornington 3931 Phone: 5973 6424 www.peninsulaessence.com.au Follow us on Instagram

@peninsulaessence

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14. Pushing the Boundaries

At 15 years of age, the young artist and entrepreneur is proof that a lot can happen in four years. This year Josh won with the inaugural Peninsula Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award, and is now running his own business in Frankston.

20. Her Next Wave is Waiting

At 23, Georgia Fish has been working toward her goal for years. The peninsula girl is a professional surfer, traveller, writer, yogi and health mentor.

24. Kate Walks Tall

Running your own business is no piece of cake, but add children into the mix and it’s an even tougher gig. Kate Walker knows all about this. As the owner of Kate Walker Design (KWD) and mother of Charlie and Jemima, the Mt Martha entrepreneur lets Peninsula Essence into her world to see what goes on behind the scenes.

32. Fort Framework

As with real estate, the success or failure of photography can depend on the location. Rosebud based photographer Derry Caulfield has found a spot on Port Phillip that exactly fits the bill to inspire the creation of interesting images.

40. The Call of the Music 44. Man up and get Waxed

They’re having things plucked, shaved, lasered and waxed and the male grooming business is booming. No longer is there the social stigma of men paying too much attention to their looks. A monthly haircut at the barber is no longer a chore that they have to endure, and regular body waxing has become part of the norm for some.

55. The Legacy of Art Lives On

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

It’s long been a meeting place for artists and celebrities.The original house still stands as the Whistlewood Gallery now and its third family, the McCulloch’s, still call it home.

58. Illustration Changes Children’s Lives 62. Life’s A Stage

‘All the worlds a stage’ and it certainly has been for Cindy Pritchard, a veteran of the theatre for more than three decades. The bubbly thespian has tread the boards with fellow actors Hugh Jackman, Bert Newton, Debra Byrne, Marina Prior and Barry Otto, to finally plant her roots on the peninsula.

66. Wine Travellers

At first glance, the 20-odd people sitting around the table at Crittenden Wines appear to be indulging in a rather heavy after-lunch drinking session. But stay and watch a little longer and you’ll notice no one is swallowing their wine. Although nine glasses containing red wine sit in front of each person, little red plastic cup gives the story away. The men and women around the table are here to taste the wine.

70. If It Aint Baroque Don’t Fix It

French renaissance furniture, red velvet baroque lounges, and gold embossed framed paintings adorn the walls of the luxurious iconic Brass Razu wine bar in Mornington. Owner and manager, Alexis Collier, tells us what it’s like to run one of the most unique bars in Mornington. Cover Photo: Rosebud on the Mornington Peninsula Photo: Yanni

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72. Cooking Was Her Destiny 75. Must Try Dishes 76. Henry Howard’s Journey

The fascinating story of how one man journey saw him in Mornington, then Frankston, then the gallows.

88. Focus on Mount Eliza 94. Grand Old Estate Up For Sale


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Peninsula events

May

HERITAGE FESTIVAL THE STORY OF COOLART April 18 - Tuesday May 16 An experienced volunteer guide will give voice to the story of Coolart Wetlands and Homestead in Somers on the Mornington Peninsula. Coolart Homestead, 40 Lord Somers Road, Somers Ph 13 19 63 parkweb.vic.gov.au

ART RED HILL Friday 5 - Sunday 7 In its 36th year, Art Red Hill is the premier art show held on the Mornington Peninsula. Showcasing artists from both the local thriving art community and from around Australia. 341 Arthurs Seat Road, Red Hill Ph 0411416852 artredhill.redhillcs.vic.edu.au

PENINSULA WINERY WALK

INTERNATIONAL COOL CLIMATE WINE SHOW

Saturday 6 Walk from Red Hill to Merricks with local vignerons and friends to celebrate the end of harvest and experience current vintage wines. Taste a variety of wines along the way complemented by a fine selection of food. Red Hill Recreation Reserve 184 Arthurs Seat Road, Red Hill Ph 5989 2377 mpva.com.au

Monday 22–Monday 29 Peninsula bringings an international and domestic spotlight on the region as a destination for cool climate wines. Ph 0402 134 245 coolclimatewineshow.org

AUSTRALIAN HERITAGE FESTIVAL

MELBOURNE COASTREK

Wednesday 17 Step back into time. Hear from a panel of Briars' experts on what life was like through the centuries. The Briars 450 Nepean Highway, Mt Martha nationaltrust.org.au/ahf_event/ the-briars-through-thecenturies

Friday 26 Trekking to restore sight and raise fund for the Fred Hollows Foundation. Explore the magic of the Mornington Peninsula's rugged coastline, spectacular bays, secret bush trails, and historic sites. 02 8039 3580 melbourne.coastrek.com.au

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Call 9788 7234 for enrolment enquiries. www.toorakcollege.vic.edu.au


The

BEAUTY of

By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

I

s standing up on stage in your underwear as scary as it sounds? Corset’s not. Just ask burlesque beauty, Gemma Sheree, a burlesque teacher, hair and make-up artist, and founder of Gloriana Burlesque.

“My passion is for burlesque, teaching for ‘Dance Heels up Dance School’ in Somerville, performing around Melbourne and putting on shows,” said the UK born 37 year old who now lives in Rye with her husband. “I love art, everything from 17th century European portraiture to pop art. I was obsessed with Andy Warhol as a teenager, as well as 1970's punk rock, drag queens, the rebellious designs of Vivienne Westwood, Jean Paul Gaultier and Thierry Mugler. I used to borrow all the fashion and art books from the library and just update them every fortnight so I could keep them at my house. Hollywood legends also intrigued me. My favorite was Marlene Dietrich.” Gemma says her venture into burlesque was a natural progression, given her love of dressing up and all things glamorous. But it was her move to Bath in England that sealed the deal. “I used to go to shows but it wasn't until I met my burlesque mentor Venus Noir that I began taking lessons and developing my act properly. My first act was a Marie Antoinette style fan dance. People say I'm a ‘glamazon' so I began to lean more towards the classic burlesque, with the feathers and corsets, rather than the comedy or neo styles. When I design a new costume I draw pictures of my ideas and I make what I can. I assign the really complicated pieces such as corsets and gowns to costumiers. It's

worth investing in amazing costumes. A well-made corset will last forever and hopefully will someday be found in a dusty box in an attic, ready to inspire burlesque performers of the future.” “Most girls only get to wear a fabulous princess gown on their wedding day. I get to dress up in glamorous costumes as a job,” said the dancer who introduced the first ever burlesque show to the Western Port side of the peninsula in April to astounding success. “Our first show at the Westernport Hotel was fabulous and we have another booked for Saturday July 15,” said Gemma, who ran sell-out burlesque shows in the UK for four years before moving back to Australia. “At present, this is the only burlesque event offered on the Mornington Peninsula and was sold out in days. These shows are most popular among women and older people and those who like to dress in the vintage style.” Gloriana Burlesque features several award winners, including Bella De Jac as headliner for the second show. “Bella De Jac is a superb performer, who won Miss Burlesque Australia 2015 and we are thrilled to have her in our next show,” said Gemma. Known as the art of tease, burlesque combines beautiful or outrageous costumes and themes with striptease to tantalise the eyes and the mind. Gemma explains that the different forms of striptease can be glamorous and classy, bawdy, or downright shocking depending on the performance. continued next page...

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Did You Know? The literal meaning of burlesque is to "send up" and the term is derived from the Latin word burra. In 14th century Britain, Geoffrey Chaucer’s satirical The Canterbury Tales popularized burlesque in verse and prose.

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In 17th century France and Italy, burlesque became a widely known term and was popularly known as the grotesque imitation of the pathetic or dignified. In 19th century England, theatrical burlesque became popular in the form of musical parody and became a form of middle class entertainment.

The traditional British burlesque is now known as classical burlesque or musical burlesque and is very different from modern burlesque which focuses more on striptease. In 20th century America, burlesque became associated with many variety shows where striptease became the chief attracting element. American burlesque encompasses parody,


“Each performer is different in terms of what they want to reveal and how many pieces of clothing they actually remove. I personally like starting with a lot of clothing and remove it one at a time to get down to usually a G-string and pasties. I have seen other performers who only take off two pieces of clothing over a period of ten minutes but you are totally mesmerized,” said Gemma, explaining most performers will wear a classic gown, pair of gloves, corset, bra, G-string, panel belt and stockings. As far as nerves on stage, Gemma says the first time she performed she was terrified. “I wasn’t concerned about taking my clothes off and people seeing my body but I was worried I was going to forget my choreography and stuff up the act,” she said. “It’s all about the performance and the art of striptease.”

“I WASN’T CONCERNED ABOUT TAKING MY CLOTHES OFF AND PEOPLE SEEING MY BODY BUT I WAS WORRIED I WAS GOING TO FORGET MY CHOREOGRAPHY AND STUFF UP THE ACT,”

The adage ‘less is more’ certainly doesn’t apply to burlesque costumes which are over the top in the best possible way with feathers, glitter, sequins, bows and ribbons helping create the spectacle on the stage. “To make a burlesque costume takes more than one person. You certainly don’t get the whole thing from one costumier and there is no burlesque shop you can go to,” explains Gemma. “I draw a design of what I want and then send it to the costumier in Australia or New Zealand. You get the corset made by somebody else and a different person to embellish the shoes. Some of our costumes will be hand bead at home by the girls and I have been known to do that in front of the TV.” For Gemma and the other burlesque performers, part of the thrill is taking the audience on a journey back in time to the old Hollywood days. “When you walk into our burlesque show, you are stepping into another era with that wonderful vintage glamour of the Hollywood legends. In our industry it is important to hold our burlesque legends in high regard. It is a tribute to their incredible work and we are honored to keep it alive.”

wit, and pastiche with a variety of acts such as chanson singers, mime artists, dancing girls, comedians, and striptease artists. Burlesque made it into the big screen for the first time in the 1943 film, Lady of Burlesque, which depicted the back stage life of burlesque performers. There are three different types of burlesque dancing: cabaret,

Gloriana Burlesque will be performing at the Westernport Hotel, 16 High Street, Hastings on Saturday July 15. For tickets go to www.westernporthotel.com.au For further details about Gloriana Burlesque, check out the facebook page.

striptease and traditional burlesque.

Cabaret: Epitomized in French chorus line shows like the Moulin Rouge or the Lido where glamour and grace are the main attractions and there is hardly ever a striptease, as most of the dancers appear topless to begin with. Striptease: Also very glamorous. Dita Von Teese is an excellent example of this kind of burlesque:

the focus is on the gorgeous and expensive props and costumes, and how well she uses and loses them.

Traditional Burlesque: The favourite in the UK. This kind of burlesque is about humorous social satire, whether obvious or not. Each act relies on a story; if the performer strips, it is because the character or the situation requires it.

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PUSHING THE

BOUNDARIES

Photo Yanni

By Melissa Walsh

I

t’s been four years since local photographer, Josh Brnjac, sold his first photograph of the Dromana Pier. He was completely self-taught, and a primary school student who simply loved taking photos. He had only just picked up his first camera 18 months before.

“I got a point and shoot digital for my 11th birthday because I just wanted a camera to take on holidays. But I soon got bored with it and borrowed my parents Canon EOS 1000P,” said Josh. “I started out taking photos of the flowers in the backyard and the birds in our aviary, and everything was pretty much trial and error back then, and many hours were spent researching on the internet.” Now 15 years of age, the young artist and entrepreneur is proof that a lot can happen in four years.

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This year Josh won the inaugural Peninsula Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award, and is now running his own business in Frankston. “When I started I had about $400 invested with a camera and a lens; now I have put about $10,000 into equipment for the business,” said Josh with a laugh. “I was thrilled to receive the award and have already invested the grant back into my business,” said Josh. “I have moved from home to lease an office at the Frankston Foundry co-working space to work among other thriving local business owners. Last year, the photography business was in such high demand that I enrolled in online schooling with the support of my parents as it was the only way to keep up with business commitments.” continued next page...


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business with something different compared to generic images, I take the business strategy and what they want to achieve through their images, and I develop a style according to their needs. My speciality is working out what each business needs and showing them how my images will bring them customers.” With youth on his side, Josh has been well aware of the need for online marketing and evolving his business and has always made sure he has a strong online presence even from the early days. “I am in the process of rebranding and upgrading the website and have also become involved with videography to offer to clients as it is important to a business’s online presence. A company can explain who they are in a 30 second video.” Much like his photography, Josh is self-taught in videography, taking many of the skills he has learnt and applying them to making videos. “My main passion is still taking photos and connecting with like-minded people. I still go out and do my photography and have my solitude,” said Josh, who has learnt the importance of pushing the boundaries with his art. “I have just recently started doing aerial photography which was a huge step for me as I have a fear of heights. I decided I needed to keep pushing myself and that 2017 is the year I am getting rid of anything I am scared of so I chartered a flight in February and took photos of the peninsula from the back beaches to Frankston pier,” said Josh, who leant out the window to take his images. “Before I knew it, I barely noticed the height and even got used to the plane swaying around with the wind.” For Josh taking the aerial photos was another way to show off the marvellous beauty of the Mornington Peninsula. “I noticed that there hadn’t been a lot done locally so decided to show the peninsula from a different perspective and incorporate it into my coastal exhibition at The Cube gallery,” said Josh, who will be hosting a solo exhibition of his work at The Cube Gallery from June 8 till July 5. “The coastal exhibition project is to promote the local beauty that surrounds us, using a variety of materials, including my cushion range, and traditional mediums like canvas and framed prints, glass and wall murals.” As a young man, it hasn’t been all smooth sailing and Josh has had to face some obstacles during his first business endeavour. Josh says he still loves doing landscape photography but made the decision to focus on commercial aspects to grow the business. “I now do more creative commercial, event and landscape photography services,” said South African born Josh who shares his time between online schooling for year nine and over 35 hours a week capturing content behind a lens for professional clients. “I now do a lot of commercial and event work with Sand Sculpting Australia, Gravity Zone Seaford, Faun and Finch, Smashing Sorrento Café, and have recently shot a campaign for Martini and Co,” said Josh. “What I do differently is providing a

“Many people assume because of my age I am inexperienced or I charge painfully low rates, but this is something that I advocate strongly against. I’ve learnt to value my work and skillset. I’ve been very lucky so far to garner interest and respect for my work from family, friends and importantly clients.” Josh now finds himself booked out weeks in advance, and is determined to continue pushing boundaries and inspiring others to be their best. Coast to Coast - Through the Eyes of the Young is at the Cube Gallery in the Frankston Arts centre, from June 8 until July 5. www.joshbrnjac.com

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By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

G

eorgia Fish wakes up in the morning, walks out her door and straight down to the beach to practice her surfing; it's an easy walk for the athlete down the clifftop face of her Flinders property. Often her two dogs might follow and frolic in the water or chase a seal or seagull. Somewhere there’s a wave out there for her. The warm, salty water crushes over her as she waits patiently for the universe to send her the one wave with her name on it.

