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OCTOBER 2021

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

Between Two Worlds • Stars Of The Sea • Behind The Blue Gate MP Mumpreneurs • Moonlit Milestone • The Art Of The Matter • Happy Space Italian Adventure • “Old Tichingorourke” – A Mt Martha Settler


What's on?Upcoming Peninsula Events

*OCTOBER 2021

* Check with venue for individual Covid lockdown restrictions.

OCTOBER 2 KEEPING BACKYARD CHOOKS

OCTOBER 4-31 FRANKSTON SENIORS FESTIVAL

OCTOBER 17 PETS' DAY OUT

OCTOBER 26 COMPUTER DECLUTTERING CLASS

OCTOBER 3-31 LIVE MUSIC SUNDAY SESSIONS

OCTOBER 31 BUDDY HOLLY IN CONCERT: THE TOURING YEARS

Chooks not only make great pets. They're great composters and give us delicious eggs as a reward! Come along to this online workshop by Ella from Chooktopia and learn how to create a healthy, happy chooktopia of your own. www.mornpen.vic.gov.au/EventsActivities

Pets’ Day Out is the perfect op-pawtunity to spoil your best friends to a fun day out at Ballam Park! Big or small, fluffy or scaly, whether you pet meows or quacks we welcome them all. This one stop hop to animal activities, pet information, stalls and demonstrations is not to be missed. Save the date and mark it in your calendars. www.discoverfrankston.com/ whats-on

There will be a mixture of free and low cost activities and free public transport covering all metropolitan services, all V/line services and all regional town bus service for Victorian Seniors Card holders for the period of October 3-10. www.discoverfrankston.com/ whats-on

There's no better way to finish off a great weekend or pre-empt a tough week ahead by lapping up some live tunes, enjoying a chilled vibe with of a few mojitos, local beers or wines. Every Sunday from 3pm, local musicians play live at JimmyRum Distillery. www.jimmyrum.com.au/events

Sen Feeling overwhelmed with all the emails, photos and files on your Windows 10 computer or laptop? Join this free digital decluttering class and we will help you get organised. Free, but bookings essential. www.ourlibrary.mornpen.vic.gov. au/Whats-On/Events

A Tribute to the Music Legend Buddy Holly & with special tributes to Chuck Berry, Ritchie Valens, Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Jerry Lee Lewis and Eddie Cochran starring internationally renowned Scot Robin! www.artscentre.frankston.vic. gov.au

Calling all 8 - 10 year olds to Try Sailing! LEVEL 1 - MYC JUNIOR & YOUTH SAILING PROGRAM

TRYSAIL Developing independence & resilience outdoors

Mornington Yacht Club’s Junior and Youth Sailing Program encourages active learning for young sailors to develop confidence and competence as they develop into resilient and independent youth. After 4 sessions, membership is required, committing to a lifelong journey of Family, Friendship & Sailing at MYC! Act Now! Only 10 places available each month! Go to our website to register your interest Sundays 11.30am-2pm

A - October

B - November

C - Jan / Feb

D - Feb / Mar

4 SESSIONS

Find out more by contacting the club or going to our website.

Mornington Yacht Club Schnapper Point Drive, Mornington VIC 3931 Phone: (03) 5975 7001 www.morningtonyc.net.au

FREE!

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contents

Leading 7.

Between Two Worlds

Robert Newton is a full-time firefighter with the Metropolitan Fire Brigade in Moorabbin, but at home in Mount Martha, he’s an award-winning young adult novelist.

10. Stars Of The Sea Starfish Nippers is a program managed by Sarah Hilli and Julie Marshall, designed specifically for kids and young adults with special needs where the participants are made to feel like everyone else.

16. Behind The Blue Gate Five time Walkley award winner Peter Nicholson enjoyed a long and successful career as a political cartoonist. These days Peter has organised the Friends of The Beleura Cliff Path, a group committed to indigenous revegetation and working with Mornington Peninsula Shire Council to protect the path in perpetuity.

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Special Feature

20. MP Mumpreneurs The AusMumpreneur Awards celebrate the efforts of women around Australia that have dedicated themselves to entrepreneurship alongside the challenges of parenthood. Mothers in the Mornington Peninsula area won awards for their efforts in establishing and maintaining businesses that not only thrive but are creative and sustainable.

24. Moonlit Milestone

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32 Proudly published by

Writers: Andrea Louise Thomas, Joe Novella, Andrea Rowe Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Creative: Sam Loverso, Dannielle Espagne Publisher: Melissa McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or email brooke@mpnews.com.au Phone: (03) 5974 9000 Registered address: 63 Watt Road, Mornington 3931 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention. Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

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26. The Art Of The Matter Michelle Crozier expresses herself through recycled and repurposed materials that she incorporates into artworks and installations. And sometimes she just makes something special for someone she loves.

28. Happy Space KWD & Co. want to give kids some control back in their lives and have developed a program called #myhappyspacemovement where two students will be gifted a bedroom makeover.

Eat & Drink 30. Italian Adventure Securing a parcel of Nero d’Avola grapes, Garry Crittenden has jumped in feet first to produce an elegant new drop called 'Catto'.

Focus On 40. Focus On Rye Interesting facts, coffee safari, what to do and photos.

45. “Old Tichingorourke” – A Mt Martha Settler The local Bunurong people called him “Old Tichingorourke” after their name for the waterway that ran through the land. He was the first European to settle there – Captain James Reid.

Cover Image by Yanni

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Arts

History

facebook/peninsulaessence Instagram @peninsulaessence

PEFC Certified This product is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. www.pefc.org

Moonlit Sanctuary Wildlife Park celebrated its 20th anniversary in September, and the success of the park is a tribute to the enthusiasm and commitment to the natural environment of director and founder Michael Johnson.

The Matthew Flinders cairn is an impressive monument set in a viewing area on the way to the top of Arthurs Seat. This is the location in April of 1802, from which the English explorer noted Port Phillip Bay’s characteristics and named what is now known as the Bellarine Peninsula “Indented Head”.

October 2021

Every Month 6.

Peninsula Styles

32. Recipe

42. Crossword


The all-electric EQC. Electric now has a Mercedes.

Visit us at Mercedes-Benz Mornington and discover the all-electric EQC today. www.mbmornington.com.au

Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road, Mornington (03) 5923 0011 LMCT443 www.mbmornington.com.au


ORIGINAL SPIRIT Pink grapefruit with pomegranate Ginfusion is super delicious sipped over ice or simply enjoyed with a splash of soda or tonic - perfect for spring and summer. Forget the ‘rosé all day’, this one is such a great weekend sip! Available online at www.originalspiritco.com

Peninsula

Styles

RED HILL CANDLES Red Hill Candle Co essential oil range of candles and room sprays smell divine, alleviate stress, give energy and clear the airways. Available online at www.redhillcandleco.com.au

PRODUCTS FROM THE PENINSULA WE'RE SURE YOU WILL LOVE

OLIEVE & OLIE Olieve & Olie’s beautifully packaged solid body oil bar is a mess-free alternative to body oil. The amazing combination of aromas will mesmerise and the natural ingredients will nourish and soothe your skin. www.olieveandolie.com.au

INDIGO THREADS SALTBOX Al fresco season is on the way, so why not set your table with our new Sona Ceramic Serveware Collection. Lovingly handmade, where no pieces are the same, this unique serveware will create a beautifully styled dining experience. A range to be loved and adored in your home. Shop online www.saltboxhome.com.au

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Here Comes the Sun! The Roam Tassel Boho Dress by Aria has a flattering fit and a unique detail that you will definitely adore. This 100% ethically made rayon exclusive print dress with tassel, drawstring front and waist and functional side pocket detail pairs beautifully with wedges or slides. Available in-store at Indigo Threads new Mornington boutique and online at www.indigothreads.com.au


BETWEEN TWO worlds

By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

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obert Newton is complex. He’s a full-time firefighter with the Metropolitan Fire Brigade in Moorabbin, but, at home in Mount Martha, he’s an award-winning young adult novelist with nine books under his belt. On the surface, the two professions seem to have nothing in common, but the common denominator is variety. “That’s what I love about my job. You never know what you’ll go to. I love not knowing. It’s the same thing with writing. I love being surprised. I don’t plan a story, I allow it to evolve,” he says. In his 32 years in the fire service, Rob has responded to a wide variety of incidents. Some stay in his head. One call to an overdose haunted him. As the young mother lay convulsing on the floor, her seven-year-old daughter held her hand. The mother later died. He wanted to make sense of it. He wondered what happened to that little girl in the pink pyjamas with bunny rabbits on them. So, he gave her a new life as Lexie in his novel, Mr. Romanov’s Garden in the Sky. In many of his novels, there is an outsider, a person craving to be seen, someone who wants to be understood and needs to be cared for. In his work as a firefighter and his own life experience, Rob has found a way to comfort the victim, the patient, the character, the reader, himself. He has a real sense of people. It comes from keen observation, a kind heart and an intimate understanding of character. continued next page...

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Rob was born in Townsville, Queensland. His father was in the army so the family moved a lot. By the time he was twelve, he had been to eight schools. It was hard always being ‘the new kid’. He often felt like an outsider. Among other challenges, it inevitably meant an encounter with the school bully. Despite the upheaval, Rob says his childhood was happy. He learned the true value of friendship and resilience – lessons that helped build character in his life and his books. Becoming a writer or a firefighter hadn’t crossed his mind when he was young. He wanted to be a trumpet player in a jazz or rock band. He applied to the Victorian College of the Arts Music School, but didn’t get in so he went to Monash University to study history and politics. He got most of the way through his studies when a conversation with his cousin, a firefighter, changed his direction and he entered the fire service. Rob attributes his love of stories to his parents. They were great storytellers who told original bedtime tales full of wonderful descriptions and rich imaginings. Rob liked gangster stories. He remembers his mother referring to a notorious gangster as being as ‘flash as a rat with a gold tooth.’ These kinds of details stuck with him. His novel Runner is centred around the life of infamous Melbourne gangster, Squizzy Taylor.

