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JULY 2018

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

From Food to Fighting • An Adventurous Life - Nigel Mason Tours • A Journey Through Grief Local Teacher’s Narratives • A Life of Learning • 2018 National Works on Paper The Gentle Art of Rosie Weis • A Man on a Mission • Must Try Dishes • Focus on Baxter


Possibly the happiest place on Earth 19 Balnarring Rd, Balnarring | Phone: 5983 5348 www.balnarringdentist.com.au


contents 7. Events 8. Peninsula Styles 10. From Food to Fighting

From 15, he started his chef apprentiship and traveled around Australia for the food and sights only to settle down here on the peninsula. Now he's a professional boxer with 300 fights and a successful boxing gym under his belt.

16. The Angels - Set to Rock Chelsea Heights Legendary rock band, The Angels, celebrating four decades since their album 'Face to Face' was released, are on tour and set to rock Chelsea Heights.

Writers: Melissa Walsh, Brodie Cowburn, Andrea Louise Thomas, Peter McCullough, Cameron McCullough, Boronica King Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Publisher: Cameron McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or brooke@mpnews.com.au Marg Harrison, 0414 773 153 or marg@mpnews.com.au General enquiries: essence@mpnews.com.au Registered address: 2/1 Tyabb Road, Mornington 3931 Phone: 5973 6424 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

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20. An Adventorous Life - Nigel Mason Tours Nigel Mason and his wife Yanie are happy in Bali with their flourishing business, Mason Adventures. With a bakery, resturant, chocolate factory, elephant park and more of their creations, their list of new adventures continues to grow.

24. A Journey Through Grief Nearly a decade has passed since Su-Rose McIntyre lost her son to mental illness. Through her grief she wrote a book about her experience through powerful metaphors so she could help others through their greiving journeys.

28. Local Teacher's Narratives Brendan James Murray, author and teacher continues to inspire with his recent book "Venom", his Writers' Club and his book "The Drowned Man" which received the "Best True Crime" award.

36. Putting in the Hard Yards Paul Jayilian, who used to own a pizza shop and now owns a busy gym, continues to amaze with his bodybuilding, with two new titles claimed in September 2017 and March 2018.

40. A Life of Learning Local artist Eric Shepard, now in his 80's continues to produce beautiful art. He shares how art is a life-long journey of learning and creation.

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention.

Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

44. 2018 National Works on Paper Hosting the 2018 National Works on Paper, the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery prepares to showcase 63 of Australia's greatest artists' pieces for the 20th ofJuly.

46. The Gentle Art of Rosie Weiss Rosie Weiss, one of the 63 artists to showcase pieces in the 2018 National Works on Paper, speaks to Peninsula Essence about her inspiration and love of art.

54. Specialist - Medical Feature An insight on the Mornington Peninsula's many specialists of medical and cosmetic professions.

67. A Man on a Mission Josh Pelham is an Executive Chef and has worked with some of Australia's greatest. He shares his experience with being a chef at some of Australia's best resturants. Josh speaks about his inspiration and journey as a professional chef.

74. Focus on Baxter 76. Shere Opulence in Mt Eliza

Cover Photo Picture: Yanni

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July 2018

80. THe Battle of Moorooduc Moorooduc might be little more than a locality but for a number of years it boasted two community halls.


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July

Peninsula events

WINTER SALON OF ABORIGINAL ART

June 9 - July 29 Featuring works from seven regions. Founding artists include Freddie Timms, Eubena Nampitjin, Bugai Whyoulter, Nora Wompi, Rosella Namok, Pepai Carroll, Minnie Pwerle, Patrick Mung Mung with exciting new generation artist Charmaine Pwerle, and many more. WHISTLEWOOD Contemporary Australian Art, 642 Tucks Road, Shoreham, 3916 Ph 5989 8282 www.mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

KIDS, MAKE YOUR OWN FARM ART

CHRISTMAS IN JULY HIGH TEA

July 20-28 PLOS Musical Productions presents 'The Phantom of the Opera' for a strictly limited season from July 20-28 at the Frankston Arts Centre. In its thirtieth year of performances worldwide, Andrew Lloyd Webber's modern classic tells the story of the masked figure that lurks beneath the catacombs of the Paris Opera House. Ph 9784 1060 Frankston Arts Centre 27/37 Davey St, Frankston www.artscentre.frankston.vic.gov.au

July 27 Enjoy a selection of Christmasthemed sweet and savoury treats as the magical scenery slides by as you sail between Queenscliff and Sorrento. Indulge in a bespoke menu designed by our Head Chef and made with regional produce from both the Mornington and Bellarine Peninsulas, including a glass of sparkling wine, tea or coffee. Ph 5257 4500 Searoad Ferries Sorrento Pier, Sorrento www.searoad.com.au

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July 6 Sail aboard Searoad Ferries this July school holidays for a fun and interactive workshop learning all about Port Phillip's unique dolphins and other amazing marine life, including seals & whales. Play games, see dolphin skulls and meet Bella Burrunan the dolphin. Workshop free with the purchase of a ferry ticket. Ph 5257 4500 Searoad Ferries, The Esplanade, Sorrento Pier, Sorrento www.searoad.com.au

July 3 - July 10 Children’s activity where they forage around the farm to collect art tools and then make their own masterpiece. When the art work is complete enjoy a delicious hot chocolate. This activity is $12 per child and payment is taken at the cash register on the day. Ph 5989 2992 Green Olive at Red Hill, 1180 Mornington Flinders Road, Main Ridge www.greenolive.com.au

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GEORGIE BASS COOKERY CLASS WINTER ENTERTAINING AT HOME July 28 This savoury class is set up to give attendees the confidence they need to impress guests and put on a show in their own home. Focus is on tricks & techniques; it is also about the planning and starting your preparations early. Ph 5989 0201 Georgie Bass - Cafe & Cookery 30 Cook Street, Flinders www.flindershotel.com.au

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PETER YOUNG SHOES SAK bag & scarf from The Scarf Company available at Peter Young Shoes 75 Main Street Mornington 5975 4407

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FROM FOOD... By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

H

e’s been a professional boxer, coached well in excess of 300 fights with Victorian and Australian champions, runs a successful boxing gym, has travelled the world and is passionate about all things diet and fitness. But it didn’t start out that way for Peninsula Boxing Gym owner Marcos Amado, whose love of food enticed the eastern suburbs boy to be a chef for the first part of his professional life. Peninsula Essence finds out what it takes for a foodie to become a fighter.

“I didn’t start out as a boxer or on the peninsula,” said Marcos sitting amongst boxing trophies, fight posters, bags and weights at his gym in Mornington. “In fact quite the opposite, I grew up in the eastern suburbs in Chirnside Park, but my parents had a beach house in Dromana. I was 21 when I decided to stay on the peninsula and live here, and never looked back.” Starting his chef apprenticeship at the age of just 15, Marcos spent a few years travelling around Australia cooking and seeing the sights, but finally made his home on the peninsula. continued next page...

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......TO FIGHTING


“I got to a crossroad when I was younger and didn’t know what I wanted to do. Mum said 'You have to do something you love', and I love eating so decided to cook. Mum was an awesome cook, being South American, so we always had good food in the house. The problem was I put on a lot of weight as a chef and decided to try boxing to get in shape,” said Marcos, whose dad had always taken him to watch the boxing at the pub and grew up a massive fan of Mike Tyson. “When I came to the peninsula there was an old gym to train at in Mornington called the Old Tin Shed. It’s no longer there now but it is where I trained and got my fitness levels up.” As time went on, Marcos found he was teaching several kids there as well as training and found another unexpected passion in helping others. “I never had a coach but looked after myself and other kids at the gym. I found it more rewarding helping the others. I lost weight and got fit while I was still working as a chef, all by making healthier choices and exercise,” said the boxer who worked at T’Gallant and the Boathouse as well as city restaurants. The forty year old says those days were like a lifetime ago and coaching boxers and training people at his gym is now where his passion lies.

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“It evolved very naturally. I started leasing space at gyms to train boxers and used my food knowledge as well as training to help others make better choices,” said the boxer who is proud to have fought professionally but mainly to have trained some great boxers. “I found myself helping guys get ready for fights and I was very fortunate the first kid I trained, Jai Alexander, is a professional now. He has had 120 amateur fights and won a bronze medal at the Commonwealth Games. I started training Jai when he was 14 and he is now 26,” said Marcos who now has 16 amateurs, four professionals, and runs five classes per day. For Marcos the sport of boxing won his heart for many reasons. “I love the sport as, although it takes a team to get there, you are on your own in the ring. It’s all up to you once you are out there so you must be prepared with training and dedication. It is all about putting in the hard yards mentally and physically to get a good result,” he said. To train for an event, Marcos says it is about physical and mental endurance. continued next page...


KINDERGARTEN AT PENINSULA GRAMMAR

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Kindergarten at Peninsula Grammar is a time of exploration, of educating young minds in the endless possibilities that lie before them. For more information about Kindergarten at Peninsula, visit our website or call to arrange a tour on 9788 7777.

SCHOOL TOURS

EVERY THURSDAY AT 9.30 AM Tours depart from the H.A. Macdonald Pavilion. No appointment necessary. Enter via Gate 2 on Wooralla Drive, Mount Eliza.

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July 2018

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“There is a lot of road work so plenty of running, distance and short sprints, boxing using specific exercises with hitting pads, sparring, bag work, and floor patterns for footwork,” he said. “You can create a decent boxer but the really special talented ones are naturally athletic plus have the right attitude and work range. If you don’t put in the hard yards you won’t succeed.” For Marcos one of the most rewarding aspects has been working with kids and seeing the difference boxing can make to their lives. “I do a lot work with bullied kids and kids who bully. Boxing and the discipline it takes is good for structure, doing what you are told to do, respecting yourself, and having an outlet. If you are the bully maybe you need somewhere to channel it and this is a great way.”

Peninsula Boxing Gym runs classes for people of all ages and fitness levels with personal training classes for mums and kids, and masters fighters for the over forties.

Fighting for two years as a professional, Marcos says he was given a great insight into what’s needed and passes that on to his boxers. “I have been doing this for 13 years now, two of them professionally and have made some incredible friends in the process. Once you have put so much blood, sweat and tears into something you have a lot of respect for others who have put themselves in the same situation.”

“People come here for all sorts of reasons, for boxing training, for fitness, diet advice, to lose weight, or gain fitness, or just a social outlet. Boxing has something for everyone.” www.peninsulaboxing.com.au

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s l e g An

The

Set to rock Chelsea Heights

By Brodie Cowburn

L

egendary rock band The Angels, who have sold out concerts around the world for over forty years, are set to stop through Chelsea on their latest tour to celebrate four decades since the release of their album ‘Face to Face’. The ARIA Hall of Fame band is now led by Screaming Jets front man Dave Gleeson, who joined up with the iconic band in 2011. He says the tour will feature some of the groups’s greatest hits, and will include every track from the Face to Face album, which first hit record stores in 1978.

“Performing with the band has been unreal. The songs we’re playing mean so much to our fans, and they’re timeless. I really enjoy belting them out every night and keeping the legacy alive. I love playing songs like Shadow Boxer, After the Rain, Am I Ever Gonna See Your Face Again. It’s a blast to play those with the boys,” Gleeson said. continued next page...

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“The 40 year milestone of this album was the perfect reason to head out on tour; to be able to still play it is a great opportunity. We’ll be playing the album from start to finish, just like the days when the fans put their cassette on.” Gleeson has been a lifelong fan of The Angels, and he said he is delighted to have the chance to perform with them. Now having spent over half a decade as lead vocalist of the band, he says it’s surreal to be able to perform this anniversary show alongside his heroes. “I shared a bedroom with my two older brothers who dictated the playlist. One of them was a mad Angels fan; that was when they were constantly touring around the country. I heard him come home from concerts so many times talking about how awesome it was. So I always had this romantic image of The Angels, and when I saw them for the first time in '85 I was blown away. They were on fire and I’ve loved them ever since,” he said. “John and Rick Brewster are humble guys, they’ve been doing this for over 40 years, and they’re stoked to still be out there touring. We pull big crowds wherever we go and there’s still a real energy in the band. You need that energy singing Angels' songs, and it comes from us new guys up there with the guys who started the band, playing great music, and having a great time together.” Gleeson, who has also been front man of the Screaming Jets for close to 30 years, was first tapped on the shoulder to join up with The Angels by founding members Rick and John Brewster. Since then, he’s been performing the band’s greatest hits alongside his bandmates all across the country. “I first met up with John and Rick Brewster when The Angels were off the road and those two were just out there together as the Brewster Brothers. I met them at a gig after they’d parted ways with Doc, and John asked me what Angels songs I knew. I told him I knew all of them because I’m a mad fan. So I got up and did a few songs and a week later John rang up and asked if I’d go into the studios to do some demos, and it grew from there. Before we knew it we were out on the road and now we’ve done nearly 500 gigs together,” Gleeson said. “Our first tour around the country with the Screaming Jets was supporting The Angels, so there’s a lot of history there. To be going out to do the 40th anniversary tour of Face to Face is surreal.