When it’s time for breakfast she treks back up to the family home and blends up a healthy mixture of green vegetables and blueberries or perhaps some blackberries she has picked on the way back from her surf. She checks some emails and gets stuck into her weights or yoga depending on her mood. She might even meditate. Sounds like a cruisy life but don’t be fooled; this 23 year old is more driven and determined than most people twice her age which is how she became a pro surfer since her teen years, and has already made the quarter finals in the world championships four years running. At the moment she is training for the Rip Curl Pro so has pumped up the training schedule even more. Georgia has never been one to sit on the beach watching. Ever since she was a little girl, she tried her hand at anything, and was determined to succeed at whatever she did, even making the state diving team at just 10 years of age. At 23, the peninsula girl is a professional surfer, traveller, writer, yogi and health mentor. “It all started with nippers when I was a kid. We were living in Brighton and would come down to Flinders to do nippers on the weekends. I loved it and felt at home straight away in the water. One of the girls I became friends with asked me to go surfing with her and I was hooked. We would go to little shore breaks with her dad and it was awesome,” said Georgia, whose own dad had also been a surfer back in the day. “Even my dad started to get back into it, and then my sister followed and now even mum surfs.” By the time Georgia was about to start high school, the family decided on a sea change and bought their first property in Flinders. Georgia and her older sister, Alex, went to Toorak College where the girls learnt to get into surfing even more. Even now, Georgia still holds an affiliation with the surf program the school runs and has been a judge on occasions. “I started out doing grommet contests and quickly learnt that it is a very male dominated industry, which has made it challenging over the years. Getting sponsorship as a woman is really difficult as a lot of the surf companies put money towards the male athletes. At this level the prize money is substantially different as well. When men and women’s contests are aligned, men get priority over the waves,” said Georgia. “I understand why it used to be that way as men were substantially better than the women in the early days. In the past their abilities have been superior but it is continued next page...

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HER NEXT

WAVE IS WAITING

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now at the point where the ability of men and women is levelling out and the quality of women’s surfing has improved dramatically. Unfortunately the WSL hasn’t kept up with those changes.” Georgia says many of the female surfers feel the same and have tried to make changes in the industry but to no avail. “We approached the World Surf League (WSL) in February last year to get more female surfers in the competition. At the moment there are 17 girls on the main tour and 32 men. It is hard to break through, and make positive changes though. Me and Paige Hareb started a movement to talk to the surfing body about making positive changes as all the competitors were having the same issue but they said there would not be any changes until three years,” said Georgia, who has brief moments of disappointment but is determined to be relentless in her pursuits to do well personally and improve the sport for women. “I have had moments in the past two years where I have felt defeated by it, but then I have a break think about why I started and it refuels me,” she said of the sport that is more a passion. “The thing is I have an insane connection with the ocean and natural environment. I am my happiest when in the water or on

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the beach. Still to this day if I go out and surf it brings me so much joy. It has taught me a lifestyle that I absolutely love where I have to take into consideration my nutrition, my fitness and it helps me live a mindful life.” It wasn’t always smooth seas for Georgia who, in her teenage years, fell ill with an immune related sickness, which left her tired and depressed at times. For this wise young soul, however, it was all part of her learning journey, with her mantra “through struggle comes the most growth”. “Mum was always health conscious with what she packed in our lunches but I got quite sick from 14 to 18 with chronic fatigue and other debilitating illness. I had to work out what was wrong and it ended up coming down to food and my mental state. I am grateful that it happened as otherwise I would never have learnt to incorporate yoga and meditation into my routine,” said Georgia. “I had a lot of times when I felt anxious and defeated during those years but deep down I just had to keep going. It made me do a lot of soul searching very early on to work out who I was and what I needed so I am actually lucky it all happened. I found out very young just what I needed to be doing. I had to go away and work


7 FACTORIES OF NEW, USED AND RETRO FURNITURE out who I was and what I wanted in my life, adapting my lifestyle to creating the best version of myself.” For Georgia, the proudest moments in her surfing career would have to be winning through to the quarter finals on the Australian Open four years running from 2013 to 2016.

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“It was amazing. It all came together for me. I had an amazing energy about myself and was really controlled,” said the athlete, who attributes her balanced attitude to a combination of meditation, yoga, Pilates, weights and surf training. “Yoga and Pilates are perfect for strength, flexibility and injury prevention. I got into yoga through mum and would say I am almost as passionate about it as my surfing.” These days sponsorship is the biggest hurdle for this young surfer to get over, as her career and training is dependent on it. “I am currently actively seeking sponsorship as it is my only source of income,” said Georgia, who is happy to align with local business in any industry. “I am happy to help promote other business including the surf industry, with an online presence, social media support and am looking forward to being more hands on with helping the promotional aspect.” With a career that has taken her all over the world from South America to California, Europe and Indonesia, Georgia says her favourite surfing memory was on a family holiday in West Timor.

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“We had gone on an exploratory trip to an untouched area in West Timor and I remember surfing with mum, dad and my sister on the most amazing waves. It is a time I will never forget,” she said. When it comes to advice for other young women wanting to get into surf contests, Georgia says it is important to remember certain things. “Always be yourself. Find out who you are and be true to that. Know yourself and what is good for you with food, exercise and all aspects of your life. And try not to get caught up in the way you look. For women in surfing there has been a tendency to put too much emphasis on looks and less on talent,” said Georgia who knows all too well the pressure put on women. “I fell for that once when I was a teenager. My friends and I wore certain things to get attention from the surf community. Now I know that if a sponsor wants to be aligned with me it will be as my authentic self, and not a fake version.” With her dad’s advice “the harder you work, the luckier you get” it seems like Georgia Fish is destined for an even bigger future. “My most tangible goal is to make the world tour and then I want to be world champion,” she said. If you are interested in sponsoring Georgia, or want to keep up to date with her journey, go to www.georgiafish.com.au

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KATE WALKS TALL By Melissa Walsh

Running your own business is no piece of cake, but add children into the mix and it’s an even tougher gig. Kate Walker knows all about this. As the owner of Kate Walker Design (KWD) and mother of Charlie and Jemima, the Mt Martha entrepreneur lets Peninsula Essence into her world to see what goes on behind the scenes.

Photo Yanni

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W

hen we meet Kate at her stunning Mt Martha property, you can see why she loves living there and working from her home base. The two storey white painted homestead has a Hamptons feel with French doors leading to wisteria covered pergolas, rose gardens and hedges that provide a sacred, private space necessary with such a busy lifestyle. The welcoming home feels like it has been there forever but Kate only renovated and moved into it last year. Kate is the epitome of elegance and style and you would never know she works 15 hour days to run her successful, but reasonably new, business, starting KWD just four years ago. Kate grew up in a well-known Melbourne family; her father is one of Australia’s most successful ceramic tile merchants with Frank Walker National Tiles, and her mother is a much loved interior designer. Kate started working in the family business at a very early age. “I started when I was young helping out on weekends and during the holidays and over the years have worked in all the areas of the business. It was when I was 20, and had finished university, dad said while you are working out what you want to do, come and work for me for six months. On my first day there I sold a massive job of timber flooring, and I was hooked. I loved being able to help people choose what they needed and supply them with a good product. I loved working for National Tiles,” said Kate. It wasn’t until 15 years later that Kate decided to take a leap of faith and get out on her own. “I learnt about the family business from the ground up, and became proficient in all facets of the tile and stone industry, and was trained in every aspect of the business from the retail floor and showroom design to working with major domestic builders, managing architectural and commercial sales and handling procurement. People would come in to buy tiles and I would help them with their carpet and timber flooring, splash backs and tiles. I became a hard finish expert,” said Kate, insisting she is not an interior designer but she is definitely passionate about all hard finishes and creating a cohesive, quality and functional space. Kate definitely won in the gene pool with a creative and passionate mother, and a father who taught her an indelible work ethic. “I am very fortunate, as my dad has been an incredible mentor during my life. Still today even though I have gone out on my own, he is my biggest supporter,” said Kate, who made her first steps away from the city lifestyle ten years ago, when she moved down to the peninsula. “We had a gorgeous place in Armadale but it had no backyard, and my oldest child, Charlie was 18 months. Mum and dad had a holiday home down here so we were down most weekends and one day I thought, let’s just move here,” she said. “It was the best decision I made and we all love it here. The kids and I wander down to the beach on the weekends or walk into Mt Martha continued next page...

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and grab a hot drink. I love that everyone is so friendly. The newsagent knows you and so does the pharmacist. It really is lovely. Even my daughter, who loves shopping and fancies a trip to the city every now and again, says she can’t wait to get back. She even made the comment I can’t breathe in the city.” Kate’s love of her bayside haven is displayed above the fire place in a stunning painting she commissioned recently. “It is my favourite artwork of my children and me walking with our puppy down to Mt Martha beach like we do most weekends,” she said. Starting KWD in 2013 was a huge leap of faith for the young businesswoman. Although she had a wealth of experience working in her father’s business, it was an overwhelming step but one she felt it was necessary to take. “I was petrified and felt like I was jumping off a cliff with a parachute but not knowing if the rip cord would work,” said Kate. “I have gone from starting out with my kitchen table as the office and my tile samples in the back shed, employing someone two hours a fortnight, to having a staff of ten and a purpose built office and showroom on the property,” said Kate, who was working around the clock doing the deliveries, administration and payments in the beginning. “I started off doing this Instagram thing even though I had no idea what I was doing. I would put posts up about hard finishes and décor and before I knew it I had a following. Then I started to create this brand and people were following me and my services. Initially everyone would come to me for tiles and I would just bolt everything else on. Now I have aligned myself with great partners, timber joiners, stone masons and carpet experts and have such an in depth knowledge about all these things. While we are not interior designers, we guide our clients with the overall look. Livability and working to a budget are what we do.” For Kate the process has been an incredible evolvement of selfconfidence, as she has learnt during the years just how strong she is. “I started the business with nothing, except what I had learnt and years of experience. I knew what I had to offer and was determined to do everything from the heart,” she said. And it is from the heart she has continued to grow the business, with a team of people that are more like family. “My kids are so incredibly proud of me and they see how hard I work. I have four mothers working with me and they help me raise my kids, and vice versa. When their kids are sick they bring them here and we all look after them. It is a real support network,” said Kate. “I feel like it has been a rebirth for me and my family.” KWD specialise in a wide range of projects including low and multi-density residential projects, hotel refurbishments, multinational corporate refits and high-end residential projects from Melbourne to Portsea and beyond.

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For Kate, keeping abreast of the latest trends comes naturally, as does her innate sense of style. While she has her own personal design ethos, she loves working with all manner of design schemes, from the ultra-modern to coastal chic, and from chinoiserie to all things Hamptons – and everything in between. Kate listens to experts in the field and constantly researches forecast trends so she is always up to date with the latest industry news, colour creations and product innovations. “I am so fortunate to have learnt with the best and travelled the world attending trade fairs and visiting manufacturing sites so that I have an in depth understanding of the materials we work with,” said Kate, who has found design is her way of life. It’s not surprising that KWD has been such a success. You just have to look at the woman behind the brand to see she has the perfect combination of intelligence, strength and compassion, and a family history of work ethics that is second to none. Kate is living proof that "If you want something done, give it to a busy woman". www.katewalkerdesign.com.au


A luxury marketplace set in the heart of Sorrento on Ocean Beach Road from 10am until 3pm www.craftmarkets.com.au


Photos

Peninsula

Flowers bring life to the rooms at Beleura House with the Harvest Festival- Autumn in the House. A reflection of John Tallis’s love of autumn, this year the festival embraced the autumnal glory with flower merchants from around the peninsula exhibiting their arrangements inside.

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Joan Simpson

Tyabb Roses Dawn Allen Peninsula Wild Flowers

Joan Simpson Dawn Allen Peninsula Wild Flowers

Dawn Allen Peninsula Wild Flowers

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Magdalene Watson

May 2017

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A shining star. Mercedes-Benz Mornington 2016 Rural Dealer of the Year. Mercedes-Benz Vans would like to congratulate Chris Thoday and the entire team at Mercedes-Benz Mornington on being awarded the 2016 Rural Dealer of the Year. Over the last twelve months they have consistently demonstrated the dedication and excellence that have been hallmarks of the Mercedes-Benz brand for over 130 years. Find out for yourself by visiting Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29 Mornington-Tyabb Rd, Mornington VIC 3931 T: 03 5973 9688 I F: 03 5973 9609 mbmornington.com.au

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The Total Package. The E-Class Night Edition. The perfect mix of style and substance, the E-Class Night Edition combines eye-catching design with the leading automotive intelligence you’ve come to expect from the Mercedes-Benz E-Class. With both beauty and brains, it’s the total package. Until 31 May, enjoy added value of over $8,900* on the E 200 and E 220d Night Edition, with a host of added features.

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Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington (03) 5973 9688


FORT FRAMEWORK

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By Keith Platt Photos Yanni

A

s with real estate, the success or failure of photography can depend on location.

The right location can be inspiring, helping a photographer to put the best light on a subject. Faces and places are interesting, but any good photographer, or cinematographer for that matter, knows the importance of location and background. Studio set-ups – with measured light, painted or contrived backgrounds – present a different realm to that offered by location. Making a boat trip to a new location provides the photographer with a break from the land and the familiar. And if the destination is surrounded by sea there’s no doubt that the textures, structures and natural features are going to bear the marks of weathering. Rosebud-based photographer Derry Caulfield has found a spot in Port Phillip that exactly fits the bill to inspire the creation of interesting images. Actually, found is the wrong word, she was led to the location. Having grown up on the Mornington Peninsula Caulfield knew the “go-to spots” on land, but had “never given a second thought about what might be worthwhile photographing in our beautiful bay”. That is until Caulfield was contacted by Steve Ross, of Rye-based Riptide Charters who suggested the South Channel Fort as a location for her to take photography students. Unknown to the charter boat operator the fort – six kilometres off Sorrento - would be a new location for Caulfield too. “I had never met Steve before and yet he offered to take me out to the fort at sunrise to experience this amazing part of the bay that most people don't get to visit, let alone photograph,” Caulfield recalls of her first trip to the fort in January. The historic fort and its photographic potential were all laid out before Caulfield’s eyes and lens as she arrived at the fort just before sunrise. “I was amazed at what I saw - the barracks, the remnants of the disappearing guns, the tunnels and living quarters, the surrounding grounds and the wildlife,” she says. “There were so many species of seabirds living safely and happily on the fort and we were lucky enough to get up close and personal to a penguin.” Unlike the studio where backgrounds and subjects are contrived to be shown in a particular light, Caulfield is “very aware” of the fort being a “precious eco system” and ensures there is no interference “other than to photograph it”. “The photography trips are limited to six people to ensure we keep a gentle footprint on the island.” continued next page...

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"THE FORT WAS DESIGNED TO PLAY A KEY DEFENCE ROLE IN KEEPING ENEMY SHIPS CONTAINED WITHIN A TRIANGLE OF FIRE FROM BETWEEN POINT NEPEAN, QUEENSCLIFF AND ITS OWN WEAPONS"

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On the way back Ross took his boat past the South Channel Pylon where Caulfield photographed more seabirds and the colony of seals that calls the pylon home.

to play a key defence role in keeping enemy ships contained within a triangle of fire from Point Nepean, Queenscliff and its own weapons.

The novelty of the South Channel Fort belies its historic purpose: a last line of defence for Melbourne if threatened by foreign navies.

