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MARCH 2017

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PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

Vet Keeping Blue Blood Racing On Track • Sandcastles To Build • Picture Perfect Purple Nathan loves Ricky Martin • Its Hip To Be Square • Style File • Photography For A Cure Food Glorious Food • What Next For Warrawee? • Imagine Ellen And Portia As Neighbours


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contents 7. Events 8. Window Shopping 10. Not so Sirius

When Clemens Unger started building an observatory in his backyard five years ago, his neighbours thought he was building a small Greek Orthodox Church.

Writers: Melissa Walsh, Kristy Martin, Peter McCullough, Cameron McCullough Creative Director: Maria Mirabella Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons, Jarryd Bravo Publisher: Cameron McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au Marg Harrison, 0414 773 153 or marg@mpnews.com.au General enquiries: essence@mpnews.com.au Registered address: 2/1 Tyabb Road, Mornington 3931 Phone: 5973 6424 www.peninsulaessence.com.au Follow us on Instagram

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All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

16. Brooke Satchwell 20. Vet Keeping Blue Blood Racing on Track

The horse racing industry, if its disparate parts could be brought together, would be one of the largest industries on the Mornington Peninsula.

27. Sandcastles to Build

The owners of Sandstorm Events and Sand Sculpting Australia have been making sandcastles with their children for 15 years now, ever since Sharon saw her first sand sculpture on the Rye foreshore and was hooked.

32. Our Very Own “Squizzy” Taylor

For six decades Michael “Squizzy” Taylor has been involved with the Mornington Fire Brigade, as a demonstration runner, fire fighter, trainer, representative at the VFBV (Volunteer Fire Brigade Victoria) and the VUFBA (Volunteer Urban Fire Brigade Association) and serving as Captain for seven years.

34. Picture Perfect Purple

Welcome to the Red Hill Lavender Farm and Distillery, the peninsula’s only commercial lavender farm and a place where time-honoured traditions are favoured over modern agricultural practices.

40. Its Hip to be Square

People of all ages do-si-do, swing their partners round and allemande left to the instructions by square dancing caller, Jaden Frigo, who at just 20 is one of the youngest professional callers around.

42. Nathan Loves Ricky Martin

Armed with a budget of $15,000 and Kodak sponsorship of 35mm film, old school buddies Steven Arriagada, Llewellyn Michael Bates, and Bryan Chau created their first short film, Nathan Loves Ricky Martin, this year’s winner of the Peninsula Short Film Festival

45. Style File

Autumn fashion on the peninsula.

52. Mornington Peninsula Weddings 54. Photography for a Cure

It is rare to find Jan Dance without a camera in her hand. Since receiving her first camera at just seven years of age, she has spent almost 53 years behind the lens.

58. Sisters are Doing it for Themselves

Women across the peninsula are proving that a woman’s place is not just in the home, through an innovative mini festival that began two years ago with the pure intention of celebrating local women and their stories.

66. Food Glorious Food

Peninsula Essence talks to the man who started the popular Food Truck Carnival, owner, and self-proclaimed foodie, Danny Grant.

70. She Ate a Steamed Bun and Bought a Business

She’s fun and feisty with some wicked tattoos and a somewhat laissez-faire attitude to life but don’t be fooled by her casual exterior. The new owner of Mr Paul’s, Bel Mead, definitely knows what she’s doing after 25 years in hospitality.

78. What Next for Warrawee?

One of the earliest hotels in the Hastings District began its life as a family home in Balnarring.

Cover Photo: Red Hill Lavender Farm Photo: Yanni

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88. Crossword 90. Focus on Portsea 96. Imagine Ellen and Portia as Neighbours

The Mornington Peninsula is proving a popular place for celebrities with rumours that Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi have been hunting for a house at the beachside location.


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SEVEN SISTERS FESTIVAL

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Friday 3 – Sunday 5 The annual 3-day women’s festival celebrates, educates and inspires women in the areas of health, spirituality, personal development, self-worth, expression, and sisterhood. 60 Hearn Road, Mt Martha www.sevensistersfestival.com

Saturday 11, 8.30am – 5pm This iconic Red Hill Show will be held at the Red Hill Showgrounds, Arthurs Seat Road on Easter Saturday. The Red Hill Show is a traditional country Show, it is always one of the state’s most popular agricultural shows and 2017 will be no exception. Red Hill Show Grounds, Arthurs Seat Road, Red Hill. Ph 5989 2357 www.redhillshow.com.au

VAN MORRISON'S MASTERPIECES

PENINSULA PIERS & PINOTS

Thursday 9 Vince Jones stars in a wonderful show that will return to the stage in Victoria on the 2017 Labour Day long weekend - Van Morrison's Masterpieces. Focused on Van Morrison's iconic albums, Moondance and Astral Weeks, Vince brings these much loved albums to life. Frankston Arts Centre, Corner of Young Street and Davey Street, Frankston Ph 9784 1060 www.artscentre.frankston.vic.gov.au

Sunday 12 Twenty Mornington Peninsula vignerons will showcase maritime cool climate pinots with tastings by the sea in an intimate gathering. Wines will be matched with local food and live music at the event which will be at the finish line of the Piers and Pinots Yacht Race. Flinders Foreshore, The Esplanade, Flinders. Ph 5989 2377 www.mpav.com.au

TIFFIN LUNCH BUFFET @ NAZAARAY ESTATE WINERY Monday 13, 11.45am – 2.45pm Join a celebratory Tiffin Lunch Buffet with a special Bollywood dance clinic by Mohit & Co. Bookings essential. Nazaaray Estate Winery 266 Meakins Road, Flinders. Ph 0416 143 439 www.nazaaray.com.au

REGIONAL WORLD'S LONGEST LUNCH - MORNINGTON Friday 31, 12:00pm to 4:00pm Mornington Racecourse will be transformed into a gastronomical ode to the region for Melbourne's most discerning locavores. Mornington Racecourse, 320 Racecourse Road, Mornington. Ph 5975 3310 www.melbournefoodandwine.com.au

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NOT SO SIRIUS


By Melissa Walsh Photos: Yanni

W

hen Clemens Unger started building an observatory in his backyard five years ago, his neighbours thought he was building a small Greek Orthodox Church. It’s not the typical thing you would see on a suburban Mornington allotment but then Clemens is not a typical man either. Clemens, who came out to Australia from Germany in 1996, is a self-confessed “nerd”, a title he wears proudly when his four children stir him about his astronomy passion. “Having been involved in astronomy for my whole life, I am in a lot of organisations and often attend talks which is when the kids say ‘dad’s going to a nerd meeting’,” said Clemens, who fits the ‘Big Bang Theory’ profile perfectly with his handful of masters degrees in chemical engineering, chemistry and business. For Clemens, his penchant for astronomy and science was written in the stars from a young age. “My grandfather would point out all the stars and constellations, like Sirius and Orion, and was an avid star gazer, even though he didn’t have a telescope. We would sit outside for hours on end looking up at the sky,” he said. “When I went to secondary school I then joined the astronomy club and did astronomy camps during the school holidays that went for weeks at a time. At this stage I was only 13, and my parents bought me my first telescope.” Of course, this was all during the 1970s when space flight was in its prime and, the year before, the young Clemens had witnessed the first man walking on the moon. “Watching Neil Armstrong walk on the moon in 1969 was the thing that hooked me. I will never forget sitting in our living room in Darmstadt (a city near Frankfurt), watching our grainy black and white television and being mesmerised,” said Clemens, who also had another connection to the space program. “I had a relative from Germany from my grandmother’s side who migrated to the US and married an American involved in the space program. They lived in Cocoa Beach, Florida when I was a little guy and sent me NASA magazines and bits and pieces from the space program.” For Clemens, these astronauts became his heroes, and he became obsessed with space flight. “It fascinated me - guys who get strapped on top of a big rocket and shot into space, and I have always followed the space program and had a keen interest in astronomy,” said Clemens, who believes people don’t look up enough. “We live on the Mornington Peninsula where people are passionate about nature but there is more to nature than the ocean, flora and fauna. We need to teach our kids to look up to the sky more because there is a whole lot of nature out there for us to explore.” continued next page...

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Clemens meets Buzz Aldrin, the first man to walk on the moon.

Clemens Unger with Gene Cernan, the last man on the moon.

After four decades, Clemens has proven that if you want something badly enough, you just have to work towards it, and five years ago he built his observatory. “It is something I have always wanted and, as I have a very understanding wife, I finally built one in our backyard,” said Clemens of his scientist-style man cave. “It was delivered to the front yard in flat packs and I moved it around to the back to build. It took about three days to put up but three more weeks to assemble the telescope and get everything perfectly aligned.” Building an observatory has turned out to be practical, as well as fun, cutting down the set up time for star gazing. “When you are into astronomy and go out at night the biggest pain is packing up. You are out there for hours and then you have to pack up with the risk of dropping expensive equipment. Now everything is set up for me. I just head outside when the weather is conducive and look through my telescope,” said Clemens, half joking that all his equipment is worth the price of a good car. While he does spend a lot of time out there alone, occasionally one of the kids shows an interest when something significant is happening.

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“I have an app on my phone that shows when the space station is coming over and sometimes the kids are interested in checking it out. The real nerds have a more serious application called ISS Detector which picks up a whole lot of different satellites,” he said. “The ISS Detector will tell you when and where to look for the International Space Station or Iridium flares. You get an alarm a few minutes before a pass. You will never miss a pass of the International Space Station and you will never miss the bright flashes of the iridium communication satellites.” From his observatory Clemens has photographed the sun, moon, stars, planets, nebula, and galaxies millions of light years away. “With some galaxies millions of light years away, the telescope is like a time machine. The light that goes through the lens and hits your eye left the Andromeda galaxy two and a half million years ago,” he said. “When you put it into that kind of perspective, it’s like the astronauts who say you get a totally different view of earth from space. We are sitting on this tiny little planet called earth and you realise every small thing is not as mightily important as you think. It makes things clearer.” continued next page...


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Meeting astronauts over the years has been a highlight for Clemens, who holds the space program in the highest regard. “The most famous was Buzz Aldrin, but the person I really liked was Gene Cernan, the last man on the moon. They are all heroes though and have taken risks for the good of humanity and to further our knowledge, and yet they are so down to earth,” said Clemens who believes that space exploration is essential for human development. “It is in our nature to look beyond what we know, and if we stop we are doomed. We need to explore. That’s why Captain Cook came here on a rickety boat to discover the Great Southern Land.” Clemens says most people see space travel and technology as money wasting exercises, yet we use parts of this technology in our everyday life. “Your mobile phone, ccd chips, and computers, are applications which originated somehow in that field, and without space research, we wouldn’t have this technology. “

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STAGE SET FOR BROOKE TO COME HOME By Cameron McCullough

B

rooke Satchwell is one of the peninsula's greatest exports. The Logie Award winning actress now lives in Sydney, but still describes the peninsula as her "happy place". Luckily for Brooke, she has come home with her new role in The Play That Goes Wrong. "This is a fantastic show" said Brooke. "It is basically a play within a play. As the name suggests, everything that could possibly go wrong, does go wrong!" "It is pure joy watching the actors and actresses trying to keep the show on the road against all odds!" The Play That Goes Wrong is a multi-award winning spectacle that has had critics raving. And Melbourne is its first stop of a four month, around Australia odyssey. The chance for Brooke to spend some time near her first love, the peninsula, is something she is very excited about. "I grew up around Flinders, Shoreham, Red Hill and Point Leo. I had the most magnificent childhood."

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"Our school bus ride was 45 minutes each way, along dirt roads. My mother used to wait at the end of our driveway for the bus because sometimes the bus driver would sail past our stop. Especially when we were so small that he couldn't see our heads above the seats!" "What would then follow was a treacherous reversing of the bus along the dirt road, or mum would err on the side of caution and drive to the next stop." "On Friday nights we'd head to the beach and have fish and chips from the Balnarring Fish and Chip Shop. We'd surf until the sun went down and then make the surf boards into a banquet table and eat to our hearts content. "Weekends were spent on our property with the horses and chickens, roaming the hills and playing in the garden. Our garden was full of fruit trees and we had 150 antique roses. "I have the most amazing memories of lying in the grass, continued next page...


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walkman on, staring at the sky. Sometimes even in the rain. It was just magical!" "I will be forever grateful of the opportunity I had to grow up on the peninsula. Especially at the time I did. Things seemed so quaint back then. If you wanted a block of chocolate after 4pm. It would mean a long trek all the way to the Nepean Highway for a Cadbury's Peppermint Block. "When I come back home now, I find it very changed. Not as I remember it!" Brooke has spent most of her adult life in Sydney. Sometimes for relationships, and sometimes for work. An arrangement that she describes as "the alchemy of life". "I spent eight years in Sydney before coming home for three years in 2006. After that, I headed back up to Sydney and have been there ever since." "Having said that, I am forever 'Googling' properties on the peninsula. One day... one day I'll be back!" Brooke got her start in acting on the peninsula. One of her first forays was as part of the Rosebud Astral Theatre's performance of The Music Man in 1993, although it didn't all go to plan. "I had been rehearsing studiously for the role for all week long. The night before auditions, my sister Kate came out of her bedroom and said 'I'm going to audition too!".

Of course, as fate would have it, Kate was given the lead role, although the theatre group did offer "Kate's sister" a role in the chorus, which she immediately accepted. Not deterred by that minor set back, Brooke went on to perform in commercials, eventually landing a coveted role on Neigbours playing Anne Wilkinson; a role she won a Logie Award for. Brooke's career has now spanned over 20 years of acting in television, movies and theatre. As well as her role in Neighbours she has been in Water Rats, and Packed to the Rafters, as well as a swathe of other shows. As for live theatre, she was in The Vagina Monologues, The Graduate and Jack of Hearts. "Every time I do live theatre I think to myself 'I should do more of this!' Don't miss your chance to see one of the peninsula's favourite daughters, Brooke Satchwell, live on stage in The Play That Goes Wrong. The Play That Goes Wrong is being performed at the Comedy Theatre in Melbourne until March 19. Tickets via ticketmaster.com.au or visit theplaythatgoeswrong.com.au


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EQUINE VET JOHN BOWERS IS A REGULAR AT MORNINGTON RACECOURSE, BUT MOSTLY WHEN THE CROWDS ARE GONE AND THE TRACK IS BEING USED TO EXERCISE HOPEFUL STARTERS.

THIS VET'S ON TRACK By Keith Platt

T

he deep rumble turns into a crescendo of racing hooves as the horses hit the straight and gallop to the finish line. Jockeys and horses move as one, spurred on by the roar of the crowd.

would be one of the largest industries on the Mornington Peninsula. But the way the industry is structured allows for small stables, with maybe just one or two horses, to compete alongside businesses with dozens of race contenders.

Betting slips are either kissed or thrown in the air in despair as the winners are announced.

Each race has only one winner, and the aim of all trainers is the same - to get that horse across the line first.

A day at the races is a colourful, choreographed spectacle that involves drama, despair and good fortune.

Just because a horse is reared like a racehorse doesn’t mean it’s a winner. And if it is, it won’t be all the time, or forever.

In stark contrast, most days at Mornington Racecourse begin quietly. Horses and riders emerge from the gloom onto the tracks for training.

Like most big industries, racing has a powerhouse behind it; innumerable people contribute to that one special day when colour and glitz hide the dramas unfolding on the course and in the stands.

Horses are ridden into the racecourse from nearby farms and stables or arrive inside horse trailers. There are no colourful silks for the jockeys and mostly it’s the steely eyes of trainers watching the steeds under their care, looking for signs that can signal greatness or lay the seeds of doubt, no matter what the breeding books indicate. Horseracing, if its disparate parts could be brought together,

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Race days are relatively few and far between - 14 in a year at Mornington - but that doesn’t mean there’s no daily action at the course. One day after the race crowds have gone and the grounds have been tidied and turf replaced, the horses are back. Carefully nurtured and transported by a retinue of attendants


(stable hands, strappers, riders, trainers) 400-450 horses are each morning brought to the track, saddled and walked or galloped for carefully measured distances. Equine vet John Bowers is part of several behind-the-scenes teams preparing horses for racing. Most mornings he’s up early driving to the racecourse. Once inside the gate his Staffordshire terrier Benji expects a bit of ball play before obediently climbing back into the four-wheel drive while his master, the vet, goes off to check any number of much taller well-bred animals. Nothing seems hurried with Bowers as he strolls past the tie-up stalls where horses are either being prepared for a run or are having a wash-off after being exercised and before making the trip home. There’s time for a coffee and horse health talk with some of the 100 trainers registered at the course. A few pats and a close-up look at past and present patients before amiably offering to grab a harness and walk Wednesday Golfer, one of Balnarring-based trainer Dave Cave’s horses, to the trailer. “Even though it’s close to suburbia, the racecourse is kind of peaceful,” Bowers muses as he checks his phone for the first of the day’s house (horse) calls. continued next page...

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Taking a ball break with his companion, Benji.

John Bowers checks a Welsh pony's health.

“The exercise at the track is conditioning the horses,” he says. “It’s to help their cardio vascular system, muscles, tendons, bones and even mental capacity to cope with the rigours of racing.

Before making his off-course rounds Bowers makes another stop, a leash-free area for dogs with play equipment. Staffy Benji’s quick to complete the course, knowing that he’ll again get to play ball before clambering back into the car.

“Horses need eight to 12 weeks of preparation before a race. If they’ve been spelled, it takes three months to condition bones which, like skin cells, are constantly being reabsorbed by the body. “Their bones need to be elastic enough to absorb the shock of racing.” Bowers compares the preparation of horses for racing to that of elite athletes. Care has to be taken that they are not over-trained, which can result in them “going off their feed or losing interest”. “The thing about horses is that they love the paddock where they can run if they want or just graze – they don’t tend to move unless they have to. “A horse has got to want to run. In a pack it’s a flight response. [Record-breaking thoroughbred mare] Makybe Diva was amazing, she wanted to be in front [when racing] and stayed in front.” Bowers says a horse needs to be provided with a chance to win by being “put in the company of horses where it can win”. “And it’s wins that keep the industry going. Economics demand it produce winners. It’s a very interesting game.”

In contrast to the thoroughbreds at the racecourse, Bowers’ first call is in Baxter to check on the progress of a donkey from which from which he previously removed a tumour. Although he’d never admit it, there’s definitely something of a horse whisperer about Bowers. His slow, definite movements towards the animal appear to have a calming effect. He gives steady, confident pats rather than making any audible contact. But the horses, or in this case, Scallywag the donkey stands calmly. There’s no flicker of concern when Bowers moves a stethoscope over the donkey’s flanks or lifts its hind leg for a close look. The leg wound is healing well and Bowers sees no reason why the animal won’t be able to fulfill its role as a “grass cutter” for many years to come. On the way to stables at Flinders, Bowers gives a few consultations and makes appointments over the [hands free] phone.

Bowers says he has “never been asked to [chemically] help a horse run faster”.

A large kangaroo keeps pace with Bowers’ vehicle along the unmade road before he slows to let it cross and clear a fence in a single bound to join a couple of horses, which are startled just enough to miss one mouthful of grass.

“Chemicals are not always as good as you’d expect. Look at Essendon [Football Club], its players were going well [before treatment] and they ended up with soft tissue injuries.

Wilbur, once a “hopeful” in the racehorse breeding stakes, is now a much-loved recreational horse who cut his leg on a fence, possibly after being spooked by a kangaroo.

“There are greedy people, and racing has certainly had some colourful characters in the past, greyhound [racing] more so.”

The horse seems a bit sorry for himself and is part sedated, but

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Equine vet John Bowers at Flinders with horse owner Michelle Dinicolantonio.

Applying healing cream to her horse, Wilbur.

the wound is healing and Bowers prescribes ongoing treatment with an ointment that can be applied by his owner.

Bowers completed his five-year veterinarian course at the University of Melbourne before joining a mixed practice at Mildura (where met his wife, Sue) and then moving to Bega.

“These types of cuts are the most common wounds and normally heal quite well,” he says. “This one had some complications because it had exposed the tendons, which were also partially cut.” One main difference between vets and GPs is that animals don’t respond when asked “Well, what’s wrong with you today?” Bowers says vets depend on receiving a brief animal history from its owner and “just observing”. “Most owners are good at seeing if something’s not quite right.” Newborn foals can be more difficult to diagnose as they have no history and Bowers recalls being called to attend a foal “because it had a funny noise coming from its throat”. The diagnosis was that the foal suffered “neo-natal maladjustment syndrome”. The foal was sent to a horse hospital where it was sedated to reduce swelling on its brain. “It’s now doing nicely, although it would have died without constant treatment from lack of fluids, dehydration and bacterial infection because it wasn’t taking mare’s milk. “The foal just wasn’t physically capable. It was a little hyper, running around and then almost falling down.” Although that horse will survive, Bowers, who chose to specialise as an equine vet because of an affinity with horses, sees the worst part of his job as “putting down a horse I’ve known for a long time or one you’ve worked on and can’t help”.

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Born in New Zealand to Australian parents he never realised he was a Kiwi and not an Aussie until he needed a passport for a trip to Japan to deliver a paper based on his master’s degree on the transient effect of girths on a horses performance. “I opted for the New Zealand passport because it was cheaper and I needed fewer visas.” His interest in horses came to the fore while at Bega, resulting in a move in 1986 to join a practice being run by his university mate Peter Joyce on the Mornington Peninsula. “You get more emergency callouts when doing dairy work,” Bowers says. “Horses usually give birth naturally and very quickly – they’ve got to get up and get going with the rest of the herd.” Being a horse vet allows Bowers a degree of flexibility; time for surfing (he’s a foundation member of the Disabled Surfers’ Association Mornington Peninsula) and, of course, keeping Benji company. And the patients we met under Bowers’ treatment? Wilbur is just about all healed up, although the fur won’t grow back over his scars without pinch grafting or using a biopsy punch (the equivalent of a hair transplant – cosmetic surgery); Scallywag is back to normal (from a donkey’s point of view, that is); and Wednesday Golfer is still in training to cross the line first (he came last in a 1600 metre race at Mornington just days after being photographed for this article).


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SAND CASTLES TO BUILD By Melissa Walsh Photos: Gary Sissons

S

haron and Peter Redmond’s love of the beach was the catalyst for their move to Frankston when they first married over two decades ago. But this young couple in love could never have imagined they would end up running a business where they could play amongst the sand every day. Let alone have their two beautiful daughters working alongside them.

These owners of Sandstorm Events and Sand Sculpting Australia have been making sandcastles with their children for 15 years now, ever since Sharon saw her first sand sculpture on the Rye foreshore and was hooked. “It was back in 2001 and the Rye Action Group was doing a sculpture on one weekend. I fell in love with it straight away. What I loved with the sand was that it was something that all generations enjoyed. Parents, grandparents and kids stood there in amazement looking at this sculpture and I knew then that I wanted to bring more of it to the peninsula,” said Sharon, director of Sandstorm Events. As a woman who has always made things happen, Sharon already had connections in the community after spending many years working with not for profit organisations like Vision Australia and starting the Frankston Lights Festival 20 years ago. By 2002, Sharon and a team had four sculptures on the foreshore and, in 2005, they were running their own event. These days Sandstorm Events is an award winning sand sculpture event management company and Australia’s largest sand sculpting event company staging four main sand sculpting events around Australia annually and having provided sand sculpture installations for over 350 corporate clients. “We originally kept the exhibition in Rye and it was great for years but we wanted to grow it in terms of size which meant being open to the public longer. As we couldn’t utilize the foreshore in Rye during December and January we put out the feelers for continued next page...

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Frankston,” said Sharon, on their move from Rye to the current Frankston foreshore location nine years ago. “Here we are open from December through to after Anzac Day, and it has greater access to public transport for visitors. When we left Rye, we had 50,000 to 60,000 visitors a season. In Frankston, we average between 130,000 to 150,000.” The evolution of the business has been a lovely surprise for Sharon and Peter, particularly with the girls’ continual involvement, from the time they were in primary school running the souvenir shop, and with Peter’s flair for sand sculpting itself. “It’s been an interesting journey. I fell in love with this and then Peter was drawn to the sand to sculpt. Our daughter Shelby finished her marketing and public relations degree at university and came back here to work even though she was offered a job at a TV station. Our youngest Taylah, is studying marketing at the moment but still works here during holidays,” says Sharon, who explains she still gets a thrill when she sees the enjoyment on people’s faces. “We also see ourselves as educators and enjoy explaining to people the process of creating the sculpture from start to finish.” Creating the magical sand sculpture event that just seems to pop up on the foreshore at the same time every year, takes a lot of work. The unused grassed area has 3,500 tons of local sand dumped there to be pounded up, gravel is supplied for the pathways and fences

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have to be erected. In 14 days, 22 sculptors work 12 hour days in the heat, rain and cold, to create the themed sculpture exhibition. This is when Peter really steps in, taking his place amongst other local and international sculptors. “All the sculptors are given a drawing of their character or area, which has been chosen by Shelby and Sharon according to the sculptor’s strengths. We use brickies loam sand which has ultraminute particles that fill the gaps between the grains so the density of the sand is what gives it its strength. If you have heavy rain, it will damage the surface but that is repairable. We have our concept drawing and then pull the top forms off and start blocking things out. Once you have your basic shape and are happy with it the profile, you work your way down. It’s all about removing sand,” said Peter. “The pack - up in April takes about four weeks, removing the sand, reseeding and restoring the grass, and removing the fences.” As for where all that sand goes when the sculptures disappear, Sharon says that is one of the most amazing things. “Every year the sand on the ground gets tipped, the sand up the top is stored in a pile and the sand making the bases is stored in another pile and each year we bring fresh sand here to top it up. So some of the sand we still use could have been in our very first sculpture exhibition,” said Sharon.


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OUR VERY OWN “SQUIZZY” TAYLOR By Melissa Walsh Photos: Gary Sissons

F

or six decades Michael “Squizzy” Taylor has been involved with the Mornington Fire Brigade, as a demonstration runner, fire fighter, trainer, representative at the VFBV (Volunteer Fire Brigade Victoria) and the VUFBA (Volunteer Urban Fire Brigade Association) and served as Captain for seven years. He has attended fires like Ash Wednesday, the Dandenongs, and Arthurs Seat on numerous occasions, and dealt with arson, accidents, and rescues big and small. At 79 he still has a twinkle in his eye when he sits down to regale stories of the CFA years that have been such a big part of his life. It didn’t start out this way, however, as young Squizzy often got into mischief as a kid. In fact, his first run in was with the fire brigade after he and a few mates decided to light a fire in a paddock near their house. “I was living in Wilsons Road, Mornington and was about seven. There wasn’t lot to do in those days so me and a few buddies thought we’d see what happened if we a lit a block a couple of doors from our house. We thought it would be fun but didn’t realise it was going to burn the way it did,” he said. “So the next thing along came the fire brigade and the captain who gave me swift kick up the backside and said 'Don’t do it again'.” Squizzy had moved down to Mornington with his family when he was four and has been here ever since, marrying his beloved Yvonne and raising two children, a girl Lizzy and boy Nicholas. “I met Yvonne in Mornington when she was playing netball for St Macartans and I was playing footy for the local footy club. We were all part of a gang and hung out all the time,” said Squizzy, who found himself in strife again 12 years later. “At 19 I had my second mishap with the fire brigade although I never lit another fire. This time some mates and I had made bikes out of old parts we found at the tip on the corner of Craigie Road

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and Nepean Highway. There was some ripper things in that tip as the Yanks who were staying at Balcombe used to throw heaps away. Anyhow, we had our bikes and would ride down the steep road to the pier and then ride off the pier at the end into the water. The locals all knew it was us causing mischief but visitors were upset and screaming. One day, the then captain of the fire brigade, Stan Hutchins, who was also a fisherman, saw us. He grabbed me when I got out of the water and said “Do you run?” and I said “Yes” so he sent me to the top of the hill to go in the running demonstrations for the CFA. I ended up joining and going to heaps of competitions all over Australia in a running career that went for 28 years,” said Squizzy, who will celebrate 60 years with the brigade in November. For Squizzy, and many of the fire fighters, a lot of the appeal is the camaraderie.

didn’t have a car to use, and they disappeared with all our stuff when they left.” These days, Squizzy admits all the organisations are a lot more switched on, including the arson squad. “Now the arson squad and police are super tactical, and we have a more scientific approach too,” he said. “What arsonists used to do is dip a cat’s tail in kerosene and light it and the cat would run around and burn everything in the place. That was something we got used to. When we lost half the Mornington High School, the arson squad were brilliant, and even came in a police car,” he said with a laugh. “Some arsonists used to put three inch nails in the fuse box which kept the fire lit. So the first thing we did was go to the fuse box when we got a fire.”

“You meet some amazing people and get to have great experiences. I travelled a lot with the demonstrations and I also travelled with my positions within the two associations,” said Squizzy, who has seen a lot of changes over those years. “For a start, when I first started going out to fires, I wore shorts and a t-shirt – basically whatever I had worn to work that day. We were never supplied with safety gear, so you just wore your work gear. There were ten coats that you had to share, but as captain you don’t get a coat because you have to look after everybody else. In the 70s we got hard hats, but full protective gear didn’t come in till around 2000.”

Squizzy says a lot changed after the tragedy at Linton in 1998 when five volunteer fire fighters were killed.

For Squizzy and his wife, Yvonne, firefighting became a part of their life, at one point even having the FRS Recording system in their home.

“That is when it is all around and over the top of you. It happened in Gippsland and we knew what we had to do. So we went down to the football field and put the fire trucks in a circle and sprayed the water over our heads and we didn’t get burnt,” he said.

“That was a phone that was connected to the fire station so we would get calls if there was a fire, and Yvonne would raise the alarm back at the station,” said Squizzy. The brigade would get in their truck, which was much more primitive than todays, and head to the fire.

“Linton changed things dramatically because there were so many people killed. They got out in front of the bulldozer which you should never do and they didn’t have any water left. There’s a line on the truck for water and you never get below that or you’ll never get out.” Squizzy says when people ask about his worst fire he says it was a five sided one.

These days Squizzy is found at the fire station every Monday night for training, as he has for the past 60 years. He’s not an active fire fighter any more but is still involved as a mentor, trainer and is always the first person in there to help.

“Some of us would go straight there depending on how bad it was,” said Squizzy, who has seen it all over the past six decades. “I can’t count how many people we pulled out of the bay because they did stupid things. We’ve rescued many kids with fingers in the plug hole requiring us to pull the bath apart, and rescued a heap of kids out of the tee tree that used to be in Mornington Park.” Dealing with arson was a regular problem for anyone in the fire brigade. “We had to deal with arson as well and sometimes the arson squad would attend. The first time we had them turn up here was when we lost the Overlander, which is where Bunnings is now. It was a restaurant like the Swagman, and the Waltzing Matilda which all burnt down, so the arson squad was there. When they turned up we said “Do you need anything?” and they replied “Oh yeah we could do with rubber boots, and then they said “Would you have a spare hammer and would you have a pinch bar?” They had showed up in a stolen car from their lot at the station as they

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PICTURE PERFECT

PURPLE


By Kristy Martin Photos: Jarryd Bravo & Yanni

Kristy Martin visits the Red Hill Lavender Farm and Distillery and discovers a boutique operation where time-honoured traditions reign supreme.

I

t is an overcast summer’s morning in Main Ridge with grey clouds blanketing the sky.

An athletic blonde woman in a blue apron is crouched over a vibrant lavender field. She is using a small rusty sickle to harvest the plants, one handful at a time. Oblivious to the rest of the world, she purposefully packs the purple and green bunches into a wicker basket, while a golden labrador bounds playfully at her feet. The fields are alive with the buzzing of scores of bees, a gentle hum that gives the scene its own sweet melody. It is a romantic setting, reminiscent of regional France, and one you wouldn’t readily associate with Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula. Welcome to the Red Hill Lavender Farm and Distillery, the peninsula’s only commercial lavender farm and a place where timehonoured traditions are favoured over modern agricultural practices. The woman harvesting the crops is Kylie Crump, owner of the 27-acre property with its rows of lavender, café and farm gate store, tranquil lake and farmhouse. “Harvesting is a massive job, as you can imagine,” Kylie says. “We don’t mechanically harvest for two reasons: the first being the fumes and chemicals from the machinery and the second that it damages the plants. “We hand harvest everything so it takes a good few hours just to do one row.” The farm is a family affair, run by Kylie and her husband, Brad, along with their four daughters aged 18, 16, 14 and eight. The Crumps choose to keep their lavender pesticide and chemical free and opt to use traditional methods, like those preferred in provincial France, to harvest and process the plant. This ensures purity and makes for a higher quality final product. The family does all the harvesting themselves, along with a handful of workers, each summer when the lavender flowers. They collect the lavender before stripping it, bundling it and hanging it up to dry or else it is placed directly into the distiller, which extracts the lavender oil. “That is exactly what happens in France,” Kylie explains. “It’s a simple process, really.” Lavender farming has been a huge learning experience for the continued next page... March 2017

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“I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE REALLY LOVELY TO HAVE SOMETHING THAT FLOWERED IN SUMMER, WHEN ALL THE PEOPLE ARE COMING DOWN TO THE PENINSULA.”

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Crumps, who had limited knowledge of the multi-faceted herb when they decided to plant the crops in favour of the property’s established vineyard. Kylie previously worked in clinical research and Brad, who is now in finance, comes equipped with a background in agriculture. “We bought the property in 2007 and it was another Mornington Peninsula vineyard. “Most people thought I was crazy for pulling out vines, but I don’t know anything about wine, and I think it's a real passion for the people here that do it. “You really have to love what you’re doing when it comes to wine.” Kylie says the lavender has been a process of trial and error, and it all began with one throwaway line to her husband that it would be nice to look out over a field of flowers from the property’s elevated café deck. “I thought it would be really lovely to have something that flowered in summer, when all the people are coming down to the peninsula.” When someone suggested that the couple try lavender, Kylie began researching the conditions required to grow the plant and whether the orientation of the property would be suitable. She joined The Australian Lavender Growers Association (TALGA), which to this day she still finds amusing. continued next page...

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“I knew absolutely nothing and did not have one lavender plant at my house,” she laughs. As part of her education, she spent a month in Provence, in southern France, where she got an insider’s look at the region’s famous lavender industry. In 2010, the family hand planted the first of five acres of lavender, a culinary variety called angustifolia, but it wasn’t until three years in that they yielded their first oil. “The first few years are really labour intensive,” Kylie explains. “The hardest thing about planting lavender, if you’re not spraying, is the weeds. “You’ve got to weed around (the bed) so you can find the lavender.” Today, the Red Hill Lavender Farm produces a range of natural botanical skincare products, including essential oil, hydrosol spray, soaps and hand wash, plus a range of candles, fragrance diffusers and tea. “Everything is hand made locally and none of it is synthetic; it is all natural.” Kylie says the benefits of lavender and its uses are wide-ranging. “It stimulates the olfactory nerve so it is predominantly used for relaxation and sleep. “It can also be used for skin conditions like eczema, or to treat stings and burns. “They use it in pet shampoo for fleas, or it can be used for mosquitoes instead of citronella. “It’s phenomenal,” she says.

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“No one even has to do anything to it.

It is fascinating to watch such antiquated techniques being used today.

“It is amazing just as Mother Nature produces.” Kylie says that while most people recognise the purple plant, it can be tough convincing them that lavender is so much more than something you might find in Granny’s sock drawer. “We are trying to educate people to the fact it’s actually quite contemporary,” she laughs. “But we also do a range of modern scents like lemon myrtle, orange and vanilla and French pear for the younger crowds.” Kylie and her team use traditional steam distillation to extract the lavender oil, a process used in France. The still is located inside an old timber fishermen’s shed at the rear of the property and resembles a huge pot, or kettle, topped with a mesh tray that the lavender is placed on for steaming. The oil filters down a tube and is collected for bottling. Some companies water down their oil to cut costs, but you won’t find any of that here. The hydrosol contains small quantities of essential oil, along with water-soluble properties from the lavender plant, and is actually a convenient byproduct of the steam distillation process. The lavender that is to be sold as tea or in scented bags is stripped by a machine with a spinning brush and then hand sifted to clear out the dust.

“It’s lovely,” Kylie admits, “but it is a lot of work.” The lavender fields are open to the public from 8.30am to 4pm over summer (closed Tuesdays) and people can also visit the adjoining Main Ridge Harvest café (run by the expanding Epicurean Group) and enjoy excellent views of the lavender fields from the deck. The property also features a stunning lake surrounded by native trees - a popular site for weddings - and the luxury four-bedroom farmhouse is available to be rented out by visitors looking to stay in the area. While the lavender farm is definitely a passion project for the Crumps, who live in East Hawthorn, Kylie says she is always exploring new ideas and different ways to further use the idyllic peninsula property. She talks about the potential to host yoga groups, to hold local produce markets and says it would even be the ideal site for a festival featuring local bands. And for someone who took an unlikely idea and forged a successful business within a few short years, it is safe to say anything is possible. www.redhilllavender.com

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IT’S HIP TO BE SQUARE By Melissa Walsh Photos: Yanni

T

here’s a whole world of fun going on in Mornington at the Senior Citizens Club when the Mornington Peninsula Square Dancers meet up each week.

This meant Jaden would need to be home schooled so his mum took on the task of teaching him at home, in between calling dances, and doing his professional training.

Square dancing is no longer a country-western dance; it is a contemporary form of dance that is attracting thousands of people across the world.

Jaden says it is important to have a good, clear voice when calling as people need to understand your instructions clearly.

Anyone from a child to an 80 year old can square dance - it is great for singles, couples and families. People of all ages do-si-do, swing their partners round and allemande left to the instructions by square dancing caller, Jaden Frigo, who at just 20 is one of the youngest professional callers around. For Jaden, square dancing was in his blood from the start, with his mother and father taking him along to dances when he was just a baby. “I started dancing at seven and, within a year, decided I wanted to call. So at eight years of age, I called my first dance,” says Jaden, admitting part of the fun at that age was telling adults what to do. “I absolutely loved it and so spent the next four years in training, learning to be a caller,” he said.

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“Square dancing is done in groups of eight people, four groups of two (usually one man and one lady, but if we have more of either gender then we have plenty of ways to get around it). The four couples are arranged in a square formation - and from this we teach you 'movements' or 'calls.' The most interesting part of square dancing is you don't learn sequences or whole dances, rather you learn individual calls which are then put into varying and interesting sequences by the caller. Once you walk in the door the first night we get you dancing within 30 seconds of starting the dance - and from then on you are dancing all the time,” said Jaden. “It is important for me to understand backwards all the 68 movements and learn how to put them together,” he said. “I have taught people from eight to 91 how to square dance, from lawyers to helicopter pilots and people from all walks of life.” Modern square dancing in Australia has been going for over 100 years and you can see why it’s described as ‘fun and friendship set to music’.


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“Square dancing has been in existence for hundreds of years, first appearing in Australia in the early 1900's. However the past few years has seen an exciting transition from a 'western style' activity to a modern, vibrant dance form - ideal for all ages and backgrounds,” said Jaden. Also known as “called dancing” it contains moves that the dancers follow in time with the music and the caller’s rhythm. The moves are always called in English so once you learn how to square dance at mainstream level, you can travel and square dance all over the world and enjoy mainstream modern square dancing.

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“We have everyone from teenagers to people in their 70’s, all of whom are attracted by the same thing - the wonderful friendships that are formed whilst enjoying a dance form that is both interesting and exciting,” said Jaden, who has an excellent calling resume. “Aside from running clubs all over the peninsula, I have called all over Australia along with the USA, Denmark and Sweden.” For further information on Mornington Peninsula Square Dancers go to www.mornpensquaredance.com

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NATHAN LOVES RICKY MARTIN By Melissa Walsh

A

rmed with a budget of $15,000 and Kodak sponsorship of 35mm film, old school buddies Steven Arriagada, Llewellyn Michael Bates, and Bryan Chau created their first short film, Nathan Loves Ricky Martin, this year’s winner of the Peninsula Short Film Festival. The touching and emotional story centres on Pauline who is the full-time mother and carer for her mentally and developmentally disabled adult son Nathan. After years of isolation and anhedonia Pauline orchestrates a ruse to form a meaningful connection with the man next door. “The film is based on the younger brother of a friend of ours who had a mental and developmental disability,” said Steven, of the six and a half minute film. “Llewellyn Michael, Bryan and I went to school together in Springvale and we knew the guy and his family. He happened to be obsessed with Ricky Martin.” The final version of the film was adapted from a 2015 script and co-written by Steven and Llewellyn to condense to a shorter film. For the 30 year olds who all work in the film and television industry, Nathan loves Ricky Martin was the first film they had properly funded. “Nathan loves Ricky Martin is a story that is both representative of our innate human drive to pursue our fantasies as well an exploration of the symbiotic relationship between carers and their dependents,” said Steven. “The material comes from a few key sources; in 2012 I worked on a production of the Impossible

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Orchestra, a 24 hour concert that was setup to demonstrate that being a carer was a twenty four hour responsibility that conduces stress, financial hardship and social isolation. After the production I shared my feelings in conversation to writer Llewellyn Michael Bates who informed me that his mother was a carer to his grandfather. Based on that conversation, Llewellyn contacted me many years later believing that I had the correct sensibilities to direct a screenplay he had written based on an amalgamation between two real-life characters, his carer mother and a beloved family friend Dennis, who has a mental disability." With a tight budget only allowing for a one day shoot, the team got together and shot the film in an abandoned house in Glen Iris which they had painted prior to filming. “The team included award winning cinematographer, Michael Wylam, producer Jessica Pearce, renowned composer Simon Walbrook, and Offspring and Chronicles of Narnia colourist Deidre McClelland. Along with the great production team, we also had an amazingly skilled cast that have pushed the limits of dedication including Verity Higgins, Albert Goikhman and Dennis Manahan. “We heard a lot about the other films and didn’t think we had a shot at winning but will put the prize money towards our next film which we is already in development,” said Steven. “It is a Japanese language film set in Australia starring Kuni Hashimoto but I can’t give any more than that away.”


Photos

Peninsula

The annual Peninsula Short Film Fest gets better every year, with 12 short listed films screened to a crowd of thousands on the Rosebud Village Green. Now in its sixth year, the peninsula`s iconic short film festival boasts the largest single viewing audience in Victoria. What started out as 500 people packed into a theatre, quickly turned into an annual pilgrimage, seeing thousands of people head to the peninsula each year to enjoy quality short films free outdoors. Each year, 12 shortlisted films are screened and are judged live by a panel of celebrity judges of the highest calibre, and record crowds.

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Fashion

Style File AUTUMN FASHION ON THE PENINSULA

Turn over a new leaf and step into autumn with flowing maxi dresses, metallic pants and embellished jackets all the rage. Embrace slightly cooler days and evenings with a wardrobe change to incorporate everything from block dressing to florals and embellishments. For men, the new season’s suits take on a brighter look, while classic pullovers and shirts match with chinos and old school denim jeans. March 2017

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Previous page: Sista Sista Cest Beau La Vie Cream cardigan with hood Cest Beau La Vie Nomad Printed top Verge Maddox blue denim jeans Peter Young Shoes Beige Hat Model Maria This page: Camerons Menswear Town and Country RMW Blue vest RMW Striped shirt RMW Blue denim jeans RMW boots Model Sam Euro Collections Denion grigio skirt Knit pullover Peter Young Shoes Brown tote Model Madeline

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33 Main Street Mornington Ph 5973 6149

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Australian designed and made - Limited qualities for the individual look - Quality accessories.

LADIES’ WEAR-RETAIL Sista Sista Black top Euro Collections Gold metallic jeans Peter Young Shoes Multi coloured scarf

71 MAIN ST, MORNINGTON TEL 5976 3311 SORRENTO 72 OCEAN BEACH ROAD TEL 5984 0927 AND STORES THROUGH MELBOURNE AND NOOSA

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Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 730 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u

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Camerons Menswear Town and Country Cambridge suit Ganton B. shirt Tie Le Serge belt


Euro Collections

Elisa Cavaletti multi embellished midi jacket Elisa Cavaletti metallic leggings Silver tote

Camerons Menswear Town and Country Cambridge suit Le Serge belt

The Barber Shop & Co T-shirt

Euro Collections

Elisa Cavaletti white jacket Elisa Cavaletti Gold metallic jeans Elisa Cavaletti Gold top Blue tote

Peter Young Shoes

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QUALITY EUROPEAN DESIGNER SHOES LOCAL BUSINESS FOR OVER 40 YEARS LADIES & MENS SHOES & ACCESSORIES 75 Main Street Mornington Ph 5975 4407

199 MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON – TEL. 5975 7255 March 2017

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This page: Camerons Menswear Town and Country

McDonald Possum ½ zip Ganton shirt Meyer Chino trouser

Sketa

White trousers Multi top Grey jacket

Sketa

Burnt orange maxi dress Matching jacket

Fashion Suppliers Euro Collections

72 Mt Eliza Way, Mt Eliza Ph: 5976 4681

Sketa

71 Main Street, Mornington Phone 5976 3311

Sista Sista

87 Main Street, Mornington Phone 5973 4762

Camerons Menswear Town and Country 199 Main Street, Mornington Phone 5975 7255

Peter Young Shoes

75 Main Street, Mornington Phone 5975 4407

Models

Maria Mirabella Madeline Stock Samuel Grove

Venue

Mornington Railway Station www.morningtonrailway.org.au

Photographer

Yanni

Stylist

Melissa Walsh

Thank you

Sincere gratitude to the volunteers of the Mornington Railway, Marg French and Geoff Blake for opening their marvellous station and train for our fashion shoot.


Sista Sista Saints Black shirt Alembika Black and white pants Cashmere Magg & Me grey scarf

TUZZI DAVID POND SABATINI LS COLLECTION JOSEPH RIBKOFF DRAMA ANNETTE GORTZ BLUE BLANC ROUGE CAP FERRAT DENNY ROSE ISABEL DE PEDRO BRAX ELISA CAVALETTI GAUDI CREA CONCEPT TALBOT RUNHOF MARELLA CARTISE FABER

Peter Young Shoes Multi clutch

CATERING FOR: SPECIAL OCCASION DRESSING MOTHER OF THE BRIDE/GROOM Camerons Menswear Town and Country RMW Blue vest RMW Striped shirt RMW Blue denim jeans RMW boots

MON-SAT 9am-6pm SUN 1pm-5pm

9775 4022 5976 1633 9509 0633 5442 1569

72-74 Mt Eliza Way, Mt Eliza 5/59 Barkly St, Mornington 1180 High St, Armadale 75 Mitchell St, Bendigo

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Eyewear As Individual As You Are Eyewear As Individual As You Are Eyewear As Individual • Professional Care • Top Quality Eyewear

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As You Are Eyewear As Individual As You Are


Mornington Peninsula Weddings SLICK SHOOTS AT YOUR SERVICE When you have been photographing weddings for as long as Kim and Steve Hearn you certainly know what you’re doing. The husband and wife team have been shooting weddings for 14 years and love every moment of being involved in a couple’s special day. “We started in the UK and have been in Australia for the last 10 years,” said Kim. “We capture your wedding as the day unfolds, shooting moments in a relaxed style and giving you the space to enjoy your day.” Kim says that each couple and wedding is different and, as experienced photographers, she and Steve know when to direct a couple and when to let them do their own thing. “Of course we will do the group shots and gently guide each person to make a wonderful

photo. However, we also make sure to capture those candid moments and will not miss a thing on the day.” With two photographers at each wedding, you can guarantee that every angle is covered. “We have one photographer covering the girls getting ready and the other, the boys, and each couple gets digital images plus high res images and an album,” said Kim. “And we have recently introduced a six hour package deal.” For further details phone 9005 8214 or 0424 300 920. www.slickshoots.com.au

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PHOTOGR APHY FOR A CURE E ssence

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Arts By Melissa Walsh

I

t is rare to find Jan Dance without a camera in her hand. Since receiving her first camera at just seven years of age, she has spent almost 53 years behind the lens. With a mother and a close cousin both keen photographers, it was a sure bet young Jan wouldn’t be too far behind. “I loved watching my mother and cousin work and would spend hours getting caught up in the peace and calm of it all. The first time I took photos I was at the Chinese festival in Bendigo. I had a little Pentax camera and photographed in black and white. To this day I still have those photographs,” said Jan. “Over the years I have learned to experiment with images and subjects. Once I moved on to the era of digital cameras, my horizons widened and I became more adventurous and more successful in capturing beautiful images.” One of Jan’s favourite subjects is water. “It is calming and peaceful, so it is easy to capture its beauty and serenity. I also love nature, birds and animals, and spend many hours waiting to get that perfect photograph in their natural habitat.” Admitting she is not a morning person, Jan nevertheless has been known to venture out before sunrise to capture some amazing images. “I guess you could say that I am a full time photographer as I have no other job. But my hours are flexible as I tend to watch the weather for any interesting events to capture, like great sunsets or storms,” she said. “I am also constantly looking for beautiful areas to photograph. I have just recently produced a perpetual calendar of the Yarrawonga area where I have been visiting for over 30 years. The calendar is made up of 368 images, one for each day, one for the leap year and one each for front and back covers. All images except for the back cover have been taken by me.” There is one thing Jan can’t tolerate in this technological era – photo shopping. “I love all styles and subjects of photography, but I am dead against photo shopping my images. I believe that if I can’t get what I want the first time, I will continue to photograph till I get the desired effect. I feel that photo shopping is like cheating,” she said. For this artistic spirit, using the power of her photography took a different turn last year when she decided to donate a percentage of her exhibition sales to a cause close to her heart. “My sister, Sue Whyte, died from motor neurone disease in 2011, just four years after being diagnosed with the illness. She was a beautiful soul and I wanted to honour her memory and raise money for MND Vic through my exhibition at the Red Hill Bakery in Balnarring. There is still a lot of mystery surrounding motor neurone disease and it's really important that we keep continued next page...

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“MY SISTER, SUE WHYTE, DIED FROM MOTOR NEURONE DISEASE IN 2011, SHE WAS A BEAUTIFUL SOUL AND I WANTED TO HONOUR HER MEMORY AND RAISE MONEY FOR MND"

supporting research to find a cure,” said Jan. “My first exhibition was at the Fire Station Café in Preston. I was asked to give the exhibition a name and it was then that I decided to dedicate the exhibition to my sister and I named it Whyte Vision. It was easy for me to then decide to donate to MND in her honour.” For Jan it was wonderful to raise $1160 from the auction of her image ‘Storm Surfer’ at the Red Hill Bakery last year, but there is still plenty more to be done for her sister’s cause. “On my webpage www.jandancephotography.com.au and my Facebook pages www.facebook.com/JanDancePhotography; www.facebook.com/Sue@WhyteVision; and lastly my Instagram page – www.instagram.com/jaani2310, with any purchase from these pages I will donate five per cent to MND Association of Victoria who provide the best possible care and support for people and their families living with Motor Neurone Disease. www.jandancephotography.com.au

Jan Dance (right) with her sister, Sue Whyte, who died from Motor Neurone Disease six years go.

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ONE STOP SHOP Tyrepower Mornington offers even more services. As part of their commitment to supplying customers with the best tyre service Tyrepower has added brakes, batteries, full vehicle service and general repairs to the agenda. They offer a free pick up and delivery service, free tyre pressure check and free battery check. Roger Sharp and his fully trained team of professionals know everything there is to know about tyres and can advise motorists about the correct tyre type for every vehicle. “Our business is not just selling tyres but following through with after sales service,” said Roger.

increase as the tyre warms through road friction. 3. Under-inflated tyres are dangerous and costly. Car handling can be adversely affected plus the life of the tyre will be shorter. Petrol consumption will be more on a long journey as well. 4. Tyres showing uneven wear may be indicative of a mechanical or suspension fault, misalignment or under-inflation. 5. Rotation of tyres is more important than ever due to advanced tread designs, particularly with front or all-wheel drive vehicles. Rotation extends tyre lift and can make for smoother and quieter motoring.

Tyrepower also offers customers a waiting area Roger provided the following tips for safer motoring: with comfortable seating and a coffee machine - another reason to switch to Australia’s biggest 1. Tyre pressure needs to be checked regularly independent and locally owned tyre company! to retain the projected life of the tyre - and don’t forget to check the spare. 2. Before setting off on a trip, make sure the tyre pressure is right, keeping in mind the pressure will

To experience the Tyrepower difference, call 5975 1199 to book a service or vehicle inspection today.

WATT A WAY TO GET AROUND VINTAGE ELECTRIC BIKES HAVE ARRIVED ON THE PENINSULA . Hand-built in California, these are e-bikes with a difference - better technology, more power, smoother acceleration and undeniable style. Electric bikes are a new way of riding - they are not quite a bicycle and not quite a motorbike, but something in between that feels just right - and with a range of 50km they’re perfect for zipping around the Peninsula. There are three classic styles. The Tracker is roundly retro but it is boosted by a thoroughly modern electric motor, the rear hub-mode for tooling around at 30km/h and a 3000-watt mode that’ll let you zoom along at 60km/h. The Cruz is a classic California cruiser with design elements reminiscent of the US Art Deco movement. Offering the same best-in-class performance as the racker, it has a top speed of 60km/h in race mode and awesome control. The Scrambler is the have-your-cake-and-eat-it-too electric bike; it’s equally at home on a winding dirt track, or a suburban street. With a charge time of just two hours, you won’t have long to wait until you’re back on the road again.

T E S T R I D E O N E T O DAY ! Vintage Electric Bikes Mornington 47 Tyabb Rd, Mornington (Tyrepower) Call 0438 751 199 or email tyrmor@bigpond.net.au www.vintageelectricbikes.com

WW W. T Y RE POWE RMO RN I N GTON .CO M .AU | 47 T YABB RD , MOR NINGTON | 5975 1199


Sisters

ARE DOING IT FOR THEMSELVES By Melissa Walsh Photo: Yanni

“The men are the wool of the tribe but the women are the ones who weave the pattern.” Arabic proverb

W

omen across the peninsula are proving that a woman’s place is not just in the home, through an innovative mini festival that began two years ago with the pure intention of celebrating local women and their stories. Celebrating women's stories through theatre, music and dance, ‘A Woman's Place’ was established in 2015 with a focus to connect, strengthen and nurture female artists of all ages living and working on the Mornington Peninsula. When local women, Anthea Mackenzie and Carole Patullo decided it was time the peninsula had their own women’s festival two years ago, there was no stopping them. The ladies, who had a background in performance, promptly put together the first festival in 2015, and are delighted to be bringing it back.

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“This year, A Woman's Place has expanded its program to offer a range of workshops, performances and a film screening to celebrate International Women’s Day. There is also a dedicated music workshop and performance night for teenage girls,” said Anthea. “Once again the weekend will begin with a morning tea Story and a Plate. But this is a morning tea with a twist. Story and a Plate will be set amongst pop-up op shops and everyone who comes will be asked to bring a plate of food that holds a special meaning or story behind it. Over the course of two hours we will share our food and our stories, a simple act that will reconnect us to our sense of community.” The stories shared will be recorded, transcribed and transformed into a verbatim style reading performed by Carole and fellow actor, Jane Bayly on International Women’s Day. Following Story and a Place will be a series of dance, singing and writing workshops run by Dianne Reid, Ling Marra and Andrea Louise Thomas.


‘A WOMAN'S PLACE’ WAS ESTABLISHED IN 2015 WITH A FOCUS TO CONNECT, STRENGTHEN AND NURTURE FEMALE ARTISTS OF ALL AGES LIVING AND WORKING ON THE MORNINGTON PENINSULA.

“You can sign up for just one workshop or all three. The day offers the chance for women to refill their creative cup and connect with other creatives living on the Peninsula,” said Carole. “We are also thrilled to have the support of the Peninsula Writers’ Club who are writing a collaborative piece to be performed prior to the screening of the award winning documentary, Embrace.” A Woman’s Place International Women’s Day Arts Festival will run from March 4th-8th at the Southern Peninsula Arts Centre in Rosebud. For further details visit www.awomansplace2017.squarespace.com.

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LOVE ONE ANOTHER By Melissa Walsh

M

erricks House Art Gallery at Merricks General Wine Store is thrilled to be presenting an exhibition of paintings by Gee Ryan (Gerald), entitled Love One Another and Care for Our Planet. The exhibition runs from Saturday, February 25 until Monday, April 3.

Gee lives on the Mornington Peninsula and has painted naturally from childhood. He was also a lawyer for many years. Explaining his art Gee said, "My paintings reflect my central belief that, in order for humanity to achieve a positive and lasting future, each of us needs to live our life in accordance with two principles: love one another and care for our planet." One of the paintings from Gee’s Love One Another Basin series has been acquired by the world-renowned Luciano Benetton Collection, based in Milan, Italy. “I am primarily interested in the power of colour to celebrate the mysteries that surround us", said Gee. "The works of Matisse have

had the greatest influence on my use of colour. And the other Masters who have greatly influenced me in various ways include da Vinci, Monet, Cézanne, Munch, Warhol and Rothko.” Gee says the Mornington Peninsula is like an artist's paradise. "The peninsula's light and colours, natural beauty, and sense of community explain why the Peninsula is home to so many artists. If you're a painter, it's definitely one of the top places on the planet,” he said. The historic Merricks House Art Gallery (open from 8.30am to 5pm daily) is located at 3460 Frankston-Flinders Road, Merricks. It adjoins the equally historic Merricks General Wine Store, renowned for its stunning Elgee Park and Baillieu wines and its French-inspired contemporary Australian cuisine. Phone 5989 8088. www.mgwinestore.com.au

GEE RYAN (GERALD) EXHIBITION Love One Another and Care For Our Planet

Saturday 25th February - preview from noon - opening at 3pm Unitl Monday 3rd April

Merricks House Art Gallery | 3460 Frankston-Flinders Road, Merricks Tel: 5989 8088 | www.mgwinestore.com.au Gallery is open daily 8.30am-5pm

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H O EA F TH F PS E UN K ID S! FO

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An independent market showcasing Melbourne and the Peninsula’s very best makers, creators, growers and collectors. Over 200 stalls, amazing kids entertainment, live music, craft workshops, gourmet food & local fresh produce!

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By Melissa Walsh

THE ULTIMATE JAZZ SINGER E ssence

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ustralia’s foremost jazz vocalist, Vince Jones, is heading to the peninsula on March 9, leading a celebration of one of rock’s greatest music performers, Van Morrison. With his reputation as a remarkable interpreter of jazz songs, Jones will lead the specially formed seven-piece Astral Orchestra, spearheaded by musical director, Matt McMahon, as they bring to life two of Van’s most cherished albums, Astral Weeks and Moondance. Growing up in a musical family, the young Vince Jones was surrounded by the cool sounds of Louis Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie records. “I used to copy Louis Armstrong as a little boy,” says Jones with a laugh. “I was always surrounded by music. My dad had a big band and was also involved in a brass band, and mum was a great jazz singer. I was 10 when dad got me into a brass band, first off playing trombone and then cornet, and a lot of those guys loved trumpet music.”


The love of music continued to grow for Jones and, by 25, he decided to put his own jazz band together. “I knew there were jazz players around and asked them to join me to make a record,” he says of the process that just fell into place. “When I was younger I listened to lots of different music but the first of Van Morrison’s albums I had access to was Astral Weeks when I was 17. It intrigued me that he used jazz guys for that album. I thought he must be really gifted to bring all those guys together and was really impressed with the music.” Vince Jones and the Astral Orchestra started performing the show in 2016 and it was very well received. “We decided to take it to the regional areas to give people outside the major cities a chance to experience this music. I’m not a cover guy so interpret the songs while in no way diminishing the Van Morrison quality,” he said.

After a 20 album international career, spanning four decades, Vince Jones has set the benchmark for Australian jazz vocalists and musicians. His Celtic, jazz and blues influence provides the perfect background for interpreting the great Van Morrison’s work. Sold-out concerts during the 2016 Melbourne International Jazz Festival and cities across Australia, confirmed the demand for Morrison’s repertoire and iconic masterpieces, and Jones interpretation of them. Van Morrison Masterpieces presented by Vince Jones and the Astral Orchestra is at the Frankston Arts Centre on Thursday March 9 at 8pm. www.artscentrefrankston.vic.gov.au

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ALADDIN'S CAVE OF TREASURES As you wander along the glamorous Sorrento shopping strip, you simply have to visit Marlene Miller Antiques, an Aladdin’s cave of unique and unexpected treasures. Marlene has owned antique shops since 1985, after earning her living as a law clerk in Melbourne, and longing for a sea change. “We used to come here for holidays all the time and one year decided to restore an old building in the main street. We pretty much didn’t leave after that, ran art stores and soon antique shops,” says Marlene. As soon as you walk into the shop, there is so much to see, with two storeys of antiques and bric-a-brac, from crystal, coach lamps and fine china to fur coats, hats, dining furniture, photographs and frames. “Upstairs is a great range of antique books dating back to the 1700s. We even had a

book from circa 1600. And our jewellery is stunning, with a selection from top Melbourne jewellers including Simon Kushnir, who is well known for his handmade rings and jewels of the finest quality, and very popular for engagement rings.” When you wander inside, you will be amazed at what you can learn, as Marlene takes you through the enchanting world of old wares. “We sell a lot of gold rush jewellery, which was actually made during the gold rush, with intricate detail modern jewellers cannot imitate,” says Marlene. She has a large selection of mourning jewellery, beautiful and macabre pieces that were created to mourn the death of a loved one, which became popular in the 1800s. “We have lockets with the person’s hair on one side and their photo on the other, rings with the hair intertwined in the

design, and jet-black enamel rings surrounded by pearls. The black signifies death and the pearls represent tears.” Marlene Miller Antiques has a wonderful eclectic mix of English china, 1920s oil lamps, furniture by Jacob and Josef Kohn – established in 1849 – hat boxes, candles and Japanese room dividers. With a large variety of treasures in her store, sometimes it's hard to let go of some items. “You do become attached at times, especially when it’s something you know you will never see again, but there are always new pieces coming in.” Marlene Miller Antiques has been in Sorrento for 28 years but in a purpose-built building for the past four. Marlene Miller Antiques 128 Ocean Beach Road Phone 5984 1762

128 Ocean Beach Road, Sorrento t: 03 5984 1762 m: 0438 537 757 e: marlenemiller3@bigpond.com

Specialising in antique jewellery, as well as newly-made jewellery by Melbourne’s top Jewellers

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OBTAINIUM ANTIQUES AND VINTAGE WARES Karine Cugurno simply loves antiques and collecting, and last year made her lifelong dream of owning her own store a reality when she opened Obtainium Antiques and Vintage Wares. “I had always been a collector and love the history of pieces. I started selling years ago at the Mornington Antique Centre, then at the Vintage Shed in Dromana. I knew I wanted to open a store in Progress Street, and finally last year I did,” she said. When Karine heard the word “obtainium” used on a TV show one day, she knew it was the perfect name for her store. “Obtainium means to use materials that people throw away to create things. It is about re-using, re-purposing and recycling and that’s what we do here,” said Karine. “We not only sell antiques but have lots of bits and pieces that people can use for their arts and crafts, or to sculpt with.

We also repurpose furniture by dismantling and creating different pieces. We have made hall tables and stands out of recycled timber and metal frames.” Obtainium Antiques and Vintage Wares is the one stop shop for pieces that will bring your home to life, with everything from quirky pieces to retro and genuine antiques. “We have vintage and antiques, with a varied price range so there is something for everyone,” said Karine, from her store with is about 180 square metres of vintage goodies. “We have everything ranging from antique and old books, lots of vinyl, tables and chairs, book shelves, china and jewellery to name a few. Collectors love our footy cards, war memorabilia, midcentury and Victorian furniture, and wide selection of music.” After opening in July last year, Karine says she is delighted with the response from customers.

“I have been so happy with how people have loved the store and have got brilliant feedback from everyone who comes in. It’s been a lovely surprise and it’s a great feeling to be supplying to people the kind of items they are passionate about collecting,” she said.

Obtainium Antiques and Vintage Wares is open seven days through summer, from 9.30am till 5pm 2/15 Progress Street, Mornington Phone 5975 3169.

Obtainium Antiques & Vintage Wares

Antiques, vintage wears, collectables, memorabilia, records and more. Bought and sold.

7 Days A Week 9.30am - 5.00pm

2/15 Progress Street Mornington | t: 5975 3169

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Eat & Drink

FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD By Melissa Walsh

A

ustralia’s biggest food truck carnival is back on the Mornington Peninsula over the Labour Day long weekend, serving up tasty treats from Melbourne’s finest food trucks for the local community to enjoy, all whilst raising funds to help sick children in need. Running from Friday, March 10 to 13, the four-day Peninsula Food Truck Carnival will offer a selection of mouth-watering international dishes as well as a range of entertainment options, helping to raise funds for the Monash Children’s Hospital. Peninsula Essence talks to the man who started it all, Food Truck Carnival owner, and self-proclaimed foodie, Danny Grant. How did you get into this industry?

I have worked in events for the last 11 years, running music event and festivals throughout Australia. Events have been in my blood but as I got older my focus shifted. Rather than late nights listening to live music I was more inclined to catch up with friends over dinner with a red wine. Melbourne is the food capital of Australia; we have so much to offer from food trucks to Michelin star restaurants to breweries and distilleries and everything in between. Gone are the days where a pizza or Chinese were the Aussie take away staples. People are more adventurous with food now than ever, and for the first time in history food is fashionable. Every six months there is a new food trend and restaurants lines with hour plus waits. And I think this resonates more in Victoria than anywhere else in Australia. When did you first come up with the idea of the food truck carnivals?

Throughout the summer of 2015 I would often attend markets or food truck parks for dinner or lunch. I used to love sitting with friends and trying multiple dishes from continued next page...

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each truck with friends. The flavours captivated me, trying cuisines from across the world. I loved the concept of food trucks and I was speaking to a friend one night about how great it would be to have more options then the 3-4 that was normally on offer. From that moment on the concept of a food truck fair popped in to my mind. As time went on the idea evolved. We decided to add a extra little spin on it with entertainment, roving performers and an authentic carnival feel alongside the stars of our show; the food trucks. From there the Food Truck Carnival was born. When and where was the first one?

The first ever food truck carnival was in Berwick. We anticipated maybe 20,000 people but had over 50,000 people in the five days. How many food trucks did you have then and how many do you have these days?

Originally we had 18 trucks. The first day we had 12 which was a disaster. We now run at around 30. Who else is involved in the business with you?

I have a great team I work alongside. Guys from all different

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fields and different specialties, from accounts, infrastructure, even management, operations and licensing. Without them our carnival would not be where it is today - eight festivals in and well over 250,000 hungry people in attendance just this summer alone. How did the Mornington festival go?

Mornington was a great success. We saw just shy of 45,000 people over the 5 days. We broke the record for the most people ever at the racecourse on the Saturday with a whopping 15,000 people. An amazing result. Was that the first festival you have done on the peninsula?

Yes,this is the first time we have visited the peninsula and looking forward to coming back this Labour Day. We will have an array of trucks throughout the five days, foods from all over the globe. American, Latin, European, Asian and everywhere in between. Expect to see crowd favourites like Mr Burger, Super Taco, El Chivi, White Guy Cooks Thai and St Gerrys Donuts.


Have you spent much time on the peninsula?

I live in Berwick and literally grew up all over Victoria but spent every summer since the age of 16 on the peninsula. Every day I have off or any chance I get I head down to the peninsula. I often say to people that even though I have travelled around the world the peninsula is still my favourite place on the planet. Something about the sea water that just clears your mind. What is the best part of your job organizing the food truck festivals?

The diversity of people I work with, each truck has a story. These stories are what I love most about them, people who have settled from all over the world. I love hearing about where they come from, how they got here and the passion that leads them to share their food and culture with us via food.

The Peninsula Food Truck Carnival is part of a dozen Food Truck Carnivals being held across suburban Melbourne over the Summer period, aiming to raise $150,000 to $200,000 for the hospital. What is your favourite food there?

It depends what I am craving! I am big fan of El Chivi’s Uruguayan steak sandwiches, Brazilian bites smoky BBQ, Caliko’s Asian LA infusion and St Gerry’s amazing Greek doughnuts. For more information visit www.ftcco.com.au or www.facebook.com.au/FoodTruckCarnivalCo/

Tell us about the fundraising aspect of the carnival?

Although entry to the carnival is free, funds from various components will be donated to the hospital, including amusement rides, face painting, roaming entertainment and parking. March 2017

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SHE ATE A STEAM BUN AND BOUGHT A BUSINESS By Melissa Walsh Photos: Yanni

S

he’s fun and feisty with some wicked tattoos and a somewhat laissez-faire attitude to life but don’t be fooled by her casual exterior. The new owner of Mr Paul’s, Bel Mead, definitely knows what she’s doing after 25 years in hospitality.

“I really haven’t had to make too many changes as it was great the way it was. Paul, my predecessor, had set it up beautifully and it’s been a popular spot for the locals so I wanted to keep it that way.”

I met Bel and her staff down at the local bar and café that’s been described as Mornington’s hidden gem in the Vale Arcade.

“It is different owning the establishment as opposed to running it. I had to learn about beer. I had never really been a beer drinker so now I am getting to know the beers and the beer makers and it’s great. I officially love beer now,” she says. “We have also introduced some awesome cocktails, particularly the longest island iced tea, which is made in our extra-large glasses and is already becoming a favourite. We also do a great espresso martini.”

“I took over in October last year after seeing how awesome it was and realising it was exactly the kind of place I always wanted to own. I came in and checked it out, ate a steam bun, made a bid and bought a business,” says Bel with a laugh. For the woman who had been in hospitality most of her adult life, with ten years on Mornington Main Street, Bel could immediately recognise the appeal of the place.

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The only thing Bel and her staff have added is a few more diverse beers, a couple of menu additions and cocktails for the ladies.

Another coup and part of the smooth transition was the head chef, Alicia Bickley, who came across with her to work in the business.


Even as we sit talking, Alicia comes out with a new pancake recipe she wants Bel to taste. “We had worked together for years in Mornington and the plan was always that, when I bought a business, she would come across with me. She creates amazing menus with a street-food style, while sticking to the old favourites that the customers love like the twice cooked pork belly steam buns, the calamari, and popcorn chicken,” said Bel. “With just two hot plates, a fryer and a Salamander, she produces some of the best food in Mornington.” As if it was meant to be, Bel also scored Tom Bowen, the lad with a Pommie accent that sometimes gets him into trouble. “Tom has been here for nearly two years and is the bar supervisor and beer expert, and everybody loves him,” says Bel, delighted that he decided to stay on after she bought the bar from Paul. As for Bel, she is delighted to be in this position and now own her own bar. “I’m rapt to be nearly 40, single, footloose and fancy free, and running my own place, and I am delighted that the customers know it’s the same Mr Paul’s that they always knew, with the same great vibe, food and awesome beer wall.” Mr Paul’s is at 11/234 Main St, Mornington. Open Wednesday to Sunday. Phone 5975 2258.

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THROWN IN THE DEEP END By Melissa Walsh Photo: Yanni

W

hen your mum and dad own a restaurant and you spend your early teen years on a fishing boat as a 'decky', there’s a fair chance you will end up in hospitality of some kind. This is precisely what happened to Portsea Hotel Head Chef, Ben Steele, and he still loves every minute of it.

apprentice was away I would take over their duties so really had the opportunity to learn the job early to the point of occasionally running a section. By the time I was 23 I started my own apprenticeship and have worked consistently with the hotel ever since.”

My parents owned a seafood restaurant, Scampi, in Mornington for many years and some of my best memories are going to the fish market with dad in the early hours of the morning. We would come back and I would have to descale the fish and pin bone it as a 10 year old,” said Ben, who was always thrown in the deep end with his career.

For 36 year old Ben, working at Portsea is still dream come true, as he points out the magnificent view over the bay and sailing boats bobbing in the water near the pier.

“Around 2001 dad and I both started doing some work at the Portsea Hotel, when they needed more staff over the summer. Dad was running the pan section and I was a casual cook as I hadn't done my apprenticeship yet. Sometimes when the

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“I love the peninsula lifestyle, having the best of worlds and the fabulous beaches, fishing places, and the wineries in Red Hill,” he said. “We have the best produce down here and use most of it in our menu. The choices for food and wine here are amazing.” Running such a large kitchen with 26 chefs and eight dish washers in the summer time, and 12 chefs the remainder of


the year, Ben says it works because he includes the chefs in the menu decisions.

Portsea Hotel is at 3746 Point Nepean Road, Portsea. Phone 5984 2213. www.portseahotel.com.au

“We have chefs from all over the world and so each chef gets to choose a dish they love to cook and we put it on the menu. That way the menu is diverse and each chef is happy,” he said. “While we are a pub and have traditional pub food, we also like to get more creative with some of our dishes and the response has been fantastic.” Some of the dishes include lamb bao, a slow roasted lamb shoulder cooked with Chinese bbq sauce, and one of Ben’s personal favourites. The menu also includes calamari, fish and chips, angel linguini, and pulled pork burgers. The Portsea Hotel kitchen is open every day for lunch and dinner, with open dining spaces that frame the superb views of Port Phillip Bay, Queenscliff and the surrounds. At home, Ben has a great smoking set up and loves smoking all sorts of meat. “We do some smoked dishes at Portsea but the sheer volume means we need to do it in bulk so we sometimes precook, then blast freeze and use over summer as pulled pork” he said. “Personally, I love the Americana style foods as well as fresh seafood and we have the best here.”

GPO HOTEL MORNINGTON PENINSULA

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Upcoming entertainment and current menus at www.thegpo.com.au 1003 POINT NEPEAN RD, ROSEBUD 5982 3200 March 2017

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Recipe KOREAN SPICED LAMB AND PICKLED VEGETABLE SLAW BAO INGREDIENTS FOR THE LAMB 1.2-1.5kg of boned Lamb shoulder 3-5 tbsp Gochujang (Korean fermented chilli paste) 1 jar of Korean bbq sauce FOR THE SLAW 1 small head of white cabbage 2 small carrots, julienned 1 small white onion 1 bunch of coriander

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1 bunch of Vietnamese mint 4 spring onions 200ml rice wine vinegar 150g caster sugar 1 packet of lotus bun (approx. 8-10 pieces) Sesame seeds Sriracha sauce


METHOD 1. Preheat oven to 140 degrees Celsius 2. Trim excess fat from lamb and coat with Korean chilli paste. 3. Lightly season with salt and pepper and place in oven tray, cover with ½ of the jar of Korean bbq sauce. 4. Wrap tray with a sheet of baking paper then a second sheet of aluminium foil and place in oven for approximately 4 hours. 5. While lamb is cooking finely slice the spring onions, cabbage, white onion and carrots, then pick the desired amount of herbs and mix together. 6. Combine the rice wine vinegar and sugar in a small saucepan and dissolve over a low heat until sugar has dissolved and set aside to return to room temperature.

7. Once lamb shoulder has been cooking for approx. 3 hours, carefully peel back aluminium foil and lightly baste with pan juices and turn oven up to 160 for a further 1 hour. 8. Rest oven tray while still covered for around 25 minutes then carefully open and pull lamb to a small, stringy consistency, use a little of the basting liquid to fold back through and add the rest of the Korean bbq sauce and place in serving dish. 9. Lightly dress the cabbage and herb slaw mix with the rice wine vinegar mixture and set aside to serve. 10. Either place lotus buns in steamer, or use a microwave as per directions on packet then serve, garnishing with sriracha sauce if desired and sesame seeds to finish the dish.

Portsea Hotel is at 3746 Point Nepean Road, Portsea. Phone 5984 2213. www.portseahotel.com.au

WEDNESDAY

FISH NIGHT

Come in and enjoy our fresh fish speCials, Cooked to perfeCtion! aCCompanied by a glass of Crisp white wine. 182 oCean beaCh road, sorrento for bookings Call: 03 5984 1838 or email: bookings@mrmorCe.Com.au www.mrmorCe.Com.au

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Dishes

must try

Sardines Blue Mini Eatery Emporium Events 2 Colchester Road (corner Borneo Road), Rosebud Phone 5981 2520 www.bluemini.com.au

Crispy Skinned Atlantic salmon fillet on a Summer vegetable and beat leaf salad with celeriac remoulade The Boathouse

The Big Merch Merchant & Maker 675 Point Nepean Road, McCrae Phone 5986 3385 www.merchantmaker.com.au

366 Nepean Highway, Frankston Phone 9770 5330 www.theboathouserestaurant.com.au

Pulled pork bun with white BBQ sauce, tender pulled pork, slaw on a brioche toasted bun served with a side of beer battered chips Commonfolk Coffee 16 Progress Street, Mornington Phone 5902 2786 www.commonfolkcoffee.com.au

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Pan seared calamari tossed with chorizo, cappelletti pasta, chilli, olives, tomato and roquette The Boathouse 366 Nepean Highway, Frankston Phone 9770 5330 www.theboathouserestaurant.com.au

Cinnamon and panel sugar French toast with OJ braised rhubarb, macadamia crumb, vanilla creme fraiche and minted sugar Commonfolk Coffee 16 Progress Street, Mornington Phone 5902 2786 www.commonfolkcoffee.com.au


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History

What next for Warrawee? By Peter McCullough

W

hile the Tanti Hotel, on the corner of Tanti Avenue and the Nepean Highway in Mornington, is shown on maps as far back as the early 1850's and is almost certainly the first hotel to be established on the Mornington Peninsula, one of the earliest hotels in the Hastings District began its life as a family home in Balnarring. Subsequently named Warrawee, it was built in the 1860's for the Van Suylen* family. Its position at the junction of tracks leading from Frankston to Flinders and Dromana to Sandy Point made it an ideal stopping point for travellers. It was to become the Tower House Hotel. Who were the Van Suylens? Paul Van Suylen was born in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1824 and it was there that he married Johanna Adriaenssens in 1845. He was a sailmaker by trade and in 1854 he and Johanna, with their seven year old son, Philip, journeyed to London from where they departed for Australia on the Dutch brig “Amasis”. On 8 July, 1854 they arrived in Geelong. Victoria was in the grip of gold rush fever with new arrivals numbering around a thousand every day. The Van Suylens joined the rush, but instead of seeking the elusive metal, Paul Van Suylen

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put his skills to good use and started to manufacture tents and other canvas goods for the gold diggers or anyone else who needed them. Van Suylen tents could even be found along Elizabeth Street. As the brig “Amasis” was a cargo vessel and his ticket mentioned “stowage”, it is thought that Paul Van Suylen brought his first load of materials with him as well as his tools. However he was soon importing canvas and other materials as required, and the family moved around the goldfields to meet demand. The trips by horse and wagon between the goldfields and Melbourne to collect canvas, calico and other materials would have been most arduous. As they moved around the family expanded: their second son,Paul, was born in Maryborough in 1855 and their first girl, Elizabeth, was born at Pleasant Creek in 1858. Two years later Annie Maria was born at Sandy Creek and the family was completed when the fifth child, Emma, was born in a tent (naturally) at Landsborough, near Stawell, in 1862. Because the diggers found the name Van Suylen hard to pronounce, and even harder to spell, Paul was known as “Mr. Tent”; if Johanna was included they were “Mr. and Mrs. Tenty”. While his business was proving to be very profitable there was the occasional setback for Paul Van Suylen. On 12 December, 1860 the Chiltern Standard reported in the rather quaint terminology of the


time that on the previous day a fire had broken out in a shanty next door to Van Suylen's tent factory and there had been “...a narrow escape from conflagration. Fortunately assistance was at hand and the burning calico was stripped from the walls and the progress of the fire was thus stayed. Had it occurred at night time there was no saying where the mischief would have ceased.” The time had now come for Paul Van Suylen to start his next venture. In 1859 he had become a naturalized Australian citizen; this was a legal requirement if he wanted to become a land owner. Perhaps feeling that the address of a tent on some goldfield would not impress, he stated on his application form that he was living at McNabb Street, Richmond, his Melbourne base, and gave his occupation as “gentleman.” Besides, from his hard work and business acumen, he had accumulated 28,000 pounds ($56,000).

additional land in Balnarring and Morradoo (Crib Point) making up another 510 acres. Some rough bush tracks cut across the area linking the settlements of Sorrento, Schnapper Point (Mornington), Flinders and King's Creek (Hastings). They intersected at one corner of Van Suylen's land; it was here he decided to build his home which would, over time, include a general store and roadside inn. This was where he continued next page... Below: The original Van Suylens, Paul (left) and Johanna (right).

The move to Balnarring Under the Imperial Act of 1846 fourteen-year leases had been introduced for Crown Land. As these leases expired, the squatters were able to retain 640 acres; the rest became available for selection. Consequently the 1860's saw an influx of settlers to the Balnarring area. One of the new arrivals was Paul Van Suylen and his family. He purchased two lots of 83 acres for 83 pounds each ($166); the first in 1863 and the second in 1870. Buying the two lots gave him the full triangle bordered by what is now Warrawee Road, FrankstonFlinders Road, and Mornington-Balnarring Road. He also selected

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Above: Parish map of the Balnarring area, circa 1880. Paul senior's original holding outlined.

would sell food, hardware and liquor, establish a saleyards and a Cobb & Co. coach depot. The site had much to offer with views extending to Phillip and French Islands and the Gippsland hills. Rainfall was considered plentiful and augered well for an entry into farming. In the meantime, some surplus stock from the tent-selling days came in handy. Construction was soon under way with bluestone rubble being hauled from Palmers Point on Western Port to form a six foot foundation, sand and stones being brought from the beach, and hand-made bricks being fired on the Hurley property just along the road towards Schnapper Point. After the completion of his house, Van Suylen went on to build his own brick kiln, possibly supplying bricks used in the construction of “Coolart.� In 1868 a small timber construction was attached to the bedroom wing on the Frankston-Flinders Road end of the main building; it was Balnarring's Post Office with Paul Van Suylen appointed as Post Master. He was paid on an annual basis starting at 10 pounds ($20) for the first two years, then 15 pounds ($30) for the next five years, 20 pounds ($40) for the next four years and then, inexplicably, dropping back to 15 pounds ($30) for the next two years. The initial Post Office directory listed Paul Van Suylen as a farmer (1868), then as a shopkeeper (1875),and a shop and hotel keeper (1880). It was 1872 when Paul Van Suylen was granted a licence to develop the homestead as a hotel. Extensions were made with accommodation increased to seven bedrooms. A tower was built over the main entrance and the establishment became known as The Tower House Hotel. The bar and bar parlour with its open fireplace was situated in the northern wing. The hotel became a regular stopover for Cobb & Co. coaches; passengers and drivers enjoyed refreshment while the horses were fed and rested in the stables which had been built on the side of the hotel furthest from the Post Office.

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Patrons in the bar were kept up to date with what was going on in the theatres in Melbourne by means of posters around the walls. Johanna had a very good singing voice, was a talented pianist, and enjoyed entertaining friends at The Tower House including J.C.Williamson and his wife. Johanna and the girls were particularly fond of opera but this interest was not shared by Paul who was reluctant to part with his hard-earned money to support such frivolities. His money was kept in a locked chest of drawers but Johanna overcame the problem by boring a hole in the back of the piece of furniture and helping herself, as required. In 1875 tenders were called for a new school at Balnarring, large enough to accommodate 40 pupils. The successful tenderer was the versatile Paul Van Suylen with a quote of 242 pounds,11 shillings and 8 pence halfpenny ($485). In 1881 the Head Master, Mr. Jarvie, was appointed as Post Master. He would sort the mail when it came from Mornington, as it was now called, and then give it to the children to deliver on their way home from school. Even without the Post Master responsibilities, life for the Van Suylens was busy. The number of travellers was increasing and both the general store and farm were doing well. Fodder for the horses and cattle was grown and there was a mixed orchard of apples, pears, plums and figs. A vegetable garden was maintained, and an area of the farm was devoted to the cultivation of potatoes on a commercial scale. Paul Van Suylen was apparently not the easiest person to get along with and was inclined to be litigious; in November, 1867, the Mornington Court of Petty Sessions heard a case involving damage done to his threshing machine. Both Paul senior and junior were big men, proud of their ancestry, and neither was inclined to shy away from a confrontation. According to folklore, when visiting the hotel it was advisable to tie the horse in a direct line from the bar door so that easy access was available if trouble broke out. Records indicate that on 25 May, 1877, damages for assault were awarded


against Paul Van Suylen for 36 pounds; we are left to guess whether it was father or son. The Van Suylen Family

Above: The Tower House Hotel, prior to its transformation to Hope Lodge Farm, as sketched by the Reverend Morton. And featured in his book "Drifting Wreckage". Below: Marriage of William Davies and Elizabeth Van Suylen, 1876.

The year 1866 had brought sadness to the family when the eldest son, Philip, then 19, fell from his horse when returning from Mornington and died in the dam from where the clay had been dug to make the bricks for their home. The death certificate stated that he died from apoplexy and suffocation in the mud. Although “Old Van”, as he was often called to distinguish him from Paul junior, exerted strict control over the family, he suffered a setback in 1876. When Elizabeth Van Suylen and William Davies from Bittern began to show more than a passing interest in each other, the match was strongly opposed by both families; the Van Suylens were Roman Catholics and the Davies were Anglicans. The young couple continued to see each other in secret, although her father had threatened to disown Elizabeth if she had anything more to do with William. However Elizabeth was a very strongwilled young lady and, at the age of 18, arranged her elopement and marriage on Christmas Day, 1876, at St. Peter's at Mornington. She gave her age as 21. Her father carried out his threat and for years there was no communication between Elizabeth and her parents. Further sadness came to the family with the death of Annie Maria at the age of 17 in 1878. Her death certificate gave the cause as exhaustion after four months of illness. In May, 1880, Paul Van Suylen junior married Elizabeth Hurley whose parents had come to Balnarring in 1863, the same year as the Van Suylens. William Hurley, who came from Limerick in Ireland with his wife Johanna, was apparently quite a character and his personality was in some respects similar to that of Old Van. It is said that when he stepped off the boat in Adelaide he asked “Is there a Government here?”and, on being told “Yes, there is.” he replied continued next page...

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Left: William Hurley, whose daughter, Elizabeth, married Paul junior. Above: Emma O'Neill (nee Van Suylen) in her later years. Far right: Paul Van Suylen junior.

“Well then I'm agin it.” As the Roman Catholic church, St. John's, did not open until 1881, Paul and Elizabeth were married at Hazel Grove, the home of the bride's parents. The marriage of the Van Suylen's youngest daughter, Emma, to William O'Neill of Tyabb took place in 1884. Apparently Old Van was initially not happy with the union because he thought that his beautiful daughter might do much better for herself than marry a poor farm hand. He used the term “fortune hunter” which went against the grain with young Will. In the end things were patched up and the wedding of the year took place. The splendour of the occasion was recorded in “The Romance of Crib Point” which was written by Emily Baizeen, a niece of Emma's: “Old Van came up with enough money to provide a very fine trousseau, a beautiful wedding dress, and a wedding celebration that was an event to be remembered for years by all who attended it. The bride was driven to the church in a carriage drawn by a pair of grey horses. The harness was decorated with white satin rosettes and the driver flourished a whip with the same decoration.”The celebrations, however, ended in something of an anti-climax, as Emily Baizeen recounted it: “So with happy song and dance Emma Van's wedding wore on, and the time came for inspection of the bridal gifts. There were at least four pairs of vases (useless ornaments for a three roomed cottage home), three cruet sets, two coffee pots, five glass butter dishes, a dinner set, a tea set, six lace hand knitted antimacassars (the work and gift of the bridegroom's mother), a churn, and a bedroom set of china (all covered with brown paper by the thoughtful owner), a

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set of brass fire irons, a lamp and two candlesticks, a set of flat irons, and many other odds and ends of useless bric-a-brac which usually appear on the list of a bride's presents. The bride's mother had given all the blankets and bed linen, also a very handsome white marble clock. So far, so good. But with a wealthy papa such as Emma Van Suylen's something more than a grand wedding might surely be expected. The guests were all agog to hear what the old man had given the pair. And when at last they know, everybody, including the bride and her groom, were left gazing at each other mute and non-plussed. He gave them the Crib Point site of 30 acres; a gift that carried as cruel a proviso in its conditions as any act could have devised. Before the absolute ownership of the land could be made substantive, two years residence on the property and certain specific improvements were essential. These included clearing of an acre of land and the erection of a post-and-rail fence around it.” William began the task of clearing the land of trees and scrub, and building a two room house of wattle-and-daub. A cart track was made from the main Bittern road over two miles to the property, and on completion of the house the young couple and first child moved in. It was constant hard work and the area was “alive with snakes.”They referred to it as a terrible place, but they managed. Shortly after the end of the required term they were bought out for 2,000 pounds by George Clauscen, a businessman from Melbourne who had already bought adjoining property. They regarded it as a wonderful bargain, as did the businessman who foresaw the development of Crib Point to where the railway had


been extended following concerns about a Russian invasion. In fact the land became part of the naval base and is now a portion of the parade ground at HMAS Cerberus. The windfall enabled Emma and Will to buy a property in Church Street, Richmond where Johanna died of cancer in June, 1886, at the age of 62. The Wheels Come off for Old Van. With Johanna's illness Paul Van Suylen decided to retire. He sold the central property of 164 acres but the sale fell through and it was back on his hands a year later. The publican's licence was transferred to John Robert Irwin but by January, 1884, it had been transferred back. Then the process was repeated in 1886. He was going to be charged with “...permitting an unlicenced person to be in effect the keeper of the licenced premises in the absence of the licencee...” in September, 1886, but the charge was struck out. Meanwhile he had commenced a breach of contract case (Van Suylen v. Honner) with the defendant arguing that there was a difference of opinion over what constituted “cost price.” As reported in The Argus on 27 October, 1886 Old Van lost the case; it was a costly exercise. Soon afterwards the managers failed to stay open on Christmas Day as required in the terms of the licence, and so the licence was lost. Attempts to retrieve it were unsuccessful. After deliberation Old Van decided to sell the hotel as a private residence. Twice in 1887 sales fell through but then in October, continued next page...

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Above: Paul junior with his bullock team. Below: Paul and Elizabeth's six boys; Joseph, Phillip, William, Paul "Col.", Michael and John.

1888, it was sold to tea merchants James and John Griffiths for use as a country residence. No longer a hotel it later became known as “Warrawee”, an aboriginal word said to mean “a pleasant place.” As if his property problems weren't enough, Old Van had another disaster on his hands. In November, 1886, only five months after the death of Johanna, he married Belinda Loft. She had apparently demanded that he transfer assets into her name and this action led to a hearing before the insolvency court, as reported in The Age on 29 June, 1888. It was even stated that he had spent some time in gaol. Worse was to follow: three days later the Dandenong Journal provided details of a bigamy case involving Belinda Loft. Old Van, referred to as “an insolvent” during the proceedings, must have been a sorry sight in the courtroom. Paul Van Suylen then decided to return to Belgium on a visit and while there he married Maria Catherine Lambrechts. Back in Australia they resided in Kensington where they opened an underwear shop. This must have been a successful venture for further stores were opened in Malvern and Brighton. In January, 1898 Paul Van Suylen died at Kensington at the age of 73 and was buried with Johanna in the Melbourne Cemetery. Paul Junior After their marriage in 1880 Paul and Elizabeth Van Suylen moved onto a 200 acre property adjacent to the Hurleys. The block ran from Stumpy Gully Road through to the Mornington-Balnarring Road and was originally owned by Old Van. It was named Hazel Mere. Previously Paul had worked for his father on the farm and contracting. He continued these activities and, with his bullock team, did a lot of road contracting and general haulage. Paul

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became quite heavily involved in community activities and was on a number of committees, including the Emu Plains Racing Club when it commenced in 1879. Paul and Elizabeth had eleven children: six boys and five girls. As the family grew in numbers they started to bring home their friends. Tea, followed by a singalong around the piano, was a regular event on Saturday nights. However seating became a problem which was only overcome when Paul built a dining table to seat 27! Paul and the boys were keen on cricket and all played the game. In fact they liked it so much that there were no objections when ten acres was excised from the property to establish the Balnarring Recreation Reserve. The following item in the Peninsula Post informed readers of his passing: “Much regret was passed in Balnarring and district when it became known that Mr. Paul Van Suylen, for many years a resident, had died at his residence 'Hazel Mere' Balnarring on Sunday 2 July, 1916. The deceased, who was 61 years of age, was born at Maryborough and came to the district with his parents as a child. He held many honourable positions, being on the Board of Advice for many years and at the time of his death was Vice President of the ANA, a member of the local school committee, trustee of the local hall as well as public recreation reserve. His good humour and cheery disposition will be missed.� Many of the eleven children married members of well-known local families such as Huntley, Perrott and Myers, and their descendants are too numerous to list in detail. However I would like to add a few comments on three of the sons. The eldest, Phillip, was born in 1883 and married Lynn Huntley who was an accomplished pianist. continued next page...

Above: Phillip and Lynn (nee Huntley) Van Suylen on their wedding day. Below: "Col" Van Suylen, licencee of The Grand Hotel, Mornington, 1941-46. Brother-in-law Frank Riley in background.

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They had a farm, “Baltara”, on the Frankston-Flinders Road at Bittern where they had a small orchard and milked cows. For many years Phil did contracting work with his father and was well known for his bullock teams and wood chopping ability. He worked on the construction of Cerberus, returning each day to his farm duties. Again like his father, he was involved in the community: he is shown as a member of the Bittern cricket team in 1921/22 and he was an inaugural member of the Bittern Fire Brigade when it was formed in 1945. While he may have inherited something of a quick temper from his father and grandfather, he is also remembered for his quick wit . One story which is part of the family folklore tells how one day Phil was ploughing his paddock when a “townie” pulled up alongside the fence and shouted out, rather imperiously, “Hey, Claude!” Phil ignored him and kept on ploughing until he reached the end of the paddock, made his turn, and started back. When he reached a point opposite the stranger he stopped and enquired “Did you want me?” “Yes,” answered the man, “can you tell me which road goes to Flinders?” “How did you know my name was Claude?” asked Phil.”I guessed it,” smirked the traveller. “Then you had better guess the way to Flinders,”came the retort, and Phil resumed ploughing. Although Phil and his wife had no children, their home was frequently visited by nephews and nieces, many of whom still speak fondly of “Uncle Phil”. The second son, Paul Perry Van Suylen, married Annie Marie Riley, a member of another local family. “Col”, as he was known, Right: The Reverend W. Lockhart Morton, operator of Hope Lodge Farm. Below: A Berryman family gathering at Warrawee, in the 1920's. Below right: Warrawee taken from the air, circa 1980.

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was licencee of the Grand Hotel in Mornington in partnership with his brother-in-law, Frank Riley, between 1941 and 1946. Col and Annie had three children and their daughter, Mary Muir, has assisted with family photographs and general information.

the former bar room. This owner constructed the wide balustraded verandah with its considerable length of hand-cut wooden backing to the guttering which helped draw the various sections together. The walled verandah has since been removed

Finally, John Fitzgerald Van Suylen married Jessie May Gillett, a daughter of Francis Gillett who built the magnificent Mornington mansion “Sunnyside”, later renamed “Morning Star.” John and Jessie had two children and their daughter, Elizabeth Teresa, known as “Betsy”, compiled a family history (“The Descendants of a Sailmaker”) from which I have drawn quite extensively. Betsy married Des Cook and their children and grandchildren have continued Paul Van Suylen's interest in sport: son Simon Cook represented Australia as a fast bowler and the Crib Point football team always seems to have an abundance of players with the name of Cook.

Eric R. Rundle bought the property in 1950. Certain moves towards modernization also took place: the premises were wired for electric lighting and a septic tank system was installed. In the 1960's the rest of the Van Suylen selection was sold to be divided up as a housing estate (“Balnarring Heights”) with only about five acres, including the homestead, remaining. Warrawee was bought by Dr. Cacek in the early 1970's; he lived there and conducted his surgery for a number of years. Warrawee was empty and boarded up for about six years until 1983 when it was purchased and completely renovated by Jane McDonell and her first husband, John Burgess, for use as a dwelling, restaurant,and B&B. Today it operates as health retreat specializing in wholistic therapies.

And what of Warrawee? Although still in the ownership of the Griffiths brothers, by 1891 the property had become an “Inebriates Colony” under the guidance of the Reverend W. Lockhart Morton. Hope Lodge Farm, as it was called, catered for as many as 34 residents at a time, but the venture only lasted for two years. Over the next two decades areas ranging from two to eight acres were sold off. Many well-known district names were among the purchasers: Buckley, Johnson, Hurley, Davies, Meehan and Clauscen. Then in 1913 Henry Thomas Cook, a Balnarring farmer, acquired the remaining 20 or 30 acres including the homestead. After Cook came Louis J. Berryman . He was a teetotaller and strict Methodist who removed the tower and its painted placards which encouraged intemperance; these were too vivid a reminder of previous pursuits of the homestead. From about 1925 to 1940 the fledgling Methodist church conducted services at Warrawee, ironically in

*The spelling of the family name appears to have changed over the years. Paul senior signed his name as one word (Vansuylen) on early documents such as his naturalization papers. Later, people thought the name was Dutch and this prompted them to separate the prefix and form two words. Today “Van Suylen” appears to be the option preferred by family members and it has been used in this article.

References. Apart from assistance provided by family members (Betsy Cook and Mary Muir) I am also grateful to Ilma Hackett and the Balnarring and District Historical Society who provided photographs and other information. Some details were also obtained from Bruce Bennett's local histories “The Old General Store” and “Morradoo”, and from the publications of the Historical Society.

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Corner

puzzle

ACROSS 1. Dropping in on 5. Limestone cave formations 11. Supporter of popular rule 15. Yes in Paris 16. Drink brand, ... Maria 17. Quietened 19. Seaweed-wrapped snack 21. Simpleton 23. Poked 25. Cast out 27. Lobe ornament 28. Cowboy's noosed snare 30. Unnatural sleep 31. Amuse 32. Swapped (cheque) for money 33. Poker stake 34. Train coach 35. Underground cell 36. Orient 38. Fit of temper 40. Back (legs) 42. Docket 44. Cosmetic oil, ... butter 45. Wading bird 46. Roster 48. Sorry 49. Strong flavour 50. Ancient harp 51. Form of dermatitis 52. Chaste 53. Enormous 54. Hospital dormitory 55. Ark builder 56. Waters around Greece, the ... 58. Lampshade fitting (5,4) 59. Behaving 61. Vibrate 63. Pigment 64. Appropriate 65. Annual periods 67. Synagogue scholar 69. Endure 71. As a whole (2,3) 73. Moulds 74. Lie snugly 76. Affix (4,2) 78. Circle (globe) 80. Relaxation routine 82. A long time 83. Bye! 85. Arranging at intervals 89. Fringed cords 91. Subtle shade of meaning 93. Lump of turf

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94. Rewrite 96. Panther 98. Gratuity 99. Wedding promise (1,2) 100. Bon vivant 102. Initially (2,5) 103. Happens, ... pass (5,2) 104. Success 105. Misjudge 106. Golf ball peg 107. Venerate 108. Materialise 110. Famous record label (1,1,1) 112. Pastoral 114. Firmed muscles (5,2) 117. Leads astray 120. Hoards 123. Slightly open 125. Frozen sleet 127. Actress, ... Keaton 128. Dreaded 131. Elixir 133. Prepared 134. Twitter comment 135. Connection 136. Cooking herb 137. Marshal's reinforcements 140. Ram's mate 141. Coffee's rival 142. Whiff 145. Incendiary bullet 147. Repeat 148. Cheerfulness 150. Tibet's Dalai ... 151. Automated teller machines (1,1,2) 152. Correctional institution 153. Baby-bottle top 154. Spasm 156. Iraq's neighbour 158. Be stoical, grin & ... it 160. Fairly modern 162. Humans, ... sapiens 163. Kathmandu is there 164. Line of symmetry 165. Conqueror 166. Dozes, ... off 167. Liver sac, ... bladder 168. Bounders 170. Sum put by for a rainy day (4,3) 172. Soviet exile area 173. Mature 174. Picnic basket 177. Secreted 179. Jeans maker, ... Strauss 180. Wrongly assists March 2017

182. Sun shower arc 183. Urge (3,2) 185. Pamper 187. From Zurich 188. Having an advantage (3-2) 189. Merriest 191. Rightful 192. Anticipated arrival time (1,1,1) 193. Farce 194. Allotted 195. Not well regarded DOWN 1. Passenger carrier 2. Distress call (1,1,1) 3. Permanent 4. Author, ... Vidal 5. Female sibling 6. Mystified, all ... (2,3) 7. Burning out of control 8. School dress 9. Small bell sounds 10. Fashioned 11. Low platform 12. Baton-twirler, drum ... 13. Bone in chest wall 14. Most shipshape 18. Desolation 20. Powerful headlight type 22. Absurdity 24. Jelly-like dessert 26. Emergency touchdown (5-7) 29. Contaminating 37. Surprise attack 38. Noisy snakes 39. Meringue ingredient (3,5) 40. Determined 41. Recoiled (4,4) 43. Do harm to 44. Fiji's capital 47. Current (1,1/1,1) 57. Spookier 60. Sheer hosiery 62. Orphan girl musical 66. Leisurely walk 68. Outside bounds of decency (6,3,4) 69. Minor mistake 70. Patch (sock) 72. Artistically (pleasing) 73. Made easy 75. Receive as salary 77. Solemn vow 79. In a crass manner

81. Army corporal (1,1,1) 84. Advocate 85. Lounge furnishings 86. Hoped (to) 87. Silly 88. Shopkeepers 90. Feeds from breast 92. Aussie city, ... Springs 95. Proficient 97. Strike 101. Like peas in a ... 109. Unusual 111. Mother 113. London nightspot 115. Approaches 116. Slimmer 118. Unspoilt paradise 119. Love god 121. Take into custody 122. Run of 124. Delayed response 126. Aggravating 129. Repugnance 130. Decreases 131. Boxer's training aid 132. Intrinsic 138. Filmy 139. Office suppliers 143. Allegorically 144. Rented 146. Apiece 149. Beers 155. Rink boots (3,6) 157. California fracture line, San ... Fault 159. Great joy 161. Disobeys 165. French bean 169. Off-loaded 171. Poisoned by fumes 172. Oozed 175. Prudes 176. Up-at-dawn person, early ... 177. Weapon of mass destruction (1-4) 178. Resided 181. Swirl 184. Cattle prod 186. Jet-bubble bath 190. Large antlered animal Š Lovatts Puzzles


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Portsea on

Portsea is a township at the most westerly settlement on the Mornington Peninsula and borders Sorrento in the east. Portsea is located on a thin strip of land just 2 kilometres in width, fronting the calm waters of Port Phillip in the north and the rugged surf beaches along Bass Strait in the south. The official population of Portsea is 446 in 2011. The size of Portsea is approximately 4km².

PORTSEA FACTS The main bay beach fronts Weeroona Bay and includes the Portsea Pier from which golden sandy beaches extend in both directions, lined with a mixture of characteristic English trees and native bush. East of the pier is Point Franklin where a scenic walking track provides elevated views over Shelley Beach to the east and across the bay. The Portsea Surf Beach faces the ocean and is accessible from two main points. At the southern end of Back Beach Road is the Portsea Surf Life Saving Club and scenic views along the coast can be enjoyed from the surrounding pathways which extend down to the beach. Further west, at the end of London Bridge Road, is an access point down to the beach, scenic coastal pathways, lookouts and the rocky archway known as London Bridge. The major landmark in the town centre is the Portsea Hotel which was built in 1927 and extended in later years to include both indoor and outdoor dining and entertaining areas which extend down to the foreshore and overlooking the beach and pier.

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Portsea has become one of Melbourne's most exclusive places to live, with a number of 19th century mansions perched high on ridges above the coast, intermingled with upmarket dream homes and weekend retreats. At the western edge of Portsea and extending right to the tip of the land is the Point Nepean National Park which features relics Aboriginal settlements and past military fortifications. A quarantine station was built there in 1852 to protect Victoria against disease from people arriving by boat. In 1882, a fort with barracks was established to defend the headlands of Port Phillip against invasion. There are a network of walks throughout the park which allow visitors to explore the remains of military occupation of this area and to enjoy scenic coastal features including pristine beaches, cliffs, reef platforms and turbulent seas. OCS Portsea, an army establishment, was located just outside the town. The historic reserve became famous when Prime Minister of Australia Harold Holt disappeared while swimming inside the facility at Cheviot Beach on 17 continued next page...

COFFEE SAFARI Fresh brewed coffee is a must have for weekends away and Portsea coffee is second to none with great coffee haunts around the town. Here are a few to check out when head down to this beautiful end of the world.

PORTSEA PIER GENERAL STORE AND CAFE   3760 Point Nepean Rd Relaxed dining on the Portsea Waterfront. gourmet burgers, fish and chips, handmade pies and pastries, and seasonal produce. Great Service and the best coffee on the peninsula.

BAKED IN PORTSEA 145 Hotham Rd Casual dining setting with relaxed vibe to enjoy good coffee and bakery delights.

PORTSEA HOTEL 3746 Point Nepean Road With sweeping views of Port Phillip Bay, The Heads and Queenscliff, the Portsea Hotel is great for meals, snacks and desserts with a sensational coffee selection.


MAGNIFICENT BOUTIQUE VENUE CATERS FOR COUPLES, FAMILIES AND GROUPS Portsea Village Resort offering one, two and three bedroom apartments with fully equipped kitchen. The resort is suited to small to medium-sized meetings and events, residential training programs, seminars, planning days, board meetings and weddings. Outdoor and indoor heated swimming pools and spas, tennis court, squash court, BBQ, gym, sauna, manicured gardens and fully licensed restaurant.

Make a weekend of your wedding and invite the whole family. Enjoy the seclusion of the private gardens for your ceremony or the stunning beach across the road. Spend this special time with your guests from pre wedding preparations to brunch and/or lunch the day after the wedding.

3765 POINT NEPEAN ROAD PORTSEA P: 03 5984 8484 enquiries@portseavillageresort.com portseavillageresort.com


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December 1967 and was officially presumed dead two days later, although a formal inquest into his death did not take place until 2005. Portsea is named after Portsea Island which is an island incorporated by Portsmouth, England, United Kingdom. Portsmouth is where the first settlers to Australia set sail from. Portsea is considered by many to be the hub of Melbourne's recreational scuba diving activities. No less than four scuba-related shops operate from its otherwise modest main street. Dive boats travel to sites both inside Port Phillip and outside Port Phillip Heads, also known as "The Rip". The Portsea Pier is the home to the spectacular weedy sea dragon, as well as many other fish species, including numerous pufferfish. Boating traffic is frequent, and divers should be careful to avoid main boating routes. Portsea Back Beach is a big attraction in Portsea, due to its great surfing conditions and long stretch of sand. Portsea Surf Life Saving Club patrols the popular surf beach, as patrols are always needed during the summer period given the large waves and strong tides that are often present.

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Prominent residents include trucking magnate Lindsay Fox, Kate Baillieu and Rupert Murdoch's grandson businessman David Calvert Jones, other well-known residents are Eddie McGuire and Ron Walker.

D

FACEBOOK.COM/PORTSEAHOTEL INSTAGRAM@PORTSEAHOTEL POINT NEPEAN RD, PORTSEA | TELEPHONE (03) 5984 2213 INFO@PORTSEAHOTEL.COM.AU | PORTSEAHOTEL.COM.AU

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WHAT TO DO? Portsea's location at the tip of the Mornington Peninsula means you can cool off at a safe bay beach and be riding the surf at the ocean beach just minutes later. Slow down after a day out in the water with an evening with friends on the green lawns of the Portsea Pub. Learn to scuba dive amid sea dragons and rays around Portsea Pier. Glimpse the lifestyles of the rich and famous at Portsea's millionaire mansions, or take the Millionaire's Walk to Sorrento along cliff tops, through landscaped gardens and past private jetties for vantage points of their imposing mansions. Watch as surfers and iron-men battle it out in summer competitions or build your own skills on the water with a spot of sea kayaking, and explore the fascinating labyrinth of nineteenth century tunnels and fortifications in the Point Nepean National Park that were built to guard Port Phillip heads. Photography: Yanni


Real Estate

Imagine ELLEN

PORTIA AS NEIGHBOURS

By Melissa Walsh

T

he Mornington Peninsula is proving a popular place for celebrities with rumours that Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi have been hunting for a house at the beachside location.

With Portia having been born in Horsham and growing up in Geelong, the California based couple have shown interest in returning to her home state of Victoria, checking out one particular Cape Schanck property. Greg O’Shea, senior partner at Delmege O’Shea Real Estate in Port Melbourne said the couple had been enquiring about a 20 hectare property called Nirvana, after it was listed on an exclusive database. “We had enquiries from a representative of the couple who said the A-listers were searching properties on the peninsula,” said Mr

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With a price of approximately 5.8 million dollars, Nirvana offers breathtaking views and a striking grand entrance. The 90 square home features stone surrounded open fire place in the opulent lounge and separate formal dining with custom designed stained glass as a feature and the overall feel of a chalet. The main bedroom suite is of generous proportions with a stunning en suite featuring a spa bath and his and hers dressing rooms. The home office, gym and sauna are ‘Zen’ type spaces where creativity can flow whilst working out. There are four more bedrooms with semi en suites, a fully equipped theatre room and games room, a cellar, outdoor kitchen and alfresco dining area that overlooks the solar heated pool and separate spa. Additional features include horse stables, training and dressage areas, fenced paddocks, natural wetlands and manicured gardens.


For the couple, who were married nine years ago, the Cape Schanck property would provide a private and relaxed lifestyle, which has become a drawcard for Mornington Peninsula properties. “We have had a lot of interest in the property,” said Mr O’Shea. “As you drive up the hill towards the top of the property, you are looking at a view of the Melbourne skyline, the ocean and the Otways. It is absolutely beautiful.” Listing agent and Victorian Principal, Lynda White, says the agency often receives high profile enquiries for properties on the peninsula, and this Cape Schanck property is no different.

China and South East Asia,” said Ms White. “Every buyer is given a personal tour of the property and then I give them time to really feel the zen – all enquiries are dealt with within 15 to 30 minutes, regardless of time of day or night the enquiry comes through. Not only is the home stunning, the property is a five minute drive from the National Golf course, and the land is suitable for horses, cattle, and agriculture. A multi award winning olive grove is right next door, and the land is ideal land for a vineyard.” You can view the property on www.delmegeoshea.com

“We have had quite a few high profile enquiries, from former top CEO’s of blue chip companies, professional golfers, a couple of Toorak based families looking for a weekender, locals looking to upgrade or downsize off larger properties, and enquiries out of

March 2017

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168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Mount Martha

Auction

93 Dominion Road, Mount Martha A Leader In Family Style And Amenity Custom designed to the highest standard, this striking 18-month-old contemporary two-storey residence combines stunning appointments situated in the dress circle of Mount Martha just a short stroll from the village and beachfront. Featuring a magnificent Smeg kitchen with Butler’s pantry, media room, rumpus room, study, separate living and dining rooms linking to year-round alfresco entertaining, palatial main bedroom suite and parking for eight cars.

Auction Saturday 25th February at 2.00pm Inspect As advertised or by appointment Contact Alex Campbell 0432 344 394 Jake Egan 0491 129 137 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


168 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 T. 03 5975 6888 Dromana

For Sale

1 Glenone Avenue, Dromana Grand Stand Views, Dual Living Options Floating sky-high from its elevated corner position on the foothills of Arthurs Seat, this double-brick two-storey residence frames magnificent panoramic bay and coastal views that showcase the best of the Peninsula and glorious bay. Additionally, the home offers unique dual living options making it an outstanding place of permanent residence or holiday retreat for the entire extended family. Renovated interiors offer excellent contemporary comfort with seven bedrooms or a lower-level three-bedroom apartment and top-floor four-bedroom home. Features two kitchens, billiards room with bar, spectacular sea-viewing living and dining opening to grand entertaining terraces and water views across both levels. For Sale Inspect As advertised or by appointment Contact Ayden Nelson 0419 447 038 Kylie Miller 0404 041 554 bowmanandcompany.com.au

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bowmanandcompany.com.au


NOW G IN SELL

PRIC

ED F

$679

YOUR FOR E L L A C USIV EXCL IEW PREV

ROM

,000

CAPTURING THE ESSENCE OF SEASIDE LIVING • Beachside Lifestlye and Luxury • Premium 2 & 3 bedroom residences Kayn Luff 0416 265 337 kaynluff@conleyluff.com.au

5975 7733

www.conleyluff.com.au

www.caprimornington.com.au

Wendy O’Halloran 5975 7733 wendy@conleyluff.com.au


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Internal & External Window Coverings • Motorised & Corded Options Award Winning Installations • Customised To Suit Your Application Expert Advice • Servicing Mornington Peninsula

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March 2017  

Peninsula Essence March 2017

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