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The Charolais Connection 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com charolaisbanner@gmail.com ISSN 0824-1767 Manager/Publisher Helge By

FALL 2018 • VOL. XXXV, NO. 3

Managing Editor Candace By, Managing Editor charolaisbanner@gmail.com Cell 306-536-3374 @ByCandace Susan Penner, Production/Design charolais.susan@sasktel.net

From the Field ..........................................................................................8 Canadian Charolais Association ............................................................14

Dalyse Robertson, Web Design Box 2458, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 Ph/Fax (204) 476-8856 pdmrobertson@gmail.com

De L’Association de Charolais Canadien ................................................14

FIELDMEN:

du champ ................................................................................................12

Profile – Ken Frederickson......................................................................19 Herd Health ............................................................................................34 CCYA News ..............................................................................................36 Charolais Success ....................................................................................40 Innovation Saved Calves ........................................................................44 TwoProng Deworming Strategy Pays Off ............................................46 Understanding the Effects of Ergot Contaminated Feed ....................48 Calving Nutrition: Focus on Minerals ....................................................50 Understanding Cattle Prices ..................................................................52 Calendar of Events ..................................................................................60 Index of Advertisers ................................................................................62

Alberta & British Columbia Craig Scott 14 Keown Close, Olds, AB T4H 0E7 Res. (403) 507-2258 • Fax (403) 507-2268 Cell (403) 651-9441 sbanner@telusplanet.net @craigscott222 Saskatchewan, Manitoba, USA & Eastern Canada Helge By 124 Shannon Rd., Regina, SK S4S 5B1 (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner SUBSCRIPTIONS: $9.45 per year $25.20 – 3 years (Prices include 5% GST) The Charolais Connection is mailed to over 13,000 cattlemen nationwide. Those cattlemen include all purebred Charolais breeders, buyers of purebred Charolais bulls from the past six years and all subscribers to the Charolais Banner. No material contained in the Charolais Connection may be reprinted without the permission of the Charolais Banner. The publishers reserve the right to refuse any advertisements. The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement. Animals in the photographs in the Connection have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

On the cover… Charolais are the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow Photo: Helge By Design: Susan Penner

Printed by Print West, Regina, Saskatchewan Publications Mail Agreement No. 40047726 Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada Postmaster: Please return undeliverable publications (covers only) to: Charolais Banner, 124 Shannon Road, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1, Canada. Published by the Charolais Banner, Regina, SK (3 times per year - February, March and Fall)

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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

I hope this finds you all getting enough feed gathered in the dry parts of the country. Many areas have been hit with drought. Feed costs are higher in many parts, but with heat and irrigation, in some of the feeding zones there are good supplies. The calf market looks very solid although the cull cow prices will be under pressure with some extra females going to town to fit the feed stacks. Selling early rather than later may be the best move, but my crystal ball can be cloudy some days. Following the fat market this summer has seen a big increase in demand for beef. This has been a savior as so far this year beef production in North America is at its highest level since 2008. Here in Canada our cow numbers have been flat, while in the USA they grew. Again the Charcross calves are topping the markets everywhere and pounds are paying. I hate to beat a dead horse, but you need to crossbreed and there are far too many straight bred cows in the commercial industry that could use a Charolais bull. This spring we saw the most Charolais bulls sell in sales ever and the price was up just a tick from last year at the same time. As I have said before, there is room for more quality Charolais breeders and there are some very good sales this fall to get you started. Our website at www.charolaisbanner.com has most of the fall female sale catalogues as they become available for you to view. If we, at the Charolais Banner, can be of any assistance or if you have questions about the business, don’t hesitate to contact Craig Scott or myself. We did some international travel this summer attending the World Charolais Congress in Sweden and a post tour in Norway. Southern Sweden and Norway along with northern Europe are also in a drought. One breeder in Norway expects up to 1/3 of the cows to be gone out of 8

Norway this fall. Will we see more export potential to the EU as a result? Only time will tell. We have all seen how bad the drought in Australia is as well, so exporting countries of the world could be down in production in the next couple of years. I attended the Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC) in London, Ontario, in August and really enjoyed the program. Besides meeting and re-acquainting with many producers and industry personnel from across Canada, the program had some very interesting speakers and information packed into this four-day program including a tour day. There were sessions where you had to pick what interested you the most, but there were topics that would appeal to all. I found the update from the John Masswohl, Canadian Cattlemen (trade guy as he refers to himself) on the CPTTP, NAFTA and export potentials for Canada around the world very good. Also, Brian Perillat from Canfax gave a great update of the Canadian Cattle Market and Key Factors to watch. Giving a positive perspective on the North American and Global Industries was Kevin Good from CattleFax. A Driving Beef Demand Panel with participants from all segments of the industry all had a common theme being we must listen to the consumer and produce what they are asking for. We have the capabilities in traceability to pass information from one end of the beef chain to the other, but we can’t seem to get every sector sharing the information. BIXs is there and I hope we can start using it to produce the products demanded more efficiently. One session that was more geared to the purebred producer was the Canadian Beef Breeds Council Technical Forum with presentations on the advances of genomics and research to quicken the genetic progress in the beef industry. Brought into perspective was the fact that we still need to use our eyes for structure and collect data to back up and find Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