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I was ten when that album came out! Now I get to get up there and sing these songs and do it with the energy they’ve always been performed with.” Gleeson himself is a veteran performer of the Chelsea Heights Hotel, and he said he is so excited to return with The Angels. “We’ve played down on the peninsula many times; we’ve played at the Mornington Racecourse probably three or four times over the last five years. We love it down there and I play the Chelsea Heights Hotel all the time, either with the Screaming Jets or The Angels. It’s always packed there; what’s not to love about that,” he said. Gleeson said the band has been busy off the stage too, and is currently hard at work in the studio on new material. “We’ve just recently re-recorded the Face to Face album to be a companion to the remaster of the original album. We’ve got another album ready to go, that will probably happen next year, and that’ll be the third one I’ve done with the boys. I’m stoked we’ve been able to continue recording and continue working. It’s been awesome,” he said.

The Angels are set to play at the Chelsea Heights Hotel on July 14.


YOUR WINTER BUCKET LIST

There’s plenty to keep your senses alive this winter. Avoid the temptation to curl up at home and work your way through your Mornington Peninsula winter bucket list.

FIND YOUR WA Y TA ST EºE XPLOREºE XPERIENCE

Head online to read the Winter Bucket List blog featuring our top 30 things to see and do this winter.

Find out more at www.visitmp.org/WinterWanders E ssence July 2018

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| 19


AN ADVENTUR

By Melissa Walsh

N

igel Mason has never been afraid of an adventure, having moved out to Australia as a Ten Pound Pom at the tender age of 15, travelling the country, and eventually ending up on the Mornington Peninsula. These days, Nigel lives in Bali where he and his wife have created a flourishing business, Mason Adventures, and a deeply spiritual connection to the people and their country. “While I relocated to Bali at the end of the '70's, I still come back to the peninsula every few months to visit friends and family,” said Nigel, who brings his wife Yanie out here regularly. “I love the peninsula and have always been a skin diver so I have spent a lot of time diving off the coast, especially at Cape Schanck. In fact I was diving at Cape

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Schanck the day Harold Holt disappeared, climbing back up after the dive, we saw all these helicopters, then drove home and heard it on the radio. It was not a rough day by normal standards though.” Having just celebrated his 74th birthday, Nigel is the epitome of cool, with the leather jacket, aerial sunnies and a reminder that life is what you make it. “I guess I ended up in Bali as I’d had enough of what I was doing work-wise and just by accident bumped into a couple of old hippy friends who were making jewellery there. They invited me over so I went with them,” said Nigel who was 37 at the time and didn’t even know where Bali was.


OUS LIFE

“I met Yanie in 1985 and we started a well-known restaurant called Yanie’s,” he said. The two were married, had two beautiful boys and they would take the children down to the river and drink out of a coconut that had been pulled off the tree. “That was the catalyst for us starting the first white-water rafting company in Bali. We would sit by the river and watch people come down the river in big inner tubes and thought 'This could work', so after a lot of work and selling a nice piece of land we began the company. Soon after we added the mountain cycling and the tracking, then made the restaurant, opened the spas and, in 1997, we decided to rescue elephants.”

“We found them in this area and they were very sad and sorry for themselves. The guy who owned them suggested we buy them and we did. That opened up a whole new world for us and off we went to Sumatra where these elephants came from. We could not believe the poor conditions as the deforestation was killing them. They have a short life expectancy with extinction expected by 2029,” said Nigel. “So we ploughed money from the rafting company into creating the elephant park. We now have had four babies there, made the hotel and here we are today with the Mason Elephant Park which was formerly the Elephant Park Safari.”

Fate stepped in at that time when Nigel and Yanie found out about some elephants that had been bought by a person who had no idea what to do with them.

The logistics of rescuing and relocation elephants are so complex that a movie was made out of the final rescue of the last ten elephants in 2005.

continued next page...

July 2018

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“It was called Operation Jumbo and highlighted the drama of us rescuing the last elephants, how we got them and the logistics of bringing them down,” said Nigel, who is very proud of the sanctuary he and Yanie have created. “Our elephants have a beautiful life and the connection with the mahouts is amazing. We don’t use any forceful methods with our training. It is all very gentle and about repetitiveness. It takes longer but the results are worth it as we have calm and friendly elephants that are living a happy life.”

“We have been under criticism, along with a lot of other places, saying it’s cruel to ride an elephant. But it isn’t cruel. What they are talking about is the training methods but we do not use those. We get elephants that are highly traumatised and need to bring them back to being healthy and happy by using gentle repetition. I saw the way they were being treated and said there has to be another way. I believed there was another way to train them and it worked; it took longer but the results are far better,” said Nigel.

Nigel says there has been a change of attitude to animals in recent years as people are getting sensitive about animals in captivity.

For this dynamic duo, creating new business adventures never stops with the recent opening of All Terrain Vehicles and a chocolate factory.

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“One thing leads to another and recently we have gone into the All Terrain Vehicles, and at the same time we opened a chocolate factory. We went to this village with the idea of making this ATV course and they offered us the land but it was too big and Yanie said 'Why don’t we do chocolate'. We already had a bakery, gelato, and nobody was making chocolate, and so Mason Gourmet Chocolates was born.” For Nigel, living in Bali has become the place that he feels most settled and at home, and not just for the climate. “I love the weather of course but the Hindu culture and the lifestyle are very grounding. It is a mild mannered religion and based on family and values. The heart of Bali is the people and their wonderful family orientation. It is the place I feel most at home,” said Nigel who has rubbed shoulders with the rich

and famous. “The secret of my success is that Yanie and I started with virtually nothing, but we have the perfect marriage and the perfect business relationship. Yanie has the background of Bali and understanding the culture and I have the knowledge and experience of living in Australia and the UK with all my business dealings there. We are both hands on. Yanie keeps everything running smoothly behind the scenes and I am out there designing, building and overseeing. It is a match made in heaven,” said Nigel. “We look forward to our visits back to the peninsula to visit my family as well.” www.masonadventures.com

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A JOURNEY THROUGH By Brodie Cowburn

I

t’s been close to a decade since the life of Su-Rose McIntyre, a Mornington counsellor and teacher of the deaf, was turned upside down.

fact I’ve come to know that grief is actually its own medicine. It’s a healthy, honorable thing to do in response to profound loss. It’s nothing to be ashamed of,” she said.

On New Year’s Day 2009, Su-Rose was confronted with the heartbreaking news that her son, Carl, had passed away after a long battle with mental illness.

“I decided to think big and write a book. Writing the book was really therapeutic, and I felt lighter after finishing it. Some of the metaphors were written from deep within myself, while some are from other people who have shared with me their experience of grief.

Nearly ten years on from the start of Su-Rose’s “intense” journey through the grieving process, she has decided to take the brave step of drawing from the pain of her experience to write a book to help others struggling with grief. “This goes back further than a decade. My son developed a mental illness at the age of 18, and I watched him change radically from a fit, engaged, enthusiastic, surfing young man to someone who was heavily medicated and mentally sluggish. It was devastating to witness. I had to do a lot of readjusting to figure out how he could be happy from then on, and he was difficult to live with at times,” Su-Rose said of her son’s struggles. “Unfortunately on New Year’s Day 2009 he was in a state; he was very agitated. He died that night, even though he sought health care himself; it was truly tragic. He had never spoken about doing anything like that; he was just very unwell. From there began my grief journey.” During that journey, Su-Rose said she struggled with knowing what to do to best manage the pain she was feeling at the time. Now, in an attempt to potentially help others who may be going through similar struggles, she has decided put pen to paper and publish a grief-help book of metaphors for the grieving process. “Nothing like this had ever been on our radar before. Nothing prepares you for it, I had no script. My way of handling grief at the time was to hold it in. That’s what my family tended to do and everyone around me that I saw in grief did the same. Our culture is fairly grief averse, we don’t know what to do, and we’re frightened of the power of grief. Grief has an incredible power to change us profoundly and make us unknown to ourselves; it strips up right down to our core. You can become unpredictable and moody. Because of this, most people tend to just push it down, hoping it’ll just go away so you can get on with normal life. In

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“Grief keeps changing, and every day with it is different. You don’t know what kind of a day you’re going to wake up to, but just like a light shining through a kaleidoscope, the light brings hope, a hope that things might get better tomorrow. This inspired my book’s title, 'The Grief Kaleidoscope'.” The Grief Kaleidoscope features 28 chapters, each with a selfcontained metaphor and tips about the process of grief, some drawn from Su-Rose’s own experiences and some from the experiences of others. Su-Rose said the process of drawing on her own experiences to create metaphorical poems and short stories was challenging, as this was her first experience with symbolic creative writing. “I didn't believe what had happened until after the first anniversary; it didn’t seem real. Every anniversary that came and went like a birthday, Christmas, New Year’s Day, it hammered home the reality. That had to happen first before I could do anything with it. During my hour-long commute to work, that’s when I did most of my reflecting. I would observe myself in my grief then, and I would come up with metaphors,” she said. “I went along to some support groups and expressed how I was feeling, and the people I was with liked the metaphors I used and they suggested I make a collection of them. The metaphors kept coming and coming, so I decided to run with the idea and start that collection. I was surprised that the metaphors I had come up with matched the various models of grief that had been proposed by researchers and bereavement specialists. “The book contains fable-like metaphorical language. It was quite daunting to begin. It took me a while to settle down and write. continued next page...


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I had to get away and went up to a small northern seaside township in New South Wales with my laptop. I kept procrastinating, circling the computer like a lion pacing up and down a cage for about three days until, finally, I sat down and began. “It took two years to write. I’d leave it alone and come back to it. Some of the metaphors were too wooden, not real, and I had to change them. I wanted them to be authentic, to truly match my grief emotions, so I dug deeper within myself and changed some of them.” Since losing her son and going through the process of coming to terms with the trauma, Su-Rose became interested in learning more about the best ways to deal with that process. She has gone on to study counselling at Monash University, and now dedicates her time to helping others negotiate the grieving process. “I became very interested in grief. I wanted to read a lot about it and hear about it. I explored every corner of grief possible. One morning, five years on from my son’s death, I was in bed at about 5am when I found myself rising out of bed, going to the computer, and finding a course in grief counselling. I completed a Masters in Counselling degree at Monash University, and did my placement at the Support after Suicide Unit in Richmond. I initially didn't want to do it there because it did hit close to home, but in the end it was a good thing to do,” she said. “I now give talks about grief, its changeable nature, and its management. This includes me telling my story to suicide -bereaved people about suicide loss. They are people who are really hurting, and to have somebody talk to them who’s been through the process and is further along that dark tunnel really gives them a lot of hope. “I’ve also just completed facilitating a short grief course and have discovered that those who work with people dealing with grief, such as nurses and those working in palliative care, are interested

to know more. It’s important for non-grievers to know how to best deal with grief issues so we can help others, and also deal with it ourselves when it’s our turn. “Surprisingly, grief doesn’t have to be all grim and weigh you down. It can act as a fuel. It can be transformative and charge you. There’s such a thing as post-traumatic growth as well as posttraumatic stress. Ten years ago I would never have thought I’d be writing a grief-help book or running grief courses but here I am.” Su-Rose is available to speak to a variety of audiences about the grieving process, and can be contacted directly through her Facebook page for further enquiries. She is also available for direct one-on-one counselling either in person or over Skype. Her book, 'The Grief Kaleidoscope: Metaphors for Grief' is available in soft or hardcover from bookdepository.com or from Farrell’s Bookshop in Mornington. “Suicide grief and losing a child are probably the toughest to go through, but all loss is difficult. There are many types of grief. A devastating diagnosis, a divorce or broken relationship, losing employment, losing dreams, loss of ability, loss of identity, or having to move away,” she said. “I encourage others to talk about their personal grief in trusted company. You’re not alone, you’re part of a huge, hidden, grieving community. Everyone’s got a story, and if you’re brave enough to bring it up, it’ll help bring grief out of the shadows and to shine a light on grief as a healthy response to loss.” Su-Rose is best contacted through her Facebook page facebook. com/griefgrowthcircles or via email at sumcintyre@yahoo.com.au. Those needing support can contact Lifeline at 13 11 14

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LocalTEACHER’S NARRATIVES

By Boronica King

B

rendan James Murray is a published author and fulltime high school teacher who lives on the Mornington Peninsula with his wife Greta. His most recent book, Venom – The heroic search for Australia’s deadliest snake, is about the development of a cure for the deadly taipans' bite, the life of Indigenous man George Rosendale and George’s experience with surviving a bite from Australia’s deadliest snake.

Brendan travelled up to far north Queensland to a place called Hopevale, where taipans live and where George Rosendale still resides. Brendan got to sit down with George and interview him for his book; communication was a bit tricky because George is uite deaf.

“I have always been interested in wildlife but when I was a teenager I heard a story about this young man named Kevin Budden who’d been bitten by a taipan while he was trying to catch one to help develop an anti-venom, and he died as a result of that. I always felt that was a really interesting story, thought I would want to write about it, and ended up doing so.”

Brendan talked to multiple herpetologists about the taipan snake, its behaviour and its deadly venom. He also visited a vet’s home which houses taipans; Brendan got to see, up close, the dangerous creature he was writing this book about. For more information and insight into the hunt for an anti-venom, Brendan looked to old newspapers from around the 1940’s and 50’s.

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“All the questions I asked him I typed on my laptop screen and he read them off the screen and then answered the questions, which I audio recorded.”

continued next page... July 2018


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Brendan Murray is a full-time high school English teacher which he believes affects his writing career positively; when he corrects his students’ writing he reflects on what he has to do for his own. As an English teacher he also has to read certain texts that he may not have thought of reading, exposing him to a different types of writing, of which he would not otherwise have known. Brendan loves his job and how it helps himself and his students through their writing. He explains how his job impacts his writing: “Sometimes it’s hard to write because you are very, very, very busy as a teacher, but school holidays are a really good time for teachers to get into any hobbies they have, which for me is writing.” Brendan continues to inspire his students by being a published author. He runs Writers’ Club at the school and teaches new and advanced writing techniques to the students who choose to attend. Outside of the club Brendan has seen the impact his writing career has made on some students. Some question him about being an

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author even though they were originally not that interested in books; they also get to see and understand that published authors can be normal everyday people and not big celebrities. Many of his students have been inspired to take up writing in different forms: journalism, poetry and writing novels, just to name a few. In 2017, for the Ned Kelly Awards, Brendan James Murray was a joint winner for the “Best True Crime” award, for his first book, "The Drowned Man – A true story about life, death and murder on the HMAS Australia". This book is about a mysterious rumour, life on the HMAS Australia, and a terrible crime that was kept a secret. Brendan had heard about a gay shipmate being brutally bashed and cast overboard because of his sexuality, from an ex-navy man who fought in the Second World War. Brendan hopes to continue to spread his love of writing through his works and shed light on the narrative non-fiction genre.


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By Melissa Walsh

PUTTING IN THE HARD YARDS H

e’s a former pizza shop owner who now owns a busy gym in Rosebud and has taken out some of the world’s most prestigious titles in bodybuilding. Paul Jayilian at 42 won the world title for bodybuilding in Cypress last November, before winning the Arnold Classic in March.

“I had been chasing these titles for years,” said Paul from his newly-opened Empire Fitness Gym. “I went to America several times and then when they brought 'the Arnie' to Australia, tried again only to come in second and third. At last I won in 2017 and I was thrilled.”

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For his most recent acquisition, the world title in Cypress, Paul had to first tie down the Victorian title and then Australian, proving this athlete is not afraid of putting in the blood, sweat and tears.

With a long history and expertise in the body building industry, it was the next obvious step for Paul to open his own gym and so in April he achieved this with Empire Fitness in Rosebud.

“Mental strength is crucial in bodybuilding as we have to exercise and diet meticulously and train flat out to reach our ultimate physical shape. We have an off season where we eat seven meals a day to bulk up, then 12 straight weeks of strict dieting and exercising at least three-hours a day.”

“The process of opening the gym was easy. I was being sponsored by five different gyms, wanted to do something for myself and athletes but do it my way from what I had learnt. Since we opened we have been inundated with memberships and have started training 20 athletes,” said Paul, who loves everything about his job.

For the former pizza shop owner, the big test for him is not to eat chocolate.

“Now I am prepping again to defend the World Championship title in America which will be on 3 November. For that I do one-and-a-half hours of training and then when 12 weeks from the event will start doing "cardio"; training will go up to three hours a day as well as cutting down food.

“I can stay away from fatty foods and pizzas but I am a massive chocolate addict. I usually allow myself one cheat meal a week,” he says with a laugh. Being born in Lebanon and coming to Australia as a young boy, it was being bullied at school that made Paul take up kick boxing and started his road to fitness. “I joined a gym in 2005 and that is where I discovered body building. I had put on 25 kilos after giving up kick boxing and wanted to get back into shape,” said Paul, who was discovered by a trainer at the gym and inspired him to work towards competitions. “Within two years I was in competitions and won a string of state and national titles with my ultimate goal to win world titles.”

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Empire Fitness is set up for everyone from beginners to extreme athletes. “These machines won’t hurt you in any way. They isolate the muscle and are easy on the body. All my members here are given a full program, whether they want to lose weight, tone or train for competition. One thing for sure; I guarantee that I will put in a lot of time to help as it is my passion.” www.empirefitness247.com.au


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Learning A LIFE OF

By Melissa Walsh Photos Gary Sissons

W

ith looks like a mature Daniel Craig and a twinkle in his eye, local artist Eric Shepherd is still producing diverse works of art, from portraits to wildlife and landscapes, even in his 80’s. Peninsula Essence talks to the Mt Martha painter about his life of art and adventure, and the secret behind his youthful attitude.

“I started my working life as a sign painter, learning the ropes at a young age. In those days we had to learn the skill of creating colours and special effects, like painting the top of tables to look like they are timber,” he explained.

“Art is a lifelong process of learning,” Shepherd says as we sit in his home surrounded by decades of his work. “In my younger days I had to learn not just surface preparation and colour mixing but to paint everything, from sign writing, travelling amusement rides, gold leaf application and mural work, and I'm still learning.”

“We spent a lot of time in nature where I used to love to watch birds for hours,” he says with a laugh. “They fascinate me; you sit and look at the bird and how it operates. You look at a little bird and you can become part of it in your soul. I also paint animals, elephants, lions, and have a real affiliation with animals. I can’t stand cruelty to animals, or seeing animals being slaughtered, and have a spiritual affiliation with birds and animals.”

Best known for his birds and wildlife art, Shepherd says starting out in the sign-painting industry was just what he needed to help develop a solid skill set.

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His love of birds and wildlife started early, growing up in country England where Shepherd would spend plenty of time outdoors.

continued next page...


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With a passion for wildlife that began in the forests of Derbyshire England, Shepherd would seek out birds’ nests, or just watch a kingfisher darting back and forth to its nest as he sat on the bank of a pond fishing with his friends. It was these memories that would be the catalyst for turning his talents to portraying his love of wildlife. He first started his working career as a sign writer, learning the skills of the bygone old masters, from wood graining, marbling effects, and gilding, to mural painting, which were all part of a sign painter's trade in those days. As a young married man, Shepherd’s wife saw some paintings of birds that she wanted to buy and that gave the artist the idea to paint them himself. “I said 'We don’t need to buy them, I can paint them for you'. There was a particular artist at that time called Basil Ede and his work was immaculate. I decided I wanted to be as good as him and taught myself. I used to go the museum in England where they would let me borrow stuffed specimens to take home and paint,” he said. “After completing my apprenticeship, I was employed as the sole sign artist for a large Brewery Co. in Nottingham where I produced pictorial swing signs and general signage, mainly all done in 23ct gold leaf,” said Shepherd, who went on to become a studio manager for a large group of fashion stores in the Midlands, producing point-of-sale advertising for over one hundred stores within the group.

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“After many years I decided to form my own company in pictorial signage and had a contract to work in Florida, USA, producing 60 x 20ft murals for the film industry,” said Shepherd who was personally concentrating totally on painting wildlife when he made the decision to come to Australia. “It was 1980 when I arrived in Australia with my wife and family and I became a member of the Wildlife Art Society of Australasia,” said Shepherd, who went on to receive many of the top awards in their annual wildlife art shows. It was after a drive down to the peninsula for a music festival that the artist decided to move to Mt Martha and has since spent his time perfecting his craft with his work is now produced on greeting cards, calendars and china for Maxwell & Williams. “My work is mainly done in oils or acrylics on conservation canvas board, working from field studies and photographs,” says Shepherd who was inspired by international artists Basil Ede, Robert Bateman, and Raymond Harris Ching, and has his work held in many private collections around the world. “There is a certain preciseness that you must have when painting birds as true bird lovers will know every minor detail about the type of bird,” said Shepherd who is a fan of realism and traditional techniques. “You need to research to make sure you’re getting everything right from the eye to the bill to the claws, right down to numbers and which way the claws are pointing.”

Always learning, the Mt Martha artist is working on a World War One battlefield painting commissioned for the Holt Armistice 100 year art exhibition at Narre Warren Mechanics Institute Hall in October. “I was commissioned to do a painting for the armistice and there are about 30 artists involved,” said Shepherd, who loved the challenge. With the same dedication that goes into each wildlife painting, Shepherd says a lot of research has gone into his oil on canvas work "Battle of the Somme" to ensure it was accurate. “It is a mark of respect to get the image right, using information from the War Memorial, getting memorabilia, making sure the uniforms and rifles are correct as a lot changed between World War One and World War Two," says Shepherd, whose painting aims to evoke an emotional understanding of what it was like for the young men in the trenches. “I am trying to show the bravery and fear of these young men who are most likely going to get shot as they climb out of the trench.” Shepherd also paints portraits and is trying his hand at landscapes to keep pushing the creative boundaries. “What I am trying to do now is look at the old masters' works and trying to see what they were thinking when they were painting that. It’s a new interest of mine. Always keep learning.” www.artistericshepherd.weebly.com

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AN MPRG EXHIBITION 20 JULY – 9 SEPTEMBER 2018

2018

NATIONAL WORKS ON PAPER

By Melissa Walsh

M

ornington Peninsula Regional Gallery is hosting the 2018 National Works on Paper from July 20 to September 9.

From over 1,000 entries, 63 artists have been shortlisted for the 2018 National Works on Paper acquisition and award (total prize money $50,000). The prize, the most prestigious acquisitive prize and exhibition of its kind in Australia, showcases recent work by some of Australia’s leading artists working in the field of drawing, print-making and digital media, providing a survey of contemporary practice today. Traditional approaches to working with paper are explored along with works that use new technological mediums – displaying the ways in which these mediums are prompting new explorations of working with and on paper. Shortlisted artists include: Raymond Arnold, Jon Campbell, Danica Chappell, Katherine Hattam, Locust Jones, Viv Miller, John Nixon, Louise Paramor, Jo Scicluna and TextaQueen among others.

Since 1973 the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery has been acquiring works on paper for the permanent collection through acquisitive exhibitions. Works acquired through the former Spring Festival of Drawing and Prints Acquisitive as well as the current National Works on Paper include artists such as Fred Williams, George Baldessin, John Olsen, Rick Amor, Jan Senbergs, Pam Hallandal, Noel Counihan, Mary Macqueen, Richard Larter, Gareth Sansom and Jess Johnson. The 2018 National Works on Paper exhibition will be held at Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery from 20 July to 9 September 2018. Visit mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au to find out more about exhibitions and events, including the Gallery’s pre-schooler program Young at Art, and to listen to podcasts with artists from the 2018 National Works on Paper. www.mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

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THE GENTLE ART OF

RosieWeiss

By Melissa Walsh Photos Yanni

T

he Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery’s National Works on Paper was established in 1998 and incorporated the former Spring Festival of Drawing and the Prints Acquisitive which began in 1973.

From over 1,000 entries, 63 artists have been shortlisted for the 2018 National Works on Paper acquisition, one of which is Capel Sound artist Rosie Weiss. Peninsula Essence talks to Rosie about her love of art, the environment and what inspires her. Rosie Weiss is an artist who examines the relationship we share with the natural world and finds eroded plant fragments teetering on the edge of human activity. Over time Rosie has documented dramatic changes to the shape and structure of

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the coastline in Port Phillip Bay, eroding some parts and plants beyond recognition. “I have always been intrigued with nature and seeing the environment around me since I was a child. My dad was a painter and studied botany. He would take me out on long walks where he would point out all the plant life and how marvellous nature is. We were always looking at the interconnectedness in things,” says the artist who finds inspiration in nature everywhere. “Becoming an artist was something that naturally evolved, growing up with a father who painted and a mother who was a graphic designer. I remember when I was 12 going into a competition for drawing and winning, and that was the first time I thought perhaps I could be an artist.”


While Rosie has found inspiration in nature everywhere, for the last few years her focus has been on Port Phillip bay and looking at erosion. “I went around the bay from Point Lonsdale to Point Nepean, finding things that have eroded in the water. I couldn’t draw or photograph the eroding things fast enough before they disappeared, so had to capture them very quickly. The whole project took about 18 months,” she said of the series called The Trees Are Falling Into The Sea And Other Stories. “In September 2015, I showed the first of these drawings at The Gatekeepers Cottage at Point Nepean as a result of a short residency. Being immersed in the landscape over the winter, I was able to observe and document ‘an extreme erosion event’ which Parks Victoria called it. The trees were falling into the sea faster than I could draw or photograph them; it was like walking through the fallen on a battlefield, their bones bleaching white by the waves.” continued next page...

JULY – SEPT 2018

WHAT’S ON

PROGRAMS

20 JULY 9 SEPT

SATURDAY ART TALKS Saturday 4 August With 2018 National Works on Paper finalists Cameron Robbins, Rosie Weiss and Kylie Stillman.

AT MORNINGTON PENINSULA REGIONAL GALLERY

THE COOK, THE ARTISTS, THEIR WORK AND PAPER Saturday 8 September An MPRG exhibition

Sixty-three finalists from around Australia have been shortlisted from over 1,000 entries for the National Works on Paper acquisition and award (total prize money $50,000).

Join Guy Mirabella for an immersive dining experience with artists Katherine Hattam, Locust Jones and Godwin Bradbeer.

YOUNG AT ART 24 July and 14 August Art activities for pre-schoolers

Georgie Mattingley, I Had to Lift the Calf 2018 (detail), hand-tinted silver gelatin print

mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au adults $4 concession $2

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Rosie says what she observed on Port Phillip Bay is occurring all over the world. “This is a result of climate change, human interventions, and more locally, channel deepening, which has dramatically changed the shape and structure of the coastline in Port Phillip Bay, eroding some parts beyond recognition,” she said. “However, while it is a serious and sad issue, I always feel like there is hope for change and improvement.” The 52 piece series is a selection of mirror plant collection points from around Port Phillip Bay. “They are small fragments that have been dislodged from cliffs and embankments, but they also refer to all living beings, be they plant, animal or human, or all three at once,” said Rosie, who uses a mixture of water colours and Chinese ink for her works of art. “I have always been trying to talk about our relationship with the natural world. Early on I was joining groups and trying to save bits of land but I had this idea that maybe I could do more

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through art and that’s the track I’ve gone down, hoping that the work starts a conversation about how we can help. This work is a way of talking about a global event that is happening and in that sense I guess it is heartbreaking but I always see hope in the world.” A beautiful, gentle soul, Rosie works in her home studio surrounded by bits and pieces she has collected on her walks with ornamental grasses, twigs, shells and stones. Botany and art books, her paintings and special treasures surround her, giving her the safe space to create her stunning works of art. A mother of two, Rosie has seen her fair share of trauma but never lost her joie de vivre even when she was battling cancer. “I created a piece of art while I was going through chemotherapy and recuperating from cancer,” she said. “I just started writing and drawing with my water colours one day when I was very scared going to a doctor’s appointment. It gave me hope and made me feel less like a victim. I realised I was still an artist.”


The piece Rosie is referring to is called Diary Piece which was displayed at Monash University Faculty Gallery in 2012. It is writing and images in a long line, reflecting her feelings of going through the health challenge that lasted three years. “A lot of it is about how you recover from something like that. When I started to make the work I didn’t know I was going to show it then but it made me feel like I am still an artist and not a victim,” said Rosie, for whom everything is a reflection of her experience of life and nature, raw and natural like the woman herself.

The 2018 National Works on Paper exhibition will be held at Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery from 20 July to 9 September 2018. Visit mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au to find out more about exhibitions and events www.rosieweiss.com

“My work has always been very closely connected to my life. A kind of diary if you like, of ideas, statistics, debates in the media, my rain gauge, dreams, combined with my collected plant materials to form a kind of palette that I work from. I want to give my plant forms a voice. I find them on the margins of human activity, roadsides, schoolyards, beaches, besides logging tracks, in my vegetable garden. I want them to say, ‘remember us, we are essential, without us there is nothing.’”

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CELEBRATE NAIDOC WEEK WITH ABORIGINAL ART The McCullochs of Shoreham’s Whistlewood Gallery celebrate NAIDOC week this July with two special exhibitions. At Peninsula Hot Springs, in an exhibition first for this iconic, award-winning enterprise, Meeting Place – Art from the heartlands of Aboriginal Australia is presented in partnership with Whistlewood. Running from July 10 to 17 this beautiful show from seven regions of Aboriginal art features more than 30 pieces that celebrate the connection between water and well being. Included are works of excellence from the Central Deserts, APY Lands, Utopia, the Kimberley, Arnhem Land and the Mornington Peninsula in a wide variety of media and styles including paintings, ochres, finely wrought barks, carved ceremonial poles, small fibre and wood sculptures and the Indigenous Jewellery Project’s metal jewellery. Held in the Hot Springs’ Spa Dreaming Centre, entry is free and all works are for sale with 20 per cent of sales donated to Baluk Arts – the Peninsula’s Indigenous-owned art centre. At Whistlewood itself, women’s art in celebration of this year’s theme of NAIDOC week will be on show from July 7-15 in a focus exhibition Because of her… with a wide variety of works by senior and emerging Aboriginal women artists from around Australia. WHISTLEWOOD | Contemporary Australian Art 642 Tucks Rd, Shoreham T: 5989 8282 Saturdays & Sundays, 11-4 mccullochandmcculloch.com.au PENINSULA HOT SPRINGS 140 Springs Lane, Fingal. T 5950 8777 - Open daily peninsulahotsprings.com

Julie Yatjitja’s striking painting at Whistlewood celebrates the Pitjantjatjara lands she was born in and the heritage passed on to her by her mother.

The full moon over the sea by leading Queensland artist Rosella Namok at Peninsula Hot Springs.

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NAIDOC WEEK EXHIBITIONS

Whistlewood @ Peninsula Hot Springs JULY 10-17 MEETING PLACE Fundraising exhibition of Aboriginal art from 7 regions on the theme of water and wellbeing. 20% of sales to Baluk Arts peninsulahotsprings.com.au

WHISTLEWOOD JULY 7-15

BECAUSE OF HER… Aboriginal women’s art to celebrate the theme of NAIDOC Week

W H I S T L E WO O D

642 Tucks Road, Shoreham,VIC 3916 T: 59 898 282 | E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

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HUMANS - A STIRRING JOURNEY OF WHAT IT MEANS TO BE HUMAN Ten acrobats take us on a stiring journey of what it means to be human, and of how our bodies, our connections, and our aspirations all form part of who we are. Exploring the physical limits of their bodies as they are pushed to the extreme they question how much we can take as humans. How much weight can we carry? Who can we trust to support our load? They lead us to reflect on our lives, our loved ones, the burdens we carry and the physical and emotional strength it takes to overcome them. Created by Yaron Lifschitz, the stage is stripped bare as the vulnerability of a team of highly skilled acrobats is exposed. With incredible strength and integrity they connect each moment seamlessly with the next in a thrilling and heartstopping performance. Glimpse their humanity as they as they find redemptive power in strength and celebrate what it means to be fiercely human. Humans - FAC Theatre Wednesday 22 August, 8pm Bookings: 03 9784 1060 or thefac.com.au DAYTIME MUSIC + THEATRE

Add a two-course lunch for

$22

“Stunning athleticism and heart-stopping acrobatics”

CIRCUS

ArtsHub

$21

$27–$50

MICHAEL CORMICK

HUMANS

Friday 3 August, 10.30am & 1.30pm

Wednesday 22 August, 8pm

Michael will perform songs from favourite shows The Phantom of the Opera, Beauty and the Beast, Les Miserables, The Boy from Oz and many more.

Ten acrobats take us on a stirring journey of what it means to be human, and of how our bodies and our aspirations all form part of who we are.

THIS IS THE MOMENT

Tickets:

thefac.com.au or 03 9784 1060

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by Circa Contemporary Circus

July 2018


JURASSICA Jurassica is a story of family, migration, language and growing old. It is a heart-warming tale, told with humour and pathos and spoken in both English and Italian. It's also about dinosaurs-but not necessarily those from pre-historic times. Ralph and Sara migrated from Tuscany in the 1950s to their concrete-front-yard house in suburban Moorabbin. Their son, Ichlis, never really forgave them for his misunderstood name, and grandson Luca is struggling to talk to his father or grandfather. Then one night Ralph is rushed to hospital and, through an unlikely connection with Kaja, an interpreter who herself fled wartorn Belgrade, Luca learns to reconnect. Developed during his time as Resident Writer at Red Stitch, with Dramaturge Gary Abrahams, Dan Giovannoni's magical new play, Jurassica, weaves the past and present together, exploring what it is to migrate, to be displaced and to spend the rest of your life searching for home. Most of all, this is a play about the importance of family and about mending fences before you grow too old. Jurassica - FAC Theatre Thursday 23 August, 7pm Bookings: 03 9784 1060 or thefac.com.au

Open for breakfast everyday from 9am A luxury marketplace set in the heart of Sorrento, on Ocean Beach Road, from 10am until 3pm

Monday to Thursday: 9am - 5pm Friday & Saturday: 9am - 10pm Sunday: 9am - 5pm

Saturday the 7th July & 4th August

945 Moorooduc Hwy, Moorooduc Ph 03 5978 8049 www.barmahparkwines.com.au info@barmahparkwines.com.au

July 2018

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SPECIAL M E D I C A L F E AT U R E

IN THE

specialists HANDS

The Mornington Peninsula is home to many world class specialists of both medical and cosmetic professions. Unlike many people around the world we are fortunate to not have to travel overseas if we are in need of a specialist. Being on the Mornington Peninsula we have an extensive range of professionals at our fingertips.

The Peninsula's finest specialists range from dermatologists and gastroenterologists to neurologists and plastic surgeons. Each and every specialist is a professional in their line of work and is perfect for the job. They are always willing to give their advice on what to do and how to do it.

Dermal Aesthetics S P EC I A L I S T S K I N & L A S E R CL INIC

T R E AT M E N T S F O R A L L S K I N C O N C E R N S Face & neck tightening

Menopausal Skin

Non Surgical Eye Lid Lift

Male Skin Concerns

Skin Tags

Full Body Collagen Light

Genetic Skin Testing

"Beautiful skin requires commitment, not a miracle" Providing in depth and educational consultations for your skin questions and issues, ensuring your goals are met. We are now offering NEW and CUTTING EDGE services, including HIFU, Plasma Arc, Full Body

Monday - Friday 9am to 6pm (Nights by appointment) Saturday 10am to 3pm

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Collagen Light therapy, Vampire Facials and Nutritional and Environmental Medicine health assessments. The first on the Peninsula to offer these services, as a Dermal Health Clinic, we are more than skin deep.

Level 1/76 Main Street Mornington Phone 5975 2156


IN THE

specialists HANDS

VICTORIAN ORAL & FACIAL SURGEONS Dr Sam Verco is a proudly Australian Oral and Maxillofacial surgeon, and part of the wonderful team at Victorian Oral & Facial Surgeons in Mornington. After growing up in Adelaide, Dr Verco has worked extensively nationally, and specialises in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of defects, injuries and diseases of the facial skeleton and its associated structures. “I especially enjoy the areas of wisdom tooth removal, orthognathic surgery, dental implants and facial trauma,” said Dr Verco, who lives bayside with his wife and two sons, and loves fishing and kiteboarding. “Having grown up in Adelaide, I earnt my dentistry degree (BDS) at the University of Adelaide (2001), Graduate Diploma in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Melbourne (2004) and Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) at the University of Melbourne (2007). “After completing my Oral and Maxillofacial Training in 2013, I gained experience at some of the best hospitals in the country, including the Royal Dental Hospital Melbourne, Monash Medical Centre, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Dandenong Hospital, and Austin Hospital,” he said. Dr Verco stays abreast of advancements in Dentistry by belonging to these associations: RACDS (Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons), ANZAOMS (Australian and New Zealand Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons), ADA (Australian Dental Association), IAOMS (International Association Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons) and ITI (International Team for Implantology).

“The flexibility and scope of private practice means Victorian Oral and Facial Surgery can offer leading edge treatments to patients in a friendly setting,” said Dr Verco. “My team and I look forward to welcoming you at our clinic. Our philosophy is to provide our patients the highest standard of care with expertise, integrity and compassion. We use the latest surgical techniques based on sound scientific evidence. We strive for excellence and devote our utmost attention to perfect every procedure we undertake. In order to achieve a high level of service, we pride ourselves on education by keeping up to date with the latest technology and trends within the industry.” At Victorian Oral & Facial Surgeons in Mornington, procedures include wisdom teeth removal, corrective jaw surgery, dental implants, and bone grafts. “We service the City of Bayside and Mornington Peninsula Shire with all suburbs including but not limited to: Elsternwick, Gardenvale, Hampton, Bentleigh, Frankston, Mount Eliza, Baxter and Hastings.” www.vofs.com.au Dr Sam Verco

V I C T O R I A N ORAL & FACIAL SURGEONS TREATING CONDITIONS OF THE MOUTH, FACE AND JAWS

MORNINGTON + BRIGHTON EAST • • • • • • •

Wisdom Teeth Corrective Jaw Surgery Repair of fractured jaws Exposure of impacted teeth Placement of simple and complex dental implants Repair of fractured facial bones and other facial injuries Procedures for the diagnosis and management of benign and malignant diseases of the jaws and face • Treatment of facial infections Dr Sam Verco • Temporomandibular joint surgery Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon 759 Nepean Hwy, Brighton East T. 9592 6445 350 Main Street, Mornington T. 5976 4465 E. admin@vofs.com.au www.vofs.com.au July 2018

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IN THE

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ST JOHN OF GOD HOSPITAL

New Active Health and Wellbeing Program (AHW) This new program at St John of God Frankston Rehabilitation Hospital ensures access to their therapists is open to everyone; whether privately insured or not. You can access their experienced rehabilitation health professionals using private insurance ‘extras’ cover, or via a referral from your GP (for Chronic Disease Management Schemes). TAC, WorkCover or self-funding patients are also welcome. Programs available: • Dietitian Services • Exercise Physiology • Hydrotherapy • Occupational Therapy • Physiotherapy • Speech Pathology • Women’s & Men’s Health Their modern consulting rooms are equipped to provide the best possible care with some programs offered in their rehabilitation gyms and hydrotherapy pool. Their physiotherapists assist people affected by accident, injury, illness or disability through movement and exercise; manual therapy; education and advice. They maintain health for adults by helping patients manage pain and prevent disease.

Women’s and Men’s Health is provided by experienced physiotherapists who have specialist knowledge and expertise in this area. A variety of conditions are assessed and treated for incontinence and bladder/bowel dysfunction to musculoskeletal complaints of the pelvis. Using the latest in technology such as real time ultrasound. Exercise Physiologists design safe and effective exercise programs specifically for an individual, to ensure maximum performance. They also work with people affected by acute or chronic medical conditions, following injury, trauma or disability. Occupational Therapy enables people to participate in their activities of everyday life. Whether it is by a specific exercise program, use of assistive devices or modifying the way we do things, Occupational Therapy provides a practical approach to making life easier. Services such as dietetics, speech pathology and hydrotherapy complete the comprehensive services now available. Please call 9788 3331 to enquire and make an appointment. Chronic Disease Management Schemes will require a GP referral/management plan.

We can help, every step of the way

All your rehabilitation needs under the one roof Our comprehensive inpatient and outpatient programs will assist you after accident, injury, illness or surgery. Let our team of rehabilitation specialists help get you back to doing what you love. Tel.: 9788 3333 www.sjog.org.au/frankston

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Email: info.frankstonrehab@sjog.org.au

July 2018

255-265 Cranbourne Road, Frankston


Frankston Private Frankston Hospital Private

specialists

Frankston Private Hospital has just

Orthopaedics: We have completed

IN THE HANDSover 150 hip and knee replacement celebrated its first year milestone, after

Caring for Hospital our local for Caring community our local

community

our opening by the Federal Health Minister The Hon. Greg Hunt in 2017. Frankston Private Hospital has just

It has been aitsyear transition for after our celebrated firstof year milestone, hospital, we have surpassed expectations our opening by the Federal Health Minister The Hon. Greg in 2017. and delivered to Hunt our community an appealing hospital that now It has been a year facility of transition for our offers acute care services withexpectations medical hospital, we have surpassed and surgical overnight beds. Wean have and delivered to our community welcomed of local medical and appealinglots hospital facility that now surgical patients our Jubilee Ward. offers acute careinto services with medical and surgical overnight beds. We have

As General Manager I am happy to welcomed lots of local medical and announce a number of new key services surgical patients into our Jubilee Ward. at Frankston Private Hospital that offer the As General Manager I am happy to local community high quality and caring announce a number of new key services specialist services on their doorstep. at Frankston Private Hospital that offer the

local community high quality caring Ear, Nose and Throat: Mr Neiland Vallance, specialist services on their doorstep. immediate past Head of Monash Health ENT andThroat: the consultant at Ear,Service Nose and Mr Neil Vallance, Melbourne Voice Centre has joined us. immediate past Head of Monash Health Neil specialises in all forms of ENT surgery ENT Service and the consultant at with a particular interest voice, Melbourne Voice Centre in has joinedthroat us. Neil specialises in all forms of ENT surgery and vocal cord conditions.

surgeries since opening with Specialist Orthopaedic Surgeons Mr Peter Brydon, Orthopaedics: We have completed Mr John Rehfisch, Mr Brad Crick and over 150 hip and knee replacement Mr Sam Joseph, who are now consulting surgeries since opening with Specialist onsite. In addition, we have welcomed two Orthopaedic Surgeons Mr Peter Brydon, specialist foot and ankle surgeons Mr John Rehfisch, Mr Brad Crick and AmyJoseph, Touzellwho andare Mrnow Keith Winters, MrDrSam consulting enabling us to offer a comprehensive onsite. In addition, we have welcomed two orthopaedic service the local specialist foot and ankletosurgeons Drcommunity. Amy Touzell and Mr Keith Winters, enabling us to offer a comprehensive Urology: The launch of our continence orthopaedic service to the local service in 2018 enables us to offer the community.

local community a comprehensive service

Urology: of our continence locatedThe on launch the peninsula. Our specialist will service in 2018 enables us to offer the guide and assist patients to understand local community a comprehensive service their bladder condition and offer solutions located on the peninsula. Our specialist will that are tailored to their needs. guide and assist patients to understand their condition andday. offer solutions Webladder are growing every that are tailored to their needs.

Maree Fellows, General Manager

We are growing every day. Maree Fellows, General Manager

with a particular interest in voice, throat and vocal cord conditions.

Growing Growing every everyday day 5 Susono Way,Frankston Frankston VIC VIC 3199 3199 03 5 Susono Way, 038796 87961300 1300 www.frankstonprivatehospital.com.au www.frankstonprivatehospital.com.au July 2018

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IN THE

specialists HANDS

HALCYON SKIN CARE Halcyon Skin, a boutique anti-ageing service run by Dr Elizabeth Gascoigne, offers a variety of cosmetic treatments that can keep you looking fresh and radiant. The business is located in Mt Eliza and offers a discrete and personal service to clients from all across the peninsula who wish to look youthful but not "overdone." Services offered by Halcyon Skin include hyaluronic acid and bio-stimulating Dermal Fillers, Anti-Wrinkle Injections, and Skin Rejuvenation treatments including the V2 Beauty Booster and medical grade peels and LED treatments. Owner of Halcyon Skin Dr Elizabeth Gascoigne is a member of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners and the Cosmetic Physicians College of Australasia. She also engages in private surgical assisting in the field of plastic surgery. She has over 10 years' experience performing minor procedures. Her clinic provides a comprehensive facial assessment, advising a conservative approach to facial rejuvenation and treating skin conditions such as acne and pigmentation. Consultations involve a proper medical consultation with transparent advice on risks and costs. Dr Lizzy prides herself on offering a discrete and safe service with personal post-procedure follow-up, providing her personal mobile number to alleviate any concerns or deal with any complications. Halcyon Skin offers realistic advice on how to subtly enhance features and look fresh, whilst paying close attention to privacy and discretion. Dr Lizzy says "my clientele don't want to necessarily

a fresh look, the subtle way

Halcyon Skin can provide your discrete anti-ageing solutions. Services: - Skin Rejuvenation - Anti-wrinkle injections -Dermal Fillers - Peels, - LED, - Skin Needling. - Problem skin solutions (such as acne and pigmentation) Dr Lizzy Gascoigne

www.instagram.com/halcyonskin

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look younger, they want to look good for their age and there is a difference. They are after natural looking tweakments rather than anything too obvious.� Halycon Skin is donates a proportion of profits to several charities and helps support My Huong (Anne), a woman with whom Dr Lizzy grew up, who now helps run an orphanage in Vietnam and has adopted two boys of her own. Anne works to help unify post war Vietnamese adoptees with their birth mothers. Dr Lizzy can be contacted at drlizzy@halcyonskin.com. au or 0411 960 565 if you’re looking to make an enquiry or booking. Call today to set up an obligation free consultation with Dr Lizzy to have a chat about what might work best for you. More information is available on their website halcyonskin.com.au

Dr Elizabeth Gascoigne MBBS, RACGP, B.Pharm, Dip Obs and Gynae, Dip Pall Med, Dip Child Health


IN THE

specialists HANDS

ROSEBUD SKIN CANCER CENTRE Who is the best person to do skin checks? So you've noticed a suspicious mole on your skin. You think it's changed in size, shape or colour, but you're not sure. Or you might have a worrying spot that is itchy or bleeds a bit. You may just have no idea whether the age spots you have are normal... Should you be doing your own skin check, seeing your G.P, a skin cancer doctor, a dermatologist or a plastic surgeon? There has been a lot of controversy about this and I want to give you some hints. Though it's commonsense that when checking for dubious spots, lesions, freckles or moles, you should check your entire body, evidence suggests that doctors – and those of us who do self-checks – don't. Skin checks must be with only underwear on. Many studies have shown that the lesion a patient is concerned about is often not the dangerous one, so presenting with a mole/ sore that concerns you is not enough. Also you can’t see your back where most melanomas occur. Purpose built rooms with adequate lighting and photography for monitoring is also desirable. It may help to ask if the skin cancer doctor or GP you are seeing has had additional training in dermoscopy - a way of assessing moles using a tool called a dermatoscope, which helps visualise features not visible by the naked eye. It is important to understand what training your skin cancer doctor has undertaken. Generally they are GPs, who then go on to study further with the Skin Cancer College of Aust & NZ. To achieve

the fellowship they need to have done 3yrs full time skin cancer medicine before starting the program which generally can take another 3-10 years to complete this qualification. So as long as your practitioner does a full body skin check, has a dermatoscope, adequate lighting and has extra training and experience in skin cancer, you are in the right hands. rosebuskincancercentre.com.au

Rosebud Skin Cancer Centre BULK BILL skin checks for pensioners, healthcare card holders, DVA & over 75’s

Mole mapping available Procedures completed on site No referral needed Mole Mapping is appropriate for people with multiple moles who are therefore at higher risk of melanoma. Mole mapping is the best way to detect new moles and changing moles which cannot be detected by a skin check alone. Using this technique we can pick melanoma up at the earliest stage when they have not invaded the blood, and therefore are curable just by simple excision.

Book an appointment

Call 5986 1600

First Mole Map at a reduced cost of $150!

Experienced professional skin cancer doctors all awarded by the College of Skin Cancer. Dr Sally Shaw, Fellow SCCANZ and Dr Mary Tai Kie, Dip. Dermoscopy and Dip. Of Skin Cancer.

1079 Point Nepean Road, Rosebud Ph: 5986 1600 July 2018

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IN THE

specialists HANDS

NEPEAN HEARING Nepean Hearing is offering free hearing tests and rating your Hearing for Your Age (for the over 40’s). The number of Australians who are hearing impaired is increasing because of the Ageing Population –we are living longer and Excessive Noise - in the workplace and high level music. Hearing loss is often described as the ‘invisible disability’. People often wait for 5-10 years before they seek help. Hearing loss may also be a contributing factor in the speed of onset of dementia. The degree of loss is also correlated to the risk of Alzheimer’s disease. It is important to know about your hearing. Many people ignore the signs of hearing loss, which include turning the TV or stereo up so loud that others complain, frequently needing to ask others to repeat themselves and not being able to hear properly on the telephone. Constant ringing is also another warning sign of hearing loss. As technology advances, many people with hearing loss benefit from hearing aids. These innovations have made a positive difference in the way they can communicate and enjoy their lives. Nepean Hearing is an independently owned clinic and the audiologists are University of Melbourne trained. For hearing screenings their main office is located across the road from Frankston Hospital at 13 Hastings Road, Frankston, phone: 9783 7520. They are also located at: 184 South Gippsland Hwy Cranbourne, phone: 5966 1117, and Hastings Community Health, 185 High Street Hastings, phone: 97837520.

Take advantage of the free hearing test offered by Nepean Hearing to ensure your hearing is at it’s optimum.

Free hearing tests to Seniors Say What?.. during Seniors Week

Personalised Service, Personalised Products

Did you know that many audiologists are not independent, and rely on commissions from only one supplier? At Nepean Hearing, we are proud to be able to offer the latest technical During Seniors Week innovations from the industry, regardless of the manufacturer.

15% discount on our hearing aids We offer personalised service and for self funded retirees. personalised products. Call us today and

book your free hearing assessment and make sure you’re getting the right device.

Ph: 9783 7520 Ph: 9783 7520 www.nepeanhearing.com.au

www.nepeanhearing.com.au 13 Hastings Rd, FRANKSTON

13 Hastings Rd,Health,185 FRANKSTON Hastings Community High St, HASTINGS “Hear Hastings Community Health,185 High St, HASTINGS

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to help”

“Hear to help”

July 2018


Finance

MBA BUSINESS SOLUTIONS In celebration of the new financial year, we are proud to introduce some exciting new services. Business Advice and Monitoring

Place your finger firmly on the pulse of your business and receive continuous updates throughout the year showing you a snapshot of all the vital information you could need. Dashboard your key indicators. Prepare cash flow forecasts. Receive alerts in real time. Weekly? Monthly? Quarterly? We’ve got you covered! Personal Wealth Monitoring

Do you feel like your personal finances are all over the place? Too many separate logins to piece together your full picture? How would you like to take control today? With our personal wealth monitoring platform, your whole financial world is in one place, 24/7. Values update automatically! Bank accounts, shares, super, properties, loans, credit cards, wills, goal setting, budgets. You name it, in it goes. Cryptotax

Introducing our new division, we are the taxation and accounting specialists for people and businesses investing in cryptocurrencies. We demystify the tax legislation and create strategies to minimise income tax obligations and protect your assets. Contact Andrew Bragg on 0456 BITCOIN (0456 2482646) or andrew@cryptocurrencytax.com.au Visit: www.cryptocurrencytax.com.au

The Sounding Board

Let us be your advisory board. Bounce your business ideas off us before putting them into action. Before implementation comes planning and we’d love to be involved as early as possible to help you achieve success. Tailored to your needs, this could be highly structured with a regular diarised catch-up or can be done “ad hoc”. It’s up to you! Get in touch with us today on (03) 5970 8100 or team@mbabus.com.au to discuss how we can help you. Also make sure you check out our website at www.mbabus.com.au

ADVISORY ACCOUNTING TAXATION Level 1 332 Main Street Mornington VIC 3931 (carpark & office entrance at rear- 8 Spray Street) P 03 5970 8100 F 03 9021 8884 PO Box 504 Mornington VIC 3931 E: team@mbabus.com.au W: www.mbabus.com.au

July 2018

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ADDING VALUE TO YOUR ACCOUNTING & FINANCES The Sphere Group was formed with a desire to ‘add value’ to every conversation we have with clients.” Delivering in more progressive and dynamic ways, we have expanded our services to provide seamless financial services for today’s digital age. “We have listened to our clients and created the optimum solution for individuals and businesses alike, a real hub for all your financial needs.” - Brett Hughes, CPA, Director. Here at Sphere, we have 3 core Values : OUR MISSION (What we do everyday)

Fostering relationships with our clients and our employees that add value to their business and personal development. OUR VISION (What we are striving to become)

To be the Mornington Peninsula’s (& beyond) most sought out advisor through developing relationships with our clients and to create a work environment that attracts talented and highly motivated professionals. OUR VALUES (What's not negotiable) • We have integrity

• We demonstrate leadership

• We are pro-active

• We promote work life balance

• We are responsive

• We have fun (…and we’re good with numbers)

• We are Trusted

SPHERE’S SERVICES

Working with you, we take into account ‘the whole picture’ and always looking for ways that we can improve your financial arrangements to help create, protect and grow your wealth. We apply this approach when working with individuals and businesses, and with a breadth of expertise spanning all aspects of taxation, accounting, financial planning and more, we are able to offer a ‘one-stop’ solution for all your financial needs. The Sphere Group is also CA and CPA Accredited. Can’t find what you are looking for? Call us for a chat instead! (03) 8899 6399

At Sphere our mission is to foster long term relationships with our clients that add value to their business and help individuals minimise their tax and grow their wealth. Our team has the technical skills and experience to provide you with clear and concise advice to ensure you achieve the best outcome for your specific needs.

WE WILL WORK CLOSELY WITH YOU AND CAN PROVIDE ASSISTANCE IN:

• Personal Taxation • Small to Medium Business Taxation & Planning • Property Investment & Developments

• Bookkeeping & Payroll Services • Self Managed Super Funds • Wealth Protection & Creation

Early in 2018 Sphere Accountants & Advisors Pty Ltd acquired Positive Outlook Accounting and we welcome those clients, Leanne and staff to the Sphere family. “We have listened to our clients & created the optimum solution for individuals and businesses alike, a real hub for all your financial needs”. Neil Copp & Brett Hughes, Directors Please contact one of our friendly staff on (03) 8899 6399 for further information or to make an appointment. Alternatively, check out our website www.thespheregroup.com.au, drop us a line at info@thespheregroup.com.au or visit our Facebook page.

Conveniently located at 101 Beleura Hill Road Mornington 3931 with free onsite parking

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Are you you getting truly objective Financial advice? Are Are you you getting getting truly truly objective objective financial advice? Are

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PaulPellegrino Pellegrino Paul ROYAL ROYAL COMISSION COMISSION INTO INTO BANKING BANKING

info@partnersinplanning.com.au www.partnersinplanning.com.au www.partnersinplanning.com.au info@partnersinplanning.com.au Partners in planning Pty Ltd ABN : 25 147 390734 are Authorised Representatives of A Partner in Planning (Aus) Pty Ltd Australian Financial Services Licensee 476202 Partners in planning Pty Ltd ABN : 25 147 390734 are Authorised Representatives of A Partner in Planning (Aus) Pty Ltd Australian Financial Services Licensee 476202

How to to free free up up precious precious TIME TIME How … while while running running aa Business! Business! … Mostofofus usare aretime-poor time-poorthese thesedays, days,not notleast leastbusiness businessowners. owners.Running Runningaasuccessful successful Most business creates its own time demands with home life a usual casualty. business creates its own time demands with home life a usual casualty. The place to start looking is the efficiency of your accounting software. The place to start looking is the efficiency of your accounting software. Most software packages are a headache to use as they are too complex for business Most software packages are a headache to use as they are too complex for business operators who are not formally trained in bookkeeping. operators who are not formally trained in bookkeeping.

We are specialists in cloud-based XERO which has become the leading-edge software for We are specialists in cloud-based XERO which has become the leading-edge software for businesses in Australia. We can show you why this tool can simplify the constant “paper warfare” businesses in Australia. We can show you why this tool can simplify the constant “paper warfare” and free up your time to allow you to run your business more time effectively. and free up your time to allow you to run your business more time effectively.

Whether you are an established business or just setting up, we are confident that we can sort out any Whether you are an established business or just setting up, we are confident that we can sort out any problems with your accounting system and recommend add-ons, where appropriate, thereby adding problems with your accounting system and recommend add-ons, where appropriate, thereby adding value to your business. value to your business. Please call Lyn on 5975-3666 to arrange an obligation-free demonstration with one of our expert team. Please call Lyn on 5975-3666 to arrange an obligation-free demonstration with one of our expert team.

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We Love it! Hate Housework?

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TRY SOMETHING A R E YO U A LO C A L B U S I N E S S P R O V I D I N G A U N I Q U E E X P E R I E N C E O R S E R V I C E ? B O O K N O W F O R O U R T R Y S O M E T H I N G N E W F E AT U R E , S P R I N G E D I T I O N . F O R B O O K I N G S O R E N Q U I R E S P L E A S E C O N TA C T BROOKE HUGHES ON 0409219282

2018 TRUFFLE SEASON Enjoy a hands on experience with Jenny and her faithful truffle dog Thomas. As they find the truffle you will be given the opportunity to hold it and take in the wonderful earthy aroma. Participants will also learn about the history of the truffle, how its grown, how the farm operates and finally taste truffle in a selection of delicious food prepared by an experienced local truffle chef.

26 Special Truffle Events, including four with Michelin star truffle chef from Paris, Romu Oudeyer.

Small intimate groups of no more then 15 people allows each person to enjoy this special adventure.

Visit www.redhilltruffles.com for event details For Farm Enquiries call 0417 190 193 or for Truffle Hunt bookings visit www.mpexperience.com.au

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Dishes

Must try

Free range chicken breast Topped with bechamel sauce, Brussels sprouts, bacon & apple. Monkey Business 1/277 Point Nepean Road, Dromana Phone 5981 0685 www.monkeybusinessdromana.com.au

Duck breast, served with a stunning array of beetroot, zucchini, cauliflower and carrots. Polperro Winery

150 Red Hill Road, Red Hill Phone 5989 2471 www.polperrowines.com.au

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Beef checks Slow cooked in a dark ale braise & cauliflower puree St Andrews Beach Brewery

The Pier Cafe on Rosebud

160 Sandy Road, Fingal Phone 5988 6854 www.standrewsbeachbrewery.com.au.com.au

889 Point Nepean Rd, Rosebud Phone 5910 0540 www.thepiercafe.com.au

Chicken curry laska Spicy coconut curry broth, noodles, chicken, vegetables & tofu

Gyros plate with veggies, house made garlic dip and pita bread

St Andrews Beach Brewery

889 Point Nepean Rd, Rosebud Phone 5910 0540 www.thepiercafe.com.au

160 Sandy Road, Fingal Phone 5988 6854 www.standrewsbeachbrewery.com.au.com.au

July 2018

French toast with cream fraiche and home made berry coolies.

The Pier Cafe on Rosebud


Eat & Drink

A MAN ON A MISSION By Melissa Walsh

H

e’s worked at The Square Restaurant in London, The Press Club and Fenix in Melbourne to name a few, rubbed shoulders with George Calombaris, Raymond Capaldi, Gary Mehigan, Shannon Bennett and Marco Pierre White. At 32, Josh Pelham has already achieved the highest industry accolades and is proving his irreplaceable worth as Executive Chef at Cape Schanck RACV Resort.

“My inspiration for being a chef mostly came from sharing a meal with friends and family; to me that is what it’s all about. I love being able to deliver something that most people can’t do at home and it has pushed me to keep pursuing this career every day and every step along the way. I started at 17 at Matteo’s in North Fitzroy, and then spent the following two years of my apprenticeship at Fenix which is where I met George, Gary and Raymond,” said Josh who has been working at the RACV Resort since February last year and was the man behind the successful transition to the new purpose-built building and Cape restaurant.

For Josh working at Fenix opened his eyes to a world of cooking and became the catalyst for continuing to achieve the highest accolades in the industry. “It is a very international kitchen with people like Raymond Capaldi, and it fuelled my fire and passion for working overseas for such a long time. In the end I was working overseas for seven years, with five years working at the one restaurant, The Square, which was a two Michelin star for 22 years,” said Josh, who started at the London restaurant at just 18 or 19. “It was a huge part of my life that I spent there; it helped the way I cook but also the person I have become. Phil Howard, chef and co-owner was my mentor and taught me a lot of life lessons. He was such a kind gentleman who knew how to cook that’s for sure.” Josh says making the move to the Mornington Peninsula to take on the huge role at the resort was not unusual as he thrives on constantly challenging himself and his food also reflects this philosophy.

continued next page...

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“The past 18 months since I moved over here have been fantastic and challenging; at the same time as it’s a business with a lot of facets I have to run,” he said. “We moved from the original building to the new venue the week after Easter this year and it has gone incredibly smoothly. We have a much larger venue with more diversity with Cape, our fine dining restaurant, and Mantellina, a more relaxed, family-friendly trattoria experience with an Italianinfluenced menu. The culinary team also do breakfast buffets every morning. Cape shows off its modern grill menu designed by Josh, showcasing local and seasonal food and the finest-quality produce from the region. “Moving over to the new building, we have tweaked and refined the restaurant menu, introducing new and different dishes,” said

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Josh, who likes the menu to keep evolving. “It is wonderful being able to utilise the different produce on the peninsula with everything from an incredible variety of mushrooms, truffles, seafood, strawberries and fresh fruits,” he said. “One of the dishes I love is the Main Ridge goats' cheesecake with strawberries, balsamic, pistachio and strawberry sorbet.” “It’s great being part of the peninsula community now and we have already developed some excellent relationships with local truffle growers, 'The Diggers' to get heirloom seeds, olive growers, strawberry farmers and the like.” Cape Schanck RACV Resort is at Trent Jones Drive, Cape Schanck. Phone 5950 8000.

Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 730 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u July 2018

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Recipe for all your K I TC H E N ES SE N T I A LS TRADE SALES DIRECT TO PUBLIC

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WILD RED HILL PINE MUSHROOM RAGOUT INGREDIENTS:

METHOD:

Serves: 10 portions Preparation time: 45 minutes Ingredients: • 500g washed Fresh Pine mushroom • 100g finely sliced shallot • 50g finely sliced garlic • 200ml chicken stock • 100ml cream • 50ml brandy • Five sprigs of thyme • Two bay leaves • Finely chopped parsley • 100g butter • 10 slices sourdough • Roquette lettuce • Parmigiano reggiano • Toasted almonds

1. Slice the pine mushrooms 2. In a large pot sweat the shallots and garlic until tender 3. Add the thyme and bay leaf 4. Add the mushroom 5. Season with salt 6. Cook for 3 minutes or until the mushrooms release their liquid 7. Add the brandy and reduce 8. Add the chicken stock and reduce by half 9. Add the cream and reduce by half 10. Finish with fresh parsley and check the seasoning 11. Char or toast the sourdough

12. Place the mushroom ragout on the bread 13. Garnish with Roquette, almond and parmesan salad

Cape Schanck RACV Resort is at Trent Jones Drive, Cape Schanck Phone 5950 8000.

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Corner

Puzzle

ACROSS 1. Fellow player 5. Nursery rhyme couple (4,3,4) 11. Retaliated for 15. Compete 16. Dubai's neighbour, ... Dhabi 17. Disabling 19. Flee to wed 21. Floats on breeze 23. Shiny 25. Regent 27. Meet 28. Vietnamese metropolis 30. Sirloin or rump 31. Seeped 32. Capered 33. Land measure 34. Warded off 35. Suffer (injury) 36. Shout 38. Commoner 40. Donkey foot 42. Jabbers 44. Take leading role 45. ... & Gomorrah 46. Duty list 48. Situated inside 49. Opposite of west 50. Early harp 51. First-born 52. Stuck-up person 53. Old Thailand 54. Standard 55. Christmas carol, ... In A Manger 56. Japan, ... The Rising Sun (4,2) 58. The I of ICU 59. Appoint 61. Garbed 63. I am, ... are 64. ... for tat 65. Addicts 67. Indian city, New ... 69. Medieval farmers 71. Inactive 73. Ciphers 74. Made snug home 76. Hunting bird 78. Roughly stitches 80. Slightly crazy 82. Gape at 83. Detailed & thorough (2-5)

85. Notching 89. Gurgled 91. Purloin 93. Skirt edge 94. Northern Irish province 96. Declined (4,3) 98. Wow, ... whiz! 99. Gymnastics floor pad 100. Blackouts 102. French holiday region 103. Anticlimax 104. More of the same (3,2,2) 105. Hint 106. Maiden name indicator 107. Roadway cavity 108. Flock of geese 110. Nevada's ... Vegas 112. Pacify 114. British anthem, ... The Queen (3,4) 117. Bashfulness 120. Anti-slide 123. Genuine 125. Dusting powder 127. Attain 128. Canine illness 131. Worried 133. Taunted 134. The A of AV 135. Ventured 136. Soil-enriching peat 137. Electrical power units 140. Hamburger, Big ... 141. The Feds (1,1,1) 142. Stories 145. Canada's capital 147. Absolute (3-3-3) 148. Kindest 150. Daze 151. Molecule part 152. Grape variety, pinot ... 153. Brass instrument 154. Gaudy 156. Terrible tsar 158. Prince William's aunt, Princess ... 160. Without a spouse 162. Milk actor, Sean ... 163. Relish or salsa 164. Perches 165. Encourage 166. Copious flow 167. Beer barrels 168. Book leaf 170. Usual 172. Rudest 173. Tiny (version)

174. Food cupboard 177. Trite phrase 179. Concept 180. Coral organism 182. Pagan 183. Attachment (3-2) 185. Accelerated (4,2) 187. Opulent 188. Colorado ski town 189. Gold bars 191. UK New Year's honour (1,1,1) 192. Cable News Network (1,1,1) 193. Curly-tailed marine creature (3,5) 194. Deceitfully 195. Inundated

DOWN 1. Bedroom furniture piece 2. Marksmanship 3. Resentful 4. Bad 5. Mocked 6. Earthenware pot 7. Alter (text) 8. Wooden pin 9. Deduce 10. Flogs 11. Undoing 12. Watchdog 13. Global navigation facility (1,1,1) 14. Arid state 18. Sure-fire 20. Female bard 22. Human body study 24. Forest apes (5-5) 26. Spine-tingling 29. Making impure 37. Despite that (4,2) 38. Bonuses 39. Concerned 40. Refrains from (5,3) 41. Frenzied 43. Oriental market 44. Iffy (2-2) 47. Charity 57. Totals, ... to (4,2) 60. Rainfall duct 62. Waited, ... one's time 66. Outdo 68. Prone to pilfering (5-8)

- NOW OPEN -

69. Match before final 70. Hewn (logs) 72. Cosmetic liner (7,6) 73. Suspenseful novel 75. Simplicity 77. Cries of pleasure 79. Dodged 81. Just manage, ... out a living 84. Enrols 85. Denies 86. Inexpensively 87. Vast 88. Lily-livered 90. Surfing areas 92. Cake covering 95. Kept us going, ... us over 97. To & ... 101. Top dog, numero ... 109. Carnival 111. ... port in a storm 113. Nip 115. Outline 116. Appalled 118. Weeded 119. Skim swiftly 121. Days & ... 122. Defame 124. Treatment using essential oils 126. Dealt out (justice) 129. Getting 130. Open grassland 131. Consumer response 132. Tenderness 138. Writer 139. Speechless (6-4) 143. Trying 144. Receding 146. Stinging insect 149. Popular purple flower 155. Capsicum (3,6) 157. Guarantees 159. Tattooist's tools 161. Directing 165. Reveals 169. Passed 171. Drank like kitten 172. Dicey 175. Ruffians 176. Holler of delight 177. Rub until sore 178. Data entered 181. Flimsy (excuse) 184. Denmark native 186. Geological age 190. Lout

introducing a new level of aged care in mornington. CALL US TODAY FOR A PRIVATE TOUR AND TO FIND OUT MORE!

www.villageglen.com.au

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827-829 Nepean Hwy, Mornington VIC

Ph: 1300 VILL GLEN (1300 845 545)


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on

Baxter

Baxter is a township and rural locality in Melbourne, beyond the urban area. Baxter is seven km south-east of Frankston and 45 km south-east of Melbourne. Originally named Baxter's Flat, Baxter was founded by pastoralist Benjamin Baxter, who lived in a property named Carrup Carrup - the Aboriginal name. The property still exists today on what is now the Frankston-Flinders Road, as does the original cottage he and his wife Martha lived in. The area of Baxter is 697 square km. Served by Baxter railway station on the Stony Point line. Benjamin Baxter died in 1892 and his gravestone, found in the Frankston Cemetery, reads "Benjamin Baxter, late of h. m. 50th regiment. Died at Currup Currup 15 May 1892, aged 87. Also Martha, beloved wife of above 31 January 1906 age 94 years". It was at Baxter's Flat that the railway to Mornington and Stony Point (built in the late 1880s) separated. The station was called Mornington Junction before being changed to Baxter; however its role as a junction ended in the 1980s with the closure of the Mornington line. The early township grew around the railway station and a Post Office named Mornington Junction opened on December 1, 1892 (Baxter from 1918). Baxter has two historic houses. The first is one built by John Sage who married Baxter's daughter. Sages Cottage (1853), off Sages Road, is heritage listed and is a therapy and education centre. The second house is Mulberry Hill, Golf Links Road, built by Daryl and Joan Lindsay. Constructed around a farm cottage in 1920, both the cottage and the additions designed by Desbrowe Annear are heritage listed. The Baxter township is immediately west of the railway station and includes a small shopping centre, a hotel and a compact area of housing. Other historic cottages in the area include a primitive 1850s homestead called Eurutta, and a 1920s American-style residence called Mulberry Hill.

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Baxter celebrated its centenary this year. The Residents and Traders Progress Action Committee held a celebration at Baxter Primary School on Sunday 18 March. It honoured the renaming of Mornington Junction, Baxter’s Flat, as Baxter after Captain Benjamin Baxter the original settler. Mistaken identity: For a short time the visage of American civil war soldier Benjamin Baxter adorned the wall of the Telstra Exchange building, on Baxter-Tooradin Road, Baxter instead of early settler, Captain Benjamin Baxter. Despite being a small community, Baxter has a colourful history. Mulberry Hill is home to the artistic Lindsay family and played host to many noted artists and famous visitors from overseas. Nevil Shute, author of On the Beach and A Town like Alice, bought property in Baxter in the 1950s and, despite some referring to the location of the property as being Langwarrin, the town is determined to “claim him”. Other well-known former residents include Diane Dunleavy, of Grubby and Dee Dee fame, now on 3AW, who grew up in Baxter and went to Baxter Primary School, and daredevil rider Blake “Bilko” Williams, with Nitro Circus, who has travelled the world stunt riding. The township’s founder was believed to be the first white man to settle on the Mornington Peninsula.

COFFEE SAFARI KICK BACK CAFÉ 634 Frankston-Flinders Road Perfect coffee and pies, and great place for brunch

MOODI'S CAFE 62 Baxter-Tooradin Road Great for coffee and cake or lunch, always full of flavour

ANYONE 4 COFFE BAKERY CAFÉ 106 Baxter-Tooradin Road Fantastic coffee and nice selection of eats, sweet and savoury

OLIVERS CAFÉ BP Service Centre Shop 2, 1401 Peninsula Link Freeway Inbound From deliciously hot certified organic coffee and herbal teas to snacks and fresh meals


WHAT TO DO?

Baxter is a rural town 7 km south-east of Frankston and is a beautiful place to explore, scattered with fascinating heritage, such as Sage Cottage. Baxter is a place that has a literary connection to British born author Neville Shute, who wrote the acclaimed novel "on the beach". Baxter Tavern, being a motel, bistro and pub, is a great place to relax with a meal and a drink. Baxter Park is home to multiple sporting clubs including the Frankston Archery Club; it also houses five tennis courts, multiple sporting ovals and a horse riding facility. Photography: Yanni

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Real Estate

SHEER OPULENCE IN MT ELIZA By Melissa Walsh

A

first-class family entertainer with opulent inclusions, this spectacular 5 bedroom home with impressive swimming pool on Mt Elizas prestigious Golden Mile delivers a lifestyle coveted by many yet obtained by the lucky few. Walking distance to Toorak College and the crystal waters of Canadian Bay Beach, lifestyle is the prise de jour from this elite seaside sanctuary, while the excellent selection of eateries in the village are so close you can share a bottle of wine over dinner and stroll home under the stars.

calibre, while a large master bedroom with double-shower en suite and dual walk-in robes, an en suited guest bedroom with private balcony and water views, full family bathroom and powder room have household conveniences more than adequately covered.

Parading three stunning living areas over 45 squares (approx) and a home theatre with projector and screen, the lavish layout is divinely enriched by a vast barbecue deck through bi-fold doors with alfresco kitchen for truly exceptional poolside entertaining.

With a listed price of $2.9M, the property is offered for sale by Community Real Estate, Mt Eliza.

A premium kitchen with stone island, Miele dishwasher, dual Blanco ovens and butler’s pantry well befits a luxury home of this

For inspections or further information, contact Community Real Estate on 9708 8667.

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Set upon a magnificent 1666m2 (approx) allotment among stunning gardens and sweeping lawns, this 6 year-old home still under builders warranty includes an open study, ducted heating and vacuuming, evaporative cooling, intercom, alarm and fourcar garage with rear roller door to securely park the boat.


x

Introducing Honor Baxter A local agent with 20 years sales experience in Mount Martha, is now part of a 48 strong office network. 0418 148 468 | 5973 5444 hbaxter@hockingstuart.com.au

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LUXURIOUS LIVING IN MT ELIZA utopia of style and luxury, this striking Mt Eliza home is set to dazzle anyone who walks through its doors. Complete with a heated pool, tennis court, beer on tap and a stunning home cinema, this gorgeous property is jam packed of wonderful features to entertain guests, making it one of the peninsula's most extraordinary modern homes.

A

Stepping outside the gorgeous home will see you enter the picturesque backyard area, fitted with a pool, 20 seat spa, waterfall, a poolside alfresco kitchen, and a charming indoor/outdoor dining area, perfect for hosting visitors and enjoying unforgettable evenings by the pool with family and friends. Waking up in this home is akin to the feeling of waking up in a resort.

There is no better place to call home than the beautiful Mt Eliza, the gateway to the Mornington Peninsula, and this house of more than 60 spectacular squares is among the most spectacular you'll see there. A step inside this cutting edge property will see your breath taken away by five living areas, four fully tiled Calcutta marble bathroom, a stylish and functional epicurean kitchen with an expansive marble island, sandstone walls, and a gorgeous modern chandelier. The attention to each luxurious detail taken with the property is one of the house's outstanding qualities, with silk fabric feature panels, solid spotted gun floors, an expansive penthouse style dressing room inside the master suite, and a creative spa style ensuite opening to a large balcony area.

The home also features a number of technological innovations that are second to none, with modern keypad entry and CCTV alarms keeping your family safe. This stunning 2/3 acre property is surrounded by grand tall tapered hedges, maintain privacy in an elegant fashion.

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This unique family oasis is available for inspection. Call Natalie Sevior on 0439 368 181 or Quentin McEwing on 0409 389 268 for more information.


Your Invitation to join our community

Connecting people, Connecting business, Creating a business community. Peninsula Business Networking (PBN) is a not-for-profit association that supports and connects people like you, and businesses like yours. We help you and your business grow, and build and cement relationships that make a difference. Together, we help drive sustainable economic growth on the Peninsula.

We invite you to join our membership community for as little as $75 (annual fee) via: www.peninsulabusinessnetwork.org.au

July 2018

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By Peter McCullough

THE BATTLE OF MOOROODUC

M

oorooduc might be little more than a locality but for a number of years it boasted two community halls. Strange? Well, read on.. Progress Hall, a.k.a. The Tin Hall.

In June, 1909 the Moorooduc Progress Association was formed with Messrs Falls and Warland as President and Secretary respectively, and at a meeting later in the year Mr. R. Wilkinson proposed the building of a public hall. The local paper reported that, although his speech was “vigorous”, it did not arouse much enthusiasm. The Progress Association meetings were quite social for at the close of this meeting, held at the home of Cr. T. Male, “... the company adjourned to the spacious breakfast room, tastefully decorated with many varieties of good things suitable for the inner man, and amidst good natured jokes the vacuum caused by the good work at the meeting was replenished.”(Mornington Standard, 2 October, 1909.) The public hall was raised again in 1912 and, although the prevailing view seemed to be that roads should be a priority, it was decided to call a public meeting to canvass the matter of the hall. 'Position' was already looming as an issue. With business completed “... dancing was kept up in the large room and conservatory at 'Annesleigh' interspersed with songs and supper at twelve, after which dancing continued until three o'clock.” (Ibid. 10 August, 1912.)

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History

In order to resolve the question of location, Mr. Edward Jones and his son, Mr. Charles Jones, agreed to excise a block from their property located on the corner of Mornington-Tyabb and Derril Roads. Just south of the intersection and opposite the Moorooduc Primary School, it seemed an ideal site. With the location settled, the Progress Association moved quickly and their hall, of tin and weatherboard construction, was opened on 7 April, 1915. “Patrons and friends” were invited to attend and participate in a “sale of gifts” fete. (Ibid. 13 February, 1915) For some time this building was a hive of activity; with the assistance of kerosene lamps for evening functions dances were held frequently, balls and concerts took place, and it was the regular meeting place for community organizations such as the Farmers' Union and, of course, the Moorooduc Progress Association. The Church of England was quick to make use of the facility: “The Westernport Parochial Council has granted the local Progress Hall the right to be included in the church parish.” (Ibid. 25 November, 1916.) Alice Jones, a former student of the nearby Primary School,

became the first postmistress of Moorooduc, conducting her office in the Progress Hall. The Brick Hall In spite of the bonhomie which seemed to prevail at meetings of the Moorooduc Progress Association, there was dissension in the ranks. Although the question of location appears to have been the main bone of contention, there is also the suggestion that the rather modest “Tin Hall”, as it was rather disparagingly referred to by the dissenters, was not in keeping with the general affluence of the area. Accordingly, a group of residents, led by Mr. Wilkinson, formed the Moorooduc Advance League and decided to erect a more superior building half a mile to the south on the corner of Bentons and Derril Roads. No time was lost. There were no objections to an item on the agenda of the Shire Council: “S.E.McColl, hon. continued next page...

Above left: The Tin Hall, opened 7 April 1915. Left: Edward Jones with his wife Sarah. Below: The Brick Hall, opened 16 June 1916.

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sec. Moorooduc Advance League, submitting plans of Moorooduc Public Hall for Council's approval.” (Ibid. 20 June, 1914) . Two weeks later (2 July, 1914) tenders were called in the Melbourne Herald by Mr. Wilkinson for “...a brick and concrete public hall, Moorooduc.” The new public hall, built of Northcote bricks to the design of Mr. Berry of Oakleigh, was opened on 16 June, 1916 by Mr. A. Downward M.L.A. as a crowd in excess of three hundred looked on. Mornington Shire President Flood was in the chair, and the occasion was marked by a concert followed by a dance. Although the building was less centrally sited than the hall opened fourteen months earlier, it was more modern, and as a result a certain amount of competition and rivalry developed between the Brick Hall and the Tin Hall in a tiny community which might well have found it an effort to support one such building. Even the local primary school, when it was closed for repairs in 1916, held classes in the Brick Hall, some distance down an unmade road, instead of the close-at-hand Tin Hall. A report on the State School Patriotic Concert in 1917 stated that “...the spacious brick hall was taxed to its fullest.” However in 1919 it was reported that the school breakup was held in “the neighbouring hall.” (Ibid. 9 January, 1920.) Interestingly, the speed of its construction notwithstanding, there must have been a few complications: “...a meeting of the Advance League was held in their hall and a lengthy discussion arose on legal points.” (Ibid. 30 September, 1916.) Occasionally it was hard to work out which hall was being referred to; in 1928 the school committee held a dance in “The Moorooduc Hall” to raise funds for the Shrine of Remembrance (Ibid. 3 August,1928). If the reporter wasn't sure he resorted to “Moorooduc Hall” and let the readers work it out for themselves! Faced with the challenge from just along the road the Progress Association did not rest on its laurels: “A working bee on Saturday afternoon was well attended and good work was done in removing

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the temporary shelter in front of the hall, and getting the foundation in for the additions which the committee have felt in need of. The ladies provided afternoon tea.” (Ibid. 28 October, 1916.) The following year it was reported: “The Progress Association is now putting in pipes to underground drain their land. The anti-room is also being furnished with nice weatherboards.” (Ibid. 11 August, 1917.) As well as these continued attempts to improve the facilities, social activities at the Tin Hall continued as if nothing had happened. Fortnightly dances continued (Ibid. 4 November, 1916.) and the following year it was reported that “...a fund raising concert had been put on in the Progress Hall by the Mornington Minstrels and Variety Company to raise funds to erect a roll of honour board to the local soldiers.” (Ibid. 1 September, 1917.). A week later a fancy dress ball was held in the Progress Hall (Ibid. 8 September, 1917.) and early in 1918 the Hard Times Ball, held at the same venue, was describes as a “great success.” (Ibid. 4 May, 1918.) One can only imagine the ill-feeling that existed between the two camps at the time. Local families who were “unaligned” and were holding a family function such as a 21st birthday would seek an alternative venue in Mornington or elsewhere in order to avoid repercussions. On one occasion the tension was reflected in a letter to the local paper from “Advance Moorooduc” who gloated: “The additions to the tin hall seem to be a failure, while the studs stand there exposed to the weather.” (Ibid. July, 1917.) Perhaps spurred on by this little remark, a working bee which was held “...at the M.P.A. hall and Post Office painted all the most important parts that were feeling the effects of the weather.” This was in preparation for Christmas gatherings and the annual ball. (Ibid. 12 October, 1918.) It was subsequently reported that : “The annual ball of the Moorooduc Progress Association was held on 11 October in the local hall.”(Ibid. 26 October, 1918.) Not the Progress Hall or the Tin Hall, but “the local hall.”


Above: The church/school on Three Chain Road (Moorooduc Highway).

The following year a notice appeared in the local paper advising, at short notice, that the unveiling of the honour board had been “indefinitely postponed.” No reason was given but it is most likely that there was disagreement as to which hall should be the home for this sentimental item. Some years later mention was made of the transfer of this item, for reasons which will soon become obvious, from the Tin Hall to the Brick Hall. With the competition for support the two rival groups started to feel the pinch. The Moorooduc Progress Association tried to build support but it was reported that their “... circular letter to induce new members did not crowd the hall.” (Ibid. 1 July, 1927.) This was the reporter's gentle way of saying that the attempt was not not successful. In 1928 a public meeting was held to form a committee of management for the Brick Hall. “ The hall is popular for dances, but has been neglected over the past few years, and the debt has increased, an indication of lack of interest in public affairs by local residents...The new committee intends to hold dances which will begin in a fortnight's time, and a working bee will be held to clean up the accumulated rubbish...” (Ibid. 24 August, 1928.)

Church of England worship commenced in Moorooduc. Initially services were held in a private dwelling, 'Annesleigh', and then in the small wooden building in 'Three Chain Road' (now the Moorooduc Highway.) which served the early settlers as both church and school. Although services appear to have lapsed for a number of years, the next really positive steps taken by the Anglicans were in 1916 when Moorooduc began a 30 year association with the Parish of Hastings. Worship commenced in the Progress Hall where seven children were christened at a service in January, 1917. (Ibid. 3 February, 1917.) Enthusiasm increased and in 1920 a block of land (2 acres, 7 perches) was purchased from the Lands Department as the site for a church. The purchase price was 10 pounds, 4 shillings and 5 pence, plus costs of 3 pounds, 6 shillings and 6 pence, and it was located on the east side of Derril Road, slightly north of Bentons Road; it had been part of the Jaen Jaen Military Water Reserve.

The Anglicans come to the rescue: the Tin Hall becomes St. Paul's Church Hall

By 1927 weekly Sunday School services had started and the attendance at the fortnightly church services had increased to 50. The Tyabb Dramatic Club held a Grand Entertainment at the end of 1929 in the Tin Hall and on another occasion a movie picture “created a good deal of missionary interest.” In 1929 a group of young boys and girls met after school every Thursday afternoon

Soon after the opening of St. Peter's in Mornington in 1861,

continued next page...

With the loss of revenue, and money still owing, the position of the Tin Hall became precarious. But a white knight was at hand.

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Above: The Tin Hall, in a dilapidated state, just prior to its demolition.

to prepare for a “sale of work”; the Guild had several missionary afternoons of interest to members. The produce from Harvest Festivals was usually conveyed to the Andrew Kerr Memorial Home in Mornington. While the Tin Hall had become the focal meeting place for the Anglican community, and for which they paid a modest annual rental of one guinea, many members were still keen to establish their own centre of worship. Consideration was given to the clearing of the block purchased in 1920 adjacent to the Recreation Ground, but this did not proceed. Prior to its purchase some difference of opinion existed as to its suitability as a church site, and this was probably a factor in the lack of urgency. In 1932 the Church's need for a building, coupled with the plight of those responsible for the Tin Hall, was resolved when the land and hall were purchased by the Church of England for 105 pounds and 5 shillings, plus costs of 6 pounds, 11 shillings and 6 pence. This led to the abandonment of any plans for the building of a church on the southern site and the property was later sold in 1948 for approximately 40 pounds. Later in 1932 a further 70 pounds and 16 shillings was spent on fitting out the Tin Hall as a church hall, including the building of an altar alcove. A special dedication service was held in March, 1933 in the building which had been “...thoroughly renovated and painted and a chancel added.” It was also noted that these modifications “...can be screened off when the hall is used for other than church

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services.” (Ibid. 12 March, 1933.) In 1935 further improvements were made to church furnishings. For some years St. Paul's Church Hall, as it had now become, was used on alternate Sundays by the Church of Christ and Anglican congregations who frequently attended each other's services. Quite an emphasis was placed on the missionary aspect. Scouting activities were associated with the church, and there was a regular attendance at services by many of the scouts of the Lone Patrol. A renewal of church interest was evident in the 1940's with services each Sunday. An evening service was proposed but the difficulty was a lack of lighting. As the church newsletter reported, a solution was found: “...a social evening was arranged in the Brick Hall by an active band of ladies and the nett result of 10 pounds, 14 shillings, and 6 pence will be sufficient for two Aladdin lamps.” This might sound inadequate but it did not deter a congregation of over 50 from attending the regular evening services. As has happened in many rural areas, St. Paul's Church Hall suffered a decline: the Sunday School disappeared and the numbers in the congregation fell away. By 1969 it had ceased to operate. What next for the Moorooduc Progress Association? Without the responsibility for the Tin/Progress Hall, the Association took a few years to regroup. During this time the Moorooduc Advance League disbanded. Then in 1944 the Progress Association appeared to experience a revival when they held a dance in the Brick Hall in aid of “the new hall fund” (Ibid. 28 September,


Above: Bill Jones BEM AFSM. Top Right: The original Moorooduc Fire Station. Right: The current Moorooduc Fire Station, built on the site of the Tin Hall.

1944). Then it was reported: “The Association has decided to hold a monthly entertainment to build up a fund for the purpose of building a public hall for the district,” (Ibid. 30 November, 1944.) Surely there wasn't going to be a third hall in Moorooduc? This possibility was negated when, on the death of the owner, it was decided at a public meeting, held in January 1945 and sponsored by the Progress Association, to purchase the Brick Hall which was still being leased for public entertainment. The district was canvassed to raise funds so that the Progress Association could make the purchase. This was achieved during 1945 when it was reported that, after paying 300 pounds for the hall, the Association still had a credit balance of 145 pounds. Trustees were empowered to make the necessary arrangements for the erection of a supper room and the installation of electric light. (Ibid. 18 October, 1945.) Flushed with their success, the Moorooduc Progress Association attempted to re-badge the Brick Hall: “...a very successful dance, under the auspices of the Progress Association, was conducted in the Progress Hall...” (Ibid. 31 July, 1947.) To the locals it remained the Brick Hall. In the years following the purchase of the hall funds were raised by the Progress Association, the Entertainment Committee, and the Gymkhana Society; a new floor was installed, a kitchen and storage shed built, rooms were renovated, and the hall was repainted. Then, after a number of false starts permission for extensions was obtained and a public canvass of the district met with a very generous response. Work commenced in July, 1961 and it was believed that

the enlarged building with the addition of stage and dressing rooms would fill a need in the district by providing an entertainment centre for young people. In November, 1961 a gala ball was held to mark the opening of the “...new and splendidly equipped Moorooduc Hall.” (Ibid. 8 November, 1961.) Moorooduc today The 1st Moorooduc Scout Troop, which was established in 1952, held their meetings in the Tin Hall until they went into recess in 1968. Then, after the final church service in 1969, the Tin Hall was not used for over 20 years. Although the building itself was somewhat dilapidated, the grounds were kept tidy by members of the Jones family who still owned the adjacent property. In 1991 the Tin Hall was sold to the Country Fire Authority. It was demolished and an impressive new fire station, large enough to house three vehicles, was constructed. This would seem an appropriate outcome as the Jones family, who originally donated the block to the Progress Association, have been heavily involved in the 70 odd years of the history of the Moorooduc Fire Brigade. Bill and Bette Jones, both now deceased, were instrumental in the establishment of the brigade. They donated the land to house the brigade vehicle in a Nissen hut and converted the first tanker from an ex-army vehicle in the 1950's. In 1968 a base radio was installed on the Jones' Derril Road property. Bill was awarded the B.E.M. and the A.F.S.M. (Australian Fire Services Medal) and Bette continued next page...

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Above: Nev. Jones defending the CFA with two well-known onlookers. Nev joined the CFA at the age of 11 and has been an officer of the Moorooduc Fire brigade for nearly 40 years. He has been Captain since 1991 and is State President of the Volunter Fire Brigades Victoria. Left: CWA advertisement referring to the "little red brick hall". Below Left: Invitation to the centenary celebrations held in 2016.

received the OAM for their contributions to fire fighting in general and the Moorooduc Fire Brigade in particular. Their son, Nev., is the current captain of the brigade and he and other family members were involved in the development and eventual construction of the new station in 1994. The Brick Hall is sometimes referred to by its official name of “The Moorooduc Hall', but more commonly it is referred to either as “The Brick Hall' or even “The Red Brick Hall” The ladies in the C.W.A. take it a step further and , when they are are advertising an event, it is held at “The Little Red Brick Hall.” This almost has a fairytale ring to it. Whatever the name, the hall continues to provide outstanding service to the community. The Moorooduc Progress Association still overseas the use and maintenance of the building. It is a regular meeting place for local groups and clubs and is available for hire for social events. For many years it served as the scout hall until the scouts, who had reformed in 1978, obtained their own premises at the rear of the primary school. More recently it has become popular for its regular garage sales and craft expos. In August, 2016 the Brick Hall celebrated its centenary with a very successful open day for past and present residents of Moorooduc. ***

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Acknowledgement: It would be remiss of me not to acknowledge the assistance provided by Valda Cole. Much of the information has come from her splendid local history “Western Port-Pioneers and Preachers.” and, as always, she has happily provided further details. Thanks also to those who assited in my search for a photograph of the Tin Hall, particularly Peg Gibson and Glenn Parnell. July 2018


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Peninsula Essence July 2018  

Peninsula Essence July 2018

Peninsula Essence July 2018  

Peninsula Essence July 2018

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