The fort - also illuminated as a navigation aid - was equipped with a battery of five guns, including an eight-inch (20cm) “disappearing gun”.

Now, the fort is more likely to be besieged by boats carrying day-trippers. The island attracts anglers, snorkellers, those with an interest in Victoria’s more recent history, bird watchers and photographers. Built on slightly more than half a hectare, the fort was designed

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Mines laid as underwater booby traps could be remotely exploded from the fort as enemy ships attempted to sail down the bay. Work on building the fort began in 1879 during fears of a Russian invasion.


Construction took about nine years with up to 100 men and officers being stationed at the fort from 1890 to 1916, although by 1908 its weapons were out of date. Guns installed at Queenscliff and Point Nepean had the range and accuracy needed to protect the bay’s entrance.

Its underground layout which is connected by a series of tunnels, includes the former ammunition magazines, kitchen, officers’ quarters and storage areas.

The island on which the fort is built is based on 14,000 tonnes of bluestone quarried near Bacchus Marsh. Concrete cylinders reaching down to the sandstone bedrock support a concrete and brick slab, which, in turn, holds the concrete fort.

But these days, rather than serving as a potential weapon in the national armoury, the South Channel Fort is managed by Parks Victoria rather than Defence and is seen as a refuge for wildlife. A place of peace rather than war.

The heritage listed fort is 122 metres long, 76 metres wide and sits 6.4 metres above sea level.

It is a reminder of past fears and can be seen as a gauge of Russia’s long involvement is world affairs.

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THE CALL OF THE MUSIC By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

Music is a moral law. It gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, a charm to sadness, and life to everything. It is the essence of order, and leads to all that is good, just and beautiful, of which it is the invisible, but nevertheless dazzling, passionate, and eternal form (Plato).

W

hen it comes to male singers, a husky voice with sultry looks is a great combination. The peninsula’s own Nigel Brooker has an undeniable charisma and talent that has allowed him to work as an entertainer for three decades, and there is no sign this crooner will stop any time soon. But for this performer, there is so much more to the music than just good looks and being able to hold a tune. With a slight English accent that is still noticeable, Camden- born Nigel was one of the last 10 pound poms to come out to Australia. “I was born in Camden Town in North London and came to Australia when I was eight years old,” says the 52 year old. “It was 1972 and we moved to Coburg as mum had family there. We were the last of the ten pound poms, coming out on the ship with my mother, brother and sister as dad was already here.” Nigel was a singer first and foremost, and would sing around the house constantly from the time he was a small child. “I was obsessed with singing and learning a whole song from start to finish in my head. I would just practice in my room as if I was on stage so I could sing it from start to finish,” he says with a laugh. “Mum was a brilliant singer and would make up songs all the time. She has a photo of herself with musicians that look like Buddy Holly and it was always a big part of her life. When I was young she would say 'Give me a word and I will find a song with that word in it', and she would start singing ‘do the dishes’ while we did the dishes. My brother, two cousins and I are all musicians which we get from mum’s side.” With the sweet sounds of Roberta Flack, The Temptations, Marvin Gaye, Rod Stewart, and Motown filling the house, it was a natural progression for young Nigel to be consumed with a passion for music. When the family moved to the peninsula in 1976, the 12 year old turned his hand to the guitar which he was given as a Christmas present the year before. continued next page...

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“By the time I was 15; I started picking up the guitar and would sing at concerts at school all the time. I would always be called on to be the singer in plays,” said the natural born performer who went to Karingal High School for a couple of years and then to John Paul College. “Singing and being on stage has always been the place I feel the most myself. The stage is the one place I don’t get nervous. I always have butterflies before a gig and for me that is an important part of the preparation. If I don’t get nervous, it means I must be over it.” Nigel says that, to this day, once he starts playing a cloak comes over him and he slips straight into the zone. “I was always like that and still am. I feel the most myself when I am playing; it’s exactly who I am, and where I’m meant to be.” The call of the music has followed Nigel his entire life, from a young guy busking outside Flinders Street Station, and hitchhiking across the Nullarbor to Western Australia to busk in the Hay Street Mall, to making friends with local musicians and always being involved in the music scene on the peninsula. “I started forming bands in my teens and eventually became mates with Barry Donohue, the guy I play with in Feelix Player now. We played footy together in Langwarrin and, unbeknown to me he was also a muso. We started our first band together, the Lounge Lizards, in 1984, and played lots of gigs together with a drummer and a bass player,” said Nigel of a collaboration that has lasted 20 years.

It wasn’t until 1994 that Nigel decided to get a ‘real’ job and started nursing. “I had been busking across the country when I was 20 and thought I would get discovered like my idol, Rod Stewart who was discovered busking. Of course I didn’t but I had a fantastic time, met and sang with some amazing people. I hitchhiked with my guitar across the county to WA. When I stood there in the centre of Perth I only knew six songs from start to finish so just kept playing them over and over again. I earnt $40 on the day which was a lot then so kept going back. I met up with other buskers and when we sang together we would gather a crowd of fifty people instantly, so I stayed there for six or seven months, then travelled up north of Perth and over to Adelaide where I busked in the Rundle Mall,” said Nigel, who finally came back to the peninsula after feeling a little homesick. “It took a couple of years but I realised for me music would be a hobby and I needed to have a career so I started nursing, following in my mum’s footsteps once again.” While he loved working as a nurse, performing was in his blood so Nigel continued to work in clubs and pubs across the peninsula. “I played in most of the pubs in Frankston in my late 20s and early 30s. I remember the Pier Hotel public bar was called The Snake Pit and it was just how you would imagine,” said Nigel, who was accepted as a local by this stage. “There were a lot of rough diamonds and I was one of them, and a lot of awesome musos who performed there, and there were never any problems.” continued next page...

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"I FEEL THE MOST MYSELF WHEN I AM PLAYING; IT’S EXACTLY WHO I AM, AND WHERE I’M MEANT TO BE.”

In between bands, Nigel spent a lot of time doing solo gigs at The Pier, The Vines, and eventually in Mornington at the Backyard Bar and then Beaches, and was involved in one of the first original music bands to play at the Royal Hotel. “I was in a band with my cousin, David Williams, and he wrote a lot of original songs. We learned guitar together from the time we were 14, practicing in our sheds where we grew up in Langwarrin. We came second in a competition in the early 90s and the paper put a massive pic and write up about us but nothing about the winner, which we thought was hilarious,” said Nigel, who only ever took one hiatus from music. “For about three years from 1995 I stopped playing, worked as a nurse and had time with my family. One day, out of the blue, I just didn’t want to play anymore. I would try to play guitar and couldn’t get through a song and I remember saying to myself l 'I think I might be finished as a musician'. I looked at my guitar and had no desire to pick it up which made me really sad as it was something I had done my whole life.”

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It wasn’t long before the muse returned and Nigel was back under the spotlight where he most belongs, and is now the longest running performer on the peninsula with his band Feelix Player performing monthly at the Grand Hotel Sports Bar, Frankston, regular Sunday sessions and most long weekends at Beaches for the last 10 years, and a regular gig at The New Atrium in Dromana. “I think I have lasted this long because of pure passion, nothing more. For me if I don’t play I can feel it. It’s not the same playing in my lounge room as it is getting up on stage. And I love it when people say 'That was fantastic'. Not I am fantastic but the experience was. That’s the biggest thrill of all having people sit there and really enjoy a song.” For further information or to book Feelix Player, phone 0416 468 493.


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By Melissa Walsh

Brotox, manzilians, dermal fillers and laser treatments – Peninsula Essence delves into the mystical world of manscaping to discover it’s more common than you think.

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MAN UP AND GET WAXED GL SKINFIT has arrived at Peninsula Life Medi Spa And we have designed an exclusive introductory experience with the SKINFIT firming body package

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t all started with face cream. One day men caught onto a routine that women have been doing for years – moisturising and cleansing. They thought it was pretty good; their skin looked better and felt great. White collar, blue collar it didn’t matter – men were starting to take more care of themselves.

These days there is an entire industry devoted to men’s treatments and it doesn’t stop at moisturisers. They’re having things plucked, shaved, lasered, waxed and injected, and the male grooming business is booming. No longer is there the social stigma of men paying too much attention to their looks. A monthly haircut at the barber is no longer a chore that they have to endure, and regular body waxing has become part of the norm for some. Cosmeticians and beauty therapists have noticed a steady rise in the number of men coming to salons for treatments over the last few years. Emily Pratt, owner Brazilian Butterfly in Frankston, said the male clientele has more than doubled since she started six years ago. “We still have a lot more women than men of course, but we have a regular male clientele who have waxing and other treatments,” said Ms Pratt. “I have really noticed more men coming in the past 12 months for treatments like an eye brow tidy, back and shoulder waxing, chest and stomach waxing and men’s Brazilians. Men are a lot more conscious of that they are taking off their tops in summer so the body waxing increases then.” Brazilian Butterfly Frankston has seen the number of male clients double in the past 18 months for both waxing and spray tans. “Men come in for spray tans and we sometimes get couples going away together who want a tan,” said Ms Pratt. “We have clients of all ages from 20 year olds to 65 year old men.” Ms Pratt says that Brazilian Butterfly has always offered the same services to men and women but credits the increase in male clientele to changes in men’s attitudes. “In days past men would never think to come in and get a Brazilian or even a back wax but now it is more acceptable. Men are taking much more care in their appearance and are willing to have hair removed if their wife, for example, doesn’t like their hairy shoulders. As we also specialise in laser hair removal, and some men opt for that treatment to permanently remove hair.” It’s not just stray hair that’s being removed. There’s been a resurgence in the number of men having more permanent procedures with cosmetic injections and laser treatments.

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Alana Dyer, owner Peninsula Life Medispa, has seen a massive increase in male clientele since opening the clinic ten years ago. continued next page...

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“As a medispa, we specialise in non-invasive cosmetic procedures like anti-wrinkle injections and fillers, laser treatments and peels, and the past two years have seen a sudden increase in male customers. About thirty per cent of our clients would be men for the medispa treatments, with many having regular brotox, fillers and laser treatments,” said Ms Dyer. “Even my husband who is a tradie loves his brotox so it is becoming a lot more acceptable.” Ms Dyer says it is usually men from their thirties right up to their sixties having treatments. “We have a lot of guys who are getting married having laser treatments and then anti-wrinkle injections as a package before the wedding day. And we have many men in their 50s and 60s getting fillers and injections to help with a loss of volume in the face. While they are here they often decide to get something waxed and it opens their eyes to all the wonderful treatments available to them,” she said. “In general, men are taking better care of themselves, and cosmetic procedures are no longer taboo.”

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Mornington Peninsula Weddings THE BLACK TIE EXPERIENCE After being at the forefront of Melbourne’s catering scene for 40 years, Black Tie Catering and Event Management certainly know what they are doing. Owners David and Shelly McKernan are proud that the business has constantly maintained its focus on change, innovation and dynamic leadership. “Throughout this time, we continue to drive food trends and styles of entertainment,” said Mr McKernan. “We are original; we focus on creating the entire experience, not just delivering exceptional food.” Whether you select one of their unique venues, your home, the office or a whimsical destination, Black Tie can help every step of the way. “From food and beverage to theming, entertainment and of course, excellent service, we will create an experience: an event that will exceed your expectations and give you the wow factor you deserve,” said Mr McKernan. Black Tie Catering and Event Management specialise in boutique catering, wedding receptions, cocktail parties, private functions and events. Whatever style you desire their dedicated and experienced team will ensure delicious, innovative food

and professional service to guarantee a truly memorable occasion. “We cater for functions of 6 to 6,000, no function is too large or too small,” said Mr McKernan who has kept up with the growing discernment of clients. “Over the years our clients have required more exceptional, innovative foods matched with impeccable and flawless service, all provided in a seamless, elegant ‘package’ that is like no one else has ever received or experienced. The business has become more unique, amazingly personalised and now delivers experiences that no one else has ever created. It is a time of extreme creativity in delivering experiences for clients and their guests, not yet thought about.” Black Tie Catering and Event Management is at Suite 11, 435 Nepean Hwy, Frankston. Phone Kellie Savage on 0438 111 227. www.blacktiecatering.com.au

Your wedding is one of the most important and happiest days of your life - and at Black Tie Catering and Event Management we are suited up and ready to play our part in making your special day as magical as possible. Whether you select one of our unique venues or a destination of your choice, Black Tie is here to help at every step of the way. Food and beverage, theming, entertainment and of course; exceptional service - we create an experience that will exceed your expectations.

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We’d love to hear from you! Kellie Savage ∙ 0438 111 227 events@blacktiecatering.com.au ∙ blacktiecatering.com.au

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MORNINGTON PENINSULA WEDDING EXPO The Mornington Peninsula has long been an ideal location for weddings and now the word has spread, it has become one of the most popular destinations in Australia. In June each year, more than 120 reputable and reliable wedding industry leaders come together and host the annual MP Wedding Expo. With everything required for your magical day in one space, it's no wonder this Wedding Expo has seen enormous growth in popularity, with 2016 being spoken about as the best ever staged on the peninsula. Showcasing everything the region has to offer from venues to ceremonies, celebration ideas, huge receptions or intimate gatherings, there isn't a need that is not covered from your engagement to your honeymoon. Every style of wedding is available to couples on the peninsula, from spectacular gardens, picturesque wineries, scenic golf courses, country houses, beach side ceremonies, boutique hotels and marquees for hire. Attend this event and make priceless connections with

local suppliers eager to accommodate you, arrange your ceremony, dress and pamper you, drive you, feed you, entertain you, make your day spectacular and even capture the memories in photos or video. Mornington Peninsula Inc. is a not-for-profit organisation of local wedding and event suppliers who together promote the Mornington Peninsula as a premier wedding destination. Our members live, work and play local. We love the area and are passionate about helping couples create the best wedding memories possible. Our success comes from our members who all have a wealth of knowledge about the wedding industry and are reliable and professional. Mark the date in your calendar for this year’s MP Expo on Sunday, June 4, 2017 at Mornington Racing Club. Registration for brides and grooms via the website peninsulaweddings.com.au Follow MPW on Facebook and Instagram @ MorningtonPeninsulaWeddings

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Why BJS Mornington? Professional

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BJS Insurance Brokers are a family owned business, recently relocated to 315 Main Street, Owned Mornington.Professional We are here to provide a Innovative holistic solution and adviceAustralian for all your business risks including, but not limited to: BJS Insurance Brokers are a family owned business, recently relocated to 315 Main Street, Business  Workers’ Mornington. We are here toInsurance provide a holistic solution and adviceCompensation for all your business risks  Corporate Insurance  Life Insurance including, but not limited to:

 Tailored Products Business Insurance   Risk Management

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 Corporate Insurance  Life Insurance  knowledge Tailored Products  Claims Our difference is our and expertise of the entire Management insurance market and our team  Risk Management  Personal of specialised insurance brokers have between us over 100 years’Insurance experience in commercial and

personal insurance. Unlike some of our competitors we ensure that you are getting the very best Ourfrom difference is our knowledge and of the entire insurancefrom market cover the Insurance Market, at theexpertise most competitive premiums not and just our oneteam source. of specialised insurance brokers have between us over 100 years’ experience in commercial and We work for YOU not the insurer and provide “Advice you can trust”. personal insurance. Unlike some of our competitors we ensure that you are getting the very best cover from the Insurance Market, at the most competitive premiums from not just one source. We are offering local businesses obligation free reviews of their insurance programs. We work for YOU not the insurer and provide “Advice you can trust”.