more of the genetic markers. On that note, the Canadian Charolais Association now has Genomic Enhanced EPD. What this will mean for you the commercial producer is the accuracy of the EPD in young breeding stock will be improved. For example, the birth weight EPD accuracy should move up about .25 using DNA or give you the same accuracy as an animal that has data from 25 progeny. The Keynote speaker of the CBIC was Rex Murphy and he had the crowd laughing hard, but had a serious message in his presentation. I would go to see him again anytime. Dr. Kip Lukasiewicz gave a cattle handling demonstration called Working Together For The Cattle WellBeing in a hockey arena with a group of feeder cattle. Some of the points that made me think were why do you get on a horse from the left side? I never really thought about it as that is just how I was taught. Scientifically, what information goes in the left eye, goes to the right side of the brain, which gives a thought to the left side to move. If information goes in the right eye it goes to the left side of the brain and the animals moves, then the information goes back to the right side for a thought. Cattle are naturally drawn to people, so move cattle from the front. Tip demonstrated this which was interesting to watch. Other random points that made sense were that Alpha females lead Beta females. Bellowing is a sign of distress or feed is coming. Make cattle want to do what you want and have them do it voluntarily. Apply pressure, but not yelling. More can be found on this program sponsored by Merck at Creatingconnections.com. The CBIC is back in Calgary next August 13th to 15th and I would encourage you to try to attend. I wish you all the best in your marketing this fall and winter and look foward to seeing many of you down the trail. Until next time, Helge


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POINT A SURVEILLER

Du champ Helge By

J’espère qu’en lisant ces quelques lignes que vous vous retrouvez avec de bonnes récoltes malgré des conditions plutôt sèches dans certains endroits. L’été a apporté des sécheresses dans certaines régions et nous remarquons le prix du grain à la hausse qui reflète la récolte moins abondante. Heureusement, pour ceux équipés pour l’irrigation et la chaleur reçue, certaines régions sont moins frappées et le rendement est passable. Le marché des veaux s’avère solide même si le prix des vaches de réformes semble être sous pression. Nous prévoyons un approvisionnement à la hausse de ce côté suite au faible rendement dans la production des récoltes. Mon intuition me dit que vendre tôt en saison sera meilleur mais j’ai été brouillé dans mes prédictions antérieures. La demande pour le boeuf au courant de l’été a fait monté le prix à la livre. Cette hausse fut bien reçue car elle reflète le record de boeuf en production depuis l’an 2008 en Amérique du Nord. Au Canada, le prix maintien la tendance tandis que les États-Unis démontre une croissance. Encore une fois, les veaux croisés Charolais récolte un meilleur prix à la livre aux encans. Au risque de me répéter encore une fois, plusieurs éleveurs pourraient bénéficier d’un croisement Charolais dans leur élevage commerciaux. Ce printemps, nous avons vu un record de vente de taureaux Charolais et un prix légèrement meilleur que l’année précédente. L’industrie du Charolais a besoin de plus de producteurs de qualité et certaines ventes prévus cette automne vous donnerons un bon coup de main. En visitant notre site web, www.charolaisbanner.com, vous retrouverez un onglet sur les ventes à venir et les détails de celles-ci. Notre site est le meilleur endroit pour se garder informé sur toutes les ventes près de chez vous. N’hésitez pas à contacter le Charolais Banner, Craig 12

Scott ou moi-même. Nous pouvons répondre à vos questions et aider votre entreprise. Nous avons voyagé en Europe pendant l’été pour participer au Congrès International Charolais en Suisse et en Norvège par la suite. Le sud de la Suède, le nord de la Norvège ainsi que l’est de l’Europe ont subi une sécheresse. Un éleveur de la Norvège prédit que le tier des animaux se retrouvera sur le marché suite aux conditions climatiques. Peut-être que ce débalancement du marché se justifiera par une hausse des exportations? Qui sait. La pénible sécheresse qui persiste en Australie forcera les pays exportateurs à ajuster leurs production au cour des deux prochaines années. J’ai participé à la conférence de l’industrie du boeuf Canadian (CBIC) à London en Ontario au mois d’août. Cette conférence fut agréable. J’ai croisé certains collègues de l’industrie que j’avais pas vu depuis quelques temps et j’ai eu la chance d’écouter d’intéressants conférenciers pendant ces quatre jours remplis d’informations, incluant une journée dédiée à des visites guidées. Lors de cette conférence, je pouvais choisir les sujets qui m’intéressaient le plus, même si la plupart de ces sujets pourraient être pertinent à plusieurs éleveurs. Le conférencier John Masswhol, qui se donne le titre de commerçant d’affaire, a présenté une mise à jour sur les négociations du CPTTP, NAFTA et le statut des exportations Canadiennes. Brian Perillat de Canfax nous a présenté les indices du marché et les facteurs clés qui influencent les fluctuations. Kevin Good, de la compagnie CattleFax, nous a donné une perspective positive sur l’industrie nord-américaine et globale du boeuf. L’entreprise BIXSco.com, analyse les tendances et la demande dans la grande industrie de l’agriculture, qui inclue des participants de diverses branches de l’élevage du boeuf, ont le même message; nous devons écouter Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

le consommateur et produire des produits qui sauront plaire. Nous sommes équipés en traçabilité et nous pouvons convoyer le message d’un bout à l’autre de la chaîne. Pourtant, certain secteurs de productions ne partagent pas cette information. L’entreprise Bixsco peut vous aider à produire un boeuf sur demande avec plus d’efficacité. Une présentation ciblait les producteurs de boeuf pur-sang comme auditeurs. Le forum des producteurs de boeuf canadiens a communiqué les innovations au niveau des EPD génomique et la recherche accélérée pour améliorer la génétique dans l’industrie du boeuf. En résumé, il faut continuer d’utiliser nos yeux pour la juger la conformation de l’animal et continuer d’accumuler plus de données pour trouver davantage autres marqueurs génétiques. À ce sujet, l’Association Charolais Canadienne a introduit les EPD génomique. Pour nos éleveurs commerciaux, ces EPD assureront plus de précision dans les jeunes élevages. Par example, l’indice du poids à la naissance devrait augmenter de .25 lorsqu’une collection d’ADN est récolté, ce qui est comparable à avoir les données de 25 sujets. Le conférencier d’honneur de la CBIC, Rex Murphy a su divertir les personnes présentent tout en transmettant un message sérieux. J’aimerais bien le revoir. Le Dr Kip Lukasiewicz nous a présenté une démonstration de manipulation animale dans une aréna remplie de veaux d’embouche. Cette approche favorise le bien-être de l’animal. Un point de sa présentation est la raison de monter à selle sur un cheval du côté gauche. Je savais qu’il fallait que je monte sur le côté gauche car c’est de la manière qu’on m’a montré mais Kip nous démontre que l’information reçue à la gauche est transmise au cortex droit pour faire fonctionner le côté gauche. Si l’information est reçue par l’oeil droit, elle est communiqué au côté gauche suite à la page 16


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FROM THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

Join us this fall CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

PROVINCIAL REPRESENTATIVES: ALBERTA President: Stephen Cholak, Lamont Secretary: Jocelyn O’Neill, Innisfail SASKATCHEWAN President: Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw Secretary: Saskatchewan Livestock Assoc., Regina MANITOBA President: Hans Myrhe, Dauphin Secretary: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO President: Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton Secretary: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC President: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secretary: Chantal Raymond, Sainte-Eulalie MARITIMES President: Ricky Milton, Cornwall, PE Secretary: Jennifer MacDonald, St. Mary’s, Kent Co., NB STAFF: General Manager: MEL REEKIE Registry: SALLY STORCH French Membership: BERNARD DORE 514-910-4935 • bernarddore@videotron.ca EXECUTIVE: PRESIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 • 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net 1st VICE-PRESIDENT: MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net 2nd VICE-PRES: KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca PAST PRESIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 • 613.646.9741 C 613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com DIRECTORS: MATHIEU PALERME 814 Pink Rd., Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 C 819.213.3143 matpalerme@yahoo.ca ROGER MALONEY 2420 Jermyn Line Indian River, ON K0L 2B0 705.295.6439 C 705.761.7316 roger@mlcattleco.com SHAWN AIREY Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 204.328.7704 C 204.724.8823 htacharolais@hotmail.com JIM OLSON Box 882, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3C3 204.252.3115 C 204.856.6357 lejcharolais@gmail.com ALLAN MARSHALL 65266 RG RD 33 Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 403.227.2594 C 403.588.5282 allan@futurefarms.ca LORNE LAKUSTA Box 37, Andrew, AB T0B 0C0 780.365.2079 C780.719.0264 spruceviewcharolais@gmail.com

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Mel Reekie, General Manager

The third annual Canadian Beef Industry Conference (CBIC) presented by five partner organizations – Beef Cattle Research Council, Canada Beef, Canadian Beef Breeds Council, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association and National Cattle Feeders Association - was held in London, Ontario this past August where every facet of our beef industry was in attendance concentrating on the theme, Driving Demand. If you haven’t attended one of these conferences, you should consider attending next year’s CBIC in Calgary, Alberta. These conferences open and expand your mind and possibilities. CBIC not only houses the opportunity to listen to many speakers on topics such as domestic and foreign trade updates and the latest updates in technology but also the opportunity to network with fellow beef industry stakeholders. Rex Murphy, CBIC’s keynote speaker offered his sarcastic intellect to the crowd, but all jokes aside, his message was loud and clear. Rex had a strong message to share; take pride in what you have accomplished. Together we have accomplished a sophisticated and well-established beef industry recognized around the world, there’s a lot to be proud of. When all groups of the beef industry have the occasion to come together with the common goal of educating and networking, join us and we can continue to take this industry to new heights and build a prosperous future. In keeping with the Driving Demand theme, it’s no secret that Charolais are in demand. There’s a worldwide demand for Charolais and you have access to some of the best and sought-after genetics right here in Canada. As you wean and move

your calves to market this fall, you’ll be reminded to why you chose or continue to choose using a Charolais bull. You don’t use Charolais because your Grampa raised them, it’s because Charolais works, plain and simple. Charolais is high performing in the pasture, consistent at the sale barn and profitable in the feedlot. The question isn’t why use Charolais for your hybrid vigour but rather, why not use Charolais? Visit www.charolaisbanner.com for a complete list of catalogues and events; take advantage of the many genetic opportunities this fall at the various sales. Are you or do you know someone involved in agriculture and are registered in a post-secondary education program? Do you or your family use Charolais bulls? The Canadian Charolais Association offers scholarships to those involved with the breed whether it be a purebred breeder, commercial cattlemen or feedlot operator. Submit your completed application to the CCA office by October 31 to be considered for one of three available scholarships totalling $3500; application forms are at www.charolais.com/association/scholarships. Accept this as your invitation to join us this November 8 & 9 in Edmonton, Alberta for the National Charolais Show being held at FarmFair International. Breeders from across Canada will meet in Edmonton for all the action the event has to offer. Kicking off the festivities on November 8 is the 2018 Elite Charolais Breeder’s Bull Calf Futurity Player’s Club featuring a $50,000 prize purse. The National show on Friday, November 9 starts with a bang, the Pair of Heifer Calves class leads off the show with a $10,000 prize purse. If you haven’t already, make plans to attend!

DE LA CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE

Rejoignez-nous cet automne Mel Reekie, directeur général

La troisième conférence annuelle de l'industrie canadienne du bœuf a eu lieu à London, Ontario et elle est une présentation des cinq organismes partenaires

soient ; le Conseil de recherche du bœuf, Bœuf Canadien, le Conseil des races de boucherie, l’Association canadienne des producteurs de bœuf et

Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

l'Association nationale des engraisseurs de bovins sous le thème « Stimuler la demande ». Si vous n’avez jamais assisté à l’une de ces suite à la page 16


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DE LA CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE, SUITE DE LA PAGE 14

conférences, vous devriez envisager d’y participer l’année prochaine à Calgary, en Alberta. Ces conférences ouvrent et élargissent votre esprit et vos possibilités. C’est non seulement l’occasion d’écouter de nombreux intervenants sur des sujets tels que les mises à jour du commerce intérieur et extérieur et les dernières mises à jour technologiques, mais aussi la possibilité de créer des réseaux avec d’autres parties prenantes du secteur du bœuf. Cette année Rex Murphy était l’orateur principal à la conférence. Il a offert son intelligence sarcastique à la foule, mais toutes blagues mises à part, son message était clair et net. Son message « soyez fier de ce que vous avez accompli ». Ensemble, nous avons établi une industrie du bœuf sophistiquée et stable, reconnue dans le monde entier. Lorsque tous les maillons de l'industrie du bœuf ont l'occasion de se joindre à l'objectif commun d'éducation et de réseautage, le résultat est impressionnant. Ensemble, nous pouvons continuer à mener cette industrie vers de nouveaux sommets et à bâtir un avenir prospère. Conformément au thème de stimuler la demande, ce n’est un secret

pour personne que le Charolais est en demande. Il y a une demande mondiale pour la race Charolais et la génétique canadienne est reconnue parmi les meilleures. Lorsqu’il sera temps de sevrer et faire la mise en marché de vos veaux cet automne, vous vous rappellerez pourquoi vous avez choisi ou continuez de choisir un taureau Charolais. Vous n’utilisez pas le Charolais parce que votre grandpère en était éleveur, mais parce que le Charolais est rentable, tout simplement. Le Charolais est très performant dans les pâturages, cohérent aux encans d’animaux et rentable en engraissement. La question n’est pas de savoir pourquoi utiliser le charolais pour votre vigueur hybride, mais pourquoi ne pas l’utiliser ? Visitez www.charolaisbanner.com pour une liste complète des catalogues et des événements ; tirer parti des nombreuses possibilