Peabody School Curriculum Year at a Glance

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Curriculum Year at a Glance


Peabody School PreK Year at a Glance August & September LANGUAGE ARTS ▪ Listening and Taking Turns ▪ Describing Feelings and Ideas ▪ Building Listening and Speaking Vocabularies ▪ Developing Print and Book Concepts ▪ Phonological Awareness ▪ Relating Stories to Experiences ▪ Manipulating Writing Tools ▪ Exploring Story Elements ▪ Making Predictions ▪ Asking Questions ▪ Following Multi-Step Directions ▪ Exploring World Languages and Cultures SOCIAL STUDIES ▪ Citizenship, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion ▪ Cause and Effect Relationships ▪ Change Over Time ▪ Community Helpers and Role Models ▪ Contributions of People from Long Ago ▪ Symbols, Holidays, and Traditions ▪ Relationships Between People and Places ▪ Perspectives and Choices MATH ▪ Number Sense, Geometry, and Positional Words ▪ Patterns, Data, Comparisons, and Relationships ▪ Verbal and Pictorial Descriptions ▪ Movement and Changes in Sets ▪ Measurement ▪ Problem Solving SCIENCE ▪ Exploring with Five Senses and Science Tools and Techniques ▪ Observing and Describing ▪ Comparing and Contrasting ▪ Classifying and Sorting ▪ Identifying Patterns and Change ▪ Making Predictions and Inferences ▪ Conducting Experiments ▪ Communicating Observations ▪ Conserving and Reusing SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LEARNING ▪ Self-Confidence and Self-Reflection ▪ Self-Direction and Responsibility ▪ Enthusiasm and Persistence as Learners ▪ Positive Relationships ▪ Positive Participation ▪ Mutual Compromises ▪ Positive Strategies for Resolving Conflicts ▪ Empathy and Caring for Others PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT ▪ Body Awareness, Strength, and Coordination ▪ Directionality and Position in Space ▪ Integrated Movement and Senses ▪ Dexterity and Control Using Tools ▪ Physical Activity and Health ▪ Safe Choices, Actions, and Responses ▪ Connections Across the Curriculum SPECIAL EVENTS

October

November

December

January

Let’s Be Friends

Outside our Door

Seasons All Around

Hello, Neighbor!

We Love Animals

Welcome to School!

Exploring our Universe

Native Americans

Community Helpers

New Year Traditions

Being a Friend

Our Homes

Winter Traditions

Groundhog Day

School Spirit Spring

Empathy and Compassion

Sink or Float?

Weather

Water in our World

Dinosaurs

Plants

Recycle, Reuse, Reduce

Summer

Being Healthy

Wants and Needs

Animal Families

Landmarks and Symbols

Animal Needs

Winter

Birds

Amphibians

Animal Bodies

Animal Homes

Reptiles

Animals in Winter

Insects

Pumpkins and Falling Leaves

May & June

Reaching for the Sun

Nocturnal Animals Feelings and Emotions

April

Growing and Changing

Day and Night Safety First

March

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Fire Safety Being Part of a Team

February

It’s a Small World

Look at us Now!

Earth Day

Oceans and Ocean Animals

Trees Sharing our Earth Home

Living Things

Being a Graduate

Autumn Apples and Squirrels

Colorful Science 9/26

Firefighters TBA

Nurse TBA

Betsy Q Concert 12/4 Betsy Q Snow Date 12/9

Storytime Visitor TBA

Dental Hygienist TBA

D.E.A.R.

All About Air 4/23

Little Gym Darlene 5/6 Little Gym Jenny 5/13

Spirit Week Special Friends Day

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs. (Strong)

Revised 08.26.19


Peabody School Kindergarten Year at a Glance* Essential

Continuous Learning Social Emotional Learning What is SEL? Why is it important? What are emotions? What do we do with our emotions? How do our emotions impact how we act and react? How do I appropriately interact with my community?

Social Studies Who is in our Community? How can we celebrate individualism? What are the characteristics and defining factors that make us who we are? What connections can we make within our community?

Language Arts/ Literacy What is literature? How is literature a communication tool? What is a story? Who can tell a story? How is writing a communication tool? What can you communicate through your writing? How can you appreciate the work of others? Reading is a life long skill, developing joy

Classroom Jobs Morning Meeting Building Blocks for class meetings Group Work Team building Mindfulness Risk taking practice Problem solving scenarios

September First Six Weeks (responsive classroom) Active listening Hopes and Dreams Self portraits Routines Establishing classroom expectations

Practice active listening and responding in community. Looking at multiple perspectives Recognizing that there are many different stories and all of them are valid and important

Questions: What is my story? How can I share my story and value the story of others?

October Classroom Jobs and Meaningful work Selfies/interviewing our friends Identifying emotions Establish a calm down space/take a break area

November Level of Emotions and appropriate responses to the situation at hand

December Introduce impulsive Puppy and Slow down Snail.

January Revisit community norms, welcome back after Winter Break

What is mindfulness? Identifying Feelings and highlighting them by looking at others Size of problems, size of reactions

Calm down jars and other strategies

Who am I? and Who I am! Paper Bag sharing I am books Friendship interviews What is most important to me?

Start Wheel of Choice: how you can respond to a problem. (give scenarios) Bug and Wish

Present the Kindergarten Parade

Add to Wheel of Choice Walk away, share/take turns, bug and wish, ask for help

Highlighting the connections in our community, celebrating our differences

Who are We? We Are! What are parades; looking at actual examples of parades and floats Identifying what are the important things to you. Float planning Float building Parade planning: advertisements

February Random acts of Kindness project How can we impact our school community in a positive way? Continue to practice with the Wheel of Choice

A deep dive into food around the world! DUMPLINGS How does food connect people? Families?

March Digital Citizenship Students create their own Wheel of Choice to use at home

April Self advocacy Risk taking practice Responsible decision making

Relationship Skills Start to do intentional teamwork activities

May/June Classroom community Service Project Looking forward to First Grade I am books Who are we as a community?

- How are we alike? Different?

Celebrations of family food traditions.

Getting ready for First Grade!

- What do I do about my story and the story of my classmates?

What can we do with our Classroom Community?

Classroom Community Celebration of our community/looking forward.

What are some of the differences and similarities of foods in different cultures?

Family Connections to food. Exploration of Kindergarten family traditions around food.

- What can we do as a community? Who/what can be have a positive influence on?

End of year “All about me!” books

Developing empathy

Daily 3 Structure: read to self, read to someone, listening to reading, work on writing, word work Word Study with Words Their Way Author Studies Handwriting without Tears Writing Journal Share writing projects

Establishing Daily 3 Components : Read to Self, Read to Someone Building reading stamina Reading Assessments Shared Writing Project: Community interviews and Classroom Expectations

Continue Daily 3 Components: Listening to reading, Word Study, and Work on Writing Comprehension Skills: Key details and Retell

Handwirting:

Uppercase

Practice Daily 3, routine Shared Writing Project: Fall poetry

Handwirting:

Uppercase

Daily 3 Rotation:

Daily 3 Rotation:

Daily 3 Rotation:

Daily 3 Rotation:

Daily 3 Rotation:

Daily 3 Rotation:

Reading practice

Reading practice

Reading practice

Reading practice

Reading practice

Reading practice

Comprehension Skills: Story Elements, genres of literature

Comprehension Skills: Story Elements, genres of literature

Comprehension Skills: Story Elements, genres of literature

Comprehension Skills: Story Elements, genres of literature

Comprehension Skills: Story Elements, genres of literature

Comprehension Skills: Story Elements, genres of literature

Word Work

Word Work Shared Writing Project: What else should the Pigeon not be allowed to do?

Word Work

Word Work .

Word Work Autho Stud : nonfiction Informational Text

Word Work

Handwirting:

Uppercase

Fluency Focus with Mo Willems Readers Theater

Handwriting:

Lowercase

Shared Writing Project: Nonfiction project/ informational writing


Handwriting: grip,

and desire to become a reader

MATH Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. Construct viable arguments and critique the thinking of others. Model with mathematics. Use appropriate tools strategically. Attend to precision, Look for and make use of structure as well as regularity and repetition.

Science A look at biomes all over the world. Finding connections and differences. Focus on adaptations in relationship to the environment.

Special Events

Handwirting:

WDT, handwriting paper and Upper case Morning Munchies Number Corner Fact Fluency Questioning/proving your mathematical thinking

Number Corner (NC): Numbers All Around us Discovery of Math materials

Handwriting:

Introduce Lowercase

Lowercase

 Handwriting:

Lowercase

Number Corner (NC): Developing Strategies with Dice and Dominoes

Number Corner (NC): Adding/subtracting, counting and comparing

Number Corner (NC): Adding/subtracting, counting and comparing

Counting, Number and Operations

Number and Operations

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Temperate Forest

Marine/Oceans: Coral Reef

Marine cont.

Number Corner (NC): Number Line and Leapfrogs

Number Corner (NC): Geometry

Number Corner (NC): Figure the FactsPenguins

Number Corner (NC): One Hundred and Beyond

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Measurement and Data

Tundra

Tundra cont.

Desert

Desert cont.

Number Corner (NC): Changes and Changes

Measurement and Data

Counting and recognizing numbers through 30

Math for Love Number Hunts Number Talks Math Talks Creating a Math culture in the classroom

Where is the biome located? What plants/animals live in the biome? What are the environmental characteristics? What does it sound like? Experiments and investigations.

Tropical Rainforest

Connection with nonfiction writing.

Back to school night

Wild Rock field trip

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Kindergarten Parade Jumpology

Field Trip to Paramount

Grandparents and SF day

Savannah and Grasslands


Peabody School 1st Grade Year at a Glance* LANGUAGE ARTS

SOCIAL STUDIES

MATH

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs

September

October

November

-Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage, & Mechanics -Handwriting -Setting up the Writing Workshop - Story Writing (collecting ideas, prewriting, drafting)

-Reading Groups (focus on fluency, accuracy, and story comprehension) -Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage & Mechanics -Handwriting - Story writing (revising, proofreading, publishing)

-Reading Groups (focus on fluency, accuracy, and story comprehension) -Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage & Mechanics -Handwriting - Story writing (revising, proofreading, publishing)

Geography -Cardinal and Intermediate Directions -Map Symbols and Legends -Grid Systems, Longitude and Latitude -Continents and Oceans -Cartography Project -Map Scale -“Race Across the Country” Project -States, Regions, and Capitals Numeration -Place Value -Mental Computation Strategies -Hundreds Chart and other Number Patterns -Word Problems

Numeration continued... -Written/Standard/ Expanded Notation -Comparing and Ordering -Problem Solving

December -Reading Groups (focus on fluency, accuracy, and story comprehension) -Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage & Mechanics -Handwriting - Story writing (all elements)

January -Reading Groups (focus on fluency, accuracy, and story comprehension) -Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage & Mechanics -Handwriting - Story writing (all elements)

February -Reading Groups (focus on fluency, accuracy, and story comprehension) -Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage & Mechanics -Handwriting - Story writing (all elements)

Ancient Rome -Introduction to Studying the Past -Pompeii -Archaeological Investigations -Colosseum and Roman Architecture -Daily Life -Imperial Rome (First Hundred Years of the Empire) -Roman Coins -Independent Research Project Operations -Properties of Addition and Subtraction -Fact Families -Addition and Subtraction Strategies

Operations continued... -Missing Addend, Solving for an Unknown Value -Multi-Digit Problems w/ and w/o Regrouping -Addition and Subtraction Word Problems

Fractions -Fraction Terminology -Identifying Fractions -Expressing Fractions -Showing/Modeling Fractions

March -Reading Groups (focus on fluency, accuracy, and story comprehension) -Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage & Mechanics -Handwriting - Story writing (all elements)

April -Reading Groups (focus on fluency, accuracy, and story comprehension) -Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage & Mechanics -Handwriting - Story writing (all elements)

SPECIAL EVENTS

Geology -Earth Layers -Plate Tectonics -Volcanoes, Ring of Fire -Identify Parts of a Volcano, Create Diagrams -Rocks and Minerals (Rock Types and Rock Observations) -Rock Cycle -Caves (Including Cave Zones and Cave Life) -Speleothem Creation First Day of School: 8/28

Field Trip to Wildrock: 10/11

Parent Conferences: 10/31 & 11/1

Fractions continued… -Representing Fractions on Number Lines -Equivalent Fractions -Comparing and Ordering Fractions

Bring a Friend Day: 11/5

Astronomy -Solar System (Planetary Exploration) -Moon and Moon Phases -Constellations -Cycles, Revolution, Rotation, Seasons -Solar and Lunar Eclipses

Field Trip to Jumpology: 12/18

School Resumes: 1/6 Bring a Friend Day: 1/21

-Reading Groups (focus on fluency, accuracy, and story comprehension) -Word Study (Homework) -Grammar, Usage & Mechanics -Handwriting - Story writing (all elements)

Medieval Europe -Feudal System and Social Structure -Feasts/Celebrations -Castles (Features and Architectural Advancements) -Knights -Women in the Middle Ages

Time -Parts of a Clock -Digital and Analog Time -Telling Time to the Hour, Half-Hour, Quarter-Hour, and Five-Minute Interval -Expressing Time in Words -Elapsed Time -Word Problems

Money -Identifying Coins and Bills (Names and Monetary Values) -Adding Coins and Bills -Comparing Coin and Dollar Amounts -Calculating Change -Money Word Problems Measurement -US Customary and Metric Units -Linear Measurement -Perimeter and Area -Word Problems

SCIENCE

May/June

Geometry -Points, Lines, Line Segments, and Rays (Identifying and Naming) -Perpendicular, Parallel, and Intersecting Lines (Defining and Naming) -Right, Acute, and Obtuse Angles (Naming and Measuring)

Meteorology -Water Cycle -Air Movement -Clouds -Weather Instruments -Weather Maps/Symbols -Extreme Weather

February Break: 2/17-2/18

Game Night: 3/6 Spirit Week: 3/30-4/3

Spring Break: 4/6-4/10

Shakespeare Perf: date TBD (mid-late May)


Back to School Night: 9/12 (6:00-8:00 pm)

October Break: 10/14-10/15 Field Trip to Wayne Theater: 10/30

Field Trip to Luray Caverns: 11/14 Talent Show:11/22 Thanksgiving Break: 11/27-11/29

Winter Break: 12/23-1/3

Field Trip to Wayne Theater: 1/23

25th Anniversary Celebration: 2/22 Field Trip to UVA Observatory: 2/28

Shakespeare Family Workshop: date TBD

Earth Day Celebration: 4/24

Last Day of School: 6/5


Peabody School Second Grade Year at a Glance *This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs. September October November December January

February

March

April

May/June

LANGUAGE ARTS

Reading Groups: Making connections, visualizing, questioning/predicting, character traits and motivations Writing: Personal Narratives, Informational Writing, Creative Writing Word Study, Grammar, Handwriting

Reading Groups: summarizing main ideas, compare/contrast, cause and effect, facts and opinions Writing: Writing Prompts, Informational Writing Word Study, Grammar, Handwriting

Reading Groups: inferencing, author intentions, theme Writing: Poetry, Portfolio creation, Presentation skills Word Study, Grammar, Handwriting

SOCIAL STUDIES

Ancient African Kingdoms (Egypt and Mali): Geography Social structure Royal life Religion and mythology Education and the arts Contributions and inventions Architecture

Ancient China: Geography Social structure Royal dynasties Religion and folklore Education and the arts Contributions and inventions Architecture Time: Reading analog and digital clocks Elapsed time Operations: Multiplication and division strategies Fact fluency Problem solving strategies Measurement and Graphing: Length, weight, capacity Investigating bar, line, and picture graphs

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Ancient American Civilizations (Incas and Maya): Geography Social structure Religion and mythology Contributions and inventions Architecture Language and communication

★ ★

Geometry: Identifying angles, polygons, and three-dimensional figures Congruent and symmetrical figures Perimeter and area Money: Identifying coins and bills Calculating money totals and change

Oceanography: Topography, ocean characteristics Ocean regions Types of marine life, habitats, adaptations, food webs Environmentalism and protection of the oceans

Entomology: Classification and characteristics of insects Life cycles and contributions of insects Insect habitats and adaptations

Field Trip: Jumpology 12/18

In School Presentation: Oceanography Research Presentations 3/30-4/3

MATH

SCIENCE

SPECIAL EVENTS

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Numeration: Place value Comparing and ordering Number patterns Rounding Addition and subtraction strategies Fact fluency Problem solving strategies Fractions: Identifying fractions Mixed numbers and Improper fractions Comparing and ordering Equivalent fractions Addition and subtraction Chemistry: States and properties of matter Phase changes Introduction to the periodic table Chemical and physical reactions Acids and Bases Field Trip: Field Trip: Wayne Theater, Have Wayne Theater, You Filled a Bucket Rosie Revere Today? 10/30 9/30

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Field Trip: Science Museum of Virginia 2/6 Paramount Theater, Yamoto: The Drummers of Japan, 2/20

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

★ ★ ★

Field Trip: Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens, 4/22

In School Presentation: Writers’ Cafe: A Celebration of Writing, 5/6


Peabody School 3rd Grade Year at a Glance* * This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs. Ongoing Spelling Vocabulary Creative writing LANGUAGE ARTS

Handwriting practice (cursive begins in October) Fiction and non-fiction reading comprehension Geography (Americas)

SOCIAL STUDIES

August/ September

October

November

Because of Winn-Dixie (comprehension, “What Readers Do”, character analysis)

December

January

February

Number Talks

April

Biographies / Wax Museum project

Folktales (reading and writing)

Speech-writing and research skills

Double Life of Pocahontas (discussion and research)

Grammar: review of writing mechanics as necessary

Tiger Rising (book group activities and literature discussion) Independent novel choice (summarizing, analyzing conflict, character studies, final book report)

Grammar: parts of speech, simple sentence, word usage

Descriptive writing, narrative writing, creative writing and reading response Grammar: capitalization, end marks and other punctuation, paragraph structures

Pre-History: early exploration and famous explorers

Native Americans (historical and contemporary - North and South America)

Worlds Meet Colonization and early American settlement

Class discussions, projects, readings First Americans

Numeration (place value, comparing, rounding, estimating, addition and subtraction)

“Discovery” simulation

Operations and Algebraic Thinking (multiplication, division, patterns)

Operations with Fractions Measurement

Math enrichment

Understanding Fractions and Decimals

MATH

Geometry Mental math practice Graphing and Data Problem-solving Discussion about systems

SCIENCE

Invertebrates and vertebrates

Humans as Vertebrates

Circulatory system

Classification

Cells

Nervous system (Learning about our brains)

Being a Scientist (inquiry)

Skeletal System

Respiratory system

Experiments Interactive notebooks

Muscular System Winn Dixie Dog Party October 11th

SPECIAL EVENTS

May/June

Native American historical fiction (student-led book groups)

“Who Really Discovered America?” Readings from the textbook “The History of US” by Joy Hakim

March

Natural Bridge Field Trip October 17th “Who Really Discovered America?” Performances: December 5th and December 6th

Paramount Shows: Wilde Creatures - January. 23rd Walk On: The Story of Rosa Parks - February 28th

Frontier Culture Museum Field Trip - April 14th Wax Museum Performances: May 21st and May 22nd


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Social Studies Grades 4-8


Peabody School 4th Grade Social Studies Year at a Glance* Essential Questions: ●

Why study history?

What can we learn from the past?

How do we know what happened in the past?

How am I connected to the past?

In what ways is the past about me?

Whose story do we believe?

How can individuals make a difference?

What are the roles and responsibilities of government?

Is change inevitable/what causes change?

Why is “where” important?

How does geography affect people’s lives?

How and why do maps change?

Topic History

1st Trimester ● ● ●

Virginia Colonial History Colonial America American Revolution

2nd Trimester ● ● ● ●

American Revolution Declaration of Independence Constitution- Creation of, Importance of, Modern Relevance of “Know Your Rights”

Geography

● ●

Five Regions of Virginia Physical Features 13 Colonies

● ● ●

United States East of the Mississippi River Physical/Human Features Influence on History

Research

Students model the process and research methods of professionals such as historians, archeologists, and anthropologists. Note Taking- Cornell Notes Paraphrasing Presenting Information- Clear/Informative/Engaging

● ● ● ●

Developing Research Questions Internet Research- What Makes a Good Source? Site Validity/Reliability Citing Sources

● ● ●

Current Events

3rd Trimester Project Ephesus: Project Ephesus is a multi-disciplinary urban planning project where students are challenged to work collaboratively and individually in order to create an urban environment that is socially, environmentally, and economically sustainable. Project Ephesus will require students to utilize skills developed in the preceding two trimesters regarding geography, mapping, research, history, and current events. They will also explore issues facing modern communities in order to look toward the future. There may be opportunities to collaborate with content in math and science classes as well.

Students will be studying current events throughout the year. They will look for the influence of the past on the present, and use current events to look toward the future. They will examine environmental, political, and social issues as they manifest themselves in our world today. Students will also begin to learn to distinguish reliable and objective journalism from fake news, op-eds, and branded content. Students will become responsible and thoughtful media consumers.

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.


Fifth Grade Social Studies 2019-2020 World Geography, History, and Cultures Overarching Question: How can learning about others in our world help us to have a better world? Essential Questions Geography In what ways are resources important to a civilization’s success? How does where you live influence how you live?

Ongoing Skills: ● Problem solve ● Take notes ● Paraphrase ● Give evidence, examples, explanations ● Research ● Understand and use primary sources ● Critical thinking ● How to read non-fiction Writing ● Poetry ● Multi-genre choices ● Narrative ● Summary

Culture What makes a culture unique? How has my culture shaped me? How does our understanding of culture help us communicate with others and why is that important?

Equality and Power In what ways can equality create a more successful society? How should society deal with those who are less fortunate? What criteria do we use to grant authority? What criteria should be used?

Ongoing areas of focus

Geography of the world

How do our cultures shape us?

Current Events

Landforms, Continents, Country Review

What makes someone a hero?

Walker School ESOL Pen Pals

Conflict To what extent has conflict shaped our world? What leads to deep and lasting conflict resolution? Why does it work?

Refugees in Charlottesville

Southwest Asia

International Neighbors International Rescue Committee

Physical Features

Community Service option Immigration Ellis Island

Map skills

Perspective How are our perspectives formed and changed? Whose story is being told and how do we know?

Readings A Long Walk to Water

Family relative narrative Refugee readings, book choices

History Mesopotamia Religions Judaism Christianity Islam Current Life

Walker School ESOL students visit 10-8

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

International Neighbors focus activity

Regions and Cultures Around the World Student choice


Peabody School 6th Grade Social Studies Year at a Glance September

Historical Thinking

Historical Knowledge

Essential Understandings and Questions

October

November

December

COURSE THEME:FREEDOM January

February

March

April

May/June

Students will: -develop processes of historical inquiry to reconstruct/reinterpret the past -seek, recognize, and understand patterns and complex relationships including change/continuity, cause/effect, similarities/differences -recognize the difference between fact/conjecture, evidence/assertion -develop empathy, understand and appreciate the value of cultural diversity, and recognize the idea of a shared humanity -engage in research by analyzing and evaluating primary and secondary sources, comparing and contrasting conflicting viewpoints, forming opinions, developing and supporting a thesis statement, offering new insights or arguments, and enhancing debate skills -interpret and generate timelines, maps, charts, graphs, statistics, and demographics -acquire and use historical writing skills and strategies to generate meaningful and accurate products -apply habits of mind and metacognitive strategies to plan, monitor and evaluate one’s own work Geography Colonial America The Revolutionary War Constitutional Louisiana Purchase Jacksonian Road to War: SecessionCivil War (introduce map Convention Democracy justification, ideology skills to be practiced Abolition Movement, Reconstruction Rising tensions Building a New Nation Lewis and Clark throughout the year) Indian Removal Act, Sectionalism, Popular The Civil War Washington, Adams, Expedition Trail of Tears Sovereignty. Jefferson Lead up to the (Declaration of Bleeding Kansas First European Revolutionary War Independence, Articles Manifest Destiny settlements, of Confederation) Political parties The Gold Rush Lincoln/Douglas interactions with debates Native Americans -Survival depends -Technological, -Revolutions are the -Humans have certain -The Founding Fathers sought to establish a - Though the - The Civil War - Freedom is never upon one’s use of monetary, and result of a conflict in inalienable rights, government, given authority by the will of the Constitution was forever changed the free. the resources genetic advantages beliefs and cause including the right to people and limited by a written constitution created to protect the political, social, around them. determine outcomes profound changes in a life, liberty, and the that reflected the ideals that Americans rights of all economic and cultural -Separate can never -Native Americans in conflicts. society. pursuit of happiness. fought and died for in the Revolutionary War. Americans, some outlook of the United be equal. have a special people were left out. States. relationship with - Americans felt destined and entitled to -How is power -Each generation -Democracy is a -War does not always Nature. expand their land from “sea to shining sea”. gained, used, challenges, tests, and system of government -Fundamental -How does conflict solve the problems -The exchange and abused, and justified? transforms the values which aims to balance geographical, lead to change that caused it. diffusion of cultures, -To what extent were the Founding Fathers it inherits. the rights of economic, political, across varying levels ideas, values, and able to create a society that lived up to the individuals with the and social differences of society? resources impact ideals of the American Revolution? - Wounds caused by rights of the common emerged between the the development of this nation’s bloodiest good. North and the South, human society. -Westward Expansion changed the conflict have yet to be contributing to crises, geographical, political, economic, social, and completely healed compromises, and cultural landscape of the US. conflict. Geography:

Geography and Civics

-Students will read maps and globes and know absolute and relative locations as they relate to past civilizations and historical events -Students will understand that geographical landscapes shape and are shaped by the culture of the people who inhabit them. Physical and cultural landscapes change over time, directly related to human development -Geography influences the political, social, economic, and cultural outlook of a society. Civics: -Students will learn to be a model citizen through participation in discussions and activities which aim to strengthen “the common good” and promote civil ideals -Students will understand and appreciate the rights and responsibilities of citizens -Students will develop a sense of global and moral awareness -Students will engage in cooperative learning opportunities and develop group participation skills

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.


Peabody School 7th Grade Social Studies Year at a Glance August/ September

Historical Thinking

Historical Knowledge

-War does not always solve the problems that caused it. - Wounds caused by this nation’s bloodiest conflict have yet to be completely healed. Geography:

Geography and Civics

November

December

January

February

March

April

May/June

Students will: -develop processes of historical inquiry to reconstruct/reinterpret the past -seek, recognize, and understand patterns and complex relationships including change/continuity, cause/effect, similarities/differences -recognize the difference between fact/conjecture, evidence/assertion -develop empathy, understand and appreciate the value of cultural diversity, and recognize the idea of a shared humanity -engage in research by analyzing and evaluating primary and secondary sources, comparing and contrasting conflicting viewpoints, forming opinions, developing and supporting a thesis statement, offering new insights or arguments, and enhancing debate skills -interpret and generate timelines, maps, charts, graphs, statistics, and demographics -acquire and use historical writing skills and strategies to generate meaningful and accurate products -apply habits of mind and metacognitive strategies to plan, monitor and evaluate one’s own work Reconstruction Era Westward Expansion Native Americans, Immigration Progressive Era World War II cont’d. World War I Roaring 20s (Atomic bomb, Great Depression Holocaust) Reconstruction Native Americans, “Gilded Age” amendments (BIA policies, Industrialization Harlem Renaissance assimilation) Opposition, end of Reconstruction -Human settlement, as well as natural resources, shape the personality of our nation’s regions

Essential Understandings and Questions

October

COURSE THEME: AMERICAN IDENTITY

- New social, political, and technological ideas can transform how a nation sees itself. -A new American Identity was emerging, forcing other cultures to engage in assimilation, often at the expense of their own traditions and values. -What does it mean to be an American?

-Industrialization brought great progress, but at great costs.

-The “American Dream” came with great hardship, and was unfulfilled for many immigrants. -Immigration created this nation’s rich identity as a melting pot. - What are the benefits and challenges of a diverse society?

-As our nation grew in size, population and technology a host of social, economic and political problems arose. -The use of mediacoupled with public outrage and legislative changes- led to massive reforms in our society - How do we define “progress”? Does achieving it require some to suffer while others benefit?

-Economic interests, military prowess, ideological perspectives, and public opinion influence involvement in international conflict. -Victory comes with costs; war outcomes affect future events.

-Nothing can bring communities together or tear them apart like culture.

-The true test of a strong nation is how it is able to handle a crisis and rebuild.

-Nationalism can both unite and divide, creating both harmony and conflict.

-Art, music, and literature can transcend social, economic, and racial barriers.

-The Great Depression was an economic crisis that profoundly shaped American culture.

-Humanity can be benevolent or merciless, and wars often bring out the inhumanity in mankind.

-Unchecked optimism and confidence can lead to future disaster.

-Students will read maps and globes and know absolute and relative locations as they relate to past civilizations and historical events -Students will understand that geographical landscapes shape and are shaped by the culture of the people who inhabit them. Physical and cultural landscapes change over time, directly related to human development -Geography influences the political, social, economic, and cultural outlook of a society. Civics: -Students will learn to be a model citizen through participation in discussions and activities which aim to strengthen “the common good” and promote civil ideals -Students will understand and appreciate the rights and responsibilities of citizens -Students will develop a sense of global and moral awareness -Students will engage in cooperative learning opportunities and develop group participation skills

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.


Peabody School 8th Grade Social Studies Year at a Glance August/ September

Historical Thinking

Historical Knowledge

October

-A democracy is characterized by certain ideals including equal opportunity, freedom and independence, representative and limited government, the protection of inalienable rights, separation of powers, and rule of law. -The Constitution is a living document that can be changed to reflect the needs and values of the time. - To what extent does the Constitution uphold the Framer’s ideals?

Government and Civics

December

January

February

March

April

May/June

Students will: -develop processes of historical inquiry to reconstruct/reinterpret the past -seek, recognize, and understand patterns and complex relationships including change/continuity, cause/effect, similarities/differences -recognize the difference between fact/conjecture, evidence/assertion -develop empathy, understand and appreciate the value of cultural diversity, and recognize the idea of a shared humanity -engage in research by analyzing and evaluating primary and secondary sources, comparing and contrasting conflicting viewpoints, forming opinions, developing and supporting a thesis statement, offering new insights or arguments, and enhancing debate skills -draw connections between cultural/societal priorities and law making -acquire and use historical writing skills and strategies to generate meaningful and accurate products -apply habits of mind and metacognitive strategies to plan, monitor and evaluate one’s own work Citizenship and the Foundations of Legislative Branch Executive Branch Judicial Branch Political Process First Amendment Freedoms Government Civil Rights Movement

-What is the role of government?

Essential Understandings

November

COURSE THEME: LIBERTY AND JUSTICE

-A system of checks and balances serves to distribute power so as to prevent abuse. -Each generation challenges, tests, and transforms the values it inherits. -Laws are instituted to establish and maintain order and fairness in society. -Representation in government is not always representative of the society at large.

-A system of checks and balances serves to distribute power so as to prevent abuse. -Great presidents are able to manage various domestic and foreign struggles and steer the country in a positive direction. -A president’s philosophy, agenda, actions, and performance are largely influenced by public opinion, party views, critical events, current ideals and personal beliefs.

-How does governmental policy affect varying levels of society? -The rule of law, established through a fair system of justice, provides a process for resolving conflicts involving individual and group rights, and the rights of the society at large. -The Constitution guarantees justice to all citizens through due process and equal protection. -Courts can follow a policy of restraint or activism, sanctioning the status quo or promoting social change.

-Voting is the most fundamental right of a citizen in a democracy. -Elections are the direct expression of the power of the people to select officials they believe will best represent their perception of the common good.

Government: -Students will understand and evaluate major political ideas and forms of government -Students will understand the processes involved in making decisions and developing policies -Students will understand the fundamental ideals of government and the rights and responsibilities of citizens -Students will understand that government shapes and is shaped by the culture of its citizens Civics: -Students will learn to be a model citizen through participation in discussions and activities which aim to strengthen “the common good” and promote civil ideals -Students will understand and appreciate the rights and responsibilities of citizens -Students will develop a sense of global and moral awareness -Students will engage in cooperative learning opportunities and develop group participation skills

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs. Major elections/primaries often change the sequence of units.

-Each generation challenges, tests, and transforms the values it inherits. -Separate can never be equal. -Non-violent protest is a successful way to generate enduring and meaningful change. -A small group of people can change the world. - When should freedoms or rights be limited?


Science Grades 4-8


Peabody School 4th Grade Environmental Science Year at a Glance* Unit 1: Introducing Themes (September)

Unit 2: Seasonal Change

Unit 3: Plants

Unit 4: Animals

(September and through the year)

(September/October and revisit in the Spring)

(October/November)

Unit 5:

Unit 6:

Unit 7:

Living Systems and Interdependence

Resilience Tipping Points Human Impact

Taking a Closer and Management Efforts

(December - May)

(January - June)

(February-June)

Environmental Science and Living Systems

Introduction of environmental science themes and what it means to be a scientist Yearlong Themes: Observation Change Systems Interdependence Resilience and Tipping points (5th grade)

The sun, energy and how it influences change in living systems

Fall leaves and the chemistry of photosynthesis

How do living things respond to changes in daylight?

Structure review

Why are there seasons?

Physics of seeds

How does weather, temperature and time affect change?

The ins and outs of water: Exploring the movement of water in a plant

How do living things interact with each other?

Structure review

How are living things classified?

Behavioral and physical adaptations Physics of form and flight Native and invasive species

Latitude Longitude

Conservation and Management (5th grade)

Year Long projects and activities/ fieldtrips

Adaptations

How do animals survive change?

Identification and dichotomous keys

What are the effects of interdependence? How do ecosystems change over time?

What role do human beings play in an ecosystem?

Exploring and assessing the health of a watershed system

When is too far too far?

Chemistry analysis of streams

Tragedy of the Commons Macroinvertabrates Can systems recover after failure?

Erosion Pollution

Food webs Trophic levels/cascades Competition Balance/carrying capacity

Conservation and Management efforts

Native and invasive species

Forest Fridays begins: Yearlong observation of one area outside every friday.

Forest Fridays

Forest Fridays

Forest Fridays

Forest Fridays

Forest Fridays

Forest Fridays

Journey North: Reasons for the seasons begins

Site Visit with Nancy Striniste Oct 3 to begin the nature play project

Garden Explorations

Journey North: Mystery classroom begins

Stream stomp and health assessment

2 year project working with Nancy Striniste of earlyspace to design an outdoor nature play space in our woods: This will involve multidisciplinary practices, looking at site maps, engineering and design

Change Project: Looking at how to review scientific research papers or work within the scientific method to design an experiment looking at change

Invasive vs Noninvasive Management Plots and surveying our property to create an interactive map of our system Working with Wildlife Biologist from the Center for Urban Habitat Devin Floyd

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Watershed field trip May 13 Camp Albemarle


Peabody School 5th Grade Environmental Science Year at a Glance*

SCIENCE

Environmental science and human impact All units will be explored from the angle of how humans have influenced change within these systems

Unit 1:

Unit 2:

Unit 3:

Unit 4:

Themes

The Environment and Society

Geosphere

Atmosphere

Unit 7:

Unit 8:

Life: Biosphere

Protection and Management

Looking Closer and Make a Difference

History of environmental science

Looking closer at the Chesapeake Bay

Policies and economics

Watersheds

Hydrosphere

“But I want what I want and I want it now”

Erosion

Warming the earth

Water cycles

Adaptations

Geology

Chemistry of air

Watersheds

Extinction

Tragedy of the Common

Components of the atmosphere

River formation

Coexisting

Yearlong Themes:

Timeline of life

Rocks/Minerals: structure types process Identification What do rocks tell us about the Earth?

Ozone

Observation Change Systems Interdependence

Forest Fridays begins. Yearlong Forest Friday and 5th grade Project April 24 Earth Day Presentation Make a Difference Posters

Climate change Global warming

Origin of life Scale of humans on earth and impact Maps as a tool to explore change

Resilience and Tipping points

How do we protect our planet?

Unit 6:

Introduction of environmental science themes and what it means to be a scientist

Conservation/ Management

Year Long projects and activities/ fieldtrips

Unit 5:

How do we impact the Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, Geosphere and Biosphere?

Physics of movement on earth, specifically rivers, glaciers, storms and wind

Water as a resource

Progress

Globally/Locally

Pollution

Failures

Engineering filters Weather and electricity

Exploring natural resources within the earth

Forest Fridays

Forest Fridays

Forest Fridays

Panel Discussion

September 26: Retired Geologist Marilyn Smith to talk about Minerals

November: Meteorologist Travis Koscko to speak on weather and storm formation

October 3: Field Trip to Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy

This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Panel Discussion on Fossil Fuel Issue in class

Forest Fridays Filter Project

Forest Fridays Invasive Noninvasive Management Year long: Surveying our property to create an interactive map of our system Working with Center for Urban Habitat Devin Floyd

Forest Fridays

Forest Fridays

Windmill Challenge

RIver Exploration on the Rivanna or James


Peabody School 6th Grade Chemistry: Year at a Glance*

Scientific Knowledge

Essential Concepts

Skills

Special Events

September

October - November

December - January

February - March

April

May - June

Section 1: Introduction and Orientation

Section 1: Pre-History

Section 2: The Metal Ages

Section 3: The Industrial Revolution

Section 4: Substance Synthesis Projects

Section 5: The Nuclear Age and Beyond

-Laboratory Safety -What is Chemistry? -The Scientific Method -Experimental Design -Using Models in Science -Organizing Data

-States of Matter -Properties of Matter -Temperature and Energy -Energy Transfer

-Density -Boiling and Melting Points -Kinetic Theory of Matter -Energy & Reactions -Atomic Structure

-Development of the Periodic Table -Families of Elements -Isotopes -Atomic Mass & Atomic Number -Compounds & Molecules -Chemical Reactions

-Follow a synthesis process from start to finish -Demonstrate at least one aspect of the synthesis process in front of class

-Electron Orbitals -Valence Electrons -Ionic & Covalent Bonding -Compound Names & Formulas -Polarity -Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry

-Learn to safely conduct lab investigations -Analyze & design experiments; identify variables, controls, and constants -Distinguish between theories, laws & hypotheses -Measure mass, volume & weight using proper tools

-Identify, compare, & contrast elements, compounds -Identify physical & chemical properties -Describe & contrast states of matter on a molecular scale

-Calculate density -Separate liquids based on density -Understand the conservation of mass & energy -Understand the principle of kinetic energy and its relationship to temperature -Construct a basic atomic model

-Calculate average atomic mass -Understand electron energy levels & electron transitions -Understand the periodic table -Identify periodic trends -Complete chemical reactions -Calculate molarity -Predict percent yield

-Understand a complex, multi-step process -Identify the pivotal step during synthesis -Translate a complex subject into a relatable and appropriate form for their audience

-Understand how to name molecules according to IUPAC standards -Construct a complete atomic model -Predict which electrons participate in chemical bonding -Understand radioactive half-lives

Soap Project Dehydration Project

Metal Casting Copper Oxidation Art

Fertilizer Focus and Food Chemistry

Subject Synthesis Project

Lake Anna Nuclear Plant Field Trip

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs


Peabody School 7th Grade Physics: Year at a Glance*

Scientific Knowledge

Essential Concepts

Skills

SPECIAL EVENTS ●

September

October – November (wk1)

November(wk2) December

January

February

March – April (wk1)

April (wk2) – May

Chapter 11: Laws of Motions

Chapter 12: Forces

Chapter 13: Work and Energy

Chapter 13: What is Energy? Chapter 15: Waves

Chapter 16: Sound & Light

Chapter 17: Electricity

Chapter 18: Magnetism

-Speed, Distance & Acceleration -Motion & Forces -Fundamental Forces -Balanced and Unbalanced Forces -Friction

-Gravity and Orbital Motion -Conservation of Momentum

-Work & Power -Machines -Mechanical Advantage -Efficiency -Conservation of Energy -Energy and Work -Potential and Kinetic Energy -Energy Sources -Renewable Energy

-Energy of Waves -Anatomy of a Wave: Longitudinal, Transverse, Amplitude, Wavelength -Wave Interactions: Reflection, Refraction, and Diffraction

-Properties of Sound -Applications of Sound: Sonar, Echolocation and Ultrasound -Music -Ears & Eyes -Light & Color -Mirrors & Optics -Electromagnetic Spectrum

-Electric Charge & Field -Cells & Batteries -Voltage, Current & Resistance -Circuits & Safety: Series, Parallel, Household Circuits -Magnetism & Electricity

-Electromagnetism -Magnets & Magnetic Fields -Electromagnetic Induction

-Describe the relationship of speed & velocity to acceleration -Perform calculations for speed, time, distance & acceleration -Understand the relationship between force, motion & direction -Understand the force of friction

--Explain the relationship between free-fall, projectile & orbital motion -Perform calculations with mass, velocity & momentum

-Describe an object/ situation in terms of work & power -Identify simple machines & explain their uses -Analyze machines, describing the specific role of each component in terms of work, force magnitude & force direction, mechanical advantage & efficiency

-Compare & contrast sound waves & light waves -Illustrate the relationship between the shape & behavior of a given wave -Predict the possible outcome of wave interactions

-Predict the behavior of light waves, given the shape of a lens -Identify & give examples of different electromagnetic waves -Compare & contrast light & filter color combinations -Relate the anatomy of human ears & eyes to the nature of sound & light waves

-Compare & contrast types of electricity -Relate the manner in which electricity is created to the type of electricity -Predict the flow of electricity, given a current diagram -Calculate voltage, resistance & current

- Describe some practical uses of electromagnets -Understand repulsion & attraction - Create electric guitars to understand the interplay between magnetic fields and induction on a functional level.

Popsicle Bridges

Heavy Lifting Project

Ceiling Decorations

Sound Waves Project

Circuit board Boobytraps

Electric Guitars

This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.


Peabody School 8th Grade Biology: Year at a Glance* September

September (wk3) – October (wk4)

November (wk1) – November (wk4)

December (wk1) – January(wk2)

January (wk3) - February

March (wk1) – April (wk2)

April (wk3) – May (wk1)

May (wk2) –June

Botany (5)

Ecology(5) Chapter 13-16: Principles of Ecology

Unit: Topic (# of weeks)

Scientists in Biology(3)

Cell Biology (6)

Genetics (4)

Biochemistry (5)

Anatomy & Physiology (6)

Complexity of Life on Earth (6)

Scientific Knowledge

Chapter 1: Biology in 21st Century Chapter 10: Darwin & Principles of Evolution

Chapter 3: Cell Structure & Function Chapter 4: Cells & Energy Chapter 5: Cell Growth & Division

Chapter 6: Mendelian Genetics Chapter 7:More Genetics Chapter 8:From DNA To Proteins

Chapter 2: Chemistry of Life Chapter 12: History of Life

Chapters 29-33: The Systems of the Body Chapter 34 The Reproductive System

Chapters 17: Tree of Life Chapter 18&19: Viruses, Prokaryotes, Protists and Fungi

Chapter 20: Origins of Plant Life Chapter 21: Plant Structure Chapter 22: Plant Growth and Reproduction

Essential Concepts

-The Study of Life -Themes of Biology -Homeostasis -Experimental Design & Scientific Method -Biologists’ Tools & Technology -Early Ideas about Evolution -Darwinian Evolution -Natural Selection & Other Mechanisms of Evolution

-The Cell Cycle -Mitosis & Cytokinesis -Regulation of the Cell Cycle -Cell Theory -Cell Organelles -Cell Membrane -Diffusion & Osmosis -Active Transport, Endocytosis & Exocytosis

- DNA as the Genetic Material -Structure of DNA -DNA Replication -Transcription &Translation -Gene Expression &Regulation -Mutations -Chromosomes & Meiosis -Mendel & Heredity -Traits, Genes & Alleles -Genotype & Phenotype -Traits & Probability -Meiosis & Genetic Variation

-Atoms, Ions & Molecules -Carbon-based Molecules & Nutrition -Chemical Reactions & Enzymes -Chemical Energy & ATP -Photosynthesis -Cellular Respiration -Fermentation -The Fossil Record -Geologic Time -Origin of Life

- The Reproductive System -The Integumentary System -Asexual Reproduction -Multicellular Life -The Skeletal System -The Digestive and Excretory Systems -The Endocrine & Immune Systems -The Respiratory & Circulatory Systems

- Classification from Single-Celled to Multicellular Life - Domains & Kingdoms - Populations and Speciation -Evolutionary Biology - Disease causing pathogens - Viral structure and replication - Symbiotic relationships

- Origins and classification of plants - Plant cells and tissues - Plant vasculature - Photosynthesis - Life cycles - Reproduction - Seed Dispersal and Germination

-Ecology’s Levels of Organization -Biotic & Abiotic Factors -Food Chains & Webs -Populations, Communities & Ecosystems Habitats & Niches -Diversity & Stability -Population Growth -Survivorship Curves

Skills

-Analyze & design experiments; identify variables, controls & constants -Understand homeostasis & feedback -Summarize the characteristics all living things share -Understand unifying themes of biology -Discuss Darwin’s observations & ideas of species variation -Summarize evidence for evolution -Describe types & rates of evolution & extinction

-Explain cell theory -Compare & contrast prokaryotes & eukaryotes -Identify & describe the structure & function of cell organelles -Compare & contrast passive transport, active transport, osmosis & diffusion -Relate the structures & functions of the endocrine & immune systems to exocytosis & endocytosis -Understand purpose, structure & function of the cell membrane -Role of diffusion & osmosis in respiration & circulation Differentiate between body cells & gametes -Compare & contrast the divisions in meiosis

-Understand the discovery of DNA as the genetic material -Describe interactions of the 4 nucleotides that make up DNA -Describe & identify DNA’s 3D structure -Summarize the process of DNA replication and the role of enzymes -Compare & contrast DNA and RNA -Identify RNA & their functions -Compare replication to transcription -Summarize the process of protein synthesis -Explain gene regulation, expression & mutations -Describe patterns of Mendelian inheritance

-Compare ionic & covalent bonding -Recognize the relationships between water & living things -Compare proteins, lipids, carbohydrates & nucleic acids -Understand chemical reactions in biology -Describe how enzymes regulate chemical reactions Recognize the importance of ATP as an energy-carrying molecule -Identify organisms’ energy sources -Describe the processes of photosynthesis, cellular respiration & fermentation

-Relate meiosis to the reproductive organs -Describe significance of genetic variation in populations -Explain how natural selection can change trait distribution -Understand gene flow, genetic drift & sexual selection

- Understand differences between species and classify based on phylogeny - Evolutionary biology - Carbon dating - Discern between life and virus - Describe the symbiotic and/or parasitic relationships of bacteria - Understand the

- Compare and contrast plant life cycles with animal life cycles - Understand the similarity between photosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation - Describe the carbon/oxygen dependence between plants and animals - Identify plant structures

-Differentiate between habitat & niche -Compare & contrast interspecific & intraspecific competition -Understand the importance of wetlands and the role of the Chesapeake Bay

Cellular Community Activity

UVA Research Lab Trip (tent.)

Dairy Farm Trip

Animal Dissections

Regional Science Fair: early March

Chesapeake Bay Trip

SPECIAL EVENTS


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Language Arts Grades 4-8


Peabody School 4th Grade Language Arts Year at a Glance1 Essential Ideas2

● ●

Creative Writing

Literature is based on universal themes/characters/situations that embody the human experience and help us make sense of our lives. Writers use senses, emotions, and images to evoke connections between the text and reader

● ●

First Trimester

Second Trimester

Third Trimester

Writer’s Eye

Thematic Story

Collaborative Writing Project

Students respond in writing to a specific piece of art. They follow the writing process and take their story through multiple drafts before publishing.

After examining themes in a variety of short stories and novels, students will write their own stories addressing a specific theme.

Literature Whole Class Reading- Short Stories Reading & Critical Thinking

Grammar

Word Study

Literature

Students will, working in small groups, create stories based upon character and plot prompts provided by the teacher. Students will need to communicate and collaborate effectively as they create stories of increasing complexity. Literature

Elements of Fiction- Setting, Character, Conflict/Resolution, Theme

Literature Circles- Two novels First guided, second independent. Shared Inquiry discussions continue. Discussions will be completely student lead by the end of this trimester.

Students will practice shared inquiry discussions, supporting their ideas with evidence, and building on the ideas of their peers.

Students will compare and contrast books both in between and within genres.

Students learn to develop and support informed points of view in discussions. Students learn to respectfully disagree with one and other

A Wrinkle in Time, When You Reach Me

Parts of Speech Nouns- plural, possessive, common, proper Verbs- helping, tense, irregular, agreement Pronouns- subject, object, possessive, etc... Adjectives, Adverbs, Prepositions, Conjunctions, Interjections

Sentences

Word Usage

Subject, Predicate, Clauses

Comparative/Superlative Adjectives Subject/Verb Agreement Transition Words Antecedents I vs. Me, Who vs. Whom, affect vs. effect, etc… Homophones and Homographs

Punctuation Capitalization, Abbreviations, Contractions, Comma Use, Quotations

Expository Writing

Writers create stories to document and make sense of thoughts, feelings, and understandings about themselves and the world around them. Different perspectives and opinions of an event are legitimate when justified by evidence.

Types- Simple, Compound, Complex Declarative, Interrogative, Exclamatory Sentence Variety, Combining Sentences, Run-on Sentences, Sentence Fragments

Independent Choice of books and projects. Students will evaluate a selection of books chosen and read independently. Students will synthesize new ideas based upon the books they read. Students will demonstrate understanding in a variety of both student selected and teacher directed projects.

Expository Writing is taught throughout the year. Students will practice creating specific thesis statements and supporting them with evidence from bi-weekly reading response essays. Multiple points of view are encouraged as long as they are supported with specific evidence from the texts. Students are empowered to develop their own informed opinions and encouraged to see the value in multiple and differing perspectives. Word Study alternates between leveled spelling groups based on individual student needs, and whole class vocabulary lessons based on Latin Stems from Caesar’s English Voil. I by Michael Clay Thompson. Students have weekly spelling quizzes and cumulative vocabulary quizzes every four lessons.

1

This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

2

Callahan, Misset, Azano, et al 2017


Peabody School Fifth Grade Language Arts Year at a Glance Essential ● How is language crafted so that it is meaningful and effective? Question First Trimester Second Trimester

Reading

Writing

Skills/ topics/terms (ongoing-all trimesters)

Word Study Grammar Special events

Third Trimester

Emphasis will be given to the understanding, appreciation and enjoyment of varied genres of reading. Featured texts will be used to teach writer’s craft and critical thinking skills. Wonder Student choice research project-ILP Student choice research, cont. Non-fiction, student choice Immigration/refugee reading choice Phantom Tollbooth Tuck Everlasting book groups Poetry continued Intro. to Poetry Choice literature groups Students will use the writing process to focus on ideas, organization, word choice, sentence fluency, audience awareness and mechanics. They will apply these skills in multi-genre writing assignments. Personal narrative Poetry Critical analysis responses Critical analysis responses Letters About Literature contest Expository essay Journal writing choices Family story (Social Studies) Creative narrative Poetry Expository essay

Literary Elements Imagery Puns, motifs, Figurative language Nonfiction close reading Reader’s Theater Evidence, examples, explanations Research skills Close reading Multi-genre writing to tell stories Summarizing Oral speaking skills Socratic Seminar discussions Word study includes: the etymology of words, the use of dictionaries/thesauri, homonyms, base words, Greek and Latin roots and analogies. Emphasis is on the wonder and love of words, and how they enhance writing. Grammar will include parts of speech, punctuation and usage. The primary focus will be on crafting clear and coherent sentences. Students will be guided by modeling of authors in Paragraphs for Middle School, A Sentence Composing Approach (Donald Killgallon) Walker School ESOL pen-pal Poetry “Coffee House” Bash Jambalaya story contest students visit 10-8


Peabody School Middle School English 6: Year at a Glance

COURSE THEME: RELATIONSHIPS AND COMMUNITY ● ● ● ● ● ●

Quarter One and Quarter Two

What is community, and to what extent are our values and beliefs formed by our relationship with a community? What are the individual’s responsibilities to the community as well as the community’s responsibility to the individual? How are people transformed by their relationships with others in a community? Why and how would someone challenge the social order? What happens to an individual when a community experiences a crisis, or when an individual leaves a community? What are some of the narrative strategies that authors use to depict the growth of individuals and the relationship between individuals and communities in crisis?

Quarter Three and Quarter Four

Anchor text/s The Giver (summer reading)

Fever 1793

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Brown Girl Dreaming

American Born Chinese

Bomb

Genre

speculative fiction

historical fiction

drama/comedy

memoir/poetry

graphic novel

creative non-fiction

Other texts

Text set: poetry, article, autobiography, TED talk

Text set: letter, diary, article, visual art, medical report, philosophy

Text set: poetry, Greek myth, short story, literary analysis

Text set: poetry, essay, short story, pop songs, videos

Text set: article, graphic novel, interview, mythology, poetry

Text set: poems, letter, graphic novel, scientific research, fiction

epidemics, science and literature, characterization, narration, irony

Shakespearean drama, close reading, metaphor, iambic pentameter

Civil Rights era, African-American culture

Immigrant stories, stereotypes, visual culture

ethical dilemmas, multiple plotlines, popular science writing

reading journal analytical paragraph R.A.F.T. assignment

metaphor analysis iambic pentameter lines R.A.F.T. assignment

Annotations Poetry project

analytical essay, research report, presentation

poetry

Key topics/terms memory, utopia/dystopia, thematic analysis, hero journey Writing and speaking anchor tasks (not inclusive)

personal narrative analytical paragraphs

Special events, speakers, trips

research assignment

Spelling Bee Mid-terms in other classes

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.


Peabody School Middle School English 7: Year at a Glance*

COURSE THEME: POWER & ITS CONSEQUENCES ● ● ● ● ●

What is power, and how is it gained, justified, used, and abused? How do those not in power respond to or resist abuses of power? How can a person’s decisions and actions, especially in response to moments of crisis or the realities of oppression, reveal their values and beliefs? What role does language play in the way authors depict social structures, power, and the decisions and consequences that follow? How do decisions, actions, and consequences vary depending on the different perspectives of the people involved?

Quarter One and Quarter Two Anchor text/s

Animal Farm (summer reading) *Prometheus Hall of Fame Award

Genre

political satire/allegory/fable

Witness

Quarter Three and Quarter Four Julius Caesar

*Newberry Award-winning author

free verse poetry/historical fiction

drama/play

Saga of the Sioux: An Adaptation from Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

non-fiction/History

Farewell to Manzanar *Top 100 Nonfiction *All-time Bestselling Children’s Books memoir

Other texts

Text set: fables and parables, poetry, history, article, nonfiction excerpt

Text set: poetry, book excerpt, article, speech, songs

Text set: poetry, speech, interview, article, essay

Text set: short story, poetry, letter, article, speech, essay

Text set: newspaper articles, executive order, poetry, maps, study (excerpt), diary entries, interviews, speech, memorial

Key topics/terms

allegory, satire, fable, tyranny

point-of-view, voice, figurative language, America in the 1920s

Shakespearean drama, close reading, syntax, metaphor

narrative techniques, point of view, ethical decision-making

journalism, identity, family history

Writing and speaking anchor tasks (not inclusive)

fable writing

analytical paragraph

R.A.F.T. assignment narrative analysis

analytical paragraph

formal essay: character analysis

poetry project

formal essay: rhetorical analysis of speech

poem

argument/op-ed essay

recitation

Problem-based learning unit?

Applying Orwell writing assignment

Special events, speakers, trips

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.


Peabody School Middle School English 8 Year at a Glance

COURSE THEME: ADVERSITY, CONFLICT & CHANGE ● ● ● ● ●

Quarter One

How does conflict lead to change? How might it feel to live through a conflict that disrupts your way of life? How does an individual’s point of view affect the way they deal with conflict? What is the power of story in the face of difficult circumstances? How are the themes of adversity, conflict and change depicted in various genres of writing, both in literature and in the real world?

Quarter Two and Quarter Three

Quarter Four

Anchor text/s Life of Pi (summer reading)

Night

Persepolis

Fahrenheit 451

Shakespeare play (TBD each year)

Genre

fiction (fantastical realism)

memoir

graphic memoir

dystopian fiction

drama/play

Other texts

Text set: short story, poetry, article, letter, parable, literary analysis

Text set: graphic novel, speeches, poetry, letter, articles, essays

Text set: graphic novel, news articles, video

Text set: essay, articles, poetry, court case

Text set: poetry, essay, articles, interview, literary criticism, movie clips

Text set: student choice aligned with course theme

Key topics/terms

close reading, storytelling, allusions, intertextuality in literature

characterization, analysis of motifs, Holocaust literature

visual grammar, Iranian revolution, rebellion

utopia/dystopia, propaganda, free expression, importance of books, allusions

Shakespeare’s world, iambic pentameter, sonnet form

research techniques, genre mini-lessons

Writing and speaking anchor tasks (not inclusive)

dialectical journals (summer assignment)

Night triptych: multigenre project

research presentation

series of journal entries

Sonnet

analytical paragraphs and textual analysis

close analysis of visual grammar

short analyses of allusions in the book

Thematic analysis paper

in-class journal/notebook reflections

Compare/contrast assignment

A Book That Matters personal essay

formal essay: thematic analysis

student choice- aligned with course theme all

Multigenre Research Capstone Project and Public Presentation

My Name personal essay

Special events, speakers, trips

Paramount trip

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Spelling Bee

8TH GRADE MULTIGENRE MADNESS


Mathematics Grades 4-8


Peabody School 4th Grade Math Year at a Glance* Essential Questions ●

How can we use mathematics to better understand and improve our world?

What do effective problem solvers do when they get stuck?

When should you use pencil versus mental computation?

How do mathematical operations relate to one another?

Why is it useful to represent a part of a whole?

How are area, perimeter, and volume related and what do they help us to understand about an object?

First Trimester August-November Units

Second Trimester November to March

1. Whole Numbers & Operations 2. Fractions & Parts of a Whole 3. Decimal Concepts

Third Trimester March to May

4. Data, Graphs & Probability 5. Patterns & Algebraic Reasoning 6. Tools of Geometry

7. Foundations in Measurement 8. Three-Dimensional Geometry

Topics Operation Fluency: Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying, and Dividing Place Value & Number System

Fraction Operations: Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying and Dividing (Using Algorithm and Models) Greatest Common Factor & Least Common Multiple

Rounding & Estimation Equivalent Fractions

Comparing and Ordering Fractions & Decimals Relating Decimals and Fractions Decimal Operations: Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying and Dividing

Measures of Central Tendency

Variables and Expressions

Points, Lines, Segments, and Rays

Metric Units of Length, Mass, and Capacity

Frequency Tables

Solving Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division Equations

Angles

Converting Units in the Metric System

Types of 3-D Objects Volume of Prisms and Pyramids

Types of Graphs Analyzing Graphs

Number Properties Misleading Graphs and Statistics

Mixed Numbers & Improper Fractions

Surface Area of Prisms

Special Pairs of Angles Exploring and Classifying Triangles and Polygons

Translating Basic Equations

Perimeters and Areas of Rectangles Areas of Parallelograms and Triangles

Order of Operations

Key Vocabulary Sum Difference Factors Product Divisor Dividend Remainder Evaluate

Greatest Common Factor Least Common Multiple Numerator Denominator Equivalent Fractions Ratio Unlike Denominators

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Place Value Base Ten Model Tenths, Hundredths, Thousandths Round Estimate Conversion

Interpret Data Mean Median Mode Range Frequency Trend Conclusion

Pattern Variable Expression Associative Commutative Identity Distibutive Property

Angles Protractor Degree Angle Pairs Equilateral Isosceles Scalene Obtuse Acute Symmetrical

Metric System Customary System Conversion Perimeter Area Circle Radius Quadrilateral Terminology Polygon Terminology

Conversion Volume Polyhedron Prism Pyramid Net Cones Cylinders Spheres Pyramids


Peabody School 5th Grade Math Year at a Glance*

Essential Questions

How can we use mathematics to better understand and improve our world?

What do effective problem solvers do when they get stuck?

When should you use pencil versus mental computation?

How do we use data to influence others?

When are particular rational number forms most useful?

What real world situations do proportional relationships lend themselves to representing?

First Trimester August-November Units

Second Trimester November to March

1. Integers, Exponents & the Number System 2. Rational Number & Operations 3. Rational and Irrational Numbers

Third Trimester March to May

4. Percents 5. Ratios & Proportionality 6. Probability & Statistics

7. Two-Dimensional Geometry 8. Three-Dimensional Geometry 9. Algebraic Equations

Topics Order of Operations

Prime Factorization

Estimating Square Roots

Coordinate Plane

Equivalent Representations

Classifying Numbers

Negative Numbers Adding and Subtracting Integers Rules for Multiplying and Dividing Integers Visual Representations of Integer Operations

Fractions and Decimals Operations & Concepts

Identifying Irrational Numbers

Mixed Numbers & Improper Fractions

Percents, Fractions, and Decimals

Ratios and Unit Rates

Measures of Central Tendancy

Solving Proportions Comparing and Ordering with Fractions, Decimals and Percents

Metric Units of Length, Mass, and Capacity

Types of Graphs Scale Drawings Misleading Graphs and Statistics

Estimating With Percent

Independent and Dependent Variables

Converting Units in the Metric System Perimeters and Areas of Rectangles Areas of Parallelograms, Triangles & Circles

Problem Solving with Fractions and Decimals Scientific Notation

Angle Sum Theorem Three-Dimensional Reasoning Volume and Surface Area Congruent and Similar Figures

Variables Evaluating Expressions Solving one and two-step equations Using equations to solve word problems

Area and Circumference of Circles

Exponents

Key Vocabulary Number Line Opposite Zero Pair Absolute Value Magnitude Coordinate Plane Origin Coordinate Integer Debt Base Exponent Power

Factor Greatest Common Factor Least Common Multiple Equivalent Fractions Reciprocal Associative Commutative Distributive Multiple

Rational Irrational Imaginary Terminating Radical Radicand Square Root Cube Root

Percent Proportion Percent Bar Tip (Gratuity) Tax Discount

Rational Ratio Unit Rate Proportion(al) Nonproportional Scale Factor Cross Product

MMMR Trend Data Sample Outcome Odds Extrapolate Independent Variable Dependent Variable Experimental vs. Theoretical Probability

Metric System Customary System Quadrilaterals Radius Diameter Circumference Arc

Complementary Supplementary Straight Angles Polyhedrons Faces, Edges, and Vertices Volume Surface Area

Variable Balance Equation Expression Coefficient Constant Like Terms


Peabody School Grade Six Pre-Algebra: Year at a Glance* Essential Questions

Why is mathematical fluency essential to being an engaged citizen?

What do effective problem solvers do when they get stuck?

Why are different forms of rational numbers used in different situations?

How do mathematical operations relate to one another?

How do people use data to influence others?

How do we use principles of geometry for design or to create the illusion of movement?

First Quarter August-October Units

Second Quarter November to January

1. Operations with integers 2. Rational Number Operations 3. Proportionality, Percent and Variation

4. Transformations and Angle Relationship 5. Similarity and Scale Drawings

Third Quarter January to March 7. Pythagorean Theorem 8. 2D and 3D Geometry

Fourth Quarter April to May 7. Data Analysis and Probability 8. Equations and Inequalities

Topics Coordinate Plane Operation Fluency: Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying, and Dividing

Operation Fluency: Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying, and Dividing Decimals and Fractions

Ratios & Rates

Transformations

Identifying Similar Figures

Pythagorean Theorem

Slope

Parallel Lines cut by Transversals

Missing Sides in Similar Figures

Converse of the Pythagorean Theorem

Angle Relationships

Scale Drawings and Blueprints

Finding Distance between Coordinate Points

Proportionality

Area and Perimeter of Triangles and Quadrilaterals Circle Geometry

Direct and Inverse Variation Percents

Volume and Surface Area of Prisms, Pyramids, Cones, Cylinders and Spheres

Misleading Graphs and Statistics

Variables Evaluating Expressions

Independent and Dependent Variables

Solving one and two-step equations

Correlation Measures of Variation and Spread

Using equations to solve word problems

Independent and Dependent Probability

Key Vocabulary Number Line Opposite Zero Pair Absolute Value Coordinate Plane Origin Coordinate

GCF & LCM Numerator Denominator Equivalence Conversion

Rational Ratio Unit Rate Proportion(al) Percent Proportion Percent Bar Cross Product Tip (Gratuity) Tax Discount

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Translations Reflections Rotations Diliations Alt. Interior Alt. Exterior Corresponding Supplementary Complementary Vertical

Similarity Corresponding Indirect Measurement Scale Factor Scale Model

Legs Hypotenuse Square Root Irrational

Composite Solid Lateral Surface Area Volume Polyhedron Prism Pyramid Cones Cylinders Spheres Pyramids

MMMR Trend Data Sample Outcome Odds Extrapolate Independent vs. Dependent Variables

Variable Balance Equation Expression Coefficient Constant Like Terms Input Output Inequality Solution Function


Peabody School Algebra I Year at a Glance* September Intro to algebra:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Opposites and absolute value Solving basic absolute value equations Properties of real numbers Translating words into algebraic expressions Evaluating algebraic expressions

October Polynomials:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Solving linear equations:

Concepts and Skills

➢ ➢

Solving one and two step equations Solving equations with variables on both sides Using equations to solve word problems

Exponents Adding and subtracting polynomials Multiplying monomials Raising monomials to a power Multiplying polynomials Transforming formulas Solving word problems involving area

November factoring continued:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Rational expressions and equations:

Factoring polynomials:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Dividing monomials GCF and DOTS Squaring binomials Factoring perfect squares

Factoring quadratics Factoring quadratics by grouping Solving quadratic equations Solving quadratic word problems

Simplifying, multiplying and dividing rational expressions Adding and subtracting rational expressions Simplifying mixed expressions

December Applying fractions:

➢ ➢

Ratios and proportions Solving equations with fractional coefficients Solving fractional equations with variables in the denominator Negative and zero exponents

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

January Review for Midterm Exam Linear functions:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Plotting points in the x-y plane Slope of a line Slope-intercept form of a line Parallel and perpendicular lines Finding the equation of a line Relations and functions Domain and range of relations and functions

Quadratic functions:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Graphing quadratics Axis of symmetry Vertex Zeroes

February Solving systems of equations:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Graphically Substitution Elimination Word problems Quadratic/ linear

Inequalities:

Solving and graphing on a number line Solving and graphing compound inequalities Systems of inequalities in the coordinate plane

March inequalities cont.:

Solving absolute value equalities and inequalities

April irrational numbers cont.:

➢ ➢

Irrational numbers:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Simplifying radicals Simplifying radicals with variables Pythagorean theorem Adding and subtracting radicals Multiplying and dividing radicals Multiplying binomials with radicals Rationalizing binomial denominators Solving radical equations

May/June ERB’s Statistics:

Quadratic formula Word problems using the quadratic formula

➢ ➢ ➢

Probability:

➢ ➢ ➢ ➢

Venn diagrams Theoretical probability Probability of (A and B) and (A or B) Probability with two or more outcomes Permutations

➢ ➢

Measures or central tendency Interpreting frequency tables Box and whisker and stem and leaf plots Frequency histograms Cumulative frequency histograms

Review for Final Exam


Peabody School Geometry Grade 7 and 8 Year at a Glance* September

October

November

December

Introduction to Euclidean Geometry ● Undefined terms, definitions, postulates, and theorems

Parallel lines and triangle properties ● Properties of parallel lines ● Alternate interior, alternate exterior, and corresponding angles ● Properties of a triangle ● Isosceles triangle theorem ● Exterior angle theorem ● Triangle inequality theorem ● Inequalities involving sides and angles ● Interior and exterior angles of polygons

Quadrilaterals ● Parallelograms ● Rectangles ● Rhombuses ● Squares ● Trapezoids ● Areas of quadrilaterals and polygons in the coordinate plane ● Coordinate geometry proofs

Surface area, lateral area, and volume in three dimensions ● Rectangular prisms ● Pyramids ● Cylinders ● Cones ● Spheres

Formal triangle congruency proofs ● SAS ● ASA ● SSS ● AAS ● HL ● CPCTC

Concepts and Skills

Transformational Geometry ● Line and point symmetry ● Line reflections ● Point reflections ● Translations ● Rotations ● Dilations ● Composition of transformations

Ratio, proportion, and similarity ● Review of radicals ● Proportions involving line segments ● Proportions in similar triangles ● Proportions in right triangles ● Special right triangles

January Review for Midterm Exam Right triangle trigonometry ● Using sine, cosine, and tangent to find missing sides given a side and an angle ● Using sine, cosine, and tangent to find missing angles given two sides ● Applications of right triangle trigonometry

Geometry of the circle ● Arc length ● Central angles ● Inscribed angles ● Chords, secants, and tangents ● Angles formed by chords, secants, and tangents ● Measures of chords, secants, and tangents ● “Big” circle problems ● Circles in the coordinate plane

March Locus ● ●

Mid-term Exam

The 5 fundamental loci Compound locus

Basic constructions ● Copy line segment ● Copy angle ● Bisect segment and angle ● Perpendicular through a given point ● Equilateral triangle Logic ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Slope and equations of lines ● Slope formula ● Writing equations of lines ● Midpoint formula ● Distance formula ● Parallel and perpendicular lines

Special Events

February

April Logic continued ● Law of Detachment ● Law of Disjunctive Inference ● Law of Modus Tollens ● De Morgan’s Law ● Chain rule ● Logic proofs

May/June String art project Tessellation project Review for Final Exam

Probability ● Permutations ● Combinations

Negations Conjuctions Disjunctions Conditionals Inverses, converses, and contrpositives Biconcitionals Truth tables

Final Exam


Peabody School (Algebra II) Year at a Glance August/Septemb er Algebra I Review ➢ Systems of equations (linear and quadratic-linear) ➢ Absolute value equations and inequalities ➢ Solving quadratic equations ➢ Quadratic inequalities

Concepts and Skills

The rational numbers ➢ Operations involving rational expressions ➢ Solving rational expressions ➢ Complex fractions Real numbers and radicals ➢ Multiplying and dividing radicals ➢ Rationalizing binomial denominators ➢ Solving radical equations

October

November

December

Relations and functions cont: ➢ Transformations of quadratic functions ➢ Composition of functions ➢ Inverses

Sequences ➢ Sigma notation ➢ Arithmetic sequences ➢ Geometric sequences ➢ Infinite geometric sequences

Logarithmic functions ➢ Inverse of an exponential function and logarithmic form of an exponential function ➢ Logarithmic relationships ➢ Common and natural logarithms ➢ Solving exponential functions using logs ➢ Logarithmic equations

Quadratic functions and complex numbers ➢ Solving quadratics by completing the square ➢ Quadratic formula ➢ The discriminant and the nature of the roots ➢ Imaginary and complex numbers ➢ Operations with complex numbers ➢ Complex roots of quadratic equations ➢ Sum and product of the roots ➢ Solving cubic and quartic equations

Exponential functions ➢ Laws of exponents ➢ Exponential functions and their graphs ➢ Solving equations involving exponents ➢ Solving exponential equations ➢ Applications of exponential functions

January Review for midterm Trigonometric functions

➢ Review right triangle trigonometry ➢ Unit circle ➢ Special angles ➢ Reference angles ➢ Reciprocal trig functions ➢ Radian measure ➢ Pythagorean identities ➢ Simplifying trigonometric expressions

February

March

April

May/June

Trigonometric identities ➢ Basic identities ➢ Proving trig identities ➢ Sums and differences of angles ➢ Double angles ➢ Half angles

Trigonometric applications ➢ Law of cosines ➢ Law of sines ➢ Area of a triangle ➢ Solving triangle problems

Statistics ➢ Measures of central tendency ➢ Measures of central tendency for grouped data ➢ Measures of dispersion ➢ Variance and standard deviation ➢ Normal distribution ➢ Regression

Probability and the binomial theorem ➢ Counting principal ➢ Permutations and combinations ➢ Probability ➢ Probability with two outcomes ➢ Binomial probability and the normal curve ➢ The binomial theorem

Trigonometric equations ➢ 1st degree trigonometric equations ➢ 2nd degree trigonometric equations ➢ Using substitution to solve trigonometric equations ➢ Double angle trigonometric equations

Graphs of trigonometric functions ➢ Graphs of the sine and cosine function ➢ Amplitude, frequency, and period ➢ Sketching sine and cosine graphs ➢ Finding the equations of a sine or cosine graph ➢ Graphs of the tangent functions

Review for final exam

Relations and functions ➢ Vertical and horizontal line test ➢ Domain and range ➢ Function notations

Special Events * This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Midterm

Final Exam


Special Subjects


Peabody School French Grades K-3 Year at a Glance August/ September

K* 1st *

2nd* 3rd*

(This plan is subject to change based on students’ needs.)

October

November

-Greetings -Colors -Animals names -Simple commands

-Numbers (0-?) -Days of the week -Basic feelings

-Body parts -Food vocabulary -Likes and dislikes

-Clothing vocabulary -Weather words

-SEMESTRIAL REVIEW

-Review: Greetings Polite words Colors Numbers -Pronunciation -Alphabet -Introduce yourself and tell your age (3)

- Review: Clothing vocabulary Simple commands Animal names -How to talk about your family(3) -Time

-Classroom vocabulary -Food vocabulary -Weather words -How to express activities you do

-How to express likes and dislikes about activities (3) and food -Verb: to like and –er verbs

- SEMESTRIAL REVIEW

Special Events and Culture *These levels learn languages on alternating semesters.

December

January

February

March

May/ June

April

-Noun genders(2) -Adjective agreements (3) -Subject pronouns

Discovering other francophone countries and cultures (3)

French Breakfast or “goûter” (K, 1st)

King’s Cake celebration (2,3)

French April Fool’s Day celebration/ Mother’s day cards (2, 3)

French Breakfast or “goûter” (1) )


Peabody School French Grade 4 Year at a Glance

(This plan is subject to change based on students’ needs.)

August/ September

4th

Final tasks

Special Events and Culture

Through the year

November

December

January

February

March

- Identify animals and people - Numbers (0-

- describe one’s actions - express tastes - understand/ command - action verbs - negation - sound

- introducing one’s family - Numbers (0-

- buy -ask politely - thank - partitive articles - food - politeness - How much? - sound [V][ɛ̃] -Verb: to go, to buy, to pay

- describe a person - body parts - prepositions (place) - adjectives agreement - Nasal sound [ɔ̃] - where?

-birthday - month - ordering food in a restaurant reading a recipe

-intonation (?) - Who? How? -it is -Verbs: to be and to have

-Identify / describe objects - characterize a person (adjectives) - there is - school supplies -colors - sound [R] - what? where? - I, you, she, he -a/the

I can fill in an information sheet about myself I can create & play mini skits

I can make a game & play in French immersion I can make a comic strip

I can make a fortune teller with French questions and commands I can make & play a card game in French Discover a French region

I can buy something at the grocery shop (skit and game)

I can follow a drawing dictation

I can write an alphabet book

Follow a French recipe « les crêpes”

Games about the environment

- Greetings Introduce oneself - Numbers (0-20) - likes & dislikes(hobbie, food &animals) - nasal sound [ã]

Discover different regions of France

October

Discover other francophone countries & cultures School in France

Making games

40)

-tell one’s age - Give one’s opinion - sound [Y] - intonation (!) - who, what Verbs: to be, to have, to love

[ʃ],Vowels

- intonation

50)

- who? Why? - Clothes - family - days - emotions Sound [z]

(imperative, surprise, exasperation)

- do you?what? - -er verbs I can write a letter to speak about myself I can understand a letter from a French-speaking

person Discover a French oversea department (mystery game, discovery activities, culinary specialty)

Weekly ½ hour of total linguistic immersion: games, skits …

I can read and understand a magazine page I can introduce my family I can understand a story in French Discovering the regions of France through the tradition of French Kings cakes & the French National Parks

Discovering France and other francophone countries and cultures

I can read and write a poem

Immersion and games with the visiting French students

April

I can follow a French recipe at home

Games about food Tasting French culinary specialties

May/ June ANNUAL REVIEWactivities reusing vocabulary and grammar structures seen during the year

I can write a card and sing a song to someone special I can understand a tale in French Discover a tale Visio-conferen ce with our French pen pals

Exchanges with Victor Hugo School in Belfort (Primary school with an International Section)

In the fourth grade class, the children learn French with Vitamine1, This communicative method continues to expand vocabulary and add conjugation to the parts of speech. Students further discover the French language and culture through diverse fun activities involving the five main competences, and focusing first on the oral aspect to lead to semi-guided writing activities. A weekly ½ hour of complete immersion class is added to develop communication skills in a playful way. In addition, students get exposed to the French speaking world culture through special events, projects and authentic communication situations. (culinary activities, Peace Corps Project, French pen pals …)


Peabody School French Grade 5 Year at a Glance

(This plan is subject to change based on students’ needs.)

August/ September -Review: Greetings/Introduc e oneself

th

5

Final tasks Special Events and Culture

Spelling numbers Alphabet - French accents - Likes & dislikes - intonation (?/statement) - Why? How? -Verbs: to be, to have, to do, to play, to like, to go,to be called, to love - I,you,she,he,you

I can introduce myself/someone & speak about my preferences I can say 2 truths an a lie about myself in French French regions The French speaking world

October

November

December

-Numbers (0- 60) - identify things/persons - command - school supplies & belongings - spelling - It is/ Negation - the -Tonic personal

-Numbers (0-100) - my, your etc - the imperative - tell one’s age - express an opinion -months - tell one’s age - introducing one’s family - I have/don’t have - plural - use of be/have in French and English - birthday - Sounds:[z] [ɑ̃], Mute e, liaison - Intonation ( !) - -er verbs REVIEW Evaluation #1 I can speak and write a short email about myself & my family I can play a character Discover French regions, their landscapes and specialties

- Express one’s tastes and opinion about food - Identify food - Food & meals in France

pronouns: Moi, toi

-nasal sounds [ɔ̃],[ɛ̃] and [v], th - How? What? who? - to have, to be to spell, to give

I can write a message to my pen pals I can engage and hold a small conversation Discover Alexandre Dumas’

Les trois Mousquetaires

-er verbs and want - Partitive articles - Nasal sounds

January

February

March

April

-How to tell the time, speak about one’s schedule -Speak about one’s activities - express opinions - asking and telling the time - Action verbs -er verbs + faire -Irregular adjectives - Sport in France

- How to give directions/ say where one lives -Transportation, city - make a polite request Sound [L] & [R] - intonation question/statem ent - Where?

- Tell the time - command - reflective verbs - school subjects - giving one’s opinion - the French school system - why/because - sounds [r],[l] [ɛ] -which? what?

How to describe a person describe clothes and styles - Possessive adjectives - comparative words - adjectives -should - types of questions

- irregular verbs: go, take, want

- Run, go, leave, sleep

-Play preparation Writing and acting

REVIEW Evaluation #2

Tour de France du fromage: I can present a cheese and its region I can hold a short conversation about sports and pastimes

Make games Tour de France du fromage Discovering the regions of France with a cheese tasting and the French Kings cakes

- can, know, be able to

Discover Belfort and Paris Describe my town to my French pen pals (video, written description) Discover Paris & Belfort Follow a French recipe

I can write poetic lines about time I can write an email about my life Writing project: What’s in a second, a minute…

I can describe myself and others I can write a play about the three Musketeers and act in it Meeting the Vauban students visiting Discover French comic strips

May/ June - Describing my house/ my bedroom - possession - prepositions of place

- sounds [o] [ɔ] - To do, can - finish reading The 3 Musketeers

ANNUAL REVIEW Evaluation #3 - I can descried my house and room (video) - Skype with our French pen pals (Puppet ) Theater performance

Through Alexandre Dumas: Discovering French regions and other Weekly ½ hour of total linguistic Exchanges with Victor Hugo School in Belfort francophone countries and cultures immersion: Games, skits … (Primary school with an International Section) the year Les Trois Mousquetaires -In the fifth grade class, the students learn French with Amis et Compagnie. This textbook follows a group of adolescents Théo, Agathe, Léa and Max, and prepares students for their transition to middle school. At this level, the students develop higher conversational skills in the language and a deeper knowledge of the French grammar. This active learning method gets them fully involved in their learning process through the completion of various tasks. The diversity of activities leads them to practice all five linguistic competences. With still a strong emphasis on the oral skills, the students are developing their writing and reading skills a step further. They are also introduced to French literature with Les Trois Mousquetaires by Alexandre Dumas adapted as a graphic novel in the textbook. A weekly ½ hour of complete immersion helps to further develop communication skills in a spontaneous, genuine and playful way. In addition, students get exposed to the French speaking world culture through special events, projects and authentic communication situations (culinary activities, Peace Corps Project, French pen pals …).


Peabody School French Grades 6-8 Year at a Glance* August/ September -Reviews: Pronunciation Alphabet Accents Numbers Greetings School vocabulary

Grade 6

October -How to express likes and dislikes about hobbies -Present tense of -er verbs -City of Paris

-Conjugation of the verb: to have -Definite articles -Subject pronouns

November

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

December

-How to describe people -Family vocabulary

How to talk about school subjects -Days of the week -How to tell time

-Conjugation of the verb To Be -Adjectives agreements -Possessive adjectives

-Conjugation of -re verbs

January Reviews for Mid Term Exam

-French school system

Grade 7

Grade 8

-Clothing vocabulary

-Reviews of concepts how to describe and talk about your family adjectives and their agreements Present and passé composé of common verbs direct and indirect pronouns

-How to grocery shop in France -Review of food vocabulary

-How to express the daily routine

-How to describe your childhood

--Reflexive verbs

-New pronouns to replace place and quantities

-City of Rennes

-Imperfect tense -Comparative and superlative words

-Conjugation of common verbs: can, be able to, must -Passé composé with the verb To Be

-How to talk about the city, ask and give direction

Reviews for Mid Term Exam

May/June

-Prepare for Final Exam

ANNUAL REVIEWS

FINAL EXAM

-How to talk about outdoor activities and nature

-How to talk about health -Body parts

ANNUAL REVIEWS SPECIAL PROJECTS?

-Combine Passé composé and imperfect tenses

- Introduction to Future tense, and conditional and subjunctive moods.

-City of Dakar -Novel: “Le Petit Nicolas”

-City of Nice

Middle School “Dejeuner Breton”

French National Writing Contest

-How to ask for and give information -How to prepare for vacationing -Idioms with the verb to do.

-Region of the South of France

-French institutions and acronyms -Novel:” Le petit Prince” Reviews for Mid Term Exam

April

FINAL EXAM

-Conjugation of the verb: to know -Imperative mode (commands)

-Senegal

March

ANNUAL REVIEWS

-West region of France -Litt: BD (French comics)

-Review of concepts: Greetings School subjects Likes and dislikes activities and Food Family Time and weather Common verbs in present tense Adjective agreements and possessive adj.

-Conjugation of the verb: to wear -Past tense: passé composé with the verb: to have

-How to express interest -Season and weather vocabulary -How to express the near future and the recent past with the verbs: to go and to come -Conjugation of the common verb: to do

-Region of Quebec

-Describe a house -Talk about chores

February

-Food vocabulary -How to order in a restaurant -Conjugation of the verb: to take - Partitive articles -Restaurants versus Cafe in France/ French table manners -Prepare for Final Term

FINAL EXAM

-City of Quebec

Special Events and Cultural Experiences

ALL GRADES begin exchange linguistic program with Vauban school, in France

Middle School “Dejeuner francais” Grade 7 begins French video project

Middle School “Dejeuner Senegalais”

Middle School “Dejeuner Quebecois” MID TERM EXAM

Middle school “Dejeuner Provencal” Vauban students visit

Grade 8 to Petit Pois Grade 7 “Chasse aux tresors” FINAL EXAM (Grade 8 Mobility project to France?)


Peabody School SPANISH grades K-5 Year at a Glance September

October

November

December

Hola/Adiós “Me llamo…” The body parts Colors and Shapes #s 0-25

Kindergarten

First Grade

Review all K Color combos More shapes More greetings The farm animals

Review all K Basic actions Sports charades Farm animals project

Review all K The weather Food Farm animals project

“Quiero presentar a ___” (Introducing friends) Phases of the moon

Review all K-2 Days, Months, Seasons Writing #s 0-31

Stating the date, birthdays Age + older, younger Writing #s 0-50

Ordinal #s The Alphabet: Playing Hangman The nuclear family, The home

Noun-gender, agreement Presentations of “imaginary family and home”

Fourth Grade

Review all K-3 Writing #s 0-100 Simple math in Spanish

Writing #s 0-500 The verb Ser Telling time (up to ½ hr)

Telling time (complex: all times plus AM, PM) Writing #s 0-1000

Writing #s 0-quintillions More advanced mathematics

Fifth Grade

Review all K-4 Geography: Locations of Spanish-speaking countries

Articles and noun agreement Geography: Adj. of nationality Places to visit

Geography: Important places in the Hispanic world, Capitals of Spanishspeaking countries

Round-robin counting In-school “field trips” following commands

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

February

March

April

May/June

Objects in the classroom Simple actions Clothing #s 25-50

“Tengo # años” (=age) Days of week Children’s songs #s 50-75

“Estoy feliz, así así o triste” (=emotions) The alphabet (various songs) #s 75-100

Review and Fiesta!!

Labeling shapes and colors Counting and sorting

Interrogatives Politeness The Alphabet Spanish songs More animals

Weather Seasons Pastimes School Classroom items

Review and Fiesta!!

Animals of the world Disney’s “Planet Earth”

Animals of the ocean Disney’s “Oceans”

Animal habitats Classifying animals

Review and Fiesta!!

Basic actions Reading short descriptions of the school day

Sports, Pastimes Regular present tense Regular verbs

Academic subjects Describing the school day (writing paragraphs)

Review and Fiesta!!

Review and Fiesta!!

Review all K-1 Hispanic names Likes and Dislikes Role-playing introductions

Second Grade

Third Grade

January

Review and Fiesta!!

Review

Being “bossy” activity Subject pronouns “Tirar” and “atrapar” activity


Peabody School Spanish Grades 6-8 Year at a Glance September

October

November

December

January

February

March

April

May/June

FOCUS in grammar: mastery of PRESENT TENSE and all irregulars; in vocabulary and culture: all about people, family and society, Hispanic celebrations

Sixth Grade

Review all K-5

Body, face, hands and hair Organs, senses Present Tense: Regular verbs Gustar-like verbs

Hisp. celebrations Occupations, Descriptive adj.s Present tense: “oy verbs” Ser vs. Estar

Present tense: “go,” “jo,” “zco” and “zo” verbs Saber vs. Conocer “Tener” expressions

Review (Mid-term)

Possessive adjectives The family Present tense: Stem-changing verbs

Present tense: Verbs w “y”s, “h,”and extra accents Clothing, fashion

Daily routine Reflexive verbs The home The Present Progressive

Review (Final)

FOCUS in grammar: mastery of speaking about the past: PRETERIT TENSE and all irregulars, IMPERFECT TENSE and its uses; in vocabulary and culture: all about movement: geography, travel and transportation, interesting places and the animal kingdom as it varies from continent to continent

Seventh Grade

Review all K-6

Cities and towns Preterit Tense: Regular verbs Preterit irregulars: Completely irreg, irreg yo, irreg 3rd p

Preterit KOs Begin journals Cars, traffic and driving Intensive review of Hispanic countries

Animals of the Americas, Antarctica Imperfect Tense and its irregulars

Review (Mid-term)

Understanding two past tenses: Preterit vs. Imperfect Air travel African animals

Travel overview: Via train, boat Panama Canal The Present Perfect Demonstrative adjectives

Negative/aff wds Prepositions: Por vs para Asian animals Australian animals Passive voice

Review (Final)

FOCUS: in grammar: mastery of ALL TENSES (of the Indicative); introduction to other moods: Commands and the Subjunctive in vocabulary and culture: all about the Earth (its internal dynamics and place in the Universe) and how this affects the development of human civilization / Spanish and Latin American history

Eighth Grade

Special Events

Review all K-7

Still reviewing Solar system, weather, seasons, climate History Spain to 1492 El 12 de octubre = El Día de la Hispanidad

Future and Conditional tenses Comparisons and the Superlative

Topography: Cape Horn, Andes Mts, Nazca Lines Early exploration of the Americas

Review (Mid-term)

El 2 de noviembre = El Día de los Muertos

El 12 de diciembre = El Día de la Virgen de Guadalupe

El 6 de enero = El Día de los Reyes Magos

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Compound tenses Name-That-Tense Poss. and demons. pronouns Object pronouns Food, table settings

History Inquisition to Spanish Civil War Formal and informal commands Exploration: Cabeza de Vaca, others 8th Grade Luncheon El 15-19 de marzo = Las Fallas

History of Latin American independence The Subjunctive (introduction)

Review (Final)

(dates change) = Semana Santa (processions)

El Cinco de Mayo


PreK-3 Music August/ September

October

November

December

January

February

March

April

May/June

PreK

- Pulse - Short melodies - Silence v. music - Moving to melodies

- Basic dynamics (soft, loud) - Speaking rhythm - Choosing body movement and dynamic based on feel/emotion

- Tempo - Singing basic songs - Silent listening - Basic reflections on music

- More singing - Sitting with your own instrument (drum, xylophone) - Body percussion and rhythms

- Review - Singing - How to use your body at a xylophone

- Improvisation - Singing with pulse--drums - Learning xylophone by vocal instruction

- Instrument IDs (Peter and the Wolf) - Group drumming - Singing - Rhythm - Improv on xylophone

- Body percussion - Nursery rhymes on xylophone - Singing

- Introduction to melody - Review

K

- Musical counting and steadiness - Intro to xylophone - Musical movement - Body percussion

- Melody - Singing together; technique and warm ups - Speech rhythms - Body percussion

- Singing - Music appreciation - Xylophone songs

- Group drumming - Responding to music you listen to - Singing - Xylophone songs - iPad app intro

- Review - Quarter notes - Improvisation and adding instruments to stories and characters - Singing

- Xylophone songs - Format (ABA, AB) - Singing - Body percussion

- Xylophone songs - Singing - Introduce different genres - Measure and rhythm

- Review of our favorite pieces - Intro to dance

- Review and concert prep

- Rhythm and counting - Musical movement - Xylophone review - Body percussion

- Listening and responding to music - Dynamics & timbre - Singing: review of technique and warm up

- Song form - Singing - Xylophone songs - Reflection on performance - iPad app intro

- Multiple instruments at once (ostinato) - Adding ostinato to melodies on xylophone - Intro to ensemble - Singing

- Review - Improv with stories - Class song story with students playing - Drumming together

- Composing your own rhythms with words - Improvisation - Building on improvisation (xylophones) - Singing

- Balance and blending - Musical genres - Singing - Xylophone - Intro to dance

- REview all our favorite pieces and our story - Accents - Singing - Xylophone

- Review and concert prep

- Ostinato - Singing - Xylophone - Rhythmic and melodic dictation - Reading quarter and eighth notes, measures, rests

- Review - Famous composers and musicians--who do we leave out? - Singing - Xylophone - Intro to ukulele

- Xylophone - Singing - Improv to images and silent films in groups and individually - Ukulele

- Intro to dance - Xylophone - Singing - Ukulele

- Review all our favorite pieces - Singing - Xylophone - Style - Ukulele

- Review and concert prep - Intro to composition

- Pentatonic Scales (C, F, G) - Music reading - Singing - Xylophone - Ukulele - Basic ear training

- Review - Drumming in an ensemble - Singing - Xylophone - Ukulele

- Intro to dance - Rounds and canons - Singing - Xylophone - Ukulele - Improvisation to images and emotions

- Intro to harmony - Intro to composition using learned forms and vocabulary - Singing - Xylophone - Ukulele

- Review all our favorite pieces - Xylophone - Singing - Ukulele - Style and emotion

- Review and concert prep

1

Talent show 11/22

Talent show 11/22

K-1 Open House 5/20

K-1 Open House 5/20

In Class Performance

In Class Performance

2

- Xylophone review - Body percussion review - Counting - Singing - How to listen deeply with our music journals - iPad app intro

- Xylophone songs - Singing - Composing rhythms - Genres In Class Performance

- What makes music music? (timbre, dynamics, tempo, instrumentation, etc.) - Listening exercises - Singing - Xylophone

In Class Performance

2-5 Concert 5/19

Talent show 11/22

3

- Counting quarter, 8th, whole, and half notes and rests - Body percussion review - Xylophone review - Singing

- Reading music review - Rhythmic counterpoint - Xylophones - Singing - Expression - Ukulele intro/review

- Intro to pentatonic scales (C & F) - Music reading review - Song forms: A/B/C, etc. - Xylophones - Singing

2-5 Concert 5/19


- Music journal review

- Ukulele In Class Performance

Talent show 11/22

* subject to change based on the needs of the students

In Class Performance


Peabody School Music Grades 3-5 & MS Music Enrichment Year at a Glance* August/ September 3

- Counting quarter, 8th, 16th, whole, and half notes (+ associated rests) -Drumming unit -Xylophone technique and exercises - Vocal repertoire - Music Journals

October

November

December

January

February

March

April

May/June

- Reading and writing quarter, 8th, whole and half notes. - Drumming unit - Xylophones (repertoire) - Vocal repertoire - Music Journals -Talent Show Auditions

- Pentatonic Scales (C, F) - Recognizing the treble clef - A/B/C song form - Xylophones (repertoire) - Sound recording and music production unit - Vocal repertoire - Music Journals

- Pentatonic Scales (C, F, G) - Treble clef note values - Vocal repertoire - Xylophones (repertoire) - Music Journals - In class performances

- Review all previous material - Songwriting unit - Vocal repertoire - Xylophones (repertoire) - Music Journals

- Songwriting unit - Rounds and canons - Vocal repertoire - Xylophones (repertoire) - Music Journals

- Improvisation and composition unit - Vocal repertoire - Xylophones (repertoire) - Music Journals

- Improvisation and composition unit - Vocal repertoire - Xylophones (repertoire) - Rehearse performance pieces - Music Journals

- Review and concert preparation - In class performances Spring Concert

- Major Scales (C, F, G) - Reading treble clef (continued) - Ukulele (I - IV -V chord progression; songs) - Xylophones (repertoire) - Vocal repertoire - Music Journals - In class performances

- Review all previous material - Songwriting unit - Ukulele (review) - Vocal repertoire - Xylophones (repertoire) - Music Journals

- Songwriting unit - Vocal repertoire - Xylophones (repertoire) - Ukulele (songs) - Music Journals

- Improvisation and composition unit - Blues song form - Ukulele (songs) - Xylophones (repertoire) - Vocal repertoire - Music Journals

- Improvisation and composition unit - Xylophones (repertoire - Ukulele (songs) - Rehearse performance pieces - Music Journals

- Review and concert preparation - In class performances Spring Concert

- Ukulele: scales; strumming; songs - Mixed Ensemble - Vocal repertoire - Music journals

- Ukulele: fingerstyle; strumming; songs - Songwriting unit - Mixed Ensemble music - Vocal repertoire - Music journals

- Ukulele: fingerstyle; strumming; songs - Songwriting unit - Drumming - Mixed Ensemble - Vocal repertoire - Music journals

- Ukulele: fingerstyle; strumming; songs - Improvisation and composition unit - Mixed Ensemble - Vocal repertoire - Music journals

- Ukulele: fingerstyle; strumming; songs - Improvisation and composition unit - Mixed Ensemble - Vocal repertoire - Music journals - Rehearse performance pieces

-Review and concert prep - In class performances

Talent Show (11/22)

4

5

- Counting quarter, 8th, 16th, whole, and half notes (+ associated rests) - Drumming unit -Xylophone technique and exercises - Ukulele (introduction) - Vocal repertoire - Music Journals

- Sight singing - Drumming unit - Counting quarter, 8th, 16th, triplets, whole, and half notes (+ associated rests) - Vocal repertoire - Music journals

- Reading and writing quarter, 8th, whole and half notes. - Drumming unit - Xylophones (repertoire) - Ukulele (introduction) - Vocal repertoire - Music Journals -Talent Show Auditions

- Major Scales (C, F) - Reading the treble clef - Sound recording and music production unit - Ukulele (C, F, Am chords) - Xylophones (repertoire) - Vocal repertoire - Music Journals

- Ukulele: C major scale; strumming patterns; review first chords; songs - Drumming unit - Vocal repertoire - Music journals -Talent Show Auditions

- Ukulele: basic melodies; strumming patterns; songs - Sound recording and music production unit - Intro to Mixed Ensemble - Audio recording (tracking, mixing) - Vocal repertoire - Music journals

Talent Show (11/22)

Talent Show (11/22)

- In class performances

Spring Concert


Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

Week 7

Week 8

Week 9

Sound Recording and Production

Basic acoustic principles; Field Tests (room modes, absorption, reflection, sound outdoors); Intro to Ableton Live

Sound Stage, Frequency Spectrum, and Arrangement; Ableton composition

Sound in Space and the Sound Stage; Ableton composition

Beginnings, Process and Product; Ableton Live composition

Ableton Live (VST’s; MIDI)

Intro to Mixing (EQ, balancing); Ableton Live composition

Intro to Mixing (Panning, Effects); Ableton composition

Intro to Mixing (Editing, bouncedown); Ableton composition completion

In-class listening party and recording share

Songwriting

Defining song; example songs and analysis; teamwork & collaborative skills; co-writing challenge #1 (topic); song share

Songwriting as mystery, art, and business; analysis of a song and the language used to describe it; Journaling (introduction); co-writing challenge #2 (hooks); song share

Journal; song analysis; chords vs. rhythm vs. words as a vehicle for composition; co-writing challenge #3 (mood); song share

Journal; five historically important songwriters; co-writing challenge #4 (tempo); song share

Journal; songs as protest; writing challenge #5; song share

Journal; applying songs to an ensemble (Music Room); recording

Journal; reflection, analysis, and listening to songs recorded last class; writing challenge #6

Journal; the impact of arrangement and production; writing challenge #7

In-class listening party and song share

Mixed Ensemble

Introduction to course objectives, brainstorm song ideas, student goals, survey of instrumentation, listening

Start on song #1. All students learn song form, analyze song arrangement, start sketching out parts

Continue song #1. Putting together the basic parts into an ensemble sound for at least VS - CH

Add remaining song sections; play through entire song form

Practice and record song #1

Start on song #2. All students learn song form, analyze song arrangement, start sketching out parts

Continue song #2. Putting together the basic parts into an ensemble sound to play through entire form

Finalize Song #2; practice and record

In-class listening party and performance analysis


Percussion Ensemble

Clave, rhythmic counterpoint, and basic rhythmic subdivision (quarters, 8ths, triplets, and 16ths). Listening examples

Percussion families (drums and place); style, orchestration, balance, dynamics, and technique; counting and speaking rhythm

Introduction to the drum break (in sampled music vs. percussion music); playing a rhythmic composition with a basic A section, B section, and break form

Introduction to Polyrhythm: 3 against 2; rhythm notation (variable); group drumming

Start on composition #1 for drums and percussion

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Continue practicing composition #1 for drums and percussion

Small group rhythmic composition. Goal of a rhythmic composition with 2 sections and 2 breaks, conscious choice of orchestration, balance, dynamics

Further practice of small group compositions

Final class recording session; each small group performs/records piece to class


Peabody School Year at a Glance - Drama September

October

November

December

January

February

March

April

May

Using our voices - talking to the audience, character voices, talking to each other.

Music and animal stories: Carnival of the Animals, moving like animals.

Developing imagination guided improvisation

Nursery Rhymes telling a familiar story in sequence

Puppetry: Using stuffed animals/small toys as puppets to tell a story

Seasons: The Cat in the Hat Comes Back; Frog and Toad Spring

Stories and developing characters: Winnie the Pooh

Building audience awareness and sense of performing

Physical Theater - mime: recipes, vehicles, plants growing. Painting the box, painting the music

Using gesture and expression to show emotions

Stories: The Journey Narration and mime; travelling and building story. We’re Going on a Bear Hunt - whole class movement project

Puppetry: Making finger and shadow puppets, narrating familiar and improvised stories

Puppetry continued

Click Clack Moo - Cows that type.

When I grow up… Sequencing and selecting what is important to show the audience.

When I grow up… Real life heroes stories and improvisation. Narration

Just so stories, Tinga Tinga Tales storytelling techniques. Paper plate masks

African design/ masks/ music

Games and rules. Working together. Improvisation using stuffed animal “puppets”, mask design. Stories: The Gruffalo; Where the Wild Things Are; When Sophie Gets Angry;

Peter and the Wolf, Swan Lake, Hall of the Mountain King, Holst’s The Planets physical theater and music. Exploring status

Puppetry: Make felt glove puppets to tell stories about the different seasons.

Superheroes! Intro to the genre of Melodrama and stock characters, heroes and

Superheroes! Intro to the genre of Melodrama and stock characters, heroes and villains. Costume

Games and rules. Story: The Tyger Voyage, The Journey. maps and set design.

P Safety in the

Drama Room. Stories and pretend: Olivia Saves the Circus/Where The Wild Things Are. Mime, freeze, Working together. Guided Improvisation exercises

K Games and

rules. Working together. Stories and characters: Room on the Broom: magic spells and animal movement. Where the Wild Things Are

1

2

Sound effects - using sound effects to inform the audience and create atmosphere

Berenstain Bears - When I Grow Up

Continue puppetry puppet props and set.

Aesop’s fables, Dr Seuss, stories with a message. Stone Soup. Narration, communicatin g with the audience

Make up own fables to give the audience a message.

Ambitions, heroes/ heroines

Folk tales from around the world

Group Improvisation

The Tempest: The storm scene and shipwreck: movement, lighting and sound effects

The Tempest continued whole group improvisation stranded on an enchanted island. Story

Folk Tales from around the world: The Calabash Kids; Mouse Deer; Master Maid. Discuss

Folk Tales project continued

Poetry: Jabberwocky project

Group Improvisation

Frog and Toad All Year/ Kipper’s Year


villains. Costume design and improvisation, comic stage fighting

design and improvisation, comic stage fighting

Games and rules. Improv character development, hotseating Grimm Fairytales, Revolting Rhymes whose story is it? Fairytales told from the perspective of another character

4

5

3

Sequencing scenes and planning work. Soundscapes. The Journey

Creating a character why did people take sea voyages?

development, working as a whole class

Spooky tales, narration and mime. Using photographs as a starting point to develop a story. Stage composition, soundscape and lighting: The Haunting!

Script Work: The Witches/ The BFG

Script Work: The Witches/ The BFG

Script Work: The Witches/ The BFG

Improvising around a story, movement and using music

Stick Puppets: Scripting own scenes, making puppets and backdrops

Poetry Readers Theater staging poetry, using lighting effects to create atmosphere

Spontaneous Improvisation

Reading scripts, magic onstage, lighting and sound effects

Stick Puppets: Scripting own scenes, making puppets and backdrops

Introduction to Greek myths, gods and culture. Greek theater: masks, chorus speech, performance on a thrust stage.

Continue with Greek Myths project, using examples of Greek plays to script own versions of the Perseus/ Arachne/ Pandora/ Theseus myths

Absurd comedy: Performing comic skits focus on physical and vocal techniques and staying in role. Monty Python sketches, Mr Bean

Writing own comedy skits and standup

Introduce mystery genre - Hardy Boys/ Famous Five/ Nancy Drew/ Scooby Doo. Improvise and script own mystery

Continue with Mystery project

Mystery projects

Set Play: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. costume and props, script work

Set play continued

Games and rules. Improvisation units: It Was Terrifying/ Haunted and Hunted (character development, soundscape, dramatic tension and monologue)

Jo: Creating a character in groups and improvise scenes from their life

Set play: A Series of Unfortunate Events: working on scenes in groups, design elements: Costume, props, makeup

Set play continued

Mountain Language: Research and improvisation topic using extracts of plays about domination/ slavery and Epic Theater techniques

Extracts from Antigone, play of Rosa Parkes, Anne Frank etc. How to communicate an argument to the audience

Theater in Education project for younger children (Dr Seuss/ Cautionary tales)

Spontaneous improvisation techniques and terms: Whose Line is it Anyway?

Spontaneous improvisation techniques and terms: Whose Line is it Anyway?

Rehearsals:

Rehearsals:

Rehearsals:

Auditions: Spring Musical

similarities and differences. Introduction to scripts

Performance Whole school production -


Peabody School (Art) Year at a Glance

K How do artists See?

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

LINE

COLOR Color mixing and exploration

COLOR Warm and Cool colors will be explored.

SHAPES Printmaking with everyday objects and exploring how to create an interesting composition using shapes.

SHAPES/ COLLAGE Create a collage inspired by Henri Mattisse

PRINT MAKING Exploring monoprinting techniques.

SYMMETRY Butterflies

CERAMICS

SELF EXPRESSION

SHAPE / FORM -Shape discovery -cyanotypes from sun paper -capturing the shapes of various found objects

LANDSCAPES -Exploration of winter landscapes and animals that hibernate -Explore the idea of above and below ground animal habitats

Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture Introduction to a variety of lines.

Using color to create a landscape painting.

Mixed media collage.

Lower School Art Installation

1

SHAPE Woodland creatures Drawing, painting and printmaking 2D piece inspired by artist Claire West

SCULPTURE Students will interpret their woodland creature into a three dimensional sculpture using clay -Glaze application

PRINT MAKING -Monoprints -Styrofoam printing -Cityscapes

COLOR -Color wheel -learning to name and mix primary, secondary, and tertiary colors -create a collaged magazine color wheel -Understanding Tints and shades Lower School Art Installation

Introduce hand building techniques. Focus on surface texture to create visual interest.

Create wings from a variety of materials to represent overcoming a fear. Who am I? Self Portraits created from observation. Mixed Media.

MIXED MEDIA -Explore how to layer color, shape, and pattern -How do artists achieve visual interest through color?

PAINTING -Explore how artists use mark making to express feelings -Birds

SCULPTURE Papier Mache’ sculpture -Nests

SCALE Explore scale -Large vs Small

REPETITION/ PATTERN Introduce the work of Laurel Burch -Create drawings and paintings of cats focusing on scale -Repetition of line and shape to create pattern

SCULPTURE -Cat paintings will be cut and constructed into three dimensional paper sculpture -Balance

FIBERS Explore using fabrics to create a unique work of art. -Batik method -Animal sculpture

STILL LIFE DRAWING Observation drawings -Focus on scale -Draw with ink and use watercolor paint to apply color

Lower School Art Installation

2

Exploration of liquid watercolors. Students will create symmetrical patterns within wings of a large butterfly. Paintings will transform into stuffed sculptures.

COLOR Color Scheme Painting (warm, cool, complementary, analogous, monochromatic) -Monochromatic landscape painting

CERAMICS Create a 3D form using 2D images. Learn handbuilding techniques and best clay practices. Select glazes inspired by autumn. Magical mysterious pop-up ceramic installation

PRINT MAKING Reference work by illustrator Eloise Renauf -Explore line and repetition

MIXED MEDIA -Explore ways artists combine materials -Collage


MIXED MEDIA Create painted paper to incorporate into landscape collage

3

MIXED MEDIA Foil embossing -Warm and Cool color schemes

Lower School Art Installation

COLLAGE Inspired by Rousseau -Incorporate printmaking, painting, and collage techniques

SELF PORTRAIT Superheroes Create a self portrait as a unique superhero! Translate the drawing/ painting into a 3D ceramic sculpture -Balance, scale, proportion

4

POP ART Low Relief Sculpture Roy Lichtenstein Andy Warhol -Create a piece of pop art depicting an action word -Typography -Pattern -Primary color palette

MIXED MEDIA -Artist Clare Youngs -Woodland creatures -Cardboard sculpture -Pattern, color -Acrylic paint

MIXED MEDIA Landscapes -Create painted paper -Discuss the main components to spatial development Fifth Grade Art Installation: Birds

Focus on variation of color and pattern -Construction requires pieces to have balance and the ability to stand

FIBERS Introduce batik method of fabric design -Create a batik banner -Incorporate pom poms and tassels to add visual interest

-Best practices for handbuilding techniques

CERAMICS Low relief tile -Select a master artist’s work of art and recreate using clay

ABSTRACT

PRINT MAKING Collagraphs using foam -Explore monoprinting from Plexiglas -Color theory

FIBERS Small scale sculpture using fabric -Introduce simple sewing techniques

PAINTING Introduce watercolor techniques

CERAMICS Tile project continued

PAINTING Color mixing using acrylics and watercolor.

DRAWING Still life drawing -Observation -Value -Scale

PRINT MAKING And FIBERS Explore gelli plates to create a series of unique prints

Charcoal Ink Oil pastel Chalk pastel

If time allows incorporate embroidery into images

Collaborative sculpture for Peabody garden

Subject matter to be determined.

EXPRESSION

-Introduce abstract artist -Create an abstract art piece using a variety of techniques

-Emphasis

-Symbolism

If time allows create a small scale piece using clay

Lower School Art Installation

5

MIXED MEDIA Continued

CERAMICS Create sculptural lilypads inspired by Monet’s gardens

SCULPTURE Low Relief -Create a cityscape using cardboard -Create the illusion of space -Application of color -Positive and Negative space

PRINT MAKING Radial Prints -Design a symmetrical image focusing on line and shape -Create a series of unique prints using block printing techniques

CERAMICS Study the work of artist Wayne Thiebaud -Handbuilding techniques -Create a sculptural box with a lid in the form of a slice of cake, pie or a cupcake

CERAMICS Weaving -Create a clay slab exploring surface texture -Explore application of glaze -Using fibers and weaving techniques create a unique work of art

MIXED MEDIA Drawing/Painting Picasso Superheroes -Using Picasso’s style for portraits students will select a superhero to recreate in the style of Picasso -Students will draw, paint, and explore other media to achieve their desired effect for their interpretation

MIXED MEDIA Drawing, Painting, and Printmaking Self Portrait -Introduce technique or reverse glass painting and its history from religious work of medieval Europe. -Photograph students -Transfer images to acetate sheets

SELF PORTRAIT -Continued -Select specific areas to focus on within image for painting, allowing for negative space -Create a seperate textured background for display

SCULPTURE Found object sculpture -Environmental installation piece -Wood, plastic, fibers, paper


-Demonstrate painting techniques focusing layers and brushstrokes

Printmaking

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

INTRO TO PRINTMAKING

MONO PRINTING

BLOCK PRINTING

CYANOTYPES

COLLAGRAPHS

-Introduce printing from glass -Gelli plate printing -Plexiglas printing -Incorporate a collage element to prints

Thinking in reverse.

Prepare light sensitive paper to create a series of unique prints

-Use collage techniques to create visual texture on substrate. -Create an edition of prints

-Printing with found objects -Exploring mark-making -Understanding reverse printing techniques -Explore color using monoprint method

Using line to create visual texture Create an edition of signed and numbered prints

Using stencils and found objects to create interesting compositions

Graphic Design

Color Theory

Mar

Apr

May

FOUNDATION & TYPOGRAPHY

ILLUSTRATE

POSTER DESIGN

POSTER DESIGN

Create logo using an illustrated symbol incorporating hand drawn typography

TINTS AND SHADES -Warm and Cool Colors -Color mixing -Selecting the correct paintbrush -Application of paint

Sculpture 1&2

Feb

3D VS 2D -What makes a sculpture a sculpture?

COLOR -Learn best practices for preparing painting surface -Explore paper, wood, and fabric as substrates

3D PAPIERMACHE’ -How to transform a

DETAILS

COLOR

Learn how to manipulate the materials to

Using colored paper and acrylic paint

COLOR AND INSTALLATION

Finalize application of color and

Expand on fundamentals Combine photography with illustration and typography to create a web based advertisement

Explore film, music, and entertainment promotional posters Students design poster

Continue poster design Web based applications


-Introduction to form and space using paper -3D paper masks

drawing into a three dimensional sculpture -Constructing an armature -Application of papier-mache’

create teeth, horns, and tails

-Learn the grid technique -Review shading using artist pencils -Explore charcoal

Mixed Media

INTRODUCTION

Paper, fabric, painting, wood, two-dimensional or threedimensional Exploration of materials

Fibers

INTRO & HISTORY -Global traditions and cultural symbolism -Batik, Shibori, block printing -Pom-poms and tassels

Abstract

HISTORY AND

STILL LIFE

COMPOSITION

-Learn to draw from life using the practice of still life drawing -Incorporate light to increase contrast, notice the lights and darks of each still life display -Charcoal, pencil, and ink

-How to arrange objects so that the image is pleasing to the viewer -Tracing, projection, and transfer techniques

ARTIST’S CHOICE

2D WORK

2D WORK

3D WORK

Explore ways of combining twodimensional materials to create a unique work of art.

Incorporate techniques such as embroidery, image transfer, and layering imagery

Create a threeDimensional object using a variety of materials -Fabric, cardboard, PapierMache’, or clay

COMPOSITION

DESIGN, TEXTURE,

SEWING -Students will learn and apply basic hand sewing skills

EXPLORATION

OF COLOR

additional details Install in environment and photograph

Texture

DRAWING 101

Drawing

to apply color

Allow artists to go beyond with a particular project based on individual interest


Expressionism

APPLICATION -Introduction of Master Artists and their important works -Color Relationships

-Color Theory

-Visual Balance -Layering application of color -Opaque vs Transparency

PATTERN -Geometric design -Texture using acrylic medium -Pattern through repetition -Line

Ceramics 1&2

4th

2D VS 3D

TEXTURE

GLAZE

-Rolling a slab

-Slab forms -3D vessels

-using tools and application of additional clay to alter the surface quality of work

-Explore color -Sgraffito technique -Overglaze and Underglaze

-Joining clay together using the scoring and slip method

September

3rd

HANDBUILDING

Original Works – Zentangle Name -Express the self through writing style of name - Use decorative lines and shapes inside the name -Use watercolor to enhance design

October Independent Project -Develop criteria as a class (deepen awareness of what goes into high-quality artwork) -Engage in various preliminary drawing exercises in a nonthreatening format -Develop one practice drawing into a completed work

Random Design Watercolor Painting -Using a random array of black lines develop a watercolor painting that depicts a landscape Single Point Perspective Name Design -Learn the basics of single point perspective -Contrast with isometric drawing -Explore design principles Independent Project -Develop criteria as a class (deepen awareness of what goes into high-quality artwork)

November

December

Exquisite Corpse Book -Practice drawing shape and form -Develop problem solving –dividing the subject -Deepen understanding of painting techniques focusing on color, value, and texture -Pen and watercolor

Sculpture: Observation/ Invention -Look at a picture of a vessel and recreate -Modify through invention -Develop awareness of style and form

Automata -Create an art machine with cams and levers that depicts a scene -Explore how machines work and develop designs through trial and error -Paint the machines

January

February

Printmaking -Learn block printing -Understand that prints are backwards and negative -Devise a system to stay organized -Plaster coins with Nigerian symbols

Architecture – Dream house -Learn and use architectural symbols on a floor plan -Represent a 3D concept as a 2D floor plan -Consider how the space will be used during the design process -Translate a floor plan into a side view

March

April

Articulated Self-Portrait Collaborative Animation -Learn the shapes of the body by tracing templates and assembling parts with brads -Discover ways to mix paint to achieve many different colors of skin -Utilize various color and pattern papers to collage clothes -Work within the agreed upon constraints of the collaborative project -Work in small groups to write a scene for the articulated self-portraits -Animate with the assistance of other classmates

Signature Seals (printmaking) -Learn safe and effective use of the gouge -Learn block printing skills -Understand that prints are backwards and negative and incorporate that knowledge into the design

Sculpture Challenges -Using a limited number of materials within a set time, create a sculpture that meets design and aesthetic goals

May Independent Project -Reflect on skills learned and goals achieved -Create self-selected goals -Develop a finished work based on goals -Develop techniques to adapt to unexpected events -Consider how the works will be exhibited

Independent Project -Develop class criteria -Choose content and media -Reflect on skills learned and goals achieved throughout the year -Create self-selected goals -Develop techniques to adapt to unexpected events


Self-Portrait: An Exploration of Style Painting the face: Self Portraits in the styles of famous artists

5

th

-Paint 3 self-portraits: 1.Matisse 2.Choose artist from list 3. Invent a personal style

Flip Book (animation) -Create movement with slight variation from page to page -Learn the fundamentals of animation -Consider pace and movement

-Understand the proportions of the face -Explore media and style and reflect on how those affect representation

September

Graphic Design 1 / Claymat ion Plein Air / Sculptur e1/ Represe ntational Drawing

October

November

Create a country: Intro and Info Sheet Painting: -Map -Landscape -Aerial view -Using paint show what your invented country looks like -Use color realistically and for symbolic effect

Mythical Me: Amalgamated Animal Self-Portraits (Sculpture – clay) -Use symbols to represent aspects of myself -Form complex forms from simple forms -Consider how color and texture, as well as form, play a part in representation

December

January

Symbol: -Flag (sewing) -Coat of Arms (collage) -Develop spatial skills -Consider composition in a simple abstract design -Employ color and shapes for symbolic ends

Where I’m From Accordion Book -Create an accordion book that illustrates a poem about my identity -Use mixed media (paint, collage, text, photos) to show aspects of my identity -Learn basic bookmaking skills

February

Altered Books -Respond to a theme and the content of the book when transforming an encyclopedia volume into a sculpture -Use wire, paper mache, and paint -Explore a variety of ways to alter an object

March

Money: -Note (Lino Block Printing) -Coin (Tooling Foil) -Deepen understanding of relief -Develop visual symbols to depict qualities of the country

April History: -Monument (Clay Sculpture) -Architecture (foam core model) -Forming complex forms from simple forms -Deepen spatial skills -Consider how monuments mold our understanding of the past and who we are

-Beginning of the year routines and reminders -All school project: Birds

Drawing: Observation -Engage in various preliminary drawing exercises in a nonthreatening format -Try different observation drawing approaches -Examine and practice using value -Consider perspective -Beginning of the year routines and reminders -All school project: Birds

Transformation: Layered Paintings from Observation and Invention - Painting 1: basic form or fruit (observation) -Painting 2: Use either the shape or the form of #1 to invent a 2nd painting -Use the inherent transparency of the paint to build layers -Examine how to paint light and dark (value) using a variety of colors -Create something new based on something from observationS

Intervention of Perception -Context shift - Sculpey figure placed somewhere in or around the school -Object shift - Adding something to transform an object into something else -Scale shift - Fabricate something that changes scale of the viewer (make the viewer feel big with small things, or make the viewer feels small with oversized things).

Social Justice Heroes Perception of Character -Mixed media collage -Transparency - Two layers with a top transparent layer that augments the lower layer -Scale it up - small groups of no more than 4 - at least 2 media (pencil, watercolor, collage, paint, marker (sharpie or watercolor) -Examine how a person is depicted affects how that person is perceived -Create an artwork that augments perception a social justice hero

May Independent Project -Develop class criteria -Choose content and media -Reflect on skills learned and goals achieved -Create self-selected goals

Truth and Deception: Photography -Photo collage -Assemble photographs into a distorted figure in order to tell a story or emphasize an idea -Photo that is not true - series of 6 -Text/Image -Pair text with image that is ironic, satire, antithetical. Example work: Barbara Kruger, Adbusters, Paris climate talks posters -Learn about lighting and camera positioning -Mount exhibition around the school


Drawing: Observation -Engage in various preliminary drawing exercises -Try 3 different media -Examine and practice using value

Intro to Painting / Graphic Design 2

-Beginning of the year routines and reminders -All school project: Birds

The Disappeared: The Grid Method -Watercolor, Pencil or Charcoal -Endangered Animals, Endangered Plants, or Silenced persons -Use the grid to observe and to place lines in an accurate way according to place, size, and shape. -Use the grid and a value scale to determine the value of every part of the source image

Dream Big -Computer image manipulation -Painting or drawing then scan and add photo of self -Tell a story about changing the world through painting and digital image manipulation -Explore possible roles as agents of change on a grand scale -Use imagery to convey a complex concept -Learn the fundamentals of image editing software including layers, copying, pasting, and trimming

Where is Art? - Printmaking -Medium: Stencil or lino block -Location: on glass, clothing, or paper -Understand how the location (context) influences the meaning -Learn about contemporary artists who work outside of the established gallery and museum system -Understand negative and positive space -Develop cutting and gouging techniques

Animorphic Art -Examine how to create the perspective illusion -Collaborate on effective techniques to put up the installation -Consider how the location is part of the artwork and how the audience perceives and interacts with the work


Peabody School Technology, Grades K-3 Year at a Glance K-3 Instructional Strands Programming Concepts (P) - Vocabulary, Logical and sequential thinking, commonalities of all programming languages (repeating, conditionals, loops) Physical Computing (PC) - The connection between on screen programming and the physical world (robotics) Engineering & Design (E) - The Design Process, building and tool techniques, problem solving September What is Technology?

October

November

December

January

February

March

April

May/June

Rosie’s Runtime (P) Daisy the Dinosaur (P)

Beebot vs. codeapillar vs Cubetto (PC)

Goldiblox simple machines (E)

Goldiblox simple machines (E)

Scratch Jr( (P)

Scratch Jr( (P)

Electrodough(E)

Robots - Dash & Dot driving

Rosie Revere (E)

Rosie Revere (E)

Electrodough(E)

Dash and Dot (PC)

Scratch Jr( (P)

Scratch Jr( (P)

Code.org Course B (P)

Code.org Course B (P)

Kodable(P)

Rosie Revere (E)

Code.org Course C(P)

Dash and Dot (PC)

Scratch Jr( (P)

Scratch Jr( (P)

Brushbots(E)

Intro to Scratch (P)

Scratch(P)

Scratch(P)

Lego NXT (PC)/ Scribblebots (E)

Lego NXT (PC)/ Scribblebots (E)

Lego NXT (PC)/ Scribblebots (E)

Intro to iPads & Seesaw

K What is Technology? Kodable vs Bee-bot (app) (P)

1 Scratch Jr (P)

Rosie Revere (E)

Dash and Dot (PC)

2 The 3 strands of Technology

3

Zoombinis (P)

Zoombinis (P)

*This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on student needs.

Zoombinis (P)

Scratch (P)


Peabody School Technology, Grades 4-8 Year at a Glance K-8 Instructional Strands Programming Concepts (P) - Vocabulary, Logical and sequential thinking, commonalities of all programming languages (repeating, conditionals, loops) Physical Computing (PC) - The connection between on screen programming and the physical world (robotics) Engineering & Design (E) - The Design Process, building and tool techniques, problem solving Digital Citizenship (DC) - Ethical & safety issues surrounding technology September

October

November

December

January

February

March

April

May/June

Lego NXT (PC)/Littlebits (E)

Lego NXT (PC)/Littlebits (E)

Lego NXT (PC)/Littlebits (E)

CSFirst Game Design(P)

CSFirst Game Design(P)

Cardboard Design Project(E)

CSFirst Game Design(P)

CSFirst Game Design(P)

App Inventor (P)

App Inventor(P)

Marble Roller Coasters (E)

4

Bitsbox (P)

BitsBox (P)

BitsBox (P)

5

Breakoutedu(E)

Design Thinking(E)

Isometric/Orthographic Drawing(E) Bebras Challenge (P)

Extraordinaires (E)

Cardboard Design Project(E)

Cardboard Design Project(E)

6

Intro to Chromebooks Video Editing**

Everfi (DC) Python (P)

Python (P) Bebras Challenge (P)

Everfi (DC) Python Room (P)

Engineering 1 part 1 (E)

Engineering 1 part 1 (E)

7

Khan Academy - Pixar in a Box (P)

Alice 3.0 (P)

Alice 3.0 (P) Bebras Challenge (P)

Alice 3.0 (P)

Engineering 1 part 1 (E)

Engineering 1 part 1 (E)

Engineering 1 part 2 (E)

Engineering 1 part 2 (E)

8

Intro to AR/VR & Cospacesedu (P)

CospaceseduP)

Makey Makey (PC)

Makey Makey(PC)

Choose your Own course (PC)

Choose your Own course (PC)

CS Discoveries Unit 6 IOT (PC)

CS Discoveries Unit 6 IOT (PC)

*This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on student needs.

BitsBox (P)

Engineering 1 part 1 (E)

**All students in Grades 6-8 will video edit the LS News segment approximately once every four weeks.

Science project website(P)


Peabody School Physical Education Year at a Glance* August/ September

Pre-K-K

1-2

December

January

February

March

April

May/June

Kicking skills Tag (to increase focus) Beginning soccer skills

Small group and panther games Parachute Red light green light

Dance Rhythm Perform short dance with word cues following the teacher

Locomotor movements Jump Rope Basketball

Following directions in a group with teacher assistance

Taking turns in groups with teacher assistance

Self-control

Review activities Favorite activities

Classroom Procedures and Culture Review locomotor movements Soccer skills Kicking dribbling passing

Games that involve throwing and catching Tag to increase focus

Demonstrate leadership in small group and panther games Parachute

Dance Rhythm Create a class dance

Basketball Dribbling Shooting Jump Rope

Following directions in a group while playing a game

Badminton Serving Racket skill Lacrosse Stick Skills

Taking turns in groups while playing a game

Recreation games Favorite activities/games Student created/lead activities

Volleyball Passing Setting Serving

Dance Learn dances Create original dances in small groups

Basketball Passing Shooting Dribbling Jump Rope

Floor Hockey Stick skills Passing Shooting

Badminton Serving Racket skills Lacrosse Stick Skills

Baseball Throwing Fielding Batting Kickball/ Wiffle Ball Cricket

Recreation games Favorite sport revisited Student led activities/games Create original game

Volleyball Passing Serving Setting Strategies

Dance Rhythm Movement Choreography Create original dance in groups

Floor Hockey Stick skills Passing Shooting Strategies

Basketball Passing Shooting Dribbling Plays/Strategies

Lacrosse Passing Cradling Badminton Serving Racket Skills Strategies

Baseball Fielding Pitching Batting Kickball/ Wiffle Ball Cricket

Favorite sport revisited Recreation games Student led activities and games Create original game

Classroom Procedures and Culture Team Building Soccer Kicking Dribbling passing

6-8

Classroom Procedures and Culture Sport Leadership Soccer Kicking dribbling Passing Strategies

SPECIAL EVENTS

November

Classroom Procedures and Culture Following directions Space awareness, Gross Motor movement Creative play

3-5

Themes

October

* This is a tentative plan and is subject to change based on students’ needs.

Ultimate Frisbee Throwing Catching

Ultimate Frisbee Passing Receiving Plays/Strategies

Middle school students spend time each month working on team building activities “sport leadership”. All students participate in team building activities and are taught group interaction skills, including effective communication techniques, sportsmanship, teamwork, and ways to be considerate others’ contributions, abilities and effort in a group throughout the school year. All students learn basic playing space/size, rules, and equipment for each sports lesson. Ropes Course: 8th Grade

Teacher vs MS Volleyball Game

Teacher vs. MS B-ball Game

C’ville Cardnals; Wheelchair Bball