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architecture


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YOUR HOME MAY BE REPOSSESSED IF YOU DO NOT KEEP UP REPAYMENTS ON YOUR MORTGAGE.


Contents

07

David Blaikie Architects

38

inkdesign architecture

09 Fernandes-Binns Architects

40 JAMstudio

10

A449 Architects

44

Karen Parry Architects

12

Architeco

48

Konishi Gaffney Architects

14

Atelier-M

54

LBA

16

Bespoke

56

McGinlay Bell

20 Camerons Architects

58

Paper Igloo Architecture + Design

26

Catriona Tanner : Architect

6O Studio Hebrides Architecture

28

Crichton Wood Architects

62

Thorne Wyness Architects

32

Dab Den

66

Woodside Parker Kirk architects

34

Designworks Interior Design &

70

ZONE Architects

Architecture

74

Iain Cameron Architect

architecture18 Editor Gillian Welsh Contributor Judy Diamond Designer Linda Park Published by Peebles Media Group Cover, contents and welcome image shutterstock.com

Š Peebles Media Group, 2018

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European Interiors in the Heart of Edinburgh


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hat would make your life

better? How about more natural light, or a sense of balance and harmony in your home? A feeling that your space is properly organised, with a place for everything, and enough room for your family to breathe? Sounds good? What you need is an architect. This booklet, architecture18, free with Homes & Interiors Scotland issue 120, builds on the resounding success of last year’s edition, which quickly became essential reading for anyone interested in knowing more about the country’s leading practitioners. Inside this latest instalment, you’ll find the stories of some of the most highly regarded studios in the country. Whether long-established or more recent, these architects all share certain attributes: their work is thoughtful, accomplished and imaginative; creativity and meticulous attention to detail are at the heart of what they do; and, more than anything, they are problem-solvers – they seek not only to answer the client’s brief but to go beyond that, to uncover ways that will enhance and improve the experience of dwelling in these spaces. Read on to find out about each studio’s specialisms, the

accolades they’ve won, what sort of approach they take to new commissions, and what inspires their designs. They showcase selected projects and highlight the obstacles that had to be overcome as they sought the best solution for each design. They discuss their desire to bring in the latest 3D modelling tools to make visualising proposals and plans at the design stage so much easier, and their commitment to using eco-friendly technology based on Passivhaus principles to make their buildings as energy-efficient as possible. Scotland’s built environment is a significant beneficiary in all of this, of course, but it’s the individual client who stands to gain the most. You might be adding nothing more than a tiny boot-room to your porch – but what a difference it will make every time the kids come in with muddy shoes. Or you may wish your kitchen could open out to the garden – the effect of installing glazed doors or adding an extension can be truly transformational. As for a brand-new home, where every detail has been worked out to suit you, your lifestyle and your family – well, it doesn’t get better than that. You’ll find the answers here.

Editor, Gillian Welsh

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David Blaikie Architects

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David Blaikie Architects 10 Deanhaugh Street Edinburgh EH4 1LY T: 0131 332 1133 E: david@davidblaikiearchitects.com F: www.facebook.com/ davidblaikiearchitects www.davidblaikiearchitects.com

BISHOP AUCKLAND FARMHOUSE David Blaikie Architects’ first project south of the border is the restoration of a dilapidated Georgian farmhouse in County Durham. Contemporary extensions are also proposed to make the most of its rural, riverside setting.

PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL ZANRE

ased in Edinburgh and focused on design, David Blaikie Architects produces award-winning projects across Scotland. The practice recently celebrated its 25th anniversary, and continues to be listed among Urban Realm’s top 100 architects in Scotland. Over the years the practice has won a reputation both for sensitive conservation and adaptation of Edinburgh’s listed buildings and for strong contemporary architecture. “We work closely with our clients to provide imaginative solutions which reflect their ambitions and create beautiful quality, light-filled, restful spaces for families to live in,” says director David Blaikie. Experience gained across all areas of the residential sector has led to the practice winning Scotland’s most prestigious design awards, most recently the 2016 RIAS Award for Architecture. Daniel Masters is one client who has been impressed by the practice: “David and his team have a real expertise and a passion for combining innovative design with care for authentic period features, very good technical input and attention to detail. They were fantastic, very friendly and easy to work with, with great advice throughout the project and great transparency on cost and timelines. My family have moved in and are absolutely delighted with our new home – I would strongly recommend them,” he says. Sunlight, colour, texture, balance, sustainability and heritage are at the heart of every design: “Our work is honest, innovative and, we hope, surprising,” says Blaikie. “Our practice is extremely busy and expanding and our commercial work will be taking us to London later this year with several projects for an existing client.”

COLINTON HOUSE Above and left: This project involved remodelling a house in the Edinburgh neighbourhood of Colinton. It has fabulous views south over Colinton Dell, towards the Pentland hills, and it is easy to believe you are in remote countryside when you look out of the frameless glass box bay of the new master bedroom. Incidentally, when the original house was being built, one of its labourers would go on to become very famous indeed: Sean Connery.

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Fernandes-Binns Architects

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ustine Fernandes-Binns is an award-winning architect with a thriving studio in Edinburgh. After a spell in London (which included working on the winner of the 2001 House of the Year award), she taught architecture at university in Chile. Back in the UK, she worked at Richard Murphy and Roxburgh McEwan, before setting up her own practice in 2014. “I specialise in highquality residential design,” she says. “A lot of my work is in and around Edinburgh, Lothian and Fife, and includes extensions to historic buildings, attic conversions and new-build housing.” One recent project, a basement conversion in the Willowbrae area of the city (right), received a commendation in the Small Projects category of the 2018 Edinburgh Architectural Association Awards. “Each house has a specific brief, depending on who it is for and its location. It’s important to me that the design of the finished building is a precise response to these unique circumstances,” she says. “I want to de-mystify the whole process for the client and make it as stress-free as I can for them.” Fernandes-Binns aims to create a completely coherent design from inside to out. She enjoys a challenge (“I once had to install a glass floor in an attic conversion!”) and is very interested in sustainability – a significant amount of her work is in timber construction. “I love good craftsmanship and quality materials, and I think most clients understand the benefits of choosing to do one aspect of the design really well rather than spreading the budget too thinly.”

Fernandes-Binns Architects 3 Scone Gardens Edinburgh EH8 7DQ T: 0131 258 4506 / 07717 745897 E: info@fb-architects.co.uk www.fb-architects.co.uk

SCONE GARDENS Above and below: This Victorian terraced house has been modernised and extended, creating an open-plan kitchen-dining-living room. A home office looks over the balcony to the basement. The palette of materials was restricted: solid and veneered walnut is used for the bespoke shelving and fittings and as cladding for the mezzanine.

VILLA EXTENSION, TRINITY Below: These large doors slide all the way back, giving a complete connection to the garden. Note the unplastered back wall, which lets the new room read as a distinct object.

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A449 Architects

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eeping things as simple as possible and focusing on clarity of form is the best way to approach any new design, argues Matthew Johnson. As the founder and director of A449 Architects, widely regarded as one of the best emerging practices in Britain, Johnson knows what he is talking about. “Our work is primarily domestic in nature, with new-builds and extensions, and we love the fact that much of our work allows the story of an existing building to continue. But in addition to our recent award-winning housing projects (we won the Saltire Medal in 2016 and in 2017, and we were longlisted for the RIBA House of the Year award), we are also involved in a number of commercial projects – we’re currently on site with a restaurant and coffee roastery in Edinburgh, for example. This has been particularly interesting as we will be installing a coffee roaster in the basement of a Victorian tenement.” Understanding and utilising aspect, light and volume to maximise internal spatial quality is at the heart of what the A449 does – helped by the latest technology. “We have had a 3D printer for several years now and find that it is an incredibly useful tool during the design process,” says Johnson. “Sketches and 3D computer modelling are fantastic, but a physical object can really help the client to understand a proposal.” Context always remains key: “We create buildings that are firmly rooted by their context – in a recent project, for example, the concept for the floorplan was based on the patterns in the bark of a prominent silver birch tree on the site.”

A449 Architects 266-268 Portobello High Street Edinburgh EH15 2AT T: 07809 243388 Twitter @A449LTD Instagram @A449LTD www.a449.co.uk

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EDINBURGH ROAD A refurbishment and extension to an historic steading conversion at a coastal location on the west edge of Musselburgh, East Lothian. During construction it was established that the existing roof and walls were in very poor condition. The steading was then demolished and rebuilt, which improved the structural and thermal integrity of the entire property, securing its future as a desirable family home. This project won a RIAS award in 2017 and was also longlisted for the RIBA House of the Year.

“We love the fact that much of our work allows the story of an existing building to continue”


ROSEFIELD AVENUE LANE A refurbishment and extension in the conservation area of Portobello. The existing building was originally converted from a small coach house in the mid-1980s to form a onebedroom dwelling. The project saved this deteriorating property while sympathetically extending it to secure its future as a robust family home for generations to come. It won a RIAS award and a Saltire Society Award in 2015.

BLAKEBURN The complete overhaul of a nondescript mid-20th century dwelling to create a unique and elegant home in a rural location near Melrose, Roxburghshire. The footprint extended to the east and west of the existing building, with the entire building then over-clad in scorched larch. Given its prominent position, any new works had to minimise the visual impact of a much larger building on the site. The project won a RIAS award and a Saltire Society Award in 2016, together with the Saltire Medal for excellence in housing design.