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Fiction is not where Rob began writing. His writing began with letters to his brother Chris who moved to Switzerland 30 years ago. Letter writing wasn’t really his forte so he started to write stories instead. They were so good his brother read them aloud to friends and they all agreed that Rob had a gift to be shared. Rob’s first book, My Name is Will Thompson, is based on their childhood and Chris’ struggles with dyslexia, a learning disorder that affects one in ten children.

Story ideas are everywhere. You have to be an observer and a listener. The more I write, the more I realise it’s about the little things

“Story ideas are everywhere. You have to be an observer and a listener. The more I write, the more I realise it’s about the little things. Ideas can come from anywhere: a photograph, a conversation on the train, history or life,” he says. After he left school, Rob started reading a lot. He feels reading teaches good writing. He was introduced to young adult fiction by a bookseller in his youth. He likes YA fiction because it captures the heightened emotions of teenage life and all the new experiences that come with it. It’s nostalgic for him and the genre suits his style of writing.

Most of his books have been written at home although he says he has ‘secret spots’ on the Peninsula where he goes to start a story undistracted. He only wrote one of his books in his downtime at the fire station. He was working on Runner when his wife was pregnant with their second daughter. She told him that he had better hurry up and finish that story because he was going to be too busy for writing when the baby came!

When Rob is not writing, working, or spending time with his wife and three teenage daughters, he likes to go down to the beach for a sea swim, but the stories are always percolating. Right now, he’s working on a picture book about an asthmatic firetruck with a crooked rear end. Rob likes a good underdog in a story. Some of his books deal with very confronting issues. He likes to be a voice for kids who have had it hard in life and mirror those lives to kids who have had it good. “When I’m writing, I am hoping to make someone feel something. Feelings are at the core of my stories,” he says. At heart, Rob is a champion of people, in real life and in fiction. It’s what makes his stories so good.

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STARS OF THE sea By Joe Novella Photos Yanni & Kim Edwards

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ne of the great benefits of writing for Peninsula Essence is you get to meet wonderful human beings, and we have plenty of them here on the ‘Ninch’ including Sarah Hilli and Julie Marshall, both long-term members of the Mount Martha Life Saving Club (MMLSC) and Program Managers for the club’s Starfish Nippers program.

Starfish Nippers is a program for children older than six and young adults who have special needs. Their disabilities include autism, attention deficit disorder, Down’s Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Asperger’s Syndrome, physical and intellectual disabilities and learning difficulties. The program has been running for five years at MMLSC. I asked Sarah how the program started. “I attended a Life Saving Victoria Conference, and I saw a presentation from Anglesea

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Life Saving Club promoting the Starfish Nippers program. So I showed the MMLSC Committee a video of the program, and asked if we could start one. “MMLSC had recently been rebuilt and I thought it was the perfect venue for Starfish Nippers. We had beach-matting to allow people in wheelchairs to get to the water and we had a lift, disabled toilets and change facilities. Our committee’s response and support was amazing. They said to go for it, so we did. Julie and I started with one Nipper and it quickly grew to 5 in our first season. We now have 15 Nippers.” Kim Edwards is the parent of two of those Nippers, Holly and Cooper. Holly is 19 years old and on the severe side of the Autism Spectrum, being non-verbal and in need of constant care. Cooper is nine and also on the Autism Spectrum on the high-functioning side.


“What I love about Starfish Nippers,” Kim said, “is even though it’s a program specifically for kids and young adults with special needs, the participants are made to feel like everyone else. They share the beach with other Nipper programs and they get to wear the caps and vests just like the other Nippers do. “The other thing I love about the program is the way it makes the kids feel. Cooper may not be at the top of his class at school, but when he goes to Starfish Nippers and he can stand on a board or win at flags it makes him feel like he’s good at something. And Holly just loves being out there; even though she’s non-verbal she gets to interact with others through participating.”

"So what’s involved in a Starfish Nippers session," I asked. “We start the session with a welcome and hello,” said Sarah, “followed by a warm-up jog or stretch. Then we try to fit in rotations of beach games, flags, belt and reel, life saving and beach safety, swimming, boards, aquamat fun, just to name a few! We are pretty flexible with our sessions and change our program to suit the weather, interest levels and water conditions. “And, there are no prerequisites. The kids don’t need to know how to swim. Each Starfish Nipper has a designated helper that works with them, one on one, at their own comfort level and ability. The helpers range from club members to Bronze Medallion continued next page...

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qualified lifesavers. Some of our Nippers love the water and others are more hesitant. So their helper stays with them at the water’s edge, or very shallow water, if that’s what they prefer. There is no pressure to do anything they don’t want to, only support and encouragement. And celebration if they overcome their fear.” It’s abundantly clear the kids and young adults taking part in the Starfish Nippers program get a lot of benefit from it, but I’m also keen to find out what Sarah and Julie get out of it given they are volunteering their time to run it. “Julie and I feel like the luckiest people to get to run this program,” Sarah said. “The families we work with are wonderful, and we have so many club members offering to be part of the team. We are not special needs educators, we are just MMLSC members and lifesavers who want to share our love of the beach and water safety with people of all abilities. We hope one day to have one of our group becoming a patrolling member at the club!” “For me,” Julie said, “to watch the kids’ progress is priceless. Kids that never thought they could stand on a paddle board yelling at their parents, ‘Mum, Dad, watch me!’ as they do it for the first time is beyond amazing.

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“I also love watching the parents relax when they come to our program. They trust us with their kids and they get some precious time to sit on the beach and chill out, or have a conversation with other parents, something that many of them don’t get many opportunities to do. So when I see parents sitting on the beach with a big smile, watching their child becoming part of our community and having fun, it makes me happy.” Starfish Nippers is free for the first year with sessions on Sundays from 10 am to 11 am through January and February 2022. The program is looking for sponsors to help make it even more accessible to special needs kids on the Mornington Peninsula so if you’re a local business wanting to support a worthy cause, or if you’re a parent looking for more information, you can contact Sarah at starfishnippers@mmlsc.com.au The last words I will leave to Kim, mother of Holly and Cooper. “Starfish Nippers is the best thing since sliced bread and Sarah and Julie are amazing.”

www.mmlsc.com.au/starfish-nippers


VACCINATE TO REACTIVATE LOCAL BUSINESS

C

offee catch ups with your friends. Browsing the local shops. Seeing live music at the pub. Catching a new art exhibition. Finally getting that kitchen renovation done. We’re all dreaming of the things we miss and wondering when our favourite businesses will reopen their doors. While we’ve all pitched in to keep our local economy moving – spending local and recommending local businesses – the most important thing we can do right now to support local business is to get vaccinated. Having our community vaccinated against COVID-19 is how we get back to business. It’s our way towards a great summer on the Peninsula doing the things we love.

There are lots of other good reasons to get vaccinated – being able to visit friends and family, protecting the people you care about and being able to travel again are just a few. Saving jobs and reactivating the local economy make sense too. Local businesses need our support now more than ever. Let’s get vaccinated so we can all get back to business! Book your vaccination appointment today at coronavirus.vic.gov.au/vaccine or call 1800 675 398. To find ways you can support local business, go to; www.mpbusiness.com.au/supportlocal

Our economic recovery and high vaccination levels go hand in hand. When more people are vaccinated, there will be fewer outbreaks and less need for restrictions. Which means businesses will be able to open – and stay open. The Mornington Peninsula Shire has approved a $10 million COVID-19 recovery plan for our economy and we strongly encourage our community to get vaccinated to support our local businesses in re-opening as quickly as possible.

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OZ D E S I G N F U R N I T U R E M O R N I N G TO N A U S T R A L I A N O W N E D & O P E R AT E D October 2021


Spring into Summer SUMMER 21-22

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BEHIND THE BLUE gate By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

O

ne of the best things about living on the Mornington Peninsula is that it is full of surprises. There are amazing people and places to be discovered at every turn. In Mornington, along the spectacularly scenic Beleura Cliff Path coastal walk you may notice a blue gate. Behind it lives a man not only dedicated to ensuring the future of this amazing public asset and its indigenous flora, but one who has also provided insight into Australian politics for decades.

Peter Nicholson enjoyed a long and successful career as a political cartoonist for The Financial Review, The Australian, The Age and The Nation Review. He won five Walkley awards. He started his own film studio to make the iconic animated puppet series, Rubbery Figures, and sculpted the busts of six prime ministers from Malcolm Fraser to Julia Gillard. continued next page...

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Peter never imagined becoming an artist. He was studying law (University of Melbourne), but dropped out in his final year. It wasn’t for him. The Vietnam War was a hot topic at the time and he followed the politics of it closely. Inspired by the work of political cartoonist, Bruce Petty, Peter started to draw. He went to Prahran Technical College to hone his skills. He started submitting political cartoons to The Nation Review and they were accepted. Next, he went to The Age with a cartoon of Malcolm Fraser as King Lear dividing his kingdom amongst state premiers. The Opinion Editor loved it and asked for another the following week. Peter was on his way. Meanwhile, he was contacted by The Financial Review. They wanted him too. When The Age realised they might lose Peter, they offered him a contract. He worked there for next seventeen years. Political cartooning can be a risky business with occasional backlash. Peter felt this early in his career when he made a cartoon of Gough Whitlam in bed with his wife. There had been a major earthquake during their trip to China. Margaret asks Gough, “Did the earth move for you too, dear?” There was a huge hue and cry about this cartoon.

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A few years after starting at The Age, Peter took a break. He wanted to improve his drawing and illustration skills so he took his family to live in Italy for a year. It provided inspiration and endless sketching opportunities. He gained valuable insight into the relationship between drawing and sculpture. When he returned to The Age, Peter started sculpting caricature figures to help his drawing skills. He also made caricature puppets and then opened his film studio to create Rubbery Figures, a popular television program of the 1980s and '90s famous for its timely satire and merciless political lampooning with characters voiced by Paul Jennings. In 1993 the Rubbery Figures puppets, along with some of Peter’s cartoons and bronze caricatures, were featured at The National Gallery of Victoria in “The Exhibition We Had to Have”. In 1994 another solo exhibition, “The Rubbery Years” was on display at The National Museum in Canberra. It went on to tour nationally. Peter began working at The Australian in 1994. Initially, he enjoyed great freedom expressing his political views in the Letters section, but when his views became a mismatch with the views of the paper, he shifted to the Business section. He retired from


The Australian in 2016 though he has produced some cartoons for The Financial Review since then. Looking back, he says, “I was lucky that my career coincided with the golden age of newspapers.” One of his most interesting projects was sculpting the busts of six Prime Ministers for Ballarat Botanical Gardens Prime Ministers’ Avenue. Creating a likeness with only one sitting to capture a 360-degree view in video and one sitting for sketches proved challenging. His favourite is Julia Gillard, though it was the most difficult. She allowed him to sketch her for three hours while she worked at her desk. He had to do it silently without disturbing her. She was so absorbed in her work that she didn’t even notice when he left!

Nowadays, Peter is more passionate about plants than politics. He has dedicated himself to learning everything there is to know about Coastal Headland Scrub, the species of flora indigenous to his property and the area that runs along Beleura Cliff. His property, in his family since 1916, is now planted entirely with indigenous species.

I was lucky that my career coincided with the golden age of newspapers

Peter described Kevin Rudd as ‘jumpy’ because his sitting was just prior to having to meet with the banks after the 2008 Global Financial Crisis. Paul Keating offered a running commentary on Peter’s Rubbery Figures puppets during his sitting. Malcolm Fraser dictated letters to his stenographer as Peter captured his likeness.

Peter organised the Friends of The Beleura Cliff Path, a group committed to indigenous revegetation and working with Mornington Peninsula Shire Council to protect the path in perpetuity. The popular walking track was built with pick and shovel between 19161923 as a public walking path and access to the beach for local residents.

Information about the group can be found on their Facebook page: facebook.com/groups/beleuracliffpath or posted to the blue gate. Cartoon images courtesy of: www.nicholsoncartoons.com.au www.theaustralian.news.com.au.

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MP mumpreneurs By Zahrah Ahmad Photos Supplied

T

he AusMumpreneur Awards celebrate the efforts of women around Australia that have dedicated themselves to entrepreneurship alongside the challenges of parenthood. The awards are presented by The Women’s Business School to “celebrate and recognize Australian Mums in business achieving

BUBBA ORGANICS

outstanding success in areas such as business excellence, product development, customer service and digital innovation,” according to an AusMumpreneur media release. In September 2021, many mothers in the Mornington Peninsula area won awards for their efforts in establishing and maintaining businesses that not only thrive but are creative and sustainable.

DAFFI LEATHER

Bubba Organics’ waterless skincare is proving effective in the battle against eczema, acne and cradle cap.

Ainsley Kruithof found there was a lack of customisable belts in the fashion industry.

Founded in 2016, the Bubba Organics prides itself on its ethical and sustainably made products.

Daffi Leather has filled that gap, offering customisable belts in different sizes and colours.

“Not only does a waterless formula make the product more potent and effective, but here is also no need for chemicals or parabens. It is also more environmentally friendly,” co-founder of Bubba Organics, Kerri Chadwick said.

With no prior leatherwork experience, she spent a year learning the craft, creating her own special twist on the standard product and a vintage look and feel, and in only a year she has sold 2,000 belts.

Proudly made in Melbourne, Bubba Organics created this uniquely Australian range as a love letter to the Aussie bush, with a blend of 100% natural and vegan-friendly ingredients including native, wild harvested Kakadu Plum. The team of mums behind this skincare line found that most family products contain water, reducing their effectiveness and wasting the natural resource. The skincare line offers a range of cleansing solutions and lotions for infants and children. “We created Bubba Organics as we couldn’t find skincare products for newborns that were made in Australia, all natural with no added water.” says Kerri. Australian mothers have used their products to treat infant eczema, acne and cradle cap. Kerri’s business was awarded a shared third place for ‘sustainability’.

www.bubbaorganics.com.au

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Ainsley combined her love for fashion with her own experience working in different businesses. She believes Daffi Leather gives people of all shapes and sizes the opportunity to embrace their bodies. ”Don’t be afraid to follow your instincts, trust your ideas and back yourself 100 percent,” Ainsley says. Despite the challenges of balancing a business with motherhood, she finds the experience extremely rewarding, hoping to inspire her daughter to pursue her own dreams. “All of this wouldn't be possible without the support of my beautiful husband Richie, he has been on this journey with me from the very first spark of an idea, constant and rock solid, backing every idea and adding his own unique flavour to the Daffi brand. Each belt has both of our creative energy, loving intention and hard work infused into its very essence,” Ainsley says. She was awarded third place in the ‘emerging’ and ‘product design’ categories.

www.daffileather.com.au


Dr Peter A. Scott is a specialist orthodontist offering orthodontic care for children, teens and adults alike in both the Mornington Peninsula and inner Melbourne areas. He is also a consultant orthodontist at the Royal Childrens Hospital.

RED HILL CANDLE CO. Ebony Flett began the business of her dreams, selling handmade poured candles in Dromana alongside her responsibilities as a firsttime mother. In 2016 Red Hill Candle Co. was established and only four years later she moved her business into a Dromana factory; her business was taking off. “I’ve always had a natural knack of inspiring, teaching and bringing people together. My love and passion for the Mornington Peninsula region and deep desire to create a memorable experience sparked an idea. I had a really fun business concept that I knew would deliver a joyful experience for customers and felt confident I had what it takes to be successful”; says Ebony. Ebony sees Red Hill Candle Co. as an experience-based store, offering bespoke activities, weekly interactive workshops and a variety of candles from local and regional makers. Running her own business has allowed her to spend time with her daughter while working. But being an entrepreneur and a mother is a balancing act, one that Ebony doesn’t take for granted.

Specialist Orthodontists Creating Beautiful Smiles On The Peninsula For 30 Years Expertise In Child And Adult Orthodontics

Early Assessment Of Dental Development And Facial Growth Ideal Age Of Initial Assessment 7-9 Years Early Intervention Where Appropriate For Best Outcome No Referral Necessary

“Celebrate your wins and communicate with your support network when you need help. There are days as a ‘MumPreneur’ where you simply can’t get things done, but that’s OK, tomorrow is a new day.” Ebony says. Ebony placed first in the ‘rising star’, ‘handmade business’ and ‘creative entrepreneur’ category.

13 Beach St Frankston

Ph: 9783 4511

www.redhillcandleco.com.au continued next page...

www.drpeterscottorthodontist.com.au www.facebook.com/drpeterscottorthodontist October 2021

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STAYTRAY

BABY DINK

Staytray is a reusable drink tray made 100% recycled plastic right here in Melbourne. It is a sustainable alternative to single use trays used at every cafe and fast-food restaurant across the world. Career mother Kate Stewart came up with the idea as an escape from her long commute to work and the many hours spent away from her kids. “I love being there for my kids every day, as well as being able to provide for them. I can now drop them off at school every day. I can take them to soccer training or gymnastics. Go to their school cross country or swimming carnivals,” Kate says. But in the beginning Kate had to make a lot of sacrifices and she has advice for mothers that want to follow in her footsteps. “You are going to need to put in so much time and effort to make your business successful. So, make sure it’s something you are passionate about or something you love. In the early days you will need to sacrifice. Plenty of time away from family, time away from friends. But it will all be worth it in the end. The freedom of running your own business is fabulous,” Kate said.

Byron Bay mother, Jen McAlpine found that she was spending too much time folding swaddles for her infants. She loved being able to hold her babies hands-free, but the process was too consuming. Jen set out to solve this problem, creating a pull-on carrier that would make any parent’s life just a little easier. “I loved the feeling of carrying my baby girl and having her close to me, but it just seemed like so much effort to perfect the wrap myself. I thought this would be so much quicker, safer and easier if I could just put it on like a top,” Jen says. For over a decade she worked on her products, finding the right fabrics and patterns to make the perfect carrier. Inspired by indigenous cultures, BabyDink products provide a way for parents to keep their young babies close but hands-free. “It’s all about heartbeat rhythm and skin on skin connection – keeping that precious new baby close enough to kiss, while also honouring modern parents often need to have the flexibility of being handsfree,” Jen says. BabyDink is a world-first garment-like baby carrier.

Kate Stewart was awarded third place in the ‘sustainability’ category.

Jen’s brand was awarded a shared third place for ‘sustainability’ and second place in ‘global brand’ and ‘product design’.

www.staytray.com.au

www.babydink.com.au

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open 7 DAYS secret

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• Sun Lounges • Market Umbrellas • Massive range of Rattan • Cushions • Lamps • Jewellery • Artworks, and much more!

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contact


MOONLIT milestone

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By Stephen Taylor Photos Gary Sissons

M

OONLIT Sanctuary Wildlife Park celebrated its 20th anniversary. The milestone, Friday 17 September, and the success of the park is a tribute to the enthusiasm and commitment to the natural environment of director and founder Michael Johnson. He has dedicated his career to the conservation and care of Australian species over that time.

As part of the festivities, a few of the animals commemorated the anniversary with cake! The koalas woke up to a cake of the eucalyptus, dingoes dug into a birthday cake made of mince with peanut butter frosting, the wombats enjoy into a vegie cake made of fresh corn and sweet potato and the emu raced to a squirming insect cake that only an emu would enjoy. Mr Johnson said growing up reading the works of wildlife writer, conservationist and naturalist Gerald Durrell fostered his passion for animals and led him to study at the Durrell Conservation Academy in Jersey. Returning home after following this childhood dream, Mr Johnson set out to create a place where people could experience the rare and unusual animals that roam the Australian bush and play a role in halting the extinction of animal species in the country.

The sanctuary opened in September 2001 and, at first, provided lantern-lit tours because it was open only at night. Word quickly spread about this opportunity to get up close to nocturnal wildlife that many people had never seen before, and it wasn’t long before the sanctuary started opening during the day. In addition to its lantern-lit tours, encounter experiences with wildlife, and keeper talks and presentations, Moonlit Sanctuary runs three breeding programs that contribute to the conservation of endangered species. In 2017, the sanctuary was recognised with the Environmental Protection category award at the Sustainability Award for its role in helping to save the critically endangered orangebellied parrot with only 70 left in the wild.

As part of the festivities, a few of the animals commemorated the anniversary with cake

Assisted by his family’s marine business, he bought a 10-hectare property in Pearcedale. Over the years, the family-owned Moonlit Sanctuary Wildlife Conservation Park has grown into an awardwinning and thriving tourism business that employs 47, is home to 60 species of Australian wildlife, and welcomes more than 100,000 visitors from around the world each year. Development of the property, starting in 1998, included building an educational visitor’s centre; planting 10,000 native trees and plants; construction of a 0.8 hectare wetland with lake and waterbird habitats, and erection of about 30 animal enclosures and support facilities

The sanctuary is committed to developing its breeding program to protect the species and release these birds into the wild. “We are proud to be part of many conservation programs, notably the orange-bellied parrot recovery program,” Mr Johnson said.

“The project is our largest and most important, given the critical state of the wild population. We breed for release, this year having over 50 fledglings, and these are released at sites in Tasmania and on the mainland. “Our relationships and partnerships with government, community groups, zoos, and the orange-bellied parrot recovery team, are key to the survival of this critically endangered species. “Moonlit Sanctuary’s ongoing work and commitment to conservation educates visitors about the plight of endangered species and contributes to the survival of Australian species.”

www.moonlitsanctuary.com.au

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Arts

THE ART OF THE matter

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By Andrea Rowe Photos Yanni

M

ichelle Crozier is an art creator and found-object fancier. Under her artistic name ‘Michelle The Gorgeous’. She expresses herself through recycled and repurposed materials that she incorporates into artworks and installations. And sometimes she just makes something special for someone she loves. The Rosebud-based creator is not one for boxing herself into an artistic biography, nor is she dedicated to a set medium or materials. “I don’t really feel connected to any one arts scene or output,” she says. But what she does specialise in is creating whimsical works of repurposed art that capture the essence of joy and love. She’s never sure what she’ll create next, but she’s open to all the places where inspiration takes her. Recently that place has been the beach. Michelle’s collected kilos of discarded plastics from the shoreline during six months of lockdown exercising. She’s now putting the found pieces to good ‘reduce, reuse, recycle’ work on her latest project in her home studio. “I just love finding things and then considering how I can incorporate them. In non-lockdown times I would find things in op shops to repurpose, but I’ve had to get a little more creative of late. That’s not hard for me though,” smiles Michelle. Michelle utilises everyday and natural materials such as buttons, feathers and textiles, as well as treasured items, and discarded household accessories.

spirits up through the pandemic, and the inside have also looked through love out to the world.” “There should be much more art in our community for us all to see and touch. Creativity can really spark joy, it can take you away from yourself, and even if you don’t like what you see, you are still stirred to have a reaction.” After graduating with an Art Therapy qualification. She now provides bespoke art support and creates moments for people to connect with themselves and others.

“I like to bring a sense of fun and lightness in for people to dabble, experience and explore while expressing themselves. Creating together often happens over conversations, and conversations often lead to other incredible realisations and connections. I love seeing how people come away from making art with calmer minds, and a lightness to their being. Art doesn’t have to be something that is recorded or framed; sometimes art is in the moments.”

I just love finding things and then considering how I can incorporate them

Ask anyone who knows her and they’ll tell you that Michelle’s hands are constantly busy collecting materials and creating all sort of wonderful works. “The women in my family taught me textiles, knitting, sewing and collage and I’m always working on something. My best friend is a bloke who taught me all the practical stuff with tools so I’m not afraid to tackle big jobs or figure out how to make something that calls on new skills.” Michelle currently has a thing for hearts, really big hearts.

staff

“For me, art is so self-soothing. And maybe that’s why so many people have also turned to art and creating in the last two years; it’s a way of soothing yourself when you can’t control so much around you.”

Along with her two sisters and mother, who also live across the Peninsula, they are a creative and close family unit, as evidenced by their recent collective action to shave their heads. It was a show of support for Michelle’s niece who is undergoing cancer treatment - another act of heart-felt art for someone she cares about. “We really are all walking pieces of art,” says Michelle. “But if you can be anything, be kind. That inspires so much change and connection around you.” Instagram: @michellethegorgeous www.jackiejones.com.au

Popular Rosebud café Zarb and Ru commissioned Michelle as part of their focus on local artists and to express their thanks for community support of their business during pandemic times. Michelle’s giant hearts were commissioned to reflect a series of community messages and have since become quite the talking point in Rosebud. Her heart wreath series commenced with “A love letter to Rosebud” heart suspended in the store’s window, and was followed by “Heartfelt”, a stunning felt creation that stopped foot traffic. Lockdown walkers and take-away coffee customers were keen for selfies of her subsequent design, “We love a good yarn” a rainbowcoloured yarn-bombed heart, and more recently “Heartbreaking” a massive heart with important environmental messages “made from junk found on the beach,” Michelle says. Michelle has loved the opportunity to spark conversations in such a grass roots way. “These positive messages have kept patrons

Image: Instagram: @michellethegorgeous

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HAPPY space By Melissa McCullough Photos Supplied

K

ate Walker founded Kate Walker Design in 2013. Having worked in the tile industry for over 15 years, Kate identified the need for a streamlined solution for busy people who need support with their complete hard finish requirements. With entrepreneurial skills in her DNA, Kate naturally grew the business – seeing opportunities and seizing them with both hands. With an unrivalled network of manufacturers, importers and trades, Kate is now at the helm of a dynamic team of project managers and design enthusiasts. Mother of two, Kate has noticed how COVID and lockdown restrictions have impacted every Australian, personally and professionally, and that the focus of concern is now firmly on our children. She said, “So aptly expressed and championed by #shadowpandemicvic, children of all ages are suffering in immeasurable ways. Not being able to attend school, and partake in extracurricular activities like sport, music and dance, is having such a detrimental impact on our children.” At home, her teenagers were not immune. Her teen daughter, Jemima, has suffered her way through COVID, with deep-seated anxiety and depression. A collaborative worker, her teen daughter thrives off the physical presence of others. As an extrovert, she gets her energy from her friendship group. Kate says, “Unfortunately, when you only see people through a filtered version of their lives on social media, you are presented with a false reality. My daughter didn’t realise that other people were suffering as well that they were just presenting what they thought was a socially acceptable version of themselves.”

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Feeling socially isolated, Jemima retreated to her room. She did her schooling from her bed and wouldn’t even celebrate her 13th birthday. Kate recalls, “At that time we were renovating our home, so we were living elsewhere, and Jemima didn’t have her own space and was living in limbo.” Whilst the family did engage professionals to help Jemima, it wasn’t until they moved into their home and she had a beautiful room that was all hers, that she began to smile again. “Having her own space helped Jemima find her identity and gave her a sense of pride and self-worth. She found hope. The change was like night and day,” said Kate. Fortunately, her other teen, 15-year-old Charlie, enjoys online learning. Kate says, “He loves computers, so the system really works for him, but he is acutely aware that many of his friends are struggling.” One of the most significant issues for both of Kate’s children was that their favourite activity, snow sports, had been taken away. “For so many children losing the chance to engage in any of their hobbies that take place outside of the home leaves a massive hole in their lives,” said Kate. According to Michael Carr-Gregg, one of Australia’s leading psychologists, children need ‘islands of competence’. Being good at something gives you a sense of identity and self-worth. When the things you are good at are taken away from you, you also lose your energy and purpose.


Having her own space helped Jemima find her identity and gave her a sense of pride and self-worth

All these experiences, and what we have seen happening to children everywhere, has led Kate and the KWD & Co. team to develop a program called #myhappyspacemovement. They have created a support package for two students who will be gifted a KWD & Co. Access design consultation. “We want to give these children some control back in their lives, because COVID has taken so much of that control away. They can’t control what activities they do, where they go or who they see – but with this opportunity they can control how their private space looks and feels,” said Kate. Once the team has talked to the beneficiaries about ‘their’ space and how ‘they’ want it to look, they will work with their supply partners and trades to make their happy space a reality – make their dream come true. Kate said, “I want these children to have a sanctuary. A safe space and an environment that they feel proud of, and they are happy to share with their friends, particularly during online classes, house parties and Zoom catch ups.” Kate is passionate about creating spaces that ‘feel’ good. It’s not just about how it looks – it’s about how the space makes you feel. With many years of design experience across every design aesthetic, Kate can appreciate what it takes to make a home successful in terms of livability and functionality. She understands space planning, joinery, hard finishes, textures, lighting, furniture, flooring and soft furnishings, colour palettes, art and the decorative touches that make a house a home. As her daughter so succinctly said, “The people I’m with, and the space I’m in completely impacts my mood. I get my vibe from my space. And if the space is beautiful, it’s a happy vibe.” “I am so proud of Charlie and Jemima who are championing this movement with me and my KWD & Co. team, and we hope to ignite a flame for others to follow suit. Let’s make happy spaces, one room at a time, one smile at a time,” said Kate. Check out the KWD & Co. Instagram page for all the details on how to enter: @kwdandco Entries close on October 25th.

www.kwdandco.com.au October 2021

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Eat & Drink

ITALIAN adventure

I

t was in the late 1980’s that Garry Crittenden first developed a fascination with Italian wine and, consequently, grape varieties.

There was little known of the varieties in Australia, as we had firmly grasped the French Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot Noir, and not given any consideration to the Italian Dolcetto, Barbera and Nebbiolo.

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In the mid 1990’s, Garry was fortunate enough to be awarded a grant to deepen the study of Italian varieties in Australia and set upon a multi-year journey that ended in the publication of “Italian wine grape varieties in Australia”, a book still held in high regard in the industry both here and abroad.


Fast forward to early 2020 when Garry’s son Rollo broke some good news.

I am delighted with how it has turned out to either drink now or cellar for a few years

“He took me aside one day and let on that he had secured a parcel of Nero d’Avola grapes. This legendary Italian variety has its origin near the town of Avola in southern Sicily!” He wondered if Garry would like to “have a play”. “I could hardly believe my luck,” said Garry.

“In the 20 years I worked with Italian grapes they were varieties entirely from the north of the country and here I was being presented with a belated chance to ‘have a play’ with what is regarded by many as one of its top southern wine varieties.” The Italian Nero d’Avola variety, coming from the warm Southern Italian climate, produces wine of such elegance and finesse, always bright and fresh with astonishing

crimson luminescence, somewhere between a Pinot Noir and Shiraz. “I read extensively on what to expect and jumped in feet first, literally!” said Garry. “I could hardly wait to get started.”

Garry’s Nero d’Avola “Catto” is now in the bottle and ready to go with free shipping for a pack of six. “I am delighted with how it has turned out to either drink now or cellar for a few years.”

Each six pack of Catto purchased comes with a booklet detailing the origins of the “Catto” label and information on Garry’s role in the development of Italian varietals in Australia. Order at: www.crittendenwines.com.au

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recipe CHOCOLATE LAVA CAKE Yields approximately 10 single serve puddings.

INGREDIENTS 160 g Cuvée Grand Cru 75% Extra Dark Chocolate 185 g butter 310 g eggs 190 g caster sugar 80 g plain flour butter & plain flour for your pudding dishes

METHOD 1. Break the chocolate into small pieces, roughly the size of five cent pieces or smaller and place them into a bowl. 2. Add the butter into a saucepan or small pot and melt it on the stove until just before boiling point. 3. Pour the hot butter over the chocolate bits and leave it to melt for 1-2 minutes before thoroughly combining with a whisk. 4. Crack your eggs, combine them with the sugar and whip both in a kitchen mixer until it forms soft peak 5. Fold in the sifted flour, cover the mix with plastic wrap and set it aside in the refrigerator, ideally overnight but for at least 8 hours.

6. Prepare your pudding dishes by brushing them thin and evenly with some melted butter and dusting them with plain flour. 7. Using a piping bag or large spoon, fill the pudding mix into your prepared pudding dishes, about 4/5 to the rim. 8. Bake the puddings at 180°C for approx. 6-8 minutes, the outer should be just baked and the centre still quite gooey. 9. Un-mould your puddings directly onto a plate and serve them whilst they are still hot.

CHEF'S TIPS Nothing is more disappointing than a lava cake missing the lava! To make sure you don’t overcook yours, watch for the cakes still looking kind of wet in the middle and de-mould them straight after baking. Serve with homemade ice cream and fresh raspberries for some extra indulgence. Photo: Leon Schoots

www.cuveechocolate.com.au

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CELEBRATE 2021 SENIORS FESTIVAL WITH FRANKSTON CITY LIBRARIES Online FrankTALK via Zoom Wednesday 30 September - Bookings essential

Join us for an online FrankTALK with Amanda Hampson, as we discuss her newest novel Lovebirds. In their youth, lovebirds Elizabeth and Ray had to fight to be together. Their future was full of promise and, blessed with children and careers, their happiness complete. But a twist of fate changed their lives forever.

Mindset Matters Online workshop via Zoom Saturday 9th October at 10.30am - Bookings Esssential

Learn how your mindset can help you manage obstacles and build resilience to achieve better outcomes. Eva’s extensive knowledge will be able to assist with positive health and well-being. www.library.frankston.vic.gov.au/FrankstonLibraries/Events

www.library.frankston.vic.gov.au/FrankstonLibraries/Events

Health Habits for Longevity Online workshop via Zoom Saturday 2nd October at 10.30am - Bookings Essential

Discover simple habits to support great health, happiness and longevity through looking after your body, mind and soul. Eva’s workshop will inspire you to eat well and move more. www.library.frankston.vic.gov.au/FrankstonLibraries/Events

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ESSENTIAL HOME CLEANING The sun is shining, the weather is warming up and it has been a long time in lockdown. With Victoria’s vaccination on the rise, we are well on target for people and businesses to start preparing to come out of Covid restrictions. This will be a busy time now for everyone across Victoria to get back to a Covid normal along with kids returning to school. We have spent a lot of time in our homes or offices and has likely had very high traffic and usage in such a closed off environment but it’s now time to let the fresh air in and open up your windows! You’re probably wondering where to start... Getting back to normal isn’t easy and there is quite a bit to do. Many of us may even be scratching our heads on how or where to start. The solution is outsourcing and hiring a professional cleaning company that can perform a spring clean for your home or a deep clean for your office. By outsourcing the cleaning task to a professional cleaning company, it may be one of the best things you do for yourself. It means you will be taking the stress off you and leaving the hard work to the professionals who do this day in and day out. The benefits of hiring a company to do a thorough Spring Clean of your home or Office is not only for the health aspect but the peace of mind knowing that you can reset your environment in a One-Day blitz that can bring your environment back to normal quickly without doing any of the hard work.

Our trained team members, friendly office crew and predictable cleaning systems will ensure that you get a great outcome! If we don’t meet your expectations, we will come back free of charge with our ‘Touch Up Guarantee’ promise. We aim to make the process as easy as possible! Your first step is to speak to one of our friendly office team members to understand your home or environment better, the second step is to then arrange one of our amazing representatives to come visit you for an appraisal and lastly, discuss the details of the service that best suit you and your needs. Visiting your home helps us better understand the activity levels and environment of your home or office so we can communicate clearly to our cleaning service people through briefings, detailed work orders and phone communications. It is also an opportunity for us to explain better how our services work and what we can offer to make a difference in your life. Once you are happy to go ahead with our services, we will then set up your schedule in our system and send a team out to clean your home with no fuss. Our customer relations management system will automatically repeat your clean on a weekly, fortnightly or monthly routine, this way you can expect your service to occur regularly and you won't have to lift a finger! So call us today and experience for yourself a cleaner environment with Essential Home Services - cleaning made easy! Take the time to visit our website and read our reviews.

Spring Cleaning offers great health and wellbeing benefits to you and your family and in turn reinvigorates your space bringing in a new energy. Here at Essential Home Services, we take our cleaning seriously and pride ourselves on delivering integrity, professionalism and commitment to the service, meaning that you will hire a company who cares and genuinely wants to deliver an amazing result.

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P. 1300 910 971 E. enquiries@essentialhomeservices.com.au www.essentialhomeservices.com.au


BOOK YOUR

SPRING

CLEAN TODAY AND RECEIVE A FREE HIGH TOUCH POINT DISINFECTION TREATMENT

Give us a call Now 1300 910 971 www.es s en t ia lho m e se r vic e s.c o m.au

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c o n t ac t @ e s s e n t i al h o m e s e r v i c e s .c o m.a u October 2021

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EXCEPTIONAL HOME CARE SOLUTIONS PROVIDER TheGoodCompanion is an easy and convenient platform to book a professional vetted carer. Connecting individuals looking for home based support services with topquality, pre-screened supervised carers. With a seamless online service booking and a dedicated client portal, TheGoodCompanion is a sure and convenient way to book care support services. TheGoodCompanion offers in-home support services including Hourly, Overnight, Live-in care for Seniors and Disability NDIS participants. TheGoodCompanion have successfully cared for individuals living a healthier and better life in their own home.

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TheGoodCompanion In-home care ensures you have the same carer every time, which enables you to get to know your carer and build a comfortable and lasting rapport. One morning or daily, a skilled proficient carer is just a few clicks away. Call or visit website for further information.

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P: 9813 1000 www.thegoodcompanion.com

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Be inspired to discover your creativity

ART CLASSES FOR ALL AGES AND ABILITIES

Our studio is a fun and friendly space for people who would like to explore their creativity, no matter their age or skill level! We will guide you to discover your unique creative self. Pre-Primary and Primary Kids classes A comprehensive timetable of School Holiday Classes Adult Art and Creative classes Family Workshops Group classes and Private lessons (NDIS compliant) Online and in-store Art and craft supplies Custom workshops

location: 6 High Street Hastings VIC 3915 website: www.creativemakes.com.au email: melscreativemakes@gmail.com | phone: 0425 867 919 facebook/melscreativemakes | instagram/_creativemakes_

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Creative Makes help people discover their creativity through a wide range of classes including, pottery, adult art classes, children’s art classes, life drawing, collage, watercolour, paint & sip sessions, & children’s art parties. Our classes are designed to guide people, at any stage of their creative journey, in an encouraging and supportive environment, without judgment or expectations. Whether as a complete beginner or already started on your creative path, Mel & Jade bring their experience & enthusiasm to the Creative Makes studio. Our guest facilitators embrace the same ethos, making the Studio a place of Creative Freedom with a sense of adventure & connectedness throughout the wider creative Makes community. Our students are encouraged to think about their own individuality, so their work will be uniquely theirs. Learning through experimentation and exploration of different mediums, such as painting, drawing, printing, & collage. Join the Creative Makes community and Be Inspired to Discover Your Creativity

A: 6 High Street Hastings M: 0425 867 919 E: melscreativemakes@gmail.com www.creativemakes.com.au


BACKYARD HENS KEY TO INCREASING SELF-SUSTAINABILITY Many people either own backyard hens or know of someone who does. The growing popularity has largely been due to families wanting to become more self-sustainable. So why is keeping backyard hens so good for your family? Well, hens make for fantastic pets! Our breed of hens are Hy-line Browns which are extremely friendly and placid. They love company and like nothing more than to spend time interacting with their owners. We hear lots of entertaining stories from our customers such as their hens going on school runs, on swings with the kids, and happily jumping up onto their laps. Good egg-laying breeds like our Hy-Line’s also quickly pay for themselves by providing your family with highly nutritious and delicious eggs throughout the year. Their eggs are high in protein and minerals but low in calories. You also have peace of mind knowing exactly how your hens are treated and what food they have eaten.

Hen ownership also teaches children some important, practical lessons about life. Not only do they need to be responsible for feeding and providing water for their hens but they must collect eggs daily and keep the coop clean and safe. Excess eggs can also be sold or given away to friends and neighbours which is a great way of benefiting others in your local community. Visit our farm: 3590 Frankston-Flinders Road,Merricks Call Jason: 0406 691 231 OPEN Thu to Mon 10am - 4pm ( Closed Tue & Wed) www.TalkingHens.com.au

Of course, you can’t get more “local” food than what you get from your own backyard! When combined with a vegetable garden, your family becomes far more self-sufficient and able to live more sustainably. If you really had to avoid social contact, your hens and vegetables could keep your household well fed over the long-term.

Looking for backyard hens but unsure where to start? Talking Hens is a family business that enjoys backyard hens. We specialise in friendly, egg laying hens with quality products to keep them happy and healthy. There’s nothing like the friendship and entertainment that you receive from our laying hens - a pleasure to be shared!

Talking Hens 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd Merricks, Vic 3916

Opening Hours: Thursday to Monday 10am to 4pm Closed: Tuesday and Wednesday

For enquiries call Jason 0406 691 231 Email: talk@talkinghens.com.au Visit: TalkingHens.com.au

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RETIRING IS EASY WITH THE RIGHT TEAM McNeill Real Estate have always had a vision: a vision to positively impact our older generation as they transition from their family home into a home more suited to their lifestyle by providing open, transparent and seamless real estate services to retirees (and their families) on the Mornington Peninsula. Prior to entering the world of real estate, Janet McNeill provided paralegal services in the banking and finance department of a major Melbourne law firm. This background enables her to provide a level of real estate service that is second to none. Having been Mornington Peninsula residents for over 50 years, you are engaging the services of a team who truly know the area. With McNeill Real Estate at your side, you can sit back and comfortably enjoy your retirement years. Particular emphasis is placed on providing an ethical, honest and trustworthy experience to all they meet. They care about your retirement, and they understand that you only have one chance to set yourself up for retirement. When you need an agent who understands the importance of ensuring you have a stress free, smooth experience, and achieving the result you seek, you can be sure that McNeill Real Estate search for the best buyer, not necessarily the first buyer. With years of experience, the agents take the time to understand your needs and ultimate goals, whether it be seeking a particular settlement timeframe, knowing how you wish to be communicated with or keeping you and/or your family fully informed and involved in the process. Treating you with respect, answering any question without hesitation and going above and beyond to ensure you are satisfied makes them the perfect team to be on your side. When you choose McNeill Real Estate, it feels like you choose an extended member of your family! One who truly cares about you and your family. Their motto is “It’s not about us – it’s about you”. Making the decision to downsize comes with a range of emotions from excitement, to fear and everything in between. It can also be daunting if you are coming to terms with failing health, dependency on relatives and working through the myriad of options around moving to a smaller home, or retirement village. Having a real estate agent who understands all aspects of downsizing, and who helps guide and assist, can be an immense weight off your shoulders.

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The McNeill Real Estate team ensure that you, and where applicable your family, are involved in the whole process. They work to your timeframe, not theirs. They know that sometimes you may not be ready for inspections or may have other commitments to meet. Knowing how to work in with you while also ensuring that your buyers are given full opportunity to feel comfortable making an offer on your home is just one of the ways they differ from other agencies. Their marketing and negotiating skills top off the professionalism offered by McNeill Real Estate. Let McNeill Real Estate take care of your next move so you have more time with your family, more money in your pocket and a great real estate experience. Contact the team at McNeill Real Estate today for a free market appraisal. Virtual appraisals are currently being offered online. Download your free copy of “the Selling Game” from their website. To ensure you stay informed, subscribe to get the latest insider tips, market updates and access to the hottest deals as they come on the market.

When the time is right, call them on 5977 1737 or for further information visit: www.McNeillRealEstate.com.au


Residential Sales Property Management www.McNeillRealEstate.com.au

janet@mcneillrealestate.com.au

Your partners in Retirement

0419 503 327 david@mcneillrealestate.com.au

0438 788 595

Get your FREE virtual market appraisal!

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Focus On

on

Rye

Rye is a seaside resort town, approximately 83 km south of Melbourne, on the Mornington Peninsula. Its bay beach is popular with swimmers, fishermen, yachtsmen and kite surfers. Rye has an area of 14.7 km². •Rye median house price is $970,000. Rental median price is $480pw. •The coastal town of Rye is situated on the popular holiday destination of the Mornington Peninsula, nestled between Rosebud and Blairgowrie. •Point Nepean Road is Rye's main thoroughfare, running parallel to the town's bay beach. The main concentration of shops is located east of Dundas Street and includes a hotel, eateries, a major supermarket and other retailers. •Rye's main beach, fronting Port Phillip, offers safe sandy beaches, ideal for swimming and boating. There is a jetty, several boat ramps, and attractive foreshore facilities with picnic areas, shelters, playgrounds and walking tracks. •Around a kilometre west of the Rye Jetty is an outcrop of land called White Cliffs. At the base of the cliffs is a reconstructed old Lime Burners Kiln - a reminder of the mid-1800s when the extraction of lime was the area's primary industry. Scenic views along the coast can be enjoyed from a lookout above the kiln. •Rye extends southwards across the narrow width of the Mornington Peninsula in this area, right down to the coastline fronting the open waters of Bass Strait. The Mornington Peninsula National Park spans the foreshore here, consisting of scenic walking tracks, rocky coastal features, dunes and pockets of sandy beach. A pathway and steps extend from Tasman Drive down to the sandy bay at Number 16 Beach

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•Population of Rye is 8,416. •If you enjoy snorkeling, you can hire gear locally and then head for the Octopus’s Garden at Rye Pier. This is a 200 metre underwater trail with signage introducing you to the underwater wildlife. •Rye also has an impressive ocean beach, where you can experience an exhilarating horse ride. There are magnificent walks along the clifftops that form part of the 25 kilometre Coastal Walk. •Rye was proclaimed a town on February 26, 1861 and is partly in the parish of Wannaeue but mainly in the parish of Nepean, which is west of Government Road and Weeroona Street. The township extends south to the southern boundary of the cemetery, with its east and west boundaries being Weir Street and Dundas Street. •In the early years of settlement, Rye was known for lime burning, wood cutting and fishing industries. The building of Melbourne was under way, and the lime burnt from stone kilns at Rye was transported by dray, then barge, onto small sailing vessels. The lime industry gave employment to wood cutters, quarry men and lime burners and a settlement soon developed. •Rye had the natural bounty provided by the bay and ocean beaches. Fish were in great abundance and provided a living for some families. As well as putting food on the table for many others, the rocky edges at the ocean beaches were a rich source of crayfish, and the bay held a multitude of species.

Coffee Safari

Freshly brewed coffee is a must-have for weekends. Here are a few places to check out when you're in this beautiful part of the world.*

Freaky Tiki

SHOP 14, 2185 POINT NEPEAN ROAD

Great coffee and fresh food in a warm friendly environment. Locally roasted coffee and a delicious menu.

Captains of Rye

2285 POINT NEPEAN ROAD

A laid back, unique atmosphere with friendly staff serving up an extensive breakfast menu, burgers and the cheeky brunch cocktail.

Peninsula Pantry 43A WONDAREE STREET

Brekkie, light fare and homemade cakes in a cheerful cafe with communal tables, plus outdoor seats. Excellent coffee that is second to none and perfect with a slice or cake.

Hunter Café & Store 364 DUNDAS STREET

100% vegan cafe out the back of Rye serving delicious, healthy, vibrant food and Commonfolk coffee.

*Please note: Due to on going lock downs in Victoria, trading conditions are subject to change in line with State Government COVID-19 restrictions. It is advised to check with the individual businesses for their trading information.


What to do The coastal town of Rye is a popular holiday destination with everything you could want right within walking distance with some great cafes specialising in breakfast and lunches, fantastic restaurants, a wonderful foreshore and bay beach and of course the Rye’s Up! Community playground which was refurbished in 2017. Point Nepean Road is Rye's main thoroughfare, running parallel to the town's bay beach and the main beach offers sandy beaches ideal for swimming, boating and fishing. Many visitors and locals enjoy picnics along the stunning foreshore reserve. World class golf courses are within a few minutes’ drive of the main township and the multi award winning Peninsula Hot Springs is also nearby. Photos Yanni

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Puzzle

Corner

ACROSS 1. Spread 5. Mammal, humpback ... 9. Use loom 12. Suffered 16. Spiny desert succulents 17. Dock 18. Greedy 20. Polar sea feature (4,3) 22. Introduces to solid food 23. Last-minute news (4,5) 24. Reworked (text) 26. Nil 27. Cabaret frontman 28. Pacified by medication 31. Writer, ... Dahl 32. Disinclined 34. Culminate in (4,2) 36. Hoo-ha 37. Varies 40. Argentina's ... Peron 42. Hunger pains 43. Eloquent 45. Freed from blame 47. Construct 49. Embarked on 50. Secretly 52. European coins 54. Chopped 55. 1996 Oscar-winner, ... Sarandon 56. Smidgen 58. Open sore 59. Cougars 60. Short back & sides 61. San Francisco's Golden ... Bridge 62. Moroccan capital 63. Remove rind from 64. Hoity-toity (2-2-2) 67. Common-walled suburban house 68. Neither ... nor that 69. Baby bird of prey 72. Cremation vase 74. Small carved figure 78. Affirmative vote 79. ... Baba & The 40 Thieves 80. Metal pen-point 81. Unprincipled man 82. Peace prize 85. Necklace components 87. Of vision 88. Geometric design style, Art ...

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90. Without liability cover 91. Furtive glance 92. Walks with muffled tread 93. Pleasant sanctuary 94. Bellows instrument 95. Verbal 96. Glove 97. Ann Miller or Gene Kelly (3,6) 100. Cheque butt 102. Wobbly 103. Music platters 104. Choose (government) 106. Dominate, rule the ... 108. Cantonese lunch, yum ... 109. Caviar 110. Wears, ... on 112. Biologically-interactive community 116. Pouch-like body part 118. Most timid 120. Locks 121. Cry of disgust 123. Hire agreements 125. Lout 126. Dive 127. Roadway border 128. Egypt, formerly United ... Republic 129. Oozes 130. Arrant 131. Stereo unit (2-2) 132. Donations 134. Clutch 136. Sherwood Forest's ... Hood 139. Fiendish 141. Coffin stands 142. Drawback 144. Imbue 146. Friendly word on meeting 147. Troubled 148. Gesture of assent 149. Separate entities 151. Anti-terrorist group (1,1,1) 152. Defray 155. Turn sharply 158. Barber's honing leather 159. Yuletide fir (9,4) 162. Harvests 164. Funeral vehicle 165. Satire (4-2) 166. Undermined (efforts) 170. King's time on throne 171. Tenor, ... Domingo

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172. Presume 173. Stadium 174. Stomach parasites 175. Royal family name 176. Hayseed 177. Guitar sound 178. Put clothes on

DOWN 1. Waste matter 2. Covetous 3. Fruit confection on a stick (6-5) 4. Temporary relief 5. Money cases 6. In current state (2,2) 7. Repeat 8. Agnostics 9. Trounce, ... the floor with 10. Curving lines 11. Occurrence 12. Came to light 13. Trampled-on 14. Supply of new weapons 15. Destroyed (hopes) 19. Stupefy 21. Wine, ... spumante 25. Excavate mud 26. Admiral Horatio ... 29. Slake (thirst) 30. Lobbed 33. Computer displays (4-4) 35. Beaded counting frames 36. Noisy timepiece (5,5) 38. Tel Aviv natives 39. Withdraw to safe place 41. Lopsided 42. In itself, ... se 44. Hollywood is there, ... Angeles 46. Tasteless 48. Rental occupant 49. Scold 51. Land depression 53. Get up late (5,2) 55. Humans, homo ... 57. CD brand (1,1,1) 60. Yank 65. Insistently 66. Conned 70. Greek storyteller 71. Post receptacles 73. Drugs

75. 13-19 year-old 76. Oddly 77. You (archaic) 78. Truants 83. Fractures 84. Favours one leg 85. Author of The Power of One, ... Courtenay 86. Idolise 89. Porridge flake 91. Dance, ... de deux 92. Generating plant (5,7) 96. Folk tales 98. Powered by battery or mains (1,1/1,1) 99. Different 101. Batman's alter-ego, ... Wayne 103. Court compensation 105. Game hunter 107. Loyalty 111. Achieve 112. Upsurge 113. Public drains 114. Nike symbol 115. Transcendental 117. Even though 119. Outflow 120. Shysters 122. Lamp fuel 124. Fire powder 132. Record players 133. Mi, ..., soh 134. Specks of sand 135. Poster girls (3-3) 137. Unhealthy 138. Car's registration sign 140. Alliance 141. Carefree 143. Expressions of contempt 145. Non-drinkers 150. Puerile 153. 1920s extroverted woman 154. Supreme joy 156. Hoeing 157. Carrot-top 158. Woe 160. Apple Inc. device 161. Those people 163. Monopoly street, The ... 166. Under the weather 167. Mixing dish 168. Substance 169. Scientific information


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History

“Old Tichingorourke” – A Mt Martha Settler By Ilma Hackett - Balnarring & District Historical Society

T

he local Bunurong people called him “Old Tichingorourke” after their name for the waterway that ran through the land. He was the first European to settle there – Captain James Reid. Reid, a retired army captain, came to the Port Phillip colony as a ‘military settler’ in 1840, with high hopes. It was a step he later regretted. Early Life and Soldiering Reid was born in Edinburgh in 1795, the oldest of the seven children born to James Reid of the Scottish Exchequer and Ann Baird Reid. Both his parents died when he was young and in 1812, fifteen months after his father’s death, Reid joined the army. He was seventeen. As an ensign of the 45 Regiment of Foot, he served under Wellington and was sent to southern France where he took part in four victorious Peninsular War battles for which he was awarded the Peninsula Medal with clasps. After the defeat of Napoleon’s armies at Waterloo his regiment was sent to the Indian subcontinent. While still young, Reid was appointed an adjutant and was selected by his colonel to be taught sword exercises by the celebrated military swordsman, Angelo. He then taught these exercises to his fellow officers. Between 1824 and 1826 he was in north-eastern India fighting against the Burmese who had been expanding into territories along the northern high borders. For his part in the brutal conflict he received another medal with clasp for the victory at Ava. continued next page... Above Right: Captain James Reid Below: Illustration from Henry Angelo’s fencing manual : The School of Fencing

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Reid then went to Ceylon as Government Agent for the Northern Provinces. The appointment was both a civil and a military one. Ceylon had become a British colony in1815 and the British introduced a series of changes and reforms, some social, some administrative. As a consequence rebellion occasionally broke out. The time Reid spent in Ceylon provided him with many colourful memories which he later delighted in recounting at dinner parties. After several years of service he was invalided home with an acute liver complaint. First trip to the Antipodes In 1832 Reid sailed in the Katherine Stewart Forbes, a convict ship bound for Van Diemen’s Land. He was in command of the accompanying military guard. Cholera broke out and the ship was quarantined in the Thames Estuary for almost a month before it was cleared to sail. Thirteen of the 220 convicts on board died. The ship reached Hobart Town in July. With its ‘cargo’ safely landed, the ship continued on to Sydney where Reid stayed for three months before sailing to Calcutta aboard the Lord William Bentinck. He served a second period in India but his former illness flared up and he was again invalided home. Back in England Reid’s life took a new turn. While stationed at Canterbury Barracks he met young Scottish lass, Margaret Forbes, the daughter of a Midlothian glass blower. In 1838 she gave birth

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to a son, John, whose birth was registered at the Canterbury Barracks. The wedding between James Reid and Margaret Forbes took place in March 1839, soon after Reid had been transferred to the Windsor Barracks. A second marriage service, performed by the Reverend Scott (a brother-in-law of Reid) took place at St George’s Edinburgh six months later. Margaret was 18 years old and James was 44. Before the year ended a second son, Walter Scott Reid, was born in Edinburgh. A Military Settler Now a family man, Reid considered his future. The British Government was actively encouraging desirable immigrants, with capital between £500 and £2,000, to settle in the recently opened Port Phillip District of New South Wales. Retired officers of the army or navy and professional men were deemed to be highly suitable immigrants and Reid decided that life on the land would be a worthwhile venture for his retirement. After twenty-seven years as a career soldier he retired from a military life to become a squatter. He sold his commission as a Senior Captain of his regiment and prepared to emigrate. Soon after the birth of his second son the family sailed for Australia aboard the Isabella Watson, arriving in the small settlement of Melbourne in August 1840. Between 1838 and 1840 pastoral expansion in the Port Phillip District was at a peak. Land sales boomed. Grants of ‘waste and


Left: British attack in Burma 1824. Above: V-R original branding iron held by The Briars Right: Tichingorourke Run, 1841

unoccupied land’ could be obtained by licence for pastoral purposes. These were held by applying annually to the Commissioner and paying a fee of ₤10 (ten pounds) plus a small levy per head of livestock. James Reid took out a grazing licence to 6,000 acres of Crown Land in 1840. The run was ‘Tichingorourke’ on the Mornington Peninsula. He wasn’t the first to hold a licence for this land. Earlier in 1840 one was granted to a John Vockins. The property was marked as ‘Vockins Station’ on an early survey map but, by 1841, survey maps record ‘Captain Reid’s Station’ at the site. Vockins does not appear to have developed the land in any way and he moved on fairly quickly although it is possible that Reid and Vockins ran cattle together for a brief period. An old branding iron with the letters V - R (Vockins - Reid?) was found at The Briars (formerly Tichingorourke) and is now displayed there. Tichingorourke extended from Tanti Creek in the north to the base of Mt Martha in the south and inland from the coast for several miles. It was open country, dissected by a good creek and its tributaries, with good grasses and timbered with eucalypts, acacias, she-oaks and ‘honeysuckle’ (banksia) trees although there were areas of thick scrub. Several other runs on the peninsula had already been occupied. Most of these squatters were young men, some still in their late teens. Among them were the Jamieson brothers, the Barker brothers, the Meyrick trio and Alfred Hobson. Captain Baxter was an older man and, like Reid, a retired military

man. Anyone over 30 years was considered old in this new colony. Hence,“Old Tichingorourke”. Reid set about with characteristic vigour and determination to establish his run. He hired labour and using the simple hand-tools of the time –hoes, spades, the single furrow plough - the land was cleared, paddocks fenced and buildings erected by the creek at a short distances from its mouth. Henry Tuck, a ship’s carpenter newly arrived on the peninsula, worked at Reid’s station before working for the McCraes and the Barkers. Tuck was a fellow Scot, from the Isle of Skye. Home for the Reid family became a slab cottage with a roof thatched with reeds from the creek. He planted corn and potatoes, established a garden, put in a few fruit trees and ran mainly cattle. His hard work paid off as by late 1841 Reid’s station was regarded as something of a showpiece. Two years later Richard Howitt described the Reid cottage as he saw it when he walked the length of the Peninsula. The exterior was rustic but indoors it was a strange medley of military, elegant English and homely bush furniture and furnishings. There was evidence of taste. The book case was well furnished with good substantial old and elegant modern literature. Howitt noted that Reid had purposely set fire to old dead grass and scrub on his land to increase the pastureland and to encourage a new cover of fresh, green grass for his cattle. continued next page...

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Above: The Reid's Cottage (Drawing by Harold Freedman in 'Riders of Time' by Mabel Brookes)

Friendship with the McCrae family Reid was well-regarded in early Melbourne society and in government circles. He joined the elite Melbourne Club. The Club, formed in 1839, was for the ‘Gentlemen’ of the colony. To be a member one needed to be a person of social standing – a gentleman by profession, commission and upbringing. It was probably through the Melbourne Club that he met fellow Scot, Andrew McCrae, who was then living at ‘Mayfield’, his home in Abbotsford. Early in 1843 when Margaret Reid was pregnant with the Reid’s third child, Georgiana McCrae, prompted by her husband, extended an invitation to Mrs Reid to come and stay ‘Mayfield’, until after the child was born. Margaret, with her two small sons and her maid, Jane Scott, was given rooms in the upstairs section of the house as their temporary home for a couple of months. A daughter, Helen Hay, was born on 6th March. Before they returned to ‘Tichingorourke’ Captain Reid took his young sons, then five and four, to see Melbourne as they had not been before. Reid’s influential friends included the explorer and former governor of Van Diemen’s Land, Sir John Franklin. On leaving Van Diemen’s Land, Franklin wanted to revisit Arthur’s Seat which he had first climbed as a young man with the Matthew Flinders expedition. He and Lady Franklin stayed at ‘Tichingorourke’ en route to Arthur’s Seat in 1843, pitching their tents in the Captain’s yards. Reid led the party to the summit of the mountain the following day. He gave a full account of the Franklins’ visit to Georgiana McCrae when he next visited ‘Mayfield’, telling how Lady Franklin would send her china tea pot to be filled from the kettle in the kitchen. The McCraes, became the Reids closest neighbours on the Peninsula when Andrew McCrae took up the licence for Arthur’s

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Seat in February 1844. The run was approximately a dozen miles to the south of ‘Tichingorourke’ and was known to the Bunurong as ‘Wonga’. Reid organised for Georgiana and Andrew McCrae to stay with his family when they came to inspect the land. The McCraes were two weeks at ‘Tichingorourke’ while Reid introduced them to the area. They were taken on outings, visited nearby stations, neighbours stopped in. James Reid, a gregarious and hospitable host, filled in evenings regaling them with stories of characters he had known in Ceylon. Georgiana helped Margaret make covers for the chairs while the men were out riding or fishing and she heard the lessons of the two Reid boys. Johnny and “Wattie” were quite a handful. One afternoon the adults arrived back at the station to find “Wattie” had cut off the tip of his finger with the axe. Johnny was in trouble, possibly for not watching his brother or possibly for goading him on. Fortunately Dr Clutterbuck was with them and he was able to tend to the wound. Reid obviously relished the outdoor life and time spent in the saddle. When the group was returning on horseback from Arthur’s Seat, Mr Jamieson, one of the party, identified some of his bullocks grazing with a larger mob of animals. Jamieson and Reid “with much cracking of whips and shouting, proceeded to cut them from the mob”. Georgiana McCrae wrote in her diary that is was an exhilarating sight. Ever the Soldier Reid’s military background was thoroughly ingrained. He was described as being very stiff and correct and it is said he ran his family and his station with military precision. Like other station owners he took on men from the local tribe as station hands and stockmen. The Aboriginal people were perfect mimics, able to imitate his accent and expressions. As well as calling him “Old


Tichingorouke” they had an alternate name, “Understand? D’ye see?” This came from his habit of making doubly sure that his instructions were understood. Reid used the brand JR45 as his station’s brand on his cattle - JR his initials and 45 the number of his old regiment. It is recorded that he “rode abroad on his great creaking saddle, with heels well down and garnished with stout solid military ‘boxed’ spurs.” A McCrae family quarrel had Reid acting as an intermediary between the brothers, Andrew and Alexander. His part in the successful reconciliation gave him great pleasure. He also acted as a mediator between neighbours, Edward Barker and Maurice Meyrick who were at loggerheads over a waterhole and wattle trees on land bordering their two properties. Reid, in true military style, advised that the only gentlemanly way out of the dispute was to hold a duel. This took place in ‘The Cups’, the broad dunes at the back of Cape Schanck. No one was injured and honour was satisfied. Reid was a generous man, sending or bringing gifts to his friends and neighbours; a kangaroo tail perhaps if he had killed an animal. One time, when the McCraes were still living in Abbotsford, he arrived at ‘Mayfield’ quite upset at having lost the tail feathers of two lyre birds that he was bringing as gifts to Mrs McCrae. He was also very forthright and opinioned, the type of person who spoke his mind. Whilst at dinner at the Barkers’ home at Cape Schanck he came to loggerheads with Dr Barker and the hostess had to tactfully intervene to restore peace. Reid also appears to have had a quick and uncertain temper and he created a “hullabaloo about a cart whip”. He had sold a spring cart to Andrew McCrae and a couple of weeks later arrived back at ‘Mayfield’ to reclaim a whip which had inadvertently been left in the cart. McCrae had thought it part of the deal. Perhaps Reid was watching his pennies like the proverbial Scot. Bankruptcy The years1841 and ‘42 had been difficult years for the new colony. During the previous two years pastoral expansion had gone ahead like wildfire. People were spending big without any solid backing behind them, living on credit. Squatters had to wait a couple of years for a return on their properties. A crash was inevitable and it came. With money scarce properties decreased in value and prices fell dramatically. One squatter wrote there was “no money, no credit, no trade, nothing but failures”. Reid, at first, seemed to be weathering the financial crisis. As late as February 1844 he was still planning on building a bigger and more substantial home on his land. He had chosen the hilltop opposite his cottage and he had walked there with the McCraes to show them the site. That year he was also appointed a Justice of the Peace for the Colony. He had 200 cattle and six horses at ‘Tichingorourke’ as listed by the Crown Commissioner. Yet in October 1844 he applied for a Certificate of Discharge for insolvency.

‘Tichingorourke’. It was the last application to be gazetted in his name. The following year, succumbing to the financial depression that had swamped the colony, James Reid had himself declared bankrupt, paid his creditors ten shillings in the pound and with his family set sail for Gravesend aboard the Royal George. Margaret was again pregnant and their fifth child, a daughter, Margaret Adelaide, was born at sea. Again an Army Captain Back in the United Kingdom Reid obtained a position as an inspector in Ireland. Famine had engulfed that country and at the end of 1846 Reid was sent to Killarney to oversee famine relief committees for the county of Kerry. His responsibilities were to see that the aid granted by Parliament was properly dispensed. The famine dragged on for three years. During this period Margaret gave birth to two more sons; Andrew in 1847 and Alexander in March 1849. Margaret was in Edinburgh for both births, presumably with family. With the end of the famine Reid was without work. In a most unusual move he sought to rejoin the army and, through personal influence, was appointed Staff Officer of Pensioners with his old rank of Captain. Two months later the family again embarked on a new life. The British government planned to establish a colony in the remote Falkland Islands. Enrolled Pensioners, that is former soldiers who had been engaged in war and were now living on a government pension, were to form a settlement at Stanley. The object of the settlement was to have a group of men and their families who would become settlers but men who could defend the island in an emergency. The maximum age limit for the ex-soldier was 45 years and family size was limited to four children. Passage to the island was free. Two-roomed kit cottages were shipped with them and each man was to be given an allotment of ten acres with further grazing rights. Captain James Reid was in charge of the new settlement. Now 54 years old he, his wife, and seven children sailed on the Victory to the Falklands with the thirty chosen Pensioners and their families. continued next page... Below: A typical kit cottage at the Falklands

In April 1845 Margaret gave birth to another child, a son they named James. In September of the same year Reid again sent in his annual application for a licence to depasture stock at

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Return to Van Diemen’s Land Reid and his family spent three years in the Falklands and two more children, Annie and Leonard, were born at Stanley. Reid felt there was little future for his children in that remote, windswept location. He applied for a transfer to Van Diemen’s Land and, in 1852, the family sailed for Hobart Town aboard the Berwick Castle. From Hobart they went on to Launceston where Reid took up a position similar to the one he had held in the Falklands, that of Staff Officer of Pensioners. His district was the northern part of the island. He held this role until 1860. He also became a Justice of the Peace. Three more children were born during the family’s time in Launceston, Mary in 1854, Septimus in 1855 and their twelfth child, Jemima in 1857. Septimus, however, lived just four months. In 1859 Reid was appointed Governor of the Launceston Gaol when the previous governor resigned. Over a number of years he very conscientiously carried out his duties as Governor and also as Superintendant of the Penal Establishments of Launceston until his health began to deteriorate. Reid suffered from angina and the old illness he had contacted in India – disease of the kidneys returned to plague him. His family urged him to retire from public life. Towards the end of 1866 Reid sent in his letter of resignation and applied for the usual retirement compensation. This had barely been granted and he was preparing to move into a new residence when he died. It was the end of January 1867. James Reid was seventy-two years old. As a tribute of respect, the various vessels in Launceston harbour dipped their colors to half-mast. He was described in his obituary as a frank and affable man who was highly respected in his community. His body was buried in the Presbyterian cemetery in Launceston.

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Above: The launceston Gaol


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