Call us today on 9860 4279 to speak to one of our team, or email us on southern@bjsib.com.au. We are offering local businesses obligation free reviews of their insurance programs. Call us today on 9860 4279 to speak to one of our team, or email us on southern@bjsib.com.au.

Our Philosophy:

Is to always be ‘moving forward’ as a company. Our Philosophy: Rather than a traditional mission statement we have one core question: are we here? The answer simple: Is Why to always be ‘moving forward’ as isa company.

Rather than a traditional mission statement we have one core question: To be the best providerWhy of Insurance and risk solutions to our clients are we here? Themanagement answer is simple:

  

To be your trusted insurance adviser

To be the best provider of Insurance and risk management solutions to our clients

To provide staff with an enjoyable, caring work environment, providing opportunities for a  To be your trusted insurance adviser successful and rewarding career path 

To provide staff with an enjoyable, caring work environment, providing opportunities for a

To successful be a pro-active membercareer of thepath business community and rewarding To be a pro-active member of the business community

1800-208-397 | www.bjsib.com.au ABN 18 096 716 746 AFS LICENSE NO. 277725

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Accounting and Finance DO YOU WANT TO TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR SUPER, OR HAVE FUNDS INVESTED IN MORE THAN JUST TERM DEPOSITS? Managing Director and Certified Financial Planner, Lyle Weir and his team are delighted to offer a wide range of financial planning services including superannuation, shares, investments, personal insurance and Centrelink advice to peninsula clients. “Our objective is to find the best solution for your financial needs, as cost effectively as possible and bypass the necessity to travel to the city to access premium professional financial advice.� Weir said. Peninsula Financial Group can provide a tailored solution to help you in better managing your financial affairs, including your Superannuation and/or term deposit holdings, and take pride in adhering to the highest professional and ethical standards. Peninsula Financial group have a team of outstanding and experienced professionals including Amanda Hardy Lai, a Certified Financial Planner, and Michelle Horne, a financial planner with a specialty in providing comprehensive personal insurance advice. For your financial planning needs contact the team at Peninsula Financial Group on 9783 4999 to arrange an appointment. Peninsula Financial Group is located at Level 1, 434 Nepean Hwy, Frankston, and they are also regularly visit clients at home if preferred. www.peninsulafinancial.com.au

DOES YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE HAVE A POSITIVE OUTLOOK? Accounting Financial Planning Business Advisory Superannuation Taxation Bookkeeping Suite 2, 330 Main Street Mornington

P (03) 5973 5322

E admin@outlookaccounting.com.au

TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR RETIREMENT, BE IT NOW OR YEARS AWAY We can help you actively manage your Superannuation

PHONE 03 9783 4999 peninsulafinancial.com.au Authorised Representative of Lonsdale Financial Group Ltd ABN: 76 006 637 225 | AFSL 246934

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HORIZON 1 & 11

Sharyn McCombe “ When the sunrise is reflected in morning mist, I feel a sense of freshness and mystery…..” Sharyn McCombe is a quality, emerging artist and Peninsula resident who spends much of her days outdoors. She is inspired by “rain, mist, fog, clouds, light and weather” and these are the key points of focus in her artwork. Manyung Gallery Mount Eliza is very pleased to present a solo exhibition of Sharyn’s new atmospheric and elemental paintings. RAIN OVER RED HILL

RAIN, MIST, FLINDERS

Opening Night 6 p.m. Friday 12th May however earlier previews are available by appointment. Please text Opening Night RSVP’s, catalogue requests or preview appointments to 0419 595 222. Paintings can also be viewed online at manyunggallery.com.au Exhibition concludes on Sunday 28th May.

60 Mt Eliza Way Mount Eliza | P 03 9787 2953 | W manyunggallery.com.au


Gallery

A NEVER ENDING FEAST, FOR THE EYES As an ambassador for almost anything ‘art like’, in Mount Eliza and on the Mornington Peninsula for almost half a century, Manyung Gallery continues to prosper and deliver great artworks to those hungry to see delectable artwork. Much has been said recently about “Manyung closing down”, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Almost a year ago the business moved its Mount Eliza gallery from the old castle at 1408 Nepean Highway to new, yet interim premises at 60 Mt Eliza Way, in the Mount Eliza Village. While that space is indeed smaller, it currently has over 200 paintings and sculptures on-site, spread over the gallery space and three stockrooms. New works come into the gallery from the business’s Mornington art warehouse almost daily and every few weeks a new exhibition launches in Mount Eliza. “From May 12, we will be exhibiting the works of Sharyn McCombe at the Mount Eliza gallery,” said Manyung Director, Sharyn Wemyss-Smith. Sharyn McCombe’s artwork provides a space to explore and reflect the moods and emotions associated with the tension between stillness and movement in the natural world. This is done through a painterly style that uses oil and canvas and employing techniques such as building up layers of paint, scratching, stencilling or rubbing back and making marks, and is one of the many and varied styles that Manyung has become famous for exhibiting. Mid-April, Manyung Gallery, trading in Asia as Contemporary Art Australia, delivered over 60 Australian paintings to its stand in Singapore and next month 70 works will be presented by Manyung in Hong Kong.

Painting by Sharyn McCombe

Sharyn Wemyss-Smith is proud of the group’s success in presenting Australian art in Asia. “We have now participated in 13 major international exhibitions in Asia and we are developing a following for our Manyung’s Australian painters,” she said. “We are also delighted to be opening our Art Warehouse in Mornington at the end of May, a space that will accommodate more than 500 artworks.” Manyung management is keen for its Mount Eliza patrons to also visit the group’s galleries in Sorrento and Malvern. “For those seeking particularly large paintings, that’s a specialty of ours. We have big works for the big walls of the Mornington Peninsula,” said Sharyn. Manyung Gallery Mount Eliza, 60 Mt Eliza Way, Mount Eliza Manyung Gallery Sorrento, 113 & 119 Ocean Beach Road & 143 Hotham Road, Sorrento Manyung Gallery Malvern, 6-10 Claremont Avenue, Malvern. www.manyunggallery.com.au

Painting by Sharyn McCombe

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THE LEGACY OF ART LIVES ON It’s long been a meeting place for artists and celebrities. Barry Humphries had been known to sleep on the couch on regular occasions after dinner parties, and Arthur Boyd helped build the studio at the back of the property. The home was built in the 1870s by Samuel Tuck and has only had two owners since. The original house still stands as the Whistlewood Gallery now and its third family, the McCullochs, still call it home. “Whistlewood has been a much-visited destination for much of the Australian art and literary world since the 1950s,” explains Susan McCulloch and her daughter, Emily, as we wander around the grand homestead. “Hundreds of artists, writers, academics, actors, dancers, directors and many others have been visitors or regular guests at Whistlewood.” Susan’s 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s photographs show artists including John Perceval, Arthur Boyd, Godfrey Miller, Guelda Pyke, Dorothy Braund, John Brack and their families as well as Nina and Clem Christesen and many others at Whistlewood. Of equal import has been the wide range of local friends who have shared many decades of friendship and socialising including regular, and fiercely fought, tennis matches of a high standard, woolshed parties, table tennis matches and sharing work on each other's properties. “I remember international visitors like my godparents, Oscar and Dorothy Hammerstein, the entire cast and crew of the New York City Ballet, art critic Clement Greenberg, Voice of America broadcaster William Winter, the artist Friedensreich Hundertwasser and numerous others,” said Susan, of the home she grew up in with her parents, Ellen and Alan McCulloch. “Mum and dad bought the house as their permanent home in 1951, on their return from living in the US and Europe. They had come back to Melbourne but couldn’t cope with the suburban way of life so found the Mornington Peninsula to have a more European style of living that suited them. I was only 18 months when we moved here.” Not long after they moved in, Arthur Boyd and Alan built Alan’s studio adjacent to the house, and it remains a working studio to this day, filled with books, artworks, memorabilia and other artistic wonders. “The front lounge room is filled to the ceiling with shelves of books on everything to do with art,” said Susan, whose father was founding director of the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, founding author of the Encyclopaedia of Australian Art and a number of other books as well as a highly influential art critic for more than 60 years. “Dad received an Order of Australia and an honorary Doctorate of Laws.” Susan’s mother was a colourful and intelligent woman, who starred in one of Australia’s first talking films in the 1930s

before leaving for the US where she lived for 16 years, becoming a US citizen and manager for Elizabeth Arden. “My grandmother, Ellen, actually owned this house. She was the one to buy it all those years ago,” explained Emily, of the lineage of strong women she is proud to be a part of. “It was in 1991, that mum and I inherited Whistlewood from my grandparents and we have been delighted to keep the artistic ambience alive in our family.” Emily would spend all school holidays and many weekends on the property with her grandparents so, for her, it also holds a special place in her heart. Like her grandparents and mother before her, the youngest of the McCullochs has also followed a creative path as a visual arts writer, researcher, publisher and curator and co-director of McCulloch & McCulloch. “I am co-author and publisher, alongside mum, of the fourth edition of McCulloch's Encyclopaedia of Australian Art and McCulloch's Contemporary Art; the complete guide. I am also the author and co-publisher of New Beginnings: Classic Paintings from the Corrigan Collection of 21st Century Aboriginal Art,” she said. continued next page...

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With Alan’s keen interest in Aboriginal art that led to him curating an exhibition of bark paintings from Museum Victoria in America in 1965, the legacy has continued through his daughter and granddaughter. “My grandfather urged for the purchasing, restoration and exhibition of Indigenous art by our state and national galleries as far back as the 1940s,” said Emily. For Susan, expanding on the family’s interest in indigenous art began in the early 90’s as an art writer and critic for leading Australian media. “After I had been writing for The Age and Bulletin and I was freelancing, I was looking for a book on purely Aboriginal art and there wasn’t one. I decided to do an overview of Aboriginal art and the regions and published McCulloch’s Contemporary Aboriginal Art, the complete guide nearly 20 years ago,” said Susan, who has a longstanding passionate interest in Aboriginal culture, has written widely on the subject and travels as often as possible to the many artproducing communities throughout Australia. Whistlewood Gallery came to fruition after their first exhibition in Flinders. “A friend who loved the book asked us to do an exhibition of the artworks and bring them to life so to speak. We held it at their café in Flinders and it was a great success so we eventually decided to start the gallery here,” said Susan, who uses Whistlewood as her home and her gallery. Since then, Whistlewood has become an art consultancy and private gallery, specialising in Aboriginal art, along with talks, private viewings and other events including unique Art Parades. www.mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

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12 MAY – 9 JULY 2017

WHAT’S ON MAX & OLIVE: THE PHOTOGRAPHIC LIFE OF OLIVE COTTON & MAX DUPAIN

Max Dupain, Sunbaker 1937, gelatin silver photograph printed c.1975, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, Gift of the Philip Morris Arts Grant 1982

ICONIC AUSTRALIAN HOUSES: AN EXHIBITION BY KAREN McCARTNEY

The Hildebrand House, Robinson Chen architects, Photograph © Michael Wee

ZOË CROGGON: DEEP CUTS

Zoë Croggon, Dive #4 (Splash) 2013 (detail), C-type print Courtesy of the artist and Daine Singer Gallery, Melbourne

www.mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au


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Arts

ILLUSTRATION

CHANGES CHILDREN’S

LIVES!

By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

Nicky Johnston is an educator, speaker and author/ illustrator of children’s books. She is passionate about promoting emotional resilience in children and raising awareness of mental health issues. Her love of teaching sees her kept busy with school visits and presenting at workshops and conferences. Peninsula Essence Magazine talks to Nicky about her journey into children’s literature and gets an insight into how this mother of four’s drawings help open a dialogue on some difficult subjects. Her books include “Go Away Mr Worry Thoughts”, “The Worst Pain in the World”, “Brave Danny”, “Actually, I Can”, and the recently released “The Fix It Man”. When did your interest in art and drawing first begin?

I had always loved drawing and art from the time I was little. We were living in our old house in Kars Street Frankston and, when I was 15, mum and dad converted the downstairs games area into an art studio for me. They even put a hole in the floor so I could get down to the studio easily. I was in high school then and doing lots of oil painting as one of my VCE prerequisites. I went to university after that and did a teaching degree so started teaching art from that little studio when I was in my early 20’s. How did you transition from art teacher to writing and illustrating your own book? When my four children were born, I started working for the RACV as a traffic safety educator in classrooms part time so had more time to devote to my children and my own writing and illustrating. I also visit schools and talk about my books to help children and parents deal with mental health issues. When my eldest child Bayley was struggling with anxiety I wrote my first book “Go Away Mr Worry Thoughts” to help him and me deal with this crippling childhood anxiety. I did lots of research to learn about the psychological behaviours

of children and desperately wanted to understand what was going on with my child and help create a more worry-free life for him. He is 18 now and doing really well. How long did it take to write your first book?

“Go Away Mr Worry Thoughts” took two years to complete. There was a lot of research that needed to be done and it was our personal story so there were many drafts before I was happy with the final result. I self-published that book in 2008 as back then the niche market books were not taken up by publishers because they are not mass market but there’s a massive market. Since then there are a lot more publishers who are taking on this type of book. What do your children think of you being a children’s book illustrator and writer?

Well they are 18, 14, 10 and six now. They kind of go “Oh yeah that’s what mum does” and don’t really make a fuss. My youngest who is six tipped an entire bottle of black ink over one of my illustrations one day so now I keep the ink up very high. Funny thing is I take that page to schools often as it looks like the ink is in the shape of the whale. I say to the kids’ maybe he’s telling me he wants to be an artist. Did you ever think this is what you would end up doing? Funnily enough, I came across my old debutante ball video recently and everybody announced at the deb what they wanted to do. Mine was I want to be a teacher, and I want to be an artist and illustrator. So it must have been in the back of my mind what I wanted to do. Where do you do your drawings?

Before I had my studio in the backyard, I would draw at the kitchen table when my children had gone to bed. Last year my youngest started school which changed things. Suddenly I had more time during the day to do my work. I continued next page...

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built the studio in 2009 with the goal of running art classes and I still want to run them for kids. Then we found out we were having number four and that changed everything so this sat for three years as an expensive shed. We had a newborn and so had to extend the house and get a new car. I moved into the studio three years ago and am slowly getting it together to be the space I want. I have the most amazing desk which is solid wood and an old draftsman’s desk. It weighs about the same as three cars and it is absolutely perfect. What do you like about being out in your studio?

It’s like my own secluded oasis. I come out here and there’s no phone. I can’t get internet from the house. I can’t hear the doorbell and I just get lost in my drawing. I can easily lose a day so I have to set timers on my phone to stop and have lunch or pick up the kids. My pleasure and my release is to draw so I am so lucky to have this space to do it. If I haven’t drawn or painted in a while I get a bit antsy so I am very lucky to have it. I get really excited when I’m working on a new book and do a lot of my initial sketches sitting on the couch. When the kid’s friends come over they say “Oh my gosh is that the next one? I will remember seeing this” and it’s really special. How long does it take you to illustrate a page?

Because I don’t do it full time it can take weeks to finish a page. Often though I have five or six pages on the go at the same time. I stretch them all out onto boards and

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put them across the desk so I have a working process of seeing several pages at once. To stretch the paper, you soak it in water put it on the board, and have to wait 24 hours for it to set. It is an old fashioned process but it is the way I like to do it. Sometimes I am not happy with a page so will start all over again. That was the case with the cover page of “The Fix-It Man” which has just been released. I got half way through and didn’t like the orange so I redid it with the green first and it was so much more defined. They are small things but each choice is a very precise decision. Why are illustrations so important in children’s books?

I create extra dimensions to the story. In the most recent book “The Fix-It Man”, the illustrations take Dimity’s words to another level. Every pause, every chosen word she has written has a purpose and when I come to my drawings every part of it is a conscious decision. In “The Fix-It Man” there is an image the day after the mum has gone. The house is in a shambles, there are dishes in the sink, the plant is dying, dad is in his pyjamas and even the dog isn’t eating. Nowhere in the words does it actually say the mum has passed away but we know through the succession of images. There are so many little images that flow through the book to show the story beneath the words like the dress the mum is knitting, the kite and the mobile she makes. I remember I laid all the pages out without the words to see what my husband thought and he ended up crying because he could see what the story was. Why are children’s books still so important?

These books have a way of helping children cope and understand real life events. “The Fix-It Man” for example, deals with grief and loss. Children begin to learn about loss early, often through the loss of a pet or someone they love. This book offers a gentle way for carers and kids to have conversations around love and loss. At the launch in March we had Georgie Harman, CEO of Beyond Blue speaking about the importance of dealing with grief and how the book can be a useful tool. www.nickyjohnston.com.au

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LIFE’S

A STAGE

Photo Yanni

By Melissa Walsh

A

ll the worlds a stage’ and it certainly has been for Cindy Pritchard, a veteran of the theatre for more than three decades. The bubbly thespian has tread the boards with fellow actors Hugh Jackman, Bert Newton, Debra Byrne, Marina Prior, Barry Otto, Nancye Hayes, Peta Toppano, Rachael Beck, June Salter, Todd McKenney, Steve Bastoni and John Waters to name a few. She’s been an original cast member of many Australian musical theatre productions including "Les Miserables" in the ensemble and Madame Thenadier cover, "Beauty and the Beast" with Hugh Jackman, as the egg timer and Mrs Potts. She was Miss Flannery in "Thoroughly Modern Millie", Sophia in "Me & My Girl", the employment officer in "Sweet Charity", Baroness Elberfeld and the late June Salter's understudy in "Sound of Music", and the matron in "Oliver". She has performed countless shows of “Fiddler on the Roof”, "How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" and the role of Earth

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Mother in the Australian regional tour of "Menopause the Musical”, as well as Grandma Poss in "Possum Magic" and Miss Plum in "Hairy Maclary and Friends". She was a regular singer, accompanied by John Foreman, for over five years on Good Morning Australia with Bert Newton, has sung on two ARIA award winning cast albums, and played roles in “Blue Heelers’, "A Country Practice" and "Sons and Daughters". It’s a long way from the bright lights of show business but Cindy finally found a place to plant her roots down by the beach on the Mornington Peninsula and, at 58, is enjoying the best of both worlds. “I was singing as soon as I could talk. Apparently I used to stand in front of the radiogram in my nappy and sing and dance, and whenever mum and dad had people over I had to entertain them whether I liked it or not,” said Cindy, who was born in the NSW town of Orange. “We had a pianola which I taught myself to play by ear so that I could accompany my songs. I was always performing in school productions at Orange High School. I was first at rehearsals but didn’t have the same enthusiasm for school work.”


Cindy with Nancye Hayes, as her understudy in 'Showboat'

With Peta Toppano

Always drawn to the theatre, ironically Cindy performed in a local amateur production of “Sound of Music” with Murray from the Wiggles. “It wasn’t until years later we realized the connection,” she said with a laugh. It was Cindy’s mum’s observation that her daughter was stagnating in Orange that changed the course of her life. “I was working in a record bar in Myer and my dad had wanted me to take over his menswear store when my mum saw that I needed more. She had been involved with the theatre years before and dated actor Willie Fennell so decided to track him down years later, much to dad’s horror. She said I have a daughter who has a wonderful voice, and there’s nothing in Orange. He told her that I needed to be at Sydney’s Ensemble Theatre and see his mate Hayes Gordon. That was the January of 1980 and I enrolled in the drama school there where I would spend the next three years of my life.”

With Marina Prior in ‘Showboat’

and doing cabaret shows until finally one day an agent spotted her. “That was 1985, and by ’87 I got the role in “Les Mis”, said Cindy who went on to do 1200 performances over four years in Sydney then Melbourne, before a national tour and finally Auckland NZ. “It was when I got to Melbourne I thought 'this is where I want to be eventually'.” Of course life had other plans for the young performer, and soon she was performing in “Me and My Girl” in Perth. “It was at that time I auditioned via video for “Beauty and the Beast” along with Ernie Bourne and Rachael Beck,” said Cindy who got the role as the egg timer, the washer woman and played Mrs Potts for 60 performances at the Princess Theatre. Just as she was drawn to the theatre, Cindy kept being drawn to the peninsula when she was performing in Melbourne.

From then, Cindy had her start, working as a singing waitress

continued next page...

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“I was renting in Toorak for four years and kept getting drawn down this way on a day trip or a weekend. As soon as I got here I loved it. One of the dressers in “Les Mis” told me years ago about this place called Rosebud and I thought it sounded like such a lovely name. So I brought my parents down and we stayed in a motel to check it out. We played mini golf and went to the beach and I just loved it.” It was June, 2000 that Cindy finally found the house of her dreams in Rosebud. “Even though I was touring all the time, I knew I wanted to live here so I bought my first house on the peninsula and haven’t looked back. I would go off on tour for months at a time but every time I got home and saw Arthur’s Seat, I would take a breath and relax,” said Cindy, who continued to do eight shows a week across the country until she finally finished the same way she started with the children's theatre, “Hairy Maclary and Friends” three years ago. “I can live in the city but I would prefer to live in a quiet place like this. As a girl I wrote in a book to the universe that I would like a house that is in the country but near the water. I wanted to be close enough to a city to do acting and I got it all those years later. I did not think it existed.”

‘Lovely Ladies’ performance with Marina Prior and Silvie Paladino

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These days Cindy is still drawn to the spotlight doing music for kids in Mornington, and performing at speaking and singing engagements and local events. “I am always drawn back to theatre and a magnet for kids,” said the actress whose life has come full circle. “When I was doing “Sound of Music” all the kids came to me, and I’m still in touch with Nicky Webster. These days I love introducing the little ones to music, and the looks on their faces when we sing is wonderful.” For Cindy there are so many moments that have been a highlight; performing on stage at the Domain in Sydney in front of over 100,000 people who had all camped overnight to see the performance of “Les Mis”, meeting and working with other fine actors, and watching the faces of mesmerised children as she performed in “Hairy Maclary”. A historian of the theatre, she recounts the superstitions and etiquette of the stage. “You don’t whistle in the wings because going back to the old days before automation that was how they would signal the flyman to drop a set. In the theatre you never said the word “Macbeth” as it was bad luck. You say "The Scottish Play" instead. In the theatre,


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COMEDY/DRAMA Warning: Strong language.

BAKERSFIELD MIST

Cindy as the head prostitute in ‘Lovely Ladies’

by Stephen Sachs

Tuesday 6 June, 7.30pm

break a leg is said because if you get past (BREAK) the leg of the side of the stage, you're on. It goes back to vaudevillian days, and 'chookers' is because chicken used to be so expensive and you could afford to buy chicken if you’d done a show,” she said.

Is the true value of art in the eyes of the beholder? Bakersfield Mist, with John Wood and Julie Nihill, is based on a true story. Tickets: $27 – $55

With the theatre running through her blood, there’s more on the cards for this entertainer who continues to do TV commercials, theatre spots and film appearances, making sure she has plenty of time to enjoy the quiet beachside life in the place she calls home. Contact prindycinders2@yahoo.com.au 0435 528 483 or 0412 655 849.

Tasmanian Theatre Company & Straightjacket Productions in association with The Karralyka Centre

Members receive a 12% discount off full priced adult tickets.

03 9784 1060 @the_fac | #thefac

thefac.com.au

Frankston Arts Centre is a business unit of Frankston City Council

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WINE TRAVELLERS


Eat & Drink

"IT’S BEEN A NON-SWALLOWING DAY, EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE ALL WINE LOVERS". By Keith Platt

A

t first glance, the 20-odd people sitting around the table at Crittenden Wines appear to be indulging in a rather heavy after-lunch drinking session. But stay and watch a little longer and you’ll notice no one is swallowing their wine. Although nine glasses containing red wine sit in front of each person, a little red plastic cup gives the story away. The men and women around the table are here to taste the wine. It’s been a non-swallowing day, even though they are all wine lovers. Crittenden’s in Harrisons Rd, Dromana is the final stop for 10 sommeliers touring Mornington Peninsula wineries as a side trip to their attendance at The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2017 awards in Melbourne. New York’s Eleven Madison Park took out the top spot. The tour of the peninsula started at Stonier Winery, Merricks, where the group was welcomed by Mornington Peninsula Vignerons Association CEO Cheryl Lee. From there the sommeliers from the United Kingdom, United States, Japan, New Zealand and interstate went to Ocean Eight, Shoreham and then to the top of Arthurs Seat before having lunch at Petit Tracteur, Main Ridge. The final stop for the day was at Crittendens, where they tasted nine wines and were told about production methods and differences between vineyards where they were made by winemakers including Rollo Crittenden (Crittendens Wines), Martin Spedding (Ten Minutes by Tractor), Kathleen Quealy (Balnarring Vineyard) and Glen Hayley (Port Phillip Estate). Sommeliers Australia describes a sommelier as being “a specialist wine waiter/wine steward who is a trained and knowledgeable wine professional who specialises in all facets of beverage service”.

It ranks sommeliers as being “strategically on a par with that of the executive chef or chef de cuisine”. Sommeliers are responsible for buying and storing wine, developing wine lists and training other restaurant staff about wine. The tours of peninsula wineries was organised by Wine Australia, which wants “Australia [to be] recognised as the world’s preeminent wine producer”. Once at Crittendens the sommeliers sit at tables arranged in a rectangle and the winemakers speak about their products, their vineyards and the attributes of the peninsula – its soils and climate - for nurturing the pinot noir variety of grape. This is serious stuff and the sommeliers make notes – on paper and computer – and ask questions. The questioning always comes round to the price of a bottle and with the quality of wine under discussion the answer usually comes in between $50 and $65. Rollo Crittenden begins the discussion by describing the peninsula’s “three to five degrees cooler than Melbourne’s” climate as “maritime rather than Mediterranean” due to the effects of Western Port and Port Phillip bays and Bass Strait. The peninsula “tends not to have frosts”, although a range of soils means “individual sites are quite different”. Martin Spedding, of Ten Minutes by Tractor, Main Ridge, described how planning a new vineyard was “a great opportunity to plant from scratch”. “We’ll be able to question everything we do and why, from the vineyard’s architecture to using machinery. We’re starting with what we think is best for the fruit.” Spedding said the vines would be spaced to enable use of a 68 centimetre wide tractor. continued next page...

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“There will be smaller wines with fewer bunches [of fruit] – time will tell if we are right or not.” Kathleen Quealy, of Balnarring Vineyard, Balnarring, said her vines were pruned so they get as much sunshine as possible “which makes a very rich, satisfying wine”. She said she would be “going for organic certification in the next 12 months”.

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Glen Hayley, Port Phillip Estate, said the “very exposed” position and the “sand a silt dominant soil” of the company’s vineyard “adds resilience and interest to the fruit”. The UK was the estate’s biggest overseas market for its “darker richer styles of wine”.


START YOUR Mornington Peninsula wine adventure with us... Just 50 minutes from Melbourne and first stop off the Peninsula Link freeway at Moorooduc ( Exit 18 ), you’ll find Stumpy Gully Vineyard. The Zantvoort family planted their first vines here in 1989 and kept it in the family.

Visitors to the Vineyard can enjoy delicious food prepared by well known local restaurateur Bernard Ricca at the new Regardz restaurant. Soak up the atmosphere amongst the vines! Lunch: Thursday to Sunday Dinner: Friday & Saturday

At Stumpy Gully you find wines with a story. Good value wines that friends ask about when you open a bottle or two at dinner or a BBQ. And wines - they don’t mind saying - that win awards. Phone.

1800 788 679 ( 1800 STUMPY )

Web.

stumpygully.com.au

Email.

info@stumpygully.com.au

Address. 1247 Stumpy Gully Road, Moorooduc, Victoria

All bookings and enquiries can be made through:

regardz@stumpygully.com.au 1800 788 679 ( 1800 STUMPY )

STU M P Y G U L LY W I NE S Zantvoort Estate

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IF IT AINT

BAROQUE

DON’T FIX IT!

By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

F

rench renaissance furniture, red velvet baroque lounges, and gold embossed framed paintings adorn the walls of the luxurious iconic Brass Razu wine bar in Mornington. Owner and manager, Alexis Collier, tells us what it’s like to run one of the most unique bars in Mornington. “I started here four years ago when my parents bought the bar as part of their retirement lifestyle,” said Alexis, who had previously worked as a teacher. “I was still doing some teaching work but slowly became more and more involved with the business until now I run it full time.” Alexis says being part of the iconic wine bar is a great way to express her creativity and she has made a few changes, mainly to the cocktail menu. “The place was perfect as it was, so the only décor we have done

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is a bit of painting to freshen it up. We have also added more artwork and displays but a lot of those have been gifted to us from customers,” said Alexis. “One customer gave us a big painting of her great grandmother and it has pride of place on the main lounge walls. Another used to come to the shop in the 1970s long before Brass Razu was here. It was called Pancakes by the Bay then and she remembered coming here as a child. She brought in a photo of the old shop and some lovely collectable china.” The one thing Alexis and her team have changed is the addition of an extensive cocktail list, increasing from two standard cocktails to nearly 60. “We have an incredible cocktail list now, and many of them I have created myself,” said Alexis as she pours her trademark Bloody Mary. “I did a bit of research on the Bloody Mary and discovered lots of cocktails that are being garnished with unusual


things so we added the prosciutto and vegetables. After all it is a very savoury cocktail.” “It is great seeing the look on people’s faces when you put a cocktail in front of them. A very popular one at the moment is a new one we just created called Unicorn Tears. It has vodka, moscato, Havana, and is garnished with fairy floss, strawberries, sprinkles, sour straps, and a secret ingredient.” In their very small kitchen area, the staff come out with some great dishes including grazing platters, antipasto dishes, bruschetta, pizzas and cheese to name a few.

lots of grazing platters. We really pump out the food considering it is such a small space,” said Alexis who designed the menu with her mother. “We source specialty items from a lot of different suppliers though, careful to make sure they are both high quality and unique for our customers.” Friday nights at Brass Razu are entertainment nights with live music from Celtic folk duos to jazz and even light rock songs. Brass Razu is at 13 Main Street, Mornington. Phone 5975 0108. www.brassrazu.com.au

Behind the scenes, the preparation has been going on for hours before customers step through the door, yet Alexis and her staffs makes it look effortless. “Mum and I make spaghetti sauce and the sauces and we do

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COOKING WAS HER DESTINY By Melissa Walsh Photos Gary Sissons

G

rowing up on a farm in Warrnambool, Susie Seater knew what it was like to cook from an early age. Her mother was forever baking and cooking as those were the days before takeaway. To Susie it was then a natural progression to become a chef. What is surprising is how late it was when she pursued the career. Susie, the head chef at Canadian Bay Hotel, was 40 when she finally decided to do her apprenticeship and become a qualified chef, although she had spent a lot of time in food, working for a bakery and fish shop before she had her children. “It was when I was working as a dish washer I decided to become a chef. I had been working with a head chef at the Frankston RSL

GPO HOTEL

Rebranded, Refurbished, Refined

Kitchen open all day - Breakfast/Lunch/Dinner

MORNINGTON PENINSULA

Check out our NEW Autumn Menu and NEW Texas BBQ options

Upcoming entertainment and current menus at www.thegpo.com.au 1003 POINT NEPEAN RD, ROSEBUD 5982 3200

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and he asked me to come and work with him at Canadian Bay Hotel,” said Susie. “Within two months of being here I started my chef apprenticeship, and within two years I was head chef.” The fast track to head chef at the hotel is understandable, a Susie knew all about cooking most of the dishes and preparation like de-boning chickens and fish, and making sauces. “I always cooked at home when I was a teenager, and when I got married and had kids, I still loved experimenting with food,” said Susie, who is particularly prone to cooking Asian influenced dishes. Being the head chef for six years at the hotel, Susie says she loves the people she works with and has definitely learnt to make the perfect steak and seafood. “Steak and seafood are the main dishes people want although we have a huge menu selection to suit all tastes,” she said. “We do rockling for a lunch special, and salmon which is delicious. Our seafood comes in fresh every day. We also do the old pub favourites like parmas, calamari, and kids meals.”

Canadian Bay Hotel is at 35 Ranelagh Drive, Mount Eliza. Open seven days a week. Phone 9775 2331. www.canadianbayhotel.com.au

FOR ALL YOUR HOSPITALITY NEEDS, BOTH FRONT AND BACK OF HOUSE REQUIREMENTS

TRADE SALES DIRECT TO PUBLIC Open Monday to Saturday 9am to 5pm

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Recipe PORTERHOUSE STEAK WITH CHIPS AND SALAD INGREDIENTS Porterhouse steak Chips (pre-cut or hand-made) Lettuce Tomatoes Onion Cucumber Onion

METHOD 1. Season steak with salt and pepper and seal it off in a hot pan or flat grill. 2. Put on char grill until cooked to order. 3. Add chips to plate.

4. Make salad by tossing ingredients together in bowl and add to plate. 5. Plate up porterhouse steak and garnish.

Canadian Bay Hotel is at 35 Ranelagh Drive, Mount Eliza. Open seven days a week. Phone 9775 2331. www.canadianbayhotel.com.au

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must try

Dishes

The Big Merch - beef patty, cheese, tomato, lettuce, house made pickles, and beer battered chips Commonfolk Coffee

Canadian Flapjack Blue Mini Eatery Emporium Events 2 Colchester Road (corner Borneo Road), Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 www.bluemini.com.au

Cauliflower Cheese Croquettes garlic cream, salad of roasted, raw & pickled cauliflower, smoked almonds, capers, curry oil. Merchant & Maker

16 Progress Street, Mornington Phone 5902 2786 www.commonfolkcoffee.com.au

675 Point Nepean Road, McCrae Phone 5986 3385 www.merchantmaker.com.au

Ottoman Lamb

Thai Chicken

Blue Mini Eatery Emporium Events

Blue Mini Eatery Emporium Events

Canadian Bay Hotel

2 Colchester Road (corner Borneo Road), Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 www.bluemini.com.au

2 Colchester Road (corner Borneo Road), Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 www.bluemini.com.au

Cnr Canadian Bay Road and Ranelagh Drive, Mt Eliza Phone 9775 2331 www.canadianbayhotel.com.au

Seafood Platter

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History

Henry Howard's journey

- From Mornington to Frankston to the gallows By Peter McCullough

I come from a race, Mr. Ritchie, who take no insults from any man, even if they should come to the gallows for it,” was the response Henry Howard gave to Thomas Ritchie, storekeeper, after the latter had commented “I hope you have not done anything that you will be sorry for.” Ritchie was one of those nearby businessmen who had been summoned to the Frankston Hotel on the evening of the 14 August, 1875 when Henry Howard stabbed Elizabeth Wright, the licensee, to death in the hotel diningroom. For good measure, he also stabbed the barman, Thomas Harman. By the time Ritchie arrived at the hotel, Harman was lying dead on the pavement. Howard's comment proved prophetic: for his actions he went to the gallows. Mornington While the Tanti was the first licensed hotel in the township of Mornington, being shown on a map prepared in 1854, the “Schnapper Point Hotel”on the Esplanade and the “Mornington Hotel”on the corner of Avenue Road (now Wilsons Road) and Brewery Road (now Nunns Road) were the next premises in Mornington to be licensed. Both hotels appear on a map dated November, 1858. On 29 April, 1857 Henry Howard was awarded the licence to the Schnapper Point Hotel, but patronage dropped off when he installed a mistress (Mrs. Wright) while his wife and children were still in residence. This resulted in the licence passing to T. Rennison in 1860, and the hotel was referred to as “Rennisons” before it became the “Royal Hotel” in 1876.

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The original licensee of the Mornington Hotel was Harley Goodall who had built a brewery beside his establishment. On 17 March, 1858 The Argus advertised first class accommodation at Mornington House with Harley Goodall as proprietor. Taking advantage of the newly-built pier, the advertisement referred to the availability of a steamer from Melbourne once a week. Goodall soon became licensee and the title of hotel was adopted. In 1865 Harley Goodall, who had been experiencing ill health, travelled to England with his wife and family where he died aged 46. However Goodall's departure provided Henry Howard with the opportunity to resume his role as a publican as the Rates Book of 1865 records a Mr. Howard as ratee for a hotel and 18 acres,


and in 1866-67 a 12 room house which would correspond to the specifications of the original Goodall property.

short period (1877-1881) when the Backhouse brothers conducted the Mornington Grammar School on the site.

During February, 1865, Henry Howard advertised in The Argus first class accommodation for families and gentlemen at the Mornington Hotel at Schnapper Point. A fishing boat was available for the use of visitors and advertisements referred to both steamer and coach access from Melbourne. While Howard had become the licensee, Mrs Goodall, who had returned to Australia with the children, apparently lived on the property and participated in the day-to-day running of the hotel. Meanwhile Howard found that public pressure was sufficient to move Mrs Wright to Frankston where, in 1866, he installed her as licensee of the Frankston Hotel. It goes without saying that a certain amount of pressure would also have been exerted by the unbelievably tolerant Mrs. Howard!

By 1877 the licensee of the Mornington Hotel was Cornelius Crowley who changed the name to the “Cricketers Arms”; the name “Mornington Hotel” lapsed. In 1889 Crowley commissioned prominent architect William Pitt to build the “Grand Coffee Palace” next door. In 1892 he transferred the licence from the Cricketers Arms to what became the “Grand Hotel”.

In December, 1867 Henry Howard applied to transfer the name and licence of the Mornington Hotel to a new location in Main Street: “I, HENRY HOWARD, the holder of a publican's licence for the house and premises known as the Mornington Hotel, situated at Mornington, do hereby give notice that it is my intention to APPLY to the justices, sitting at the Petty Sessions to be holden at Mornington on Saturday, December 21, to REMOVE the LICENCE and SIGN to a house now rented by me, containing two sitting rooms and two bedrooms, lately occupied by Mr. Cahill, bootmaker, and situated in Main Street, Mornington.” (The Argus, 11 December, 1867.) In 1868 the licence of the Mornington Hotel was transferred to the new premises in Main Street. The original Mornington Hotel, established by Harley Goodall, was advertised for sale in The Argus and in May 1868 it was purchased by distinguished academic Professor William Parkinson Wilson who renamed the property “Wolfdene”.Since then it has been a private residence except for a

Top left: Main Street Frankston in 1875. Bottom left: The Royal Hotel, Mornington, built as the Schnapper Point Hotel by Henry Howard in 1857. Below: Mornington Hotel, Mornington, built by Harley Goodall (above). The building subsequently became a private residence and was given the name "Wolfdene".

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Above: The Grand Hotel in Mornington, built as the Grand Coffee Palace in 1889, next door to the Cricketers Arms. Below: The death certificate of Elizabeth Wright.

The Frankston Hotel Accordingly, in 1866 Mrs Wright became the licensee of the Frankston Hotel, a role that she would fill until her death nine years later. She was described as a widow and was accompanied by her three year old son, Frank, a consequence of her association with Howard. Liquor licencing records show that, while the previous licensee, Henry Simpson, had transferred the licence to the Frankston Hotel to Mrs. Wright in 1866, he subsequently transferred the licence for the hotel on the other side of the street, also known as the Frankston Hotel, to Henry Howard. While his wife retained the licence for the hotel in Mornington, where she lived with their four children, within a short time Howard had moved into his Frankston establishment; although records are hazy,

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it would seem that, instead of trading as competitors, Mrs. Wright and he formed a business partnership and by 1875 they co-owned the two Frankston Hotels. By 1875, however, the partnership was under stress, apparently due to the fact that Mrs. Wright was drinking to excess. This perception would appear to be supported by Dr. Dimock's witness statement at the subsequent trial when he stated “...the deceased had been a very heavy drinker, and had suffered from delerium tremens.� (The Argus, 21 September, 1875. Page 7.) After repeated disagreements, Howard offered Mrs. Wright 100 pounds to give up her share in the business so that it could be sold. She refused the offer and Howard continued with his plans to sell. Fearful, Mrs Wright engaged Thomas Harman to mind the bar, but


Left: Payment of funeral costs for Elizabeth Wright. Above: Doctor Jame Neild, medical practicioner, who gave evidence at the inquest.

also protect her and look after her interests until the property was sold. Howard disapproved of this situation, even believing that Mrs. Wright and Thomas Harman were in some sort of relationship. A week before the murder Howard said to Mrs. Wright that he would hang for her; that it would be “ war to the knife, and the knife to the hilt.”

At the conclusion the jury foreman announced the verdict: “... pre-meditated murder on the part of the prisoner.” The prisoner was then formally committed by the Coroner for trial.

The sale took place on Friday 13 August, 1875 to Mark Young, a publican from Emerald Hill. Mrs. Wright, Howard and Harman remained in the hotel although the greater portion of the furniture and effects had been cleared out by the purchaser. On the Saturday evening, after dinner, an agitated Howard stabbed Mrs. Wright in the presence of their 12 year old son. Hearing screams, Harman, who was serving in the bar, rushed to the diningroom where he confronted Howard. He, too, was stabbed whereupon he staggered back through the bar and collapsed on the pavement.

This took place before Mr. Justice Molesworth at the Central Criminal Court on Monday 20 September, 1875. Henry Howard “...was indicted for having wilfully and deliberately and with malice aforethought murdered one Elizabeth Wright at the Frankston Hotel, Frankston, on the night of 14 August last.” Howard pleaded not guilty. The various witnesses who had appeared at the inquest were required to repeat their testimony.

The Inquest This was conducted on Tuesday 17 August and, as the reporter for The Argus stated “As all parties are well known for miles around, there was a great deal of interest taken in the proceedings...which lasted from 10 in the morning to half past 9 o'clock at night. First to appear was Jane Harman, widow of Thomas, who told of the mounting tension between Mrs. Wright and Henry Howard. Mrs Harman was followed by a number of other witnesses including 12 year old Frank Wright; Frederick William Storer who was delightfully described as the hotel's “generally useful man”; William Davey, the publican at the nearby Bayview Hotel; Thomas Ritchie, storekeeper; Richard Boyle, senior police constable from Mornington; and James Neild and George Dimock, medical practitioners.

The Trial

While the Crown expressed the opinion that the evidence was sufficient to conclude that the prisoner was guilty as charged, the counsel for Henry Howard urged the jury to find him guilty of the lesser charge of manslaughter, “...in which case he could get as high a sentence as 15 years penal servitude. He pointed out that the prisoner must have been sincerely and devotedly attached to Mrs Wright, when he had deserted his own wife and family to live with her. It had also been proved that he treated her with kindness, and showed the utmost solicitude for her when ill.”(The Argus, Tuesday 21 September, 1875. Page 7.) The plea by the counsel for the defence notwithstanding, the jury returned after 10 minutes of deliberation with the verdict: “Guilty of wilful murder.” Mr Justice Molesworth then completed proceedings with his summary: “Prisoner at the bar, you seem in several ways to have lived a very bad life, both as regards your relation to this unfortunate continued next page...

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Above: Reverend Lorenzo Moore, chaplain at Melbourne Gaol. Top Right: John Buckley Castieau, Governor of the Gaol. Below: Michael Gateley, hangman.

woman whilst you had a wife and children living, and then on the termination of that intercourse by your being the cause of her sudden and violent death. At the same time you caused the sudden and violent death of a man whom you had associated in some way or another with her. In the eyes of any rational man there does not appear to be any ground for such suspicions as you probably entertained; but whether you were right or wrong, nothing of that kind could form the slightest excuse for the terrible crime you have committed. You seem to have performed this crime in a fearless and dauntless manner, plainly accepting the consequence. No doubt you could have found some more secret way of carrying out your intention, but you acted openly in defiance of the laws of God and man. I hope the spirit you have shown up to this time , the language of pride rising above all fear of consequences, will not continue, for your fate in this world is, I must tell you, hopeless. I trust sincerely between this and the time of your death you will be enabled to make your peace with God, and be brought to view your conduct in a proper light, to feel it must bring down upon you the universal condemnation of your fellow creatures and probably the condemnation of your God if you do not sincerely repent.” His Honour then passed the sentence according to the usual formula. (The Argus, Tuesday 21 September, 1875. Page 7.) Being convicted, the second charge against Henry Howard of murdering Thomas Harman, was not proceeded with. The Execution The Leader carried a detailed and graphic description of the execution of Henry Howard which took place at the Melbourne Gaol on Monday 4 October, 1875. Readers were informed that: “The Rev. Lorenzo Moore, whose endeavours, since the passing of sentence, to bring the prisoner to a sense of guilt, have been attended with very satisfactory results, was engaged with Howard in prayer from nine o'clock up till the time of execution.”

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At the scaffold the governor of the gaol, Mr. Castieau reminded Howard that the time had arrived for him to make any confession which he might have in contemplation. “ 'All I wish to say,'he said, 'is that I am guilty of the murder of the woman Wright.' After a slight pause, he proceeded to say he had wished to plead guilty to the murder, but his friends has persuaded him not to do so. ...He was quite satisfied with the trial and the sentence, he said, and desired to thank the gaol officials for the kind treatment he had received at their hands since his confinement. As regarded Harman, he felt convinced that he never intended to kill him. 'I shall die a repenting Christian,” he continued, and raising his head to permit the executioner to bare his neck, he ceased speaking. Gateley (the hangman) performed the remainder of his task with great alacrity...”

(The Leader, Saturday 9 October, 1875. Page 12.) REFERENCES. The Argus. Monday 16 August, 1875 (News of the murders);Wednesday 18 August (Inquest); Tuesday 21 September, 1875 (Trial). The Leader. Saturday 9 October, 1875 (Execution). Cullen, Joy. “The Wolfdene Story.”Mornington & District Historical Society, 2016. Moorhead, Leslie. “Mornington-In the Wake of Flinders.”Stockland Press, 1971. Wright, Clare. “Beyond the Ladies Lounge-Australia's Female Publicans.”Text Publishing, 2003. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: For assistance in searching out old photographs my thanks to Val Wilson and Joy Cullen from the Mornington and District Historical Society and Val Latimer from the Mornington Peninsula Family History Society.

continued next page...

The key participants Henry Howard. Howard was born in Woolwich, England in 1823 and by the 1850's he was an active citizen of Schnapper Point, as Mornington was then called. In her history of the town Leslie Moorhead related how in the mid 1850's public meetings were held as residents began to clamour for port facilities. Listed amongst prominent spokesmen of the Schnapper Point community at that time was “...Henry Howard, storekeeper and dealer, who was already planning the building of the Schnapper Point Hotel on his land adjacent to where the approaches to the jetty would be employing many men...” (“Mornington-In the Wake of Flinders”. Page 71.) After Howard's execution at Melbourne Gaol on 4 October, 1875, Mr. Kreitmayer, an artist in wax and keeper of a wax works exhibition, applied to the sheriff tor permission to take a cast of the criminal's head but, in compliance with an instruction from the relations of the deceased, the request was not granted. Accordingly we have no portrait of Howard and have to rely on the description by the reporter from The Argus who was present at the inquest: “To look at him...he would seem to be a bad tempered, sensual man. He is rather under the middle height, with a low receding forehead, and massive jaws, fringed with a grizzly black beard.... About an hour or so after the inquiry had been commenced he took no further notice of the proceedings, and amused himself by looking out of the window.”

Above: The marriage certificate of Elizabeth Wright. Right: Thomas Harman, the barman stabbed to death by Henry Howard.

Elizabeth Wright. The same reporter described Mrs. Wright as “...a woman much below the middle height, with rather pleasing features, dark hair and eyes, and is said to have been well educated and able to speak four languages. She was married and had one child by her husband. He had, however, left many years ago, and when last heard of was in San Francisco. She became acquainted with the prisoner Howard, and for some time lived in his house at Schnapper Point, where he had an hotel, called the Mornington Hotel. Some improper intimacy is said to have taken place there, and the consequence was that some years ago the deceased woman had a son by the prisoner-an intelligent lad, who gave evidence in a very straightforward way at the inquest.” (Note that some of this information differs from the first account of the murders which appeared in The Argus on 16 August where it was stated that Mrs. Wright's husband had died two years before. To further complicate matters, the cost of her burial was paid by Mr George Wright!) Thomas Harman. “The deceased man Harman was originally a member of the London police force and came out here several years ago. Since then he has been engaged in taking up small road contracts...Prior to that he has settled his wife and family at Frankston, and failing in his attempt to obtain a small contract, he returned home a few weeks ago. Having known Mrs. Wright (the murdered woman) years ago, when she was in better circumstances, she applied to him to watch over her interests until the hotel was sold. This he agreed to do, and while he was carrying this out he met his death. He is spoken of as a good and kind husband, a steady man, and a good workman. He was devoted to his wife and children, and it is not believed by those who knew him that there is the slightest foundation for the rumour that he was improperly intimate with the deceased woman. He leaves a wife and four children who are utterly destitute. The eldest child is only 10 years of age.” (The Argus, Wednesday 18 August, 1875, Page 16.) The people of Frankston disbelieved the rumours regarding Thomas Harman and quickly started a public subscription for the benefit of his family.

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Three of the key witnesses

The list of witnesses at the inquest and trial includes three names that have been of significance in the history of Frankston:

However a further six children were added to the family, including a son, Thomas Junior.

Thomas Ritchie. Ritchie, who was born on the Isle of Man, came to Australia in 1852 at the age of 18 on the “Isabella Watson” which was wrecked on the Corsair Rock at the Heads. He clung to a spar and was fortunate to survive. Thomas Ritchie married Margaret Kennedy and settled in Frankston in 1854. He established a bakery in that year on what is now the Nepean Highway. Ritchie was a man of great enterprise and matching energy. Amongst his enterprises were the making and maintenance of roads, cutting and supplying wood, and he was a member of a consortium of local business men which founded the Frankston Fish Company in 1867 to transport the catches of the fishermen to the fish markets in the city. In 1870 Ritchie established his first general store on what is now the south-west corner of Playne Street and the Nepean Highway. Ritchies Stores is now the largest independent grocery chain in Australia. The lives of Thomas and Margaret Ritchie were however burdened by a terrible tragedy; one morning in 1863 Margaret had left their home on Olivers Hill to look for a stray cow when a fire broke out. Four of their five children were burned to death; only the baby girl survived.

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William Davey Junior. On 15 November, 1873 Davey applied for a licence to establish the Bay View Hotel on the north-east corner of Davey Street and the Nepean Highway, the present site of the Grand Hotel. It was constructed with a guesthouse which Davey has shipped from Jersey in the Channel Isles. Another early settler in Frankston was Amis Renouf who came from Jersey; he was astonished when he first arrived in the little village to see the old Jersey Island guest house standing in the main street! Davey was the grandson of James Davey who arrived in the Frankston area in 1840 and gained a pre-emptive right-to-land licence of 640 acres which extended from Olivers Hill to Daveys Bay. James' father, William, built a wattle-and-daub hut on the top of what was then known as “Old Man Davey's Hill”from where he could spot fish; his son was to build a more substantial residence in 1851, “Marysville”, overlooking Daveys Bay.


James Henry McComb. McComb, a labourer from Frankston, was a patron of the hotel when the murders took place. He was one of eleven children of Thomas and Grace McComb who arrived in the Frankston area from Tasmania in 1852. Thomas assisted in the development of the local fishing industry, purchased a lot of land where the Frankston CBD is now located, and was instrumental in the construction of the Frankston pier in 1857. Grace also made a substantial contribution to early Frankston and a plaque at the cemetery states “This entrance was erected in August, 1926, by grateful friends, to the memory of the late Mrs. Grace McComb for her goodness.” She was a maternity nurse, the only “doctor” in the Frankston district for 40 years, and described in the local paper as “Frankston's Florence Nightingale.” Grace McComb also headed a petition by local residents in 1873 which led to the establishment of the first school in Davey Street in the following year. Left: Thomas Ritchie's General Store Bottom far left: Thomas Ritchie (circled in red) as a member of the Frankston Fish Company. Bottom left: Bay View Hotel, built by William Davey Junior. Right: Thomas and Grace McComb, early pioneers of Frankston, parents of James Henry McComb. continued next page...

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LIVING & VISITING ON THE MORNINGT

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New Life For Church • Guardian Angel Of The Animals • Feature: Health, On The Record • Wellness, Beauty Peninsula • The Art Of Travelling Bringing The Magic • Coranderrk • Paella Photos Touch To Morley’s Passion • Focus On Safety Beach • All In The Family

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Pick up your copy in shops and cafes across the Peninsula or visit our website peninsulaessence.com.au

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Unusual, if not unique The trial of Henry Howard was conducted before Mr. Justice Robert Molesworth. What is hard to grasp is that the counsel for the defence was Hickman Molesworth, the son of the judge. Later Hickman also became a judge and, to avoid confusion, the father was referred to as “Old Judge Molesworth.” While the situation could have led to the accusation that the son had received favourable treatment from his father, the outcome of Henry Howard's trial suggests that “Old Judge Molesworth” may have been stricter with his son than with other counsel. Right: Mr Justice Robert Molesworth. Far right: His son, Hickman Molesworth, counsel for the defence.

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Corner

puzzle

ACROSS 1. Impel 5. Breakfast drink (6,5) 11. Yearly (3,5) 15. Cheek 16. Nautical shelter 17. Foams 19. Strict 21. Plumbing trap pipe (1-4) 23. Gave speech 25. Intimate (feelings) 27. Chatterer 28. Completely consume (3,2) 30. Spewed-out magma 31. Wage 32. Penetrates 33. Duty list 34. Lamb chops 35. Queer 36. Damp & chilly 38. Inlets 40. Drilling platforms 42. For ... & every 44. Temerity 45. French ... soup 46. Lumber 48. Economic bounce-back 49. Famous volcano 50. Eye lustfully 51. Confederacy 52. Against 53. Eons 54. Weaving machine 55. His lordship, his ... 56. Monarch's seat 58. Lush 59. Wine cup 61. Heighten 63. Magnetic imaging TSP Negative resonance Logo (1,1,1) 64. Record label (1,1,1) 65. Michaelmas daisy 67. Hot under the collar 69. Theft 71. Table & ... 73. Neckerchief 74. Carped 76. Afternoon nap 78. Distinguished 80. Decays 82. Donations to charity 83. Become too big for 85. More spasmodic TSP Positive Logo 89. Tiny fish

91. Morphine or heroin 93. Aural organ 94. Quarter of a half 96. Cylindrical 98. Cry 99. Klutz 100. Attempt to equal 102. Salon worker 103. Ungrateful person 104. Piggish 105. Large deer 106. Admit, ... up 107. Hamper (emotions) 108. Map pressure line 110. Ostrich cousin 112. Of race & culture 114. Journalist 117. Anaesthetises 120. Sneeze noise (1-6) 123. Flows away 125. Transaction 127. Confer 128. Garb 131. Blush 133. Brown pigment 134. Fabric insert 135. Caesar or Waldorf 136. Egg-producing chicken 137. White-faced 140. Mite 141. Forensic ID check, ... test (1,1,1) 142. Blackboard stand 145. Snub 147. Acquired in advance (3-6) 148. Dwell 150. Vexes 151. Hence 152. Blade's cutting side 153. Rove 154. Taiwanese city 156. Mineral vein 158. Type of ski lift (1-3) 160. Disruptive weather feature (2,4) 162. Leg joint 163. Unlace 164. Spreading trees 165. Castrate 166. Cult 167. Have (to) 168. Region 170. People who fast 172. Piece (of gossip) 173. Feudal peasant 174. Response

177. Soundless 179. Frosted 180. Guru 182. Foolish 183. Film award 185. Travelling stagehand 187. Palm off 188. Not ever 189. Batty 191. Umpire 192. Approximate hour of arrival (1,1,1) 193. Crested parrot 194. Cinderella's ugly kin 195. Bewitches

DOWN 1. Smothered 2. Couple 3. Sidekick 4. Panache 5. Covent Garden or La Scala spectacles 6. Ethiopia's Addis ... 7. Manage (3,2) 8. Energy unit 9. Non-reactive 10. Church officials 11. Jaunty 12. Resuming business 13. Amount after tax 14. Quagmire 18. Athletes' outfits 20. To-do (5-2) 22. Curving 24. Accords 26. Alienation 29. Of horoscopes 37. Items for discussion 38. Sanctifying 39. Grabbed 40. Nomadic 41. Suffers in heat 43. Taxi-driver 44. Mum's mum 47. Street protest 57. Female calf 60. Gained 62. Unsuitable 66. Sum 68. Fitness to fly (of plane) 69. ... & now 70. Floor slate

72. Artistically (pleasing) 73. Diddle (5-6) 75. China/Korea continent 77. Aftertaste 79. The ... is just before the dawn (7,4) 81. Also titled (1,1,1) 84. Grievances 85. Jokers 86. Berated 87. Solve (problems) (4,3) 88. Makes elegant 90. Dawdles 92. Eskimo building 95. Long-necked bird 97. Idiot 101. Soldiers 109. Bosom 111. Spoil 113. Dr Jekyll & Mr ... 115. Breadth 116. Scything 118. Goes astray 119. Supplemented, ... out 121. Case-hardened 122. Tramps 124. Wall-smashing device (9,3) 126. Photo blow-ups 129. Baby frogs 130. Legal right of access 131. Mad Russian monk 132. Tottered 138. Endeavour 139. Welsh arts festival 143. Aircraft stunts 144. Pass (of time) 146. Stink 149. Congers 155. Cross 157. Wife of duke 159. Direct course 161. Evoking 165. Digestive fluids, ... juices 169. Postal destination 171. Takes a whiff 172. Sleeps loudly 175. Forgo 176. Religious customs 177. Nasal bone cavity 178. Floodbank 181. 60s frizzy hairstyle 184. Zodiac Cancer symbol 186. Alphabet (1,1,1) 190. The lot Š Lovatts Puzzles

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MtEliza

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Mount Eliza is a seaside town on the Mornington Peninsula, located on the coast between the large centres of Frankston and Mornington. It is 48km from Melbourne and has an area of 750 /km2. The population of Mount Eliza was 17,248 in 2011.

MT ELIZA FACTS Mount Eliza is a bustling seaside village nestled between Frankston and Mornington. The town centre is known as Mount Eliza Village, and is the main shopping area for the suburb. Mount Eliza has many great cafes specialising in breakfast and lunches and some fantastic restaurants. The coastline around Mount Eliza consists of jagged cliffs featuring scenic walking tracks above stretches of secluded sandy beaches in small bays and coves below. Access to most of the beaches along the coast is via residential streets which offer small car parks at their end points. Those residential streets feature upmarket dream homes and weekend retreats, many of which have spectacular views along the coast. The attractive commercial centre of Mount Eliza is located around one kilometre inland along Mount Eliza Way and Canadian Bay Road, and features supermarkets and a number of specialty shops. The Mount Eliza Regional Park, accessed via Two Bays Road, incorporates the former Moorooduc Quarry and offers views across the surrounding plains. At the southern

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end of the park is a lake with picnic areas and a playground. The Mornington Tourist Railway, which offers steam train rides, has its Moorooduc station located adjacent to the Mount Eliza Regional Park. Mount Eliza is 46km south of Melbourne. The population of Mount Eliza is 17,200. Mount Eliza was named in 1836 by Captain William Hobson after either Eliza Elliott, his wife, or Elizabeth Callaghan, the wife of John Batman. Prior to large scale subdivision, Mount Eliza was mainly a location for holiday homes. This began to change in the early half of the 20th century when many old estates were subdivided. One such subdivision was Ranelagh Estate, designed by Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin in 1924 in tandem with the surveyors Tuxen and Miller. There are several beaches and bays located in Mount Eliza, which include Canadian Bay, which has had the name since the late 19th Century, Daveys Bay, Half Moon Bay, Moondah Beach, Ranelagh Beach and Sunnyside North Beach. continued next page...

COFFEE SAFARI Fresh brewed coffee is a must have for weekends away and Mt Eliza coffee is second to none with great coffee haunts around the town. Here are a few to check out when head down to this beautiful end of the world.

CAFE GOURMAND 64 Mount Eliza Way French pastries as good as you will find in Paris. Light meals and great coffee make Cafe Gourmand an excellent place for breakfast or brunch. Cosy and welcoming with attentive staff.

SHOP ATE 87 Mount Eliza Way Serving Genovese Coffee, this buzzing Italian-style cafe is a popular breakfast haunt for Mount Eliza locals. There is a great selection of homemade cakes, sandwiches, and hot dishes, with breads supplied by Melbourne artisan bakery.

POP & SELMAS CAFE 34 Ranelagh Drive Great coffee and service even though often busy. Coffee one of the best and varied menu selection for whole family.

VELOS MAZEH MUSETTE 76 Mount Eliza Way Small and cool coffee shop with a character for an owner. Coffee is some of the best in town and made with passion and flair.


COMMUNITY REAL ESTATE NOW EXTENDS TO THE FOURTH GENERATION OF THE CROWDER FAMILY In 1952 John Snr and Ian commenced the business which grew into an 8 office network covering the Mornington Peninsula. John Crowder was in real estate for 72 years. With offices in Frankston, Carrum Downs, Langwarrin, Somerville, Hastings, Red Hill, Mornington and Mount Eliza Crowders were the largest real estate business covering the Peninsula. Geoff joined some five years later and this combination led to some of the most important sales and commercial transactions on the Peninsula. James commenced Community Real Estate in October 2007 after the family business was bought out and his passion for residential real estate meant he had the opportunity to run his own business and build his own reputation in the area. Part of his business philosophy is to donate money back to the local community which he continues to do to this day with donations now exceeding $280,000. This is something he is very proud of and no other agency in Australia does this on a regular basis. In 2014 Ben joined the company as a fourth generation Crowder. He is now a fully Licensed Agent and is building his own reputation and following in the business. This is something James and the family are very proud of. Over the last 10 years James has built the business from scratch to a formidable agency that covers the Peninsula. He has recently secured an extension to his contract with State Trustees Ltd, has a full time rental manager with over 20 years’ experience, represents many banking and financial institutions, has a satellite office at Red Hill and employs 8 fantastic community minded staff members.

First and second generation Crowders (Geoff, John Snr & Ian)

Community Real Estate has an enviable reputation based upon proven honesty, integrity, vitality and stability which is vital in real estate transactions.

If you are considering selling, leasing or simply would like some real estate advice please call the professional team at James Crowder Community Real Estate on 9708 8667.

9708 8667

Third and fourth generation Crowders (Ben & James)

Shop 7 / 20-22 Ranelagh Drive MOUNT ELIZA www.communityrealestate.com.au


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Hollywood glamour came to Mt Eliza in 1959 when movie stars Fred Astaire, Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner arrived to shoot the Stanley Kramer film, On the Beach, based on the novel of the same name by British novelist Nevil Shute who had lived at nearby Langwarrin.

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Adjacent to Sunnyside beach sits a historical property Morning Star Estate which has also been in a number of films, including a three-month location shoot around the mansion for the movie Partisan, starring French actor Vincent Cassell occurred in 2014 and in 2013. The mansion was the location for the Kath & Kim movie spin-off Kath & Kimderella.

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The median house price in Mount Eliza is $950,000.

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Mount Eliza has its fair share of celebrities. Deborah Lee Furness’s mother once lived there and she and husband, Hugh Jackman, had been spotted visiting. Real Housewives of Melbourne star, Gamble Breaux and her husband, Rick Wolfe, live in Mount Eliza.

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WHAT TO DO?

A bustling seaside village nestled between Frankston and Mornington, Mount Eliza has many great cafes specialising in breakfast and lunches, some fantastic restaurants, and great boutique shopping. The coastline around Mount Eliza consists of jagged cliffs featuring scenic walking tracks above stretches of secluded sandy beaches in small bays and coves below. Access to most of the beaches along the coast is via residential streets which offer small car parks at their end points. Known for its upmarket dream homes and weekend retreats, many Mount Eliza properties have spectacular coastal views. With a village atmosphere and tucked away from the main highway, Mount Eliza has managed to maintain its hidden gem status, attracting celebrities to visit or purchase property there. It has even been the centre of Hollywood glamour when Fred Astaire, Gregory Peck and Ava Gardener arrived to shoot the film On the Beach in 1959. Photography: Yanni


PUSH FOR PIER

RAY BAN By Keith Platt

A

campaign is underway to stop the mostly hidden killing and maiming of a group of fish commonly known as smooth rays. The rays are rarely sought after for food but are often killed so they won’t waste a second bait or out of fear, in the case of stingrays. Although the rays will only attack if provoked, scuba diver PT Hirschfield says the level of fear has risen noticeably since Australian wildlife expert Steve Irwin died in 2006 after being pierced in the chest by a stingray barb while filming for the documentary, Ocean's Deadliest. Hirschfield likens the subsequent backlash against stingrays to the heightened fear of sharks caused by Steven Speilberg’s 1975 thriller, Jaws. She dives almost daily and has become increasingly horrified and saddened by the numbers of dead smooth rays littering the seabed around piers on the Mornington Peninsula and the rest of Port Phillip. “The huge smooth rays I dive with are gentle, curious puppies.” Hirschfield wants rays to be protected near piers “as they are rarely the intended catch of fishers”. “People seem to have a real dread of stingrays and seem to assume they will attack. They don’t really understand that they can become tame and are easily caught.” Hirschfield blames anglers for most of the ray carcasses near piers “because they don’t want to catch them twice”.

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A closed Facebook group using the name Project Banjo Action Group has about 300 followers dedicated to raising awareness of the needless cruelty being dealt to rays, which include fiddler rays or banjo sharks. Hirschfield discovered one of the most callous instances of cruelty under Rye pier where a 250-300 kilogram ray had been dumped after having its wings and tail hacked off. She believes the meat may have been kept as shark bait “which would be against Fisheries Victoria Regulations”. “The rays at peninsula piers are iconic and much loved by locals, tourists, divers, snorkelers and fishers alike. An image of me with the remains of the ray at Rye has begun to circulate and cause much outrage in social media,” Hirschfield said. “The Project Banjo Action Group is campaigning for greater education about rays on the peninsula to combat the Irwin Effect, as well as better compliance with Fisheries regulations. “Like timid, reclusive blue ringed octopuses that have only ever been responsible for three fatalities in history, stingrays have been much maligned and have become the victims of global smear and fear campaigns and unjustified knee-jerk reactions. “Ignorant fishermen frequently cut off their barbs and tails, throwing the mutilated animals back into the ocean or killing them without justification – what utterly cruel, irresponsible and senseless abuse of these gorgeous, essentially harmless creatures.


“The reality is that stingrays do not prey on humans in any way, instead preying on smaller marine creatures.” Hirschfield says regulations allow for a bag limit of five rays of one or more species. However, the same regulations also state that it is an offence to fail to return [unwanted] fish to water without injury or damage.

Open 7 days per week from 12pm till late

“Fisheries Victoria advises that fishers are to ‘dispatch fish you intend to keep immediately’. It is unacceptable common practice that the tails, barbs and wings of various species of sharks and rays - including fiddler rays and huge smooth rays - are often hacked off while the animal is still alive.” Hirschfield said the group wanted to increase “awareness and appreciation of ” rays throughout the fishing and non-fishing community; and increase the understanding and compliance with regulations and best practice “as an integral part of the licensing process”.

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More signs about regulations, best practice and penalties were needed on the fishing end of piers. Hirschfield stresses that the Project Banjo Action Group “is not a vigilante group”. “The success of this campaign is dependent on operating from a position of respect for all parties involved. Showing disrespect for those with opposing views and behaviours may inflame the situation rather than resolve it.” Details of any offences can be reported to Fisheries on 133474.

To celebrate 6 months of rewarding care of Mt Eliza’s pets, Mt Eliza Village Vet are happy to offer a geriatric feline promotion. Cats 12 years The team at Mt Eliza Village Vet have or older can book in for truly enjoyed meeting all our lovely a full examination, blood new clients and their fur kids in pressure check and blood the first 6 months of operation. test to screen for early We very much appreciate the kidney disease, liver disease warm welcome and wonderful and diabetes. Usual price is feedback that has been given $205, but for a limited time just to us by the community so $99! Weight management and far, especially the fabulous arthritis promotions will also be reviews on our Facebook occurring over Winter. Contact page - head to the page and the friendly staff for details!

see for yourself!

* Bar Open all day * Live Music Saturday Nights * Foxtel Live * Function Room Canadian Bay Hotel 35 Ranelagh Drive, Mt Eliza 3930 Phone 9775 2331 info@canadianbay.com.au www.canadianbay.com.au

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P: 9787 4511 E: info@lardnerwhite.com.au May 2017

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Real Estate

GRAND OLD ESTATE UP

E L A S FOR

By Melissa Walsh

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he circa 1867 Morning Star Estate, an iconic and prestigious Mornington Peninsula holding, has been put on the market by owner Judy Barrett, and is being offered for sale through CBRE.

Set on 63 hectares, the property features a main mansion house, a boutique hotel, a restaurant and events venue, 12 hectares of pinot, chardonnay and cabernet grapes, 75,000 rose bushes, an orchard, and views across Port Phillip Bay.

Judy bought Morning Star Estate 23 years ago after her husband, Charles, died of a heart attack. It was at the height of an economic downturn, and the property, which had been a horse stud, was in the hands of receivers and had gone to auction seven times in five years but had not sold.

It featured in films Kath and Kimderella, the Kath and Kim movie, and Partisan starring French actor Vincent Cassel, wellknown for his performances in Ocean’s Twelve, Ocean’s Thirteen, and Black Swan. Australian rock royalty Jimmy Barnes and INXS have also performed there.

When she purchased the Victorian-era mansion it was in a dilapidated condition through lack of occupation but that soon changed. Judy planted roses in the old cow paddocks, renovated the mansion to create one of the most popular wedding venues on the peninsula, created a boutique B&B Hotel from the dormitory wing of the former Franciscan Boy’s Home, and created a spacious restaurant where the woodwork room once stood.

Bianca Butterworth, CBRE sales executive, said the property has attracted an unprecedented level of attention both international and local.

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“We are seeing great enquiry from a range of buyers profiles; those looking to develop the sites existing use for a hotel and leisure development; high net worth individuals looking for an alternate residence or country estate; commercial wineries looking to expand their operations, and interests in stud farm and horses


Set on 63 hectares, the property features a main mansion house, a boutique hotel, a restaurant and events venue, 12 hectares of pinot, chardonnay and cabernet grapes, 75,000 rose bushes, an orchard, and views across Port Phillip Bay.

which would revert its use to that which it was prior to the current ownership,” said Ms Butterworth. “We are also seeing significant offshore interests for similar ventures. Most buyers understand the prolific offering of the site to the market and the rarity of being able to secure premium landholdings of this size in such a tightly held and magnificent area of Melbourne’s Mornington Peninsula.” Ms Butterworth said a major factor for the interest was the closeness of the Melbourne CBD to the Mornington Peninsula. “The location is very attractive to investors and the associated prediction in population growth into Melbourne over the next 20 years or so is quite astounding. Melbourne is predicted to overtake Sydney in terms of sheer population by 2056 and these are residents that will need somewhere to live. We have also noticed an increase in demand from offshore interest over the past 12-18months, in a variety of asset classes along the Mornington Peninsula. This includes New Zealand based ‘Ryman Healthcare’ which purchased Moondah Estate for retirement living, and various Asian groups and individuals whose primary motivation is

to land bank and preserve the existing use such as Red Hill Estate Winery and Eagle Ridge Golf Course,” she said. With almost 30 years since the property was last on the market, Ms Butterworth says the rarity of this type of offering comes only once in a generation. “It was the same for Moondah Estate which we transacted on behalf of the Melbourne Business School late in 2016 and in the case of Morning Star it is almost 30 years. There is so much potential here. Personally, I love the setting. I love the fact you can walk from the manor house though the vineyards and gardens to the coast. On a summer day when the sun is shining over the water it is simply breathtaking. I can only imagine what it would be like to look out over the views from the ground floor receiving rooms and first floor bedrooms, whether as a guest or resident of the future,” said Ms Butterworth.

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168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Mornington

For Sale

18A King Georges Avenue, Mornington Benchmark Brilliance, Fishermans Beach Exclusivity A stand-out sensation in beachside living, the luxury of this boutique new 3/4-bedroom, 2.5 bathroom single-level residence is further elevated by its magnificent setting within metres of Fishermans Beach. At the forefront of sophisticated low-maintenance living, the impressive interior proportions with zoned living and an entertainer’s Miele kitchen with butler’s pantry are augmented by a sun drenched entertaining terrace. Engineered Oak flooring, caesarstone benchtops, handmade Spanish tiles, chic black tapware and bespoke light fittings lead a long list of gilt-edged additions alongside a private main bedroom suite with deck, study/4th bedroom and double remote garage. For Sale Inspect As advertised or by appointment Contact Jake Egan 0491 129 137 Alex Campbell 0432 344 394 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Mornington

Auction

45A Carnoustie Grove, Mornington Cutting-edge Coastal Living With Bay Views A perfectionist’s approach has produced stunning results throughout this flawless as-new two-storey three-bedroom 2.5 bathroom Cahill Group designed residence where every space conveys relaxed beachside luxury made even more memorable by the lovely bay views from the top floor. Faultlessly finished, fabulous open plan living flowing to a covered entertaining deck, sublime stone and Smeg kitchen with butler’s pantry, ground-floor main bedroom suite with private deck plus an open study and rumpus room with inspired bay views are just some of the home’s sensational features in a premier beachside address close to Fossil Beach, Esplanade walking trails, vibrant Dava Drive village and schools. Auction Saturday 6th May at 1.00pm Inspect As advertised or by appointment Contact Damian Smith 0481 875 243 Rachel Crook 0419 300 515 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


2 Murralinga Place, Mount Eliza

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AMERICAN SHINGLE

architecture inspired home in Mount Eliza’s newest golden mile (1396sqm). Eye-catching period windows adorn the facade, an entry hosts a significant timber kitchen feeding informal & formal eatery options. A substantial family room incorporates bi fold doors opening onto a stunning elevated alfresco sunroom and balcony with breath-taking views across Moorooduc Plains. A formal lounge room takes the home to the next level with high ceilings & built-in gas fire place, a perfect combination for stunning winter months experienced on this part of the peninsula. Tasmanian Oak floors guide you along to carpeted rooms and tiled wet areas. Paved alfresco area.

janine harrison,

the key to all your real estate needs. To start your campaign contact 0487 000 666 or admin@janineharrisonrealestate.com.au | Janineharrisonrealestate.com.au

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Curious how much your property can generate per week as a

l? a t n e R y a d li o H

Don’t wait, the time to list your property for holiday rental is NOW. Benefit from year round bookings in addition to the busy summer season.

Experience our full management service. Call us for your holiday rental appraisal with complimentary property styling and advice on making your home guest friendly.

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0409 597 508 E ssence |

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Peninsula Essence May 2017  

Peninsula Essence May 2017

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