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Architeco Ltd

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eading a team of seven, principal architect Colin Potter has turned Architeco into an innovative practice that produces cutting-edge sustainable design across Scotland and beyond. “We are passionate about efficient design, and we work hard to find the right solutions to produce simple, effective and beautiful buildings that balance the client’s wants and needs with practical considerations,” says Potter. “Using the latest technology, researching new techniques and materials, and carefully considering the entire lifespan and impact of a building is part of our design process.” Passivhaus certified, with RIAS accreditation in sustainable design, Architeco is a leader in building homes that are ecofriendly and energy-efficient. “We carry out extensive energy modelling on all our home designs and optimise these for efficiency, to provide good comfort levels, ensure low running costs, and avoid overheating. This comes as standard,” explains Potter. “Our virtual-reality models are an excellent design communication tool, and thermal imaging and drone surveys are also in our toolbox.” While the practice is an industry leader in sustainable design, it still takes a downto-earth approach. “Our priority is to design homes that suit the client’s requirements. Careful interpretation of their wishes is what lets us create beautifully efficient buildings, and we take a responsive, open and straightforward approach to achieve this.” The studio has launched a range of standard houses under its Caber House brand. “Meeting the Passivhaus Low Energy standard, these cutting-edge homes suit self-builders who want a pre-designed house, rather than having a detailed brief for something bespoke, and we’re in the process of releasing zero-carbon designs.” Architeco Ltd 43 Argyll Street Dunoon PA23 7HG T: 01369 701 988 E: contact@architeco.co.uk www.architeco.co.uk

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LOW ENERGY HOUSE, BUTE RELAXED FAMILY LIVING A modest four-bedroom house sited at the edge of a collection of farm buildings, includes Passivhaus detailing and a renewable energy strategy to ensure minimal running costs. The main living space is light and airy, with aspects to all four cardinal directions capturing the views, as well as discreet skylights that bring light in from above. A double-height hallway gives the house a spacious, open feel and connects spaces and rooms. The wood burning stove forms a focal point, as well as meeting the heating requirements for the whole house.

CABER HOUSE – FLEXIBLE, EXCEPTIONAL ECO-HOUSE Contemporary and well balanced, Caber House combines rigorously practical design with aesthetic appeal. It is aimed at selfbuilders who want the most efficient home possible. Expertly designed with PassivHaus principles and energy efficiency in mind, the Caber House standard designs can provide Zero Carbon and positive energy homes, and are suitable for the Scottish climate and a wide range of sites. See www.caberhouse.co.uk for the full range.

“Using the latest technology and carefully considering the entire lifespan of a building is part of our design process” SEA-SIDE BUNGALOW – A LUXURIOUS, ELEGANT SPACE A modern extension, complete with interior remodelling, has transformed this 80s seaside bungalow; flooding the interior with light and creating generous spaces out of previously cramped rooms. With large, south facing glazing, its energy modelling allowed potential overheating issues to be designed out. A decked area, accessed from both the sun-room and dining room, along with a hidden private balcony from the master bedroom, provides raised outdoor space and allows long views across the sea.

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Atelier-M

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he influence of Dutch and Scandinavian architecture can be seen in the precise, paredback, award-winning buildings of Perthshire’s Atelier-M. The practice is run by two directors, husband and wife Alan Macdonald and Laura B Macdonald, supported by an architectural assistant. “Our portfolio ranges from individually designed extensions and alterations for private clients, to new-build and listed building conversions for residential developments,” says Laura. “We enjoy working collaboratively with our clients, combining contemporary ideas and technology to create unique and innovative solutions that maximise the available light and space to meet their individual requirements.” A recent project for a contemporary oakframe extension and alteration to an existing steading conversion won the Dundee Institute of Architects’ Best Use of Timber Award 2017. The proposal rationalised and extensively remodelled the existing layout, by repositioning the main entrance, removing internal walls to create a large open-plan kitchen/dining room, and converting the garage to form a playroom/ guest bedroom and en-suite. “Our approach is to try and fully understand our clients’ aspirations in order to create a design that responds to their needs, while also addressing the context and the site,” says Alan. Innovative low-carbon housing is a current interest, and the studio is also exploring efficient offsite construction techniques. From their base in a former Post Office building, which they converted themselves several years ago into a studio, the Macdonalds have successfully held a couple of small exhibitions in their gallery space to support local artists and architects. “We also recently acquired the red telephone box outside our office and we are in the process of developing ideas for its use!”

WEST END MODERNISM A contemporary extension to create an open-plan design adaptation for wheelchair use, transforming an existing 1960s bungalow into a modern sustainable home.

“We aim to understand our clients’ aspirations so we can create a design that responds to their needs”

ATELIER-M The Studio 77 Main Street, Longforgan   Perthshire DD2 5EW T: 01382 360378 E: mail@atelier-m.co.uk www.atelier-m.co.uk

‘TREE HOUSE’ EXTENSION The design for this contemporary extension to a family home was developed as a timber clad ‘tree house’ nestled amongst mature trees. 14

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COMMUNITY ‘GARDEN ROOM’ Multi purpose sustainable ‘garden room’ situated within the community garden of hospital grounds, with elevated internal and external spaces to maximise the views.

OAK FRAME EXTENSION A traditional, exposed, green oak-framed extension with modern design principles that creates a contemporary, light, warm, open-plan living space with an enhanced interaction to the landscaped gardens.

MODERN TOWNHOUSES Seven contemporary townhouses designed around a courtyard, with split level residences to address the steep, sloping topography. Modern materials engage with the scale and context of the leafy conservation area.

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Bespoke

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Emma Ellson Architects Ltd. T/A Bespoke The Studio 1A Ledcameroch Road Bearsden Glasgow G61 4AA T: 0141 942 0960 M: 07403 291 893 E: bespokeglasgow.com www.bespokeglasgow.com

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PHOTGRAPHY: MACK PHOTO. HTTPS://MACK.PHOTO/

stablished in 2014, Bespoke is an award-winning practice based in Bearsden, just outside Glasgow. With principal architect Emma Ellson at the helm, there is a focus on domestic, conservation, refurbishment and extension projects. “We are specialists in the design, delivery and co-ordination of small-scale domestic architecture projects ranging from a contract value of £50,000 to £500,000,” she says. Every detail is taken care of – Emma likes to see each project through to the end and, thanks to her experience and knowledge of interior architecture, is able to provide input into the finishing touches that often get forgotten about. “Each project is unique and each client’s brief is individual, and that is always the starting point of each journey,” she says. “We listen carefully to the client’s brief to get an immediate understanding of their desires and aspirations so that we can provide them with a design that fulfils their dreams.” She is well aware that hiring an architect and embarking on an extension or a refurbishment can feel quite intimidating and overwhelming for most people, so she endeavours to make it as straightforward and stress-free as possible. “Even small-scale domestic projects can take a number of months to see through from conception to completion, and the process can be a •


NEW-BUILD HOUSE, BEARSDEN This split-level house, which also serves as Bespoke’s studio, has a contemporary design that is respectful of the character of the surrounding conservation area. Left: View from the kitchen overlooking the dining-living area. The stairwell walls are lined in timber in a crisp white finish that continues along the balustrade to the void, wrapping under it, to connect these two elements. Top left: The upper gallery offers a connection with outside from the first-floor balcony and the void overlooking the double-height open-plan space below. Above: The first-floor balcony is a sun trap in the summer. The high-quality aluminium-framed glazing with minimal profiles is by Albann. Top right: This view from the balcony reveals the slate cladding that matches the quality roofing material. Slot windows with cedar linings offer a glimpse of the master bedroom with its free-standing bath.

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• daunting one for most inexperienced homeowners who are taking on a building project for the first time – that’s why we make sure to take a very personal approach to each and every client,” she explains. “We like to lead our clients through the process, explaining each stage to them from the outset – it’s the best way to give them a good understanding of how long things take and to ensure a realistic understanding of the building process from the beginning.” Bespoke, she says, is known for its willingness to take an all-encompassing role in every project – even if that means it has to turn down some jobs: “We limit the amount of work we take on, which means the jobs we do are the ones we want to work on, and as such we are completely dedicated to them,” explains the architect. “Our involvement continues as long as the client requires it to ensure the job is completed to the very highest standard. It is also important that it’s reflective of their individual style – each design is unique and is treated that way from day one.” With the studio in Bearsden now well established, she adds, there are plans afoot to expand the practice to accommodate its growing portfolio. Any upheaval generated by such a move she will take in her stride, having already survived relocating the Bespoke studio during its busiest year so far when its new-build premises were created. Inspiration comes from travelling: “I love exploring other cultures and contemporary architecture, and I love investigating the design of hotels, bars, restaurants and cities. Seeing beautiful historic buildings that have been refurbished and given glamorous contemporary interiors is wonderful too,” says Emma. “But there are many inspirational buildings at home on our doorstep in Glasgow and all around us in Scotland, and we seek a lot of inspiration from the surrounding landscape. Rural Skye, for instance, remains a favourite place that never fails to spark new ideas. There is something fascinating about seeing the modern take on traditional rural architecture being set within the stunning landscapes that Skye offers. It has become such a popular destination for us for this reason – we made our sixth visit to the island this year and won’t ever tire of going there.” Asked which iconic design she wishes she’d come up with, she answers: “The Mini Cooper.” Like Bespoke, it’s small but smart and gets every detail right.

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TOWNHOUSE, GLASGOW This project involved the complete refurbishment of a B-listed townhouse in the west end, which was remodelled to create a large bedroom suite and a lower garden dining room. Above: The new garden room has a sandblasted stone fire surround by Glasgow’s John Kane Fireplaces. Right: A view of the new garden room from the outside. The Crittalstyle windows are by Bronze Casement and replace the original coal cellar doors and an oldfashioned outside loo. Extensive stone repairs were carried out to the rear elevation.


Bespoke

FARMHOUSE EXTENSION, AYRSHIRE The layout was altered to allow the house to function better, and a one-and-a-half-storey extension was added to create space for an open-plan kitchen area with a master bedroom above. Left: The hand-painted kitchen by Murray & Murray is lit by a trio of Industville pendants; the Ercol bar stools are from Heal’s. Above: Light is the focus in the master bedroom suite, thanks to the glazed gable by Ayrshire Agencies.

“We limit the amount of work we take on. That means the jobs we do are the ones we want to work on and we are completely dedicated to them”

EXTENSION TO DETACHED VILLA, GLASGOW Untouched since the 1970s, this traditional detached stone villa in Glasgow was in need of extensive renovations when Emma was asked to take it on. The practice refurbished, altered and extended it. An old stone extension was demolished, which provided reclaimed stone that was then used to clad the new extension, ensuring it married in with the traditional property but in a contemporary manner. The kitchen (supplied by Kitchens International) was designed for the new space with plentiful storage, slimline worktops and a floating plinth concealing the extraction system. The garden has also undergone a full transformation, with new landscaping works completed by Cosmos Landscaping. It has allowed the external space to flow and be used as an addition to the new extension as an oasis of calm.

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Camerons Architects

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his well-established practice began in Galashiels in 1963, led by Duncan Cameron, who for a time had worked with the renowned Borders-based architect Peter Womersley. Its Galashiels office is a Peter Womersley creation, and the practice also has an Edinburgh office, based at the Shore in Leith. Duncan Cameron was instrumental in setting up the Eildon Housing Association, one of Scotland’s leading housing and care providers, which to this day remains a long-standing client. “Our high proportion of repeat business is evidence of client satisfaction – we still receive commissions from our very first client,” points out director Gavin Yuill. Projects have been completed successfully throughout the length and breadth of Scotland, including the Western Isles, with a particular emphasis on Edinburgh, the Lothians and the Scottish Borders, as well as in Northern Ireland and the north of England. Camerons has specialist expertise in many areas, including bespoke private housing, sustainable development and renewable energy. The team – seven architects, three architectural assistants, two technicians and an office manager – also operate a broad general practice •

Camerons Architects   Galashiels Office (Head Office) 1 Wilderhaugh, Galashiels TD1 1QJ   T: 01896 753 077 Edinburgh Office   Camerons Ltd Suite 3 Waterside House, 46 Shore    Leith, Edinburgh EH6 6QU T: 0131 553 7959    Facebook: @cameronsarchitects Instagram: @cameronsarchitects w: www.camerons.ltd.uk  

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PHOTOGRAPHY: BRENDAN MCNEILL


SCOTTISH BORDERS HOUSE This project involved the remodelling of the house’s kitchen and the replacement of its conservatory. The key aims were to create a more celebratory back door to the house, enlarge the kitchen-diner and create a stronger connection with the outside. Pitching the glazing towards the sun brings in more light and more of the garden into the house.

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• and work in all sectors of architecture, including domestic, developer housing, commercial, public sector, third sector, education and healthcare. “This wide experience enhances our capacity for design innovation, problem solving and risk management, and we aim to exceed client expectations on every unique project through clear understanding, creative approach and effective project management,” says Yuill. “Our in-depth local knowledge, which extends to people, property, planning policy and politics, as well as our long experience in working with local authorities and contractors, also provides a significant resource for the benefit of our local and national clients.” Describing Camerons’ approach as “collaborative and personal”, he suggests that architects have to learn from their clients in order to interpret the brief as effectively as possible: “Taking on board the client’s initial thoughts and aspirations, their requirements or their property problems, we do everything we can to find practical and imaginative solutions to suit the budget. It is satisfying when we can come up good ideas and solutions that the client hasn’t thought of,” he adds. “Thereafter, we can assist as required with all aspects of the process towards completion of the project on site. We bring to the process the benefit of our extensive experience in all types of building, along with our sound knowledge of energyefficient design, sustainable construction and renewable-energy technology. “In addition, we aspire to achieve the highest standards of quality in design and service, continuing the philosophy adopted by our founder – keeping up to date with professional and design issues, proper attention to detail, commitment to meeting clients’ requirements, effective teamwork and a personal approach.” The quality of that work has been acknowledged through a number of awards over the years, including recognition by the Scottish Borders Council for its rural newbuild designs. “We have a passion for social enterprise, and collaborate with the Yuill Community Trust (which is a community interest company and rural housing body self-build management agency) to help provide community-based affordable housing,” explains the architect. “Architecture that helps the individual and community to thrive is what really inspires us – we hugely enjoy supporting our local communities, and we would like to develop this further.” The Camerons team enjoy discovering potential sites and development opportunities and matching these with client •

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GLENCAIRN The project was about creating the client’s dream kitchen and providing a flexible space that could host the whole family. The extension is proudly contemporary, contrasting with but complementing the period features of the house. The original parts flow into the new area, as you are drawn to the light from the rooflights and wall glazing. The kitchen has a deep, practical worktop, but the design has been kept compact to allow more space in which to socialise at the dining table and at the window seat. For a north-facing space, this kitchen is hugely light and airy.


Camerons Architects

“We do everything we can to find practical and imaginative solutions to suit the budget. Coming up with good ideas is very satisfying”

LONGNIDDRY This sleek two-storey house was designed to be flexible enough to work if the owners’ needs changed in the future. It centres around a bright atrium, creating a large family/public space which connects to the south-facing garden. The building has a highly efficient envelope with an air-source heat pump, mechanical ventilation system and photovoltaic panels, to ensure minimal ongoing costs.

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GREENHOUSE CAFE, MELROSE

“We approach our work with energy, and commitment and are always up for a challenge, big or small”

This project involved the complete transformation of two existing buildings, and the creation of a new glass wall extension that links the two. The aim was to create a new space that connects the café with the beautiful Melrose Abbey, and the sky: the greenhouse of the Greenhouse Café.

• interests and objectives. Camerons has its own development company, Abbotsford Homes, which adds a different dimension to the usual architectural practice. The site in Oxton near Lauder currently has two remaining plots for sale, which has planning permission for three five-bedroom houses. “We consider ourselves to be highly proactive in everything we do. We are looking to expand our workload in different areas of Scotland, beyond Edinburgh and the Borders, and throughout the UK.” The practice’s stated aim is always to create inspiring living and working spaces that are healthy, airy and light, making effective and economic use of the site, while ensuring low energy use and the responsible use of resources. “We approach our work with energy and commitment, and are always up for a challenge, big or small.”

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VERMILLION Specialist dental practice Vermilion commissioned Camerons to design a new Kelso surgery that would help to put patients at ease. By connecting all the main spaces of the surgery with the site’s large, tranquil garden, the architects have made the journey from arrival to consultation light and calming. The sofa and reception desk were also designed by Camerons.


Camerons Architects

THE LOAN The main aim behind the design of this house in the Borders was to take all the best elements of the clients’ former home, and combine these with the things it had lacked. The house is contemporary at its heart, but draws on the local vernacular. At the centre of the house is the large family living kitchen-dining area, which in turn leads to the first-floor living room. All the prime living spaces take advantage of the views towards the surrounding hills.  

ST BOSWELLS This garden room was created so the clients would have a space in which to enjoy their garden all year round. The glazing maximises the light and warmth, while the solid wall forms the north boundary and provides a window seat area in which to relax. The stove is the focal point, and the skylight draws daylight into the adjoining original kitchen.

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Catriona Tanner : Architect

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pecialising in high-quality residential new-builds and extension projects, Catriona Tanner : Architect is a small design led studio based in Royal Deeside. “My biggest challenge so far as a sole practitioner has been getting those first few projects out the ground,” says Catriona Tanner. “But I have a huge range of experience in all project types, large and small, including offices, public buildings and sports facilities.” Catriona’s love of problem solving combined with her hands-on approach has impressed clients, as has her determination to try always to exceed their aspirations. “I’m inspired by my clients and their homes – every single one is different,” she says. “Each individual setting needs a bespoke solution that’s unique to the client and the site. I really enjoy creating homes that work for people from the inside out.” Ideas come from everywhere, says Tanner: “Walking around rural Deeside, the local rural vernacular architecture, textures and forms in nature all inspire me.” An interest in innovative materials and building methods feeds into her desire to take a sustainable approach to architecture, using new materials creatively. “At the core of everything has to be good design, though, and this shines through,” she states. At the moment, Tanner describes her friendly studio as “just me, two dogs and a great view”, but she would like to gently expand the practice into a small team of design-focused architects – “and to establish ourselves as a practice known for its high quality, creative designs and ultimately designing homes that my clients love to live in”.

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Right: Exterior view of Siberian Larch clad new build property on Deeside. Triple glazed windows and high levels of air-tightness make this an Aspect Silver Active home.

PHOTOGRAPHY: MEL SHAND

Left: Interior shot of a light-filled family room at the heart of a new-build property on Deeside.

PHOTOGRAPHY: MEL SHAND

Catriona Tanner : Architect The Beeches Finzean Banchory Aberdeenshire, AB31 6LY T: 01330 850 622 E: catrionatanner@btinternet.com Facebook: catrionatannerarchitect Twitter: deesidearchitect Instagram: deesidearchitect www.catrionatannerarchitect.co.uk

DEESIDE


PHOTOGRAPHY: MEL SHAND

“Each individual setting needs a bespoke solution that is unique to the client and the site. I really enjoy creating homes that work from the inside out�

Left: Extension at The Beeches, Finzean, references local vernacular Architecture. Right: View from living room at Mill Conversion, Finzean Below right: Elevations of New House in Strachan. Stone walls, planting and timber complement the linear horizontal lines of this contemporary home.

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Crichton Wood Architects

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ne of the uncomfortable facts about mass housing is that housing prototypes are designed as units. Designers are then asked to fit as many units as possible into a potential site, in order to maximise profit. Many of these designs are rotated, and flipped. What is poorly thought through on the majority of occasions is not just the orientation to sunshine but the views and space left between buildings, resulting in bland spatial relationships and no sense of place. As a young boy Crichton was fascinated by the romantic castle sketches of Robert Adam, originally introduced to him by his grandfather Frank Wood, a prize-winning architect who had been the last apprentice of the celebrated Edinburgh architect Sir George Washington Browne, himself a student of David Bryce, architect of Fettes College and perhaps one of the originators of the Scots Baronial style. This legacy was combined with the influence of the East Neuk – while at college, Crichton was made to study the fishing villages of Fife by his Professor ‘Big Jim’, who had been brought up in the Aberdeenshire fishing village of Portsoy, a fabulous lecturer called Jimmy MacKinnon, who had worked for the famous Glasgow architects, Gillespie, Kidd and Coia. The overriding lesson was that •

THE STABLES, BINNY HOUSE, ECCLESMACHAN, WEST LOTHIAN Conversion of a B-listed stableblock, to form four, four bedroom units commended by the Saltire Society.

Crichton Wood Architects The Courtyard, Binny House Ecclesmachan EH52 6NL T: 01506 854798 M: 07917 108244 E: mail@crichtonwoodarchitects.com www.crichtonwoodarchitects.com

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“The detailing and language of each house is evolved from a modern interpretation of our own native Scottish architectural language”


DRUMMUIR, EAST LOTHIAN A new three-bedroom house in a conservation area.

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• although each building might be simple, it was the juxtaposition of the buildings with one another that created rich and dynamic spatial arrangements. It was this rich complexity that created joy and interest for those walking through the lanes and vennels. The villages of Crail, St Monans and Pittenweem are all great examples of this. It is interesting to note that the pioneering town planner Patrick Geddes, in his work on Edinburgh’s Old Town in the 1890s, had already raised the importance of place. But Geddes went beyond this and clarified his vision with his mantra of ‘Place, Work, Folk’. He enriched and defined his vision by creating communal garden spaces. These provided recreation areas for meeting, combined with opportunities for creating healthy produce in a socially mixed environment. It is our intention at the Toors O’Ythan, Newburgh, Aberdeenshire – to take Geddes’s ideas as the basis for creating a holistic three-dimensional reality. The concept is simple yet layered. From a distance, the clachan (a small village/hamlet) is clustered to create a subtle hierarchy of massing to give a picturesque silhouette on the skyline. The site is bordered by an access road for service vehicles to the back of the site, and access to car parking which is placed on the boundary to the south and west. The rest of the site is only accessible by pedestrian routes. The houses are positioned to create a series of lanes, creating exciting spaces and views as you walk through and explore the clachan. At its heart is a parterre in box hedging, in plan taking the abstract shape of the Pictish water beast, the kelpie. The form creates allotments for the residents and these provide an opportunity for meetings, as well as space to produce fresh vegetables, herbs and fruit. Around the parterre is an orchard, planted with apple, pear and plum trees, each unit having ownership of specific trees. The kelpie is surrounding by carefully positioned housing. The gardens are open to the east to allow the whole site to have views of the stunning Ythan estuary. Each house is carefully positioned to maximise the rich harmony of spatial relationships which, in turn, reinforces a sense of place and identity. The detailing and architectural language of each house is evolved from a modern interpretation of our own native Scots architectural language. The housing units have been designed to have a mixture of types, from tower houses to four-bedroom homes, bothies and social-housing units. Rather than isolating the latter, they are at the heart of the site to create a modern Scots clachan, hopefully with a wee bit of soul.

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TOORS O’ YTHAN NEWBURGH, ABERDEENSHIRE

Crichton Wood Architects

Small clachan of 16 houses (a small village/hamlet) on the edge of the village of Newburgh, Aberdeenshire overlooking the Forvie sands. Work starts on the first unit this summer.

WHITE COTTAGE, BALLINTUIM, PERTHSHIRE Conversion, alteration of a stableblock/cottage to form a five-bedroom house, highly commended by the Saltire Society.

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Dab Den

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ood design made simple could be the motto of Dab Den, an architect-led construction company that specialises in the design and installation of bespoke garden rooms, extensions and houses, all of which are made from SIPs (Structural Insulated Panels), a high-performance construction system. “We specialise in simple but elegant designs that are built with SIPs,” says director Katherine Byers. “Maximising glazing for natural light and being energy-efficient are obvious must-haves in modern design, but we try to provide this in an easy-to-deliver package.” Dab Den designs and builds architectural products, employing their own joiners onsite. Providing a one-stop shop complete package means a streamlining of the construction process. “Getting clients involved in the design process is important,” adds Katherine. “Once the design is agreed, we detail up the drawings for building warrant and planning approval, and do everything we can to make the build energyefficient and cost-efficient for our clients. The completed project is then handed over on time, on budget and finished to a high standard.” Having a single point of contact throughout the project coordinates all the elements to ensure quick and efficient onsite delivery. This is particularly useful now that Dab Den has begun building bespoke new-build SIP houses. “We completed our first house earlier this year and have started on our second,” says Katherine. “We are very excited about growing this side of the company as well as continuing with the garden rooms and extensions.”

Dab Den Ltd Brathens Eco-Business Park Hill of Brathens Banchory Aberdeenshire AB31 4BW T: 01330 833861 E: info@dabden.com www.dabden.com

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SIGNATURE DAB DEN GARDEN ROOM Above: The first of the Dab Den Architectural products, the Signature range garden room. Fully insulated and built to house standards, this piece of garden architecture creates a habitable outdoor living space.


“We specialise in simple but elegant designs that are built with SIPs�

BESPOKE DAB DEN GARDEN ROOM The bespoke room utilises an unusable area of garden. Built with Sip panels, Siberian larch cladding and powder coated aluminium windows with a feature cantilevered roof and stepped decking area.

DAB DEN EXTENSION Above: The extension maximises solar gains, and creates a warm and comfortable interior. The living space is flooded with natural light and opens the home up to the garden.

DAB DWELLING Left: The Dab Dwelling is the most recent of the DAB architectural products, with the first house launched earlier this year with the second on sale soon. Each dwelling is bespoke to the site and Dab Den designs and builds each one to complement a modern lifestyle.

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Designworks Interior Design & Architecture

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n open mind and an empty sketchbook is how Jim Simpson only half-jokingly describes his approach to a new project. “The brief varies from project to project and each one has specific requirements, so we always endeavour to produce individual solutions to suit the client’s brief and budget,” he explains. The architect, one of three at Designworks, expands on his starting point: “We carefully analyse the client’s brief and site, investigating the history of the site and its environs. Then, through communication with the client, we gradually hone their brief and develop sketch solutions for their consideration and comments.” Designworks was established by Henrietta Simpson in 1982 in Glasgow’s west end. Today, five interior designers work alongside the architects, all backed up by office staff. “We offer both architectural and interior design services within the same company, and we also have our own design showroom in the city where clients and members of the public can visit to browse and purchase from our selections of international furniture, flooring, lighting, fabrics, wallcoverings and accessories,” says Simpson. This unusual but highly effective •

Designworks 38 Gibson Street Glasgow G12 8NX T: 0141 339 9520 E: info@designworks-scotland.co.uk

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“We can provide a bespoke interior design service working closely with our architects to create inspiring projects to suit the client’s budget”


EDWARDIAN HOUSE EXTENSION, RICHMOND This commission began when Designworks was commissioned to refurbish the bedrooms of this three-storey house in the Richmond conservation area. The client was so pleased that the team were soon tasked with designing a contemporary extension to contain a new openplan kitchen-diner, as well as putting forward proposals for the hard and soft landscaping of the back garden.

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• combination has paid dividends for the firm, giving it an edge when it comes to certain complex commissions. “We can provide a bespoke and personal interior design service working closely in conjunction with our own architectural department to create imaginative and inspiring projects to suit our clients’ needs and budget – and we have done so throughout the UK and overseas,” says Simpson. The practice specialises in new-build projects, refurbishments and interiors for predominantly private residential clients, but it also takes on commercial and corporate commissions. “Our aim is always to create a carefully thought-out design solution to satisfy and exceed our clients’ requirements, and our extensive knowledge and experience in the residential and commercial sectors allows us to do this.” Small-scale refurbishments are treated with as much care as larger projects, such as a recent challenging build in Earlsferry, on the Fife coast: “This was a 7m-wide residential project for a private client that required lengthy negotiations with the planning department before we could go ahead. To satisfy the client’s brief for a new holiday home, our design solution involved separating the twostorey living area from the three-storey bedroom accommodation. These two buildings are connected via a glazed link, which incorporates an open interior Zen garden. The seafront and a stretch of private beach are accessed through the lower kitchen, patio and formal landscape garden beyond.” A fan of the great American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, and his iconic Fallingwater in particular, Simpson is always on the lookout for inspiration, and often comes up with ideas from travelling, art and culture. He and the rest of the design team are constantly researching architectural and interior trends in the UK and abroad, visiting the most important building and interior design exhibitions around the world every year. The studio has begun to incorporate more 3D computer-generated architectural imagery into its plans to help clients view and understand the development of their design concept. Renewable technologies in new-build work and renovations are also playing a growing role. “Designworks is a family business, with two generations now involved,” says Simpson, “and it is our intention to continue this successful journey of the last thirty years into the future.”

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APARTMENT, GLASGOW Above and right: This property in Glasgow’s west end began life as two separate flats, whose owner asked Designworks to knock them together and reconfigure the resulting space into one harmonious whole. The studio also created the interior design scheme.

CONVERSION, LONDON When a former synagogue was converted into flats, Designworks created an exceptional apartment over two floors on the top storey.


Designworks Interior Designers & Architects

BEITH HOUSE A visual for a private house in Beith, which aids the design process and lead-up to the build.

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inkdesign architecture

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esidential design is at the core of inkdesign’s work, but the practice also has some key commercial and community projects in its portfolio. “We believe in the mantra ‘what doesn’t challenge you, doesn’t change you’,” says managing director Maurice Hickey, “so while the architectural landscape often throws obstacles at us, we feel that true inspiration is often found when coming up with solutions to such obstacles.” One such exciting challenge is inkdesign’s involvement in the Govan Graving Docks project: “It’s a proposal to bring this area back to life, reinstating the docks as a ship repair and maintenance yard, as well as being a celebration of Glasgow’s maritime history.” The practice, says Maurice, is friendly and approachable. “Irrespective of the size of the project, we build open and honest relationships with our clients. People are at the heart of the spaces we create, spaces we hope will not just serve those who live there, but inspire them too.” Their own inspiration is drawn from many sources, says fellow architect Carlo Guidi: “We are inspired by each other, our clients and indeed our peers. We are motivated both by emerging trends, and also by what’s come before us.” The practice is expanding, with new staff soon to join the current nine-strong team. “This is a transformative time for inkdesign,” says co-founder Lisa Fugaccia. “We are growing, and by the time this goes to print we’ll have moved to a new ‘home’ in the city’s creative district, still at the Briggait, but in a space that will better accommodate us and the needs of our clients.” inkdesign focuses on offering innovative architecture design solutions and Maurice and the team are delighted with the word-of-mouth feedback they receive: “Partly due to our flexible and collaborative approach, most of our work comes to us via recommendation – something we are very proud of and never take for granted.” inkdesign architecture The Briggait 141 Bridgegate Glasgow G1 5HZ T: 0141 552 2729 E: info@inkdesign.co.uk www.inkdesign.co.uk

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ABBOTSFORD HOUSE, GIFFNOCK Above and below: Two extensions (one to the rear, over two storeys, and one to the side) were added to this grand blond-sandstone house in Giffnock’s conservation area. This created an extensive dining-kitchen and terrace with a better connection to the garden, with more bedrooms above.

“Most of our work comes to us via recommendation – something we are very proud of and never take for granted”


MELFORT AVENUE, DUMBRECK This single-storey side extension to a detached villa in the Dumbreck conservation area has a continuous band of glazing around it, along with a large rooflight, to bring daylight deep into the new dining space.

EARLSPARK AVENUE, LANGSIDE Left: This green-roofed, generously glazed living space can be found in the single-storey side extension that was added to a semi-detached red-sandstone house on the edge of the Newlands conservation area. The clients are now able to enjoy their much-loved south-facing garden all year round.

ACHNAHAIRD, WESTER ROSS Below: inkdesign recently gained planning permission for the refurbishment and extension of a historic croft house in Wester Ross. The works proposed allow for 21stcentury expectations of a family home, while extensive glazing exploits the site’s scenic location.

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JAMstudio

F

ounded by its two directors, JAMstudio focuses on residential and commercial architecture, including new-builds and work to historic buildings. It has a particularly strong track record of success in combining old buildings with contemporary extensions and renovations. Marie-Louise Dunk specialises in architectural concepts, interiors and project management, while John Peter Wingate specialises in the technical design and detailing. Several years of rapid expansion came to an end with the oil downturn. “You cannot be based in Aberdeen and not have felt its effects,” admits Dunk. “We had to reduce the size of the practice dramatically, but it has meant we are now much nimbler and I have been able to get back to doing what I love best – designing buildings.” Another positive of being small is that that practice can be far choosier about the projects it takes on, and clients always deal with one of the directors, thus getting the full benefit of their combined 40 years of experience. “It means less risk, a more personal client experience and ultimately a higher quality of delivery for the project.” The pair’s approach continues to be practical, design-led, innovative, thoughtful and very determined. Dunk’s love of photography, she says, also plays a key role in her designs: “I spend a lot of • JAMstudio Ltd Architecture • Space Planning • Commercial Interiors City Office 5 Golden Square,Aberdeen AB10 1RD T: 01224 646450 or 01467643178 M: 07768 166 974 (try office first) Twitter: @jamstudio_ltd www.jamstudio.uk.com

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NEW-BUILD HOUSE, ABERDEENSHIRE Above: “The purchase of a greenfield site in the heart of Royal Deeside gave our clients the opportunity to create the house of their dreams. They approached us in late 2011, and the project was completed in October 2013. Our design combined vernacular details with modern construction methods. The façade is a mixture of timber cladding and reclaimed granite, along with extensive glazing.”

“Our aim is always to create a home our clients will find is perfect for them, that is a daily pleasure to use, and that they will never want to sell”

BEACONSFIELD, ABERDEEN This project involved the demolition and replacement of a ground-floor kitchen extension and basement garage. The ground and upper floors were refurbished, and new kitchen area was created.

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EAST CROFT, CLUNY JAMstudio's proposal for a replacement house at a site near Cluny has been designed in the style of the local cottage vernacular in a blend of contemporary materials.

 

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and texture. The way spaces relate to each other, and the way the light changes the look and feel of a room throughout the day, are critically important to us.� Thanks to a recent upgrade of the studio’s drafting system, projects are designed in full 3D from the outset. “The feedback from our clients has been so positive,� says Dunk. “Traditional drawings are not always easy to understand and interpret, whereas a 3D model that can be manipulated in real time, with the client watching and discussing the changes, means everyone has clarity as to what the design means, how the spaces will look and feel, and how the project sits in its surroundings.� This Building Information Modelling is a powerful tool that allows the architects to create hugely detailed models that can be carefully examined to ensure no detail has been overlooked; it makes managing the build on site a great deal easier. “Our aim is always to create a home that our clients will find is absolutely perfect for them in every respect, that is a daily pleasure to use, that they treasure and that allows them to live comfortably throughout their lives in that same house, never wanting to sell it!�



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JAMstudio

RUBISLAW DEN SOUTH, LISTED ALTERATIONS AND EXTENSION Top: An imposing house with a complex interior, JAMstudio was tasked with creating a comfortable modern family home internally, filled with light and a plenty of entertaining space, elements of a the traditional farm house kitchen look with modern contemporary twists Left: As part of a series of alterations to rationalise a confused layout of the main family kitchen living areas at the rear of this B-listed mansion house in Aberdeen’s much sought-after West End, JAMstudio responded to the clients’ brief by providing an open-plan family orientated space, with a beautifully crafted but sensitively juxtaposed conservatory style extension, that allowed room for all the home comforts of a modern area, whilst respecting the buildings listed heritage status.

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Karen Parry Architects

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aren Parry set up her practice in 2005 to focus on her love of domestic architecture. She took the decision from the very beginning to concentrate solely on houses – creating dream homes, either from scratch or, more often, working with clients’ existing properties to make the best possible use of what they already have. From very small beginnings, working from her kitchen table, Parry’s Glasgowbased business has grown steadily, and now employs five staff. She puts this success down to the fact that she and her team (four of whom are women) are experts in what they do: “Houses are our passion, and our aim is to exceed our clients’ expectations of what can be achieved,” she says. Specialising in bespoke extensions to traditional properties to transform them for modern family living, the team aim to create spaces that will enhance their clients’ quality of life, using natural light whenever possible. “Often, homeowners come to us with no prior knowledge of the building industry, so it’s up to us to guide them through the process, trying to make it as straightforward and painless as possible. We explain that they have the opportunity to create a design that exactly meets their needs – we produce different options at the sketch design stage to let them see the various ways this could •

Karen Parry Architects Ltd Suite 3, 1st floor East Clydeway House 813 South Street Glasgow G14 0BX T: 0141 438 0062 M: 07813 514369 E: mail@karenparryarchitect.com www.karenparryarchitect.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: ROSS CAMPBELL

SINCLAIR AVENUE Building a small bootroom extension to this detached house in Bearsden helped to make all the other spaces work better as everything now has its proper place. 44

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PHOTOGRAPHY: ROSS CAMPBELL

SOUTH ERSKINE PARK Top: Adding sliding doors to the new kitchen gives better connection with the garden and rooflights in the new higher ceiling keep it really bright. Right: This project involved refurbishment of the clients existing space to form a kitchendining room which works well for modern day family living and is more suited to the scale of the rest of the property. Raising the ceiling helps to make the room feel more spacious.

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“It’s very reassuring for clients to know that the quality of our service has been endorsed by industry specialists”

• be achieved. Budget is important, and we often get ballpark figures from builders at this stage so the client knows they’re not proceeding with a design that is too expensive.” Although Parry encourages taking a bespoke approach to the design, she also has an eye on the ultimate value of the property should the owner ever decide to sell, and says the practice has been told many times by clients that the improvements made to their homes mean they now command the highest resale values in the street. “Often we first meet clients when they have been house hunting but can’t find the right property or when the next step up the housing ladder is beyond their budget,” says the architect. “We advise what can be achieved with their existing property, usually for far less than the cost of moving. We love helping people to make their home really work for them – it can transform their lives.” Taking the mystery out of what architects do is very important for the practice: “Our team are friendly and approachable, while remaining professional at all times,” says Parry. “We work with a trusted group of consultants and builders to ensure that great service runs through the whole project from start to finish. We have a straightforward approach to services and fees, and publish a rough guide to fees on the website as clients often have no idea what to expect. Most of our work comes from personal recommendations and we build close relationships with our clients which continue long after their project has been completed.” The team’s desire is to be the best in the business at what they do has been recognised – they were thrilled to win the prize for best architect practice at the 2016 and 2017 Scottish Home Improvement Awards. “It’s very reassuring for clients to know that the quality of our service has been endorsed by industry specialists,” says Parry.

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LEDCAMEROCH ROAD Knocking existing rooms together and doing a very small extension has created a sociable kitchen where the family now spend lots of time. A new door through to the original dining room makes the space work practically too. Large aluminium doors and zinc detailing with minimal rooflights make the space bright and modern.


PHOTOGRAPHY: ROSS CAMPBELL

SOUTHBRAE DRIVE

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALEXIS BASSO

This large detached house had an extension added to an area which was previously a dark unused area of the garden. It connects a utility room in the garage with a coats area and gives a livingdining area off the new kitchen.

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Konishi Gaffney Architects

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uestions, says Kieran Gaffney, are always the starting point for his practice’s designs. “Challenging the usual assumptions and obvious solutions is crucial,” says the architect. “We are essentially problemsolvers; it’s the clients, sites and buildings we work with that lead to our designs. Creating something beautiful often means simplifying and paring back to find the essence of a problem.” Gaffney and fellow director Makiko Konishi established their practice in 2009 and are now a five-strong team of architects and designers. “We bring a Japanese aesthetic sensibility and acute care for detail to our projects,” says Gaffney. “We create buildings that are sensible and modest but also beautiful and atmospheric; buildings that embody a sense of Japanese wabi sabi.” This quality of relaxed restraint and quiet beauty has been well received by clients and has seen Konishi Gaffney win a series of awards. “We believe that an artistic and sensitive collaboration with the client is the best way to achieve the great solutions that we aspire to,” says the architect. “We focus on simple things like light and orientation to the sun; on movement and function; on connections between inside and out; and on materials and their emotional impact.” As well as the Far East, inspiration is drawn from Switzerland, Denmark and Norway, with Reiulf Ramstad’s dramatic Trollstigen Visitor Centre, perched above a Norwegian fjord, being cited as one of the best things Gaffney has seen lately. He and Konishi have had personal • Konishi Gaffney Architects 88 Constitution Street Edinburgh EH6 6RP T: 0131 555 4939   www.konishigaffney.com 小西

Konishi Gaffney Architects

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TRINITY EXTENSION Right and below: A lovely big Victorian house set back from the road and in a large sloping garden with a great view north over the River Forth.


RAVELSTON HOUSE Left and right: A remodelled 1960s bungalow was given a new lease of life. By clearing out the partition walls and opening up the pitched roof, a generous open-plan living space was formed with views through the building from front to back. This main space has a new roof structure with scissor trusses and timber deck whitewashed to express the lines.

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• experience of the upheavals – and rewards – that come from transforming your home: “Our first project was our own self-built house, where we acted as architect, client and builder,” recalls Gaffney. “This was an invaluable experience – to add to our 20 years in the profession – and taught us how it feels to be the client. We promise to be careful with your budget and to live the project with you, supporting you through what we know is an exciting and traumatic process.” The studio refuses to have a house style or to follow a standard approach, arguing that every project is different. What is a recurrent theme, though, is an emphasis on being eco-friendly: “We’re always looking to adopt sustainable materials, details and practices,” explains Gaffney. “We have expertise in various eco-technical products and always seek to find a passive solar arrangement in houses. We work using 3D computer software that allows us to explore the architecture and model how light and solar gain will impact on the design.” Listed buildings are another speciality, with experience in this challenging field gained over many years: “Some 35% of our work is to listed buildings, with 70% of all our projects being located in conservation areas,” says Gaffney. “We started our practice by working on small projects, exhibitions, new houses and extensions; as the practice grows, so our work is also growing in scale and ambition. We want to continue to focus on houses because we love the impact that creating small domestic spaces can have in enriching people’s lives.”

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ROSEFIELD HOUSE Above and below: Alterations were made to a Victorian terraced cottage, opening up three existing rooms to form a large, open-plan kitchenliving-dining space, with a clean and direct connection to the west-facing garden.

“We promise to be careful with your budget and to live the project with you, supporting you through what we know is an exciting and traumatic process”


Konishi Ganey Architects

BONNINGTON EXTENSION Above and right: Planning restrictions made it difficult to extend this B-listed house in Edinburgh. Konishi Gaffney’s solution was to sink it into garden to limit its visual impact. It was shortlisted for the AJ Small Projects Award 2016 and was commended by the Saltire Housing Awards of the same year.

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FERMANAGH HOUSE This project had a dream site – rural, with a view out over the picturesque Lough Erne; and a great brief – a house for a family returning from abroad to their childhood home.

JAPANESE HOUSE A family home and studio in Portobello, built in the style of a traditional Japanese house, with a sunken kotatsu dining table and a supporting pillar in prominent positions.

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“We create buildings that are sensible and modest but also beautiful and atmospheric�

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LBA

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ynamic, creative and awardwinning, LBA designs progressive buildings and spaces for pioneering property developers and private clients. The practice is also skilled at working with listed and historic buildings, particularly in Edinburgh. “We are continually striving to push the boundaries of what is possible, and are always looking for new and inspiring ways to create the best outcome in every project,” says managing director Lynsay Bell. Shared experience of working across the UK and in Norway, China, Dubai and Australia has helped the diverse team to see the unique possibilities in every project. “To be truly innovative, you need to have an open mind and not focus on what other architects and designers are doing – the very essence of LBA encourages us to think about and look at things differently,” says Bell. “We look outside of our industry both for inspiration and for how we run our business – we have a very non-hierarchical structure and operate as an inclusive team, which makes for an open, collaborative and progressive working environment where great things can be achieved.” The studio is using Building Information Modelling (BIM) to build a virtual-reality experience for its clients so they can immerse themselves in their building and watch the plans come to life. A focus on high-quality, sustainable materials gives LBA’s projects longevity, so they maintain their character and beauty for years to come. “Our practice has grown and developed due to the strong working relationships we have with our clients – 100% of our client base is from repeat business, referrals and recommendations,” says Bell. “For us, the clients’ interests are always at the forefront. We love what we do and we want our clients to enjoy the journey. “We put everything we can into each project to produce the best possible solution.”

CARLOWRIE CASTLE A historic Scots Baronial castle on the outskirts of Edinburgh was renovated and converted.

LBA 18 Walker Street Edinburgh EH3 7LP  T: 0131 226 7186 www.studiolba.co.uk

MELVILLE CRESCENT, EDINBURGH One of the five apartments created in the conversion of an A-listed townhouse in the west end of the city. 54

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LIBERTON TOWER MAINS “These townhouses offer the highest quality contemporary design-led build and layout that’s innovative yet sympathetic to the surrounding architecture and environment. LBA clearly defined our vision for the development.” Daryl Teague, Glencairn Properties

“Our clients’ interests are always at the forefront. We love what we do and we want our clients to enjoy the journey”

WELL COURT HALL, EDINBURGH This open-plan kitchenliving-dining space was created as part of the renovation of the historic Well Court Hall in the Dean Village, overlooking the Water of Leith. “Our approach was to keep the alterations and new elements simple, with sharp clean contemporary lines and natural finishes,” says Lynsay Bell.

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McGinlay Bell

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fresh approach, starting from first principles in order to understand the client’s needs and ambitions, is, according to McGinlay Bell, the only way to create something new, bold and contemporary. “We always aim to show the client something that they’d perhaps previously not considered if we feel it offers a unique and more tailored response to their brief,” explains co-founder Brian McGinlay. It’s a philosophy that has brought the practice a lot of satisfied clients, agrees Mark Bell, who joined forces with McGinlay in 2015. “Our approach is inclusive and collaborative and we strive to produce buildings, spaces, interiors, furniture and fittings that maintain a close relationship with their context and the client’s requirements. We believe all projects, regardless of scale or budget constraints, can be put together in such a way that they enrich and humanise new places of the everyday. We welcome all new challenges and opportunities to collaborate.” Before establishing their studio, the pair had gained experience in a wide variety of sectors including residential, healthcare, interiors, commercial office, and arts and cultural, and had worked on numerous awardwinning projects. Their depth of knowledge and technical expertise has helped them in their recent and current work for private, commercial and creative clients. Commissions have ranged from small-scale housing projects to larger scale residential developments. “We are committed to providing a creative, efficient, professional and personable service,” says McGinlay. “We have found that our ‘can do’ approach has been a critical factor in helping us overcome challenges and successfully deliver our projects.”

McGinlay Bell Baltic Chambers Basement Suite 27 50 Wellington Street Glasgow G2 6HJ T: 0141 202 0687 info@mcginlaybell.com www.mcginlaybell.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY: DAPPLE PHOTOGRAPHY

BUNGALOW, GLASGOW Above and right: Currently on site: a traditional 1930s suburban bungalow is given a new extension that contains a spacious bathroom. The house’s internal layout is subtly altered to make better use of the space.


MARYHILL LOCKS Left: This is an award-winning development of 40 terraced homes in Glasgow. The developer wanted to provide comfortable homes at an affordable price, while maximising the number of properties on the narrow site. McGinlay Bell’s solution combined prefabricated structures with low-cost building materials. Below and right: The interiors are coolly contemporary and minimalist.

“We have found that our ‘can do’ approach has been a critical factor in helping us overcome challenges and successfully deliver our projects”

NEW-BUILD HOUSE, BEARSDEN The practice has won approval for a new 250m2 four-bedroom home that will sit between two existing houses in a leafy suburban setting. The scheme is conceived as a “brick house that masters a subservient pavilion building to its long narrow site”, and it is expected to be complete by the end of 2018.

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Paper Igloo Architecture + Design

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ased in the village of Kippen in Central Scotland, Paper Igloo is a young, vibrant and awardwinning architectural practice which was established by Mhairi Grant and Martin McCrae in 2006. It has gone from strength to strength by maintaining a meticulous attention to detail and focusing on meeting each client’s brief. Paper Igloo specialises in high-quality residential design and works on many different types of project, from house extensions and loft conversions to multi-unit developments. Grant and McCrae collaborate closely with their clients, helping them to articulate and realise their dreams and ambitions. “The development of the brief is particularly important,” they say. “This is the part of the process that ensures the client’s wishes for the project are incorporated into the design. We believe the spaces in which we all live and work should be exciting, inspiring and comfortable.” RIAS and RIBA registered, Paper Igloo can take on projects of varying scales, from refurbishments of existing historical buildings to the design of bespoke contemporary houses, as well as projects such as the extension shown here – a contemporary addition to (and full refurbishment of) a C-Listed semi-detached villa in Stirling. The practice also seeks to bring in low-energy design to projects where possible. Mhairi Grant is a certified Passivhaus designer, meaning a multitude of energy-based services can be offered, many of which can ease the • Paper Igloo Architecture + Design Ostro, Fintry Road Kippen FK8 3HL T: 01786 870 539 E: info@paperigloo.com www.paperigloo.com

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“We believe that the spaces in which we all live and work should be

exciting, inspiring and comfortable”

SEMI-DETACHED VILLA, STIRLING This contemporary zinc and timber clad extension project features a fully glazed link that connects the Listed villa to the new kitchen / dining space. As can be seen here the original stone wall of the villa was exposed and cleaned, then incorporated as a key feature of the glazed link between the new and old. The other images show the new arched window to the stair, and the relocated first floor bathroom.

technical Building Warrant process. She and McCrae also have extensive experience of actually working on site, and have a deep practical understanding of construction. This complements the design process, and allows them to produce more thoroughly considered and thoughtful solutions. The architects believe that high-quality design – whether it’s a carefully crafted transition between various materials, or a coherent spatial arrangement – can have a significant impact on your quality of life, and they work hard to bring this to every project: “Good design is at the heart of everything we do,” they promise.


Studio Hebrides Architecture

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his small architecture practice on North Uist is run by Mhairi and Steven Dobbie. Inspired by the unique Hebridean landscape and its everchanging colours and textures, they aim to produce high-quality architecture that is sensitive to its surroundings. Mhairi specialises in residential design for extensions and conversions as well as new-build homes, while Steven enjoys the challenge of researching new materials and innovative building methods. “Our projects range from conversions of existing buildings and unique one-off houses, to community-focused developments and largerscale visitor attractions,” says Mhairi. “We have a very clear understanding of the challenges faced by rural island locations that are significantly exposed to the elements, especially in winter.” The practice has designed ‘first homes’ for a number of young families who are new to the islands or returning there. Land is relatively inexpensive in the Outer Hebrides, making it more affordable to build a new home here than to buy a much smaller property on the mainland. “It’s an exciting challenge and we have a great client base of all ages with very innovative ideas of what they wish their home to be,” says Mhairi, describing the studio’s approach as openminded and collaborative. “Our biggest challenge to date was building our own home in North Uist when we were in our 20s and had just qualified,” she adds. “It was a great learning experience and it means that we understand the challenges our clients face when going through the same process.” Making little impact on the environment is key, says Steven: “Low-carbon technologies are part of our ethos and we’re always looking for better construction methods to reduce build times, costs and the impact on the environment. We want to connect the client to their natural surroundings while also making them feel protected against the elements. Using a palette of modern and traditional materials allows the designs to bed down well in the landscape.”

Studio Hebrides Architecture Oban na Feidh 19A Locheport Isle of North Uist HS6 5EU T: 01876 580604 www.studiohebrides.co.uk STUDIO HEBRIDES ARCHITECTURE

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ST KILDA VIEWPOINT A concept design proposal for a new-build St Kilda visitor centre and viewpoint. The proposed site is elevated with uninterrupted views across the Atlantic to Hirta and Boreray.

TIGHARRY SCHOOLHOUSE, NORTH UIST A thoughtful conversion of a former 19th-century rural school and schoolhouse. The former classrooms were stripped back to create bright vaulted living spaces with timber lined walls. The interior design was by Ibsen House.


“We want to connect our clients to their natural surroundings, while making them feel protected against the elements�

THE ROCK HOUSE, NORTH UIST Set into a cliffside overlooking a freshwater loch, this small onebedroom house is a tranquil hideaway. It is constructed from highly insulated concrete and clad with local natural stone and a grass roof. The house is nearly invisible from the nearby road.

PHOTOGRAPHY: SUSAN BURNELL

OBAN NA FEIDH, NORTH UIST Home to Mhairi and Steven and their young children, the house was designed in 2008 and the starting point to their Hebridean design collaborations. The light-filled house captures the ever changing views of the landscape with carefully placed feature windows.

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Thorne Wyness Architects

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rom a base in Tobermory on the Isle of Mull, Thorne Wyness Architects has a clientele that extends across the west coast of Scotland. The inventive and dynamic partnership was established in 2010 and has since built up a broad, varied portfolio, from refurbishments and extensions to new-build residential and community projects. “We are a small office and clients always deal with an experienced partner,” says director Jenny Wyness. “Whether the project is an extension, a refurbishment or a new-build, our aim is to create sustainable and delightful spaces, and we always look for the best resolution for the client. We try to find the opportunities in any situation and we listen carefully to our clients’ needs, drawing on the specifics of site and location.” The studio walls are covered in images of brilliant buildings – Richard Rogers’ celebrated Lloyd’s of London building, Sarah Wigglesworth’s design for Mellor Primary School in the Peak District, the fairytale-like ‘House for Essex’ by Grayson Perry and FAT, and lots of work by the legendary American architect John Lautner. Should any more inspiration be required, the team only have to look outside: living and working in a rural location means the studio is fully conversant with the traditional •

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHNNY BARRINGTON

Thorne Wyness Architects 23 Main Street Tobermory Isle of Mull PA75 6NU T: 01688 302746 www.thornewyness.co.uk

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RIVERSIDE HOUSE Riverside House sits at the mouth of River Aros looking out to the Sound of Mull and Morvern in the distance. Lighting design by Sian Parsons for John Cullen Lighting. Left: Looking west towards Riverside Cottage showing its dramatic hallway that links the main living spaces. The house takes traditional forms and materials and adapts them to the site combining them with contemporary detailing and concealing a dramatic cross laminated interior. Below: View from the dining room across the hallway towards the living room in Riverside House. The Cross laminated timber interior exposes the structure of the house internally. Bottom right: Section of Riverside House kitchen, hallway and living room. Bottom left: Dramatic seaview through glazed wall

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• aesthetic of the north-west Scotland, which allows it to successfully work its contemporary approach into the landscape. “We have a unique sense of the challenges and opportunities that rural life can offer,” points out Wyness. “We are specialists in energy-saving, environmental design and are able to use materials and structures in an innovative way to create beautiful spaces.” The studio has successfully completed several difficult builds, such as the Ulva Ferry community housing project. The intention here was to deliver affordable family housing in a remote rural community on the west coast of the Isle of Mull, tackling depopulation and socio-economic decline. “This was a very challenging project where we were struggling to balance budget and quality with tight design restrictions,” recalls the architect. “It was also a project of firsts for everyone involved, from the contractor to the client.” The practice, however, had an ace up its sleeve: “We are rural architects but we also have a lot of background experience of very complex projects in terms of structure and detail design. This makes us flexible and able to rise to any challenge that faces us.” The Ulva Ferry project attracted wide acclaim and won a SURF Award in 2017 for best practice in community regeneration. The Thorne Wyness team keep abreast of the latest innovations in the building industry, especially where environmentally friendly developments are concerned. “We are keen to use our passive, fabric-first technology and understanding in our projects and we have a good technical knowledge of timber engineering, including cross-laminated timber,” says Wyness. “We’d love to work on some more zero-carbon projects using breathable materials in particular. “We look around us for inspiration and try to keep an open mind,” she concludes. “We’re inspired by simple, beautifully executed designs – not minimalist, but spare and robust, with a hint of whimsy.”

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LOCH SCRIADAN, MULL Perspective cut-away of upstention, seeking to make the most of a tiny estate cottage with fabulous sea views.

“We’re inspired by simple,

beautifully executed designs – not minimalist, but crafted and robust, with a hint of whimsy”


Thorne Wyness Architects

ULVA FERRY COMMUNITY HOUSING South elevation of the award-winning Ulva Ferry Community Housing with Loch Tuath in the distance.

GARDEN COTTAGE Left: Dining room of garden cottage enjoys sunset views across the established walled garden. Right: View from walled garden where striking red roof picks out the colours of the blooms.

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Woodside Parker Kirk architects

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oung, ambitious and passionate is how awardwinning architects practice Woodside Parker Kirk describes itself. “We live, breathe and dream good design,” says Gavin Kirk, director of the Edinburgh-based studio. Charina Beswick and Robert Lansberry are the other members of the three-strong team. Unsurprisingly, they all share a passion for great architecture and believe in working collaboratively with clients, making sure their clients are involved with every step of the design process. As Gavin explains, “We enjoy getting to know each person individually and finding out their aspirations so we can create a bespoke design. Part of that process might involve educating and guiding them, while listening to their opinions and responding to the challenges they have set us. We also understand that construction projects are stressful and that part of our role is to make it as gentle a process as possible.” For Gavin and his team, that means asking lots of questions and challenging norms and preconceptions. But this approach doesn’t just extend to working with clients, it’s felt in every part of the business. “Each new job brings up new challenges and everyone actively participates in the design process – the first idea is never, ever the last.” Gavin cites Borneo-Sporenburg in Amsterdam as one project that his practice would love to have been involved with. It’s a street of identical house plots, but each one has been designed by a different architect • Woodside Parker Kirk architects 37 Ferry Road Edinburgh EH6 4AF M: 07523 963395             E: Gavin@woodsideparker-kirk.co.uk                       www.woodsideparker-kirk.co.uk

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PERTHSHIRE FARMHOUSE Set on top of a brae, the brief for this farmhouse was “to create a space to sit and watch the weather approaching”. The design combines traditional stone with contemporary timber cladding and large windows to enjoy the stunning countryside views. The house has a high thermal performance with heating and power from a ground source heat pump and photovoltaic panels.

“We bring a lot of enthusiasm – we see so many opportunities in every project. We want it to be rewarding for us and our clients”


COTTAGE EXTENSION AND ALTERATIONS Awarded Best Interior by the Dundee Institute of Architects. The brief was to extend and modernise the existing cottage whilst combining old and new features. This was done by creating a bright, warm open-plan interior which flowed between spaces embracing the existing forms, angles and materials. The new extensions connect the house to the garden and to the street as well as forming a work from home space. Corten Steel was used externally to reference the colour and texture of the existing stone but with a contemporary aesthetic.

• which has generated a fantastic collection of solutions to the same brief. “That’s what we aim to do,” says Gavin. “We challenge preconceived ideas, both our own and those from the outside. This is often part of the process of exploring a variety of ideas in order to generate the most appropriate and successful solution. At the end of the day, we want each project to be rewarding for our clients and ourselves.” It’s clear that the team at Woodside Parker Kirk bring a lot enthusiasm to their work. “It’s very hard for us to not see the opportunities in every project,” says Gavin. “We believe everyone should live and work in places that are considered and meaningful.” To create such spaces, the team look to the site and the context to inform their design. As each project and each site is unique, their designs respond to these factors in conjunction with the client’s brief. The design can be sparked by the view, by a comment from the client during the first meeting or even as a response to the neighbouring landscape or buildings. To Woodside Parker Kirk, it’s all about exploring. “We really enjoy exploring new materials and building methods. As well as our bespoke projects, we are working on a flexible house type that can be adjusted in size and be adapted to suit a variety of sites. It can be modified by the client – we encourage people to take ownership and add their personality to their home.” “Ultimately, we want to be seen as good designers that people want to work with, and not be defined by a building, detail or typology.” The practice plans to continue growing sustainably, collaborating with talented designers and like-minded clients in its quest to create inspirational architecture. It’s also part of a new collective called Formerly Fish which combines the architects’ expertise with three other creative businesses – Be Seated, upholstery specialists; Hen and Crask, interior designers; and garden designer, Nick Burton. “Architecture is a constant in our lives,” says Kirk. “We look at it and enjoy it everywhere – on holiday, in magazines, in artwork and online. And of course, travel is a great way for revitalising the energy needed for good design, but bouncing ideas around is what keeps the studio sparky and high-spirited.

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ZONE Architects

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xceptional buildings, says director David Jamieson, is what Edinburgh studio Zone Architects aims to create. “We have a broad range of clients but all our projects employ bold and fresh thinking to create individual solutions,” he says. “Our design work is contemporary in feel but has an emphasis on craft and context. We combine creative design with expert delivery, working across a range of scales from landscape to urbanism and from new-build and the imaginative reuse and alterations to existing buildings.” The five-strong practice specialises in residential architecture and is not afraid of a challenge, having successfully tackled sites with difficult planning constraints, the conservation of historic buildings (especially of the 20th-century), low-energy construction and the design of swimming pools. “We want to delight the client,” states Jamieson. “We always try to give them more than the brief calls for and to make the design and construction process enjoyable.” He and the rest of the Zone team treat each project individually. “Each client/project is different and requires a different approach, and designing a oneoff house requires collaboration with the client and listening to their aspirations as well as leading the design process,” he points out. “We aim to tease out the character of the client to inform the design and give it a personal flavour.” Doing this, says the architect, is the •

ZONE Architects 211 Granton Road Edinburgh EH5 1HD T: 0131 551 1973 www.zonearchitects.co.uk

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HOUSE IN WESTER COATES, EDINBURGH The Old Schoolyard is a new villa in a conservation area just west of Edinburgh’s city centre. The site is an undeveloped plot within an area of grand villas laid out in the early 1900s. The plot had previously been a garden and tennis court before becoming a playground attached to the neighbouring house which had been used as a private school. Surrounded by grand houses from mostly the Victorian and Edwardian eras, facing a green and leafy crescent, with a slope of nearly one storey and the potential for a south facing garden, the site presented a rare opportunity to create an exceptional contemporary house in an established historic setting. Designed to make the most of its garden setting the living space is on the moddle of three floors with a garage, pool and guest room on the lower and the family bedrooms on the top floor.


“We want to delight the client. We always try to give them more than the brief calls for, and to make the design and construction process enjoyable and stress free�

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• way to create exciting and unique homes that will look and feel as good in 20 years’ time as when they were built. “We bring rigour to the detailing and construction process to ensure the optimum longevity from the building’s materials, and we place an emphasis on energy conservation, aiming for zerocarbon with each project.” Zone designs contemporary buildings that are often informed by an understanding of traditional building techniques. One of the practice’s biggest challenge to date was in extending (by nearly 4,000 sq. feet) a heavily protected B-listed cottage in an area of ancient woodland in North Berwick. “The client was the chief executive of CALA Homes, Alan Brown, and he was demanding in getting the most from both the design and construction process,” recalls Jamieson.w “and around what we have inherited from previous generations – the buildings we create today should be at least as good as these, but they should be built in a contemporary idiom.” As well as looking to the past, however, Zone has its eye firmly on the future, constantly investing in the latest computer technology to make the design process more accessible and quicker for clients. “We use BIM (Building Information Modelling), which helps speed up the construction process and ensures the best chance of success with the build,” explains the architect. “The development of off-site manufacturing particularly with timber construction is an inspiration. Our plans for the future are to continue expanding the company, but only if we can do so while maintaining the quality of our product.”

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ENGINE COTTAGE, NORTH BERWICK ZONE Architects secured Planning Consent for this major extension to a B-listed Tudorbethan cottage on the outskirts of North Berwick. The cottage, a former engine house to the Carlekemp Estate, occupies a spectacular location overlooking Fidra and the West Links Golf Course and sits within a heavily protected area of ancient woodland. The architects’ proposals significantly increase the floor space with two new wings which are designed as contemporary interpretations of the existing cottage. Adopting the same form and roof profile of the original, these wings accommodate expanded living space and bedrooms and are connected by a lower linking level embedded within the sloping site.


ZONE Architects

HOUSE IN MURRAYFIELD, EDINBURGH This project included the bringing up-to-date of an existing 1980s detached villa and a new kitchen extension. With new services, exterior and interior finishes the house has become worthy of its exceptional setting in one of Edinburgh’s most attractive inner suburbs. The existing house was reorganised so that the principle rooms faced the newly landscaped garden. In contrast to the traditional feel of the existing house, the new kitchen occupied a glass box to provide maximum light

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Iain Cameron Architect

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ptimism is quality that’s often in short supply in the modern world – but not with Iain Cameron, who believes it’s essential in his business. “Each project is a new challenge and an opportunity to make something beautiful,” he says. “I want to see well-considered and crafted ideas built by like-minded people who share the same sense of passion and joy.” After graduating from Edinburgh College of Art and working in a large commercial office in the city, he set up his own practice in 2010, priding himself on taking a personal approach and offering his clients exciting and imaginative solutions. “I now work mainly on domestic and small commercial projects but I have experience in education, hospitals, public and private housing, mixed-use community projects, commercial offices, industrial projects and 3D visualisations,” he says. “I work with local consultants and builders, which allows me to provide a team that understand and work closely with each other. If required, I can offer a client a complete package from design to completion.” One of his main aims is to give his clients ideas they might not have considered before, while adding value through good design, making the most of views, and incorporating thoughtful, fun details: “The process should be collaborative and fun, resulting in a combination of ideas that is unique.”

Iain Cameron Architect 14 Forthview Terrace Edinburgh EH4 2AE T: 0131 467 0579 E: info@iaincameronarchitect.co.uk www.iaincameronarchitect.co.uk

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ORCHARD BRAE Above: A 1930s detached house was transformed by this modern open-plan extension. The new layout lets natural daylight flood the house. A terrace with ‘floating’ steps enjoys an elevated position over the garden, which now has a large outdoor living space.

CRAIGLEITH Left: This extension replaced an old conservatory. The new open-plan kitchen, dining and living area has Velfac sliding doors to the garden.

KINGSKNOWE DRIVE Below: The inverted roof provides a dramatic rising ceiling in this extended garden room. Left: 3D visual of this project.


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Architecture18  

What would make your life better? How about more natural light, or a sense of balance and harmony in your home? A feeling that your space is...

Architecture18  

What would make your life better? How about more natural light, or a sense of balance and harmony in your home? A feeling that your space is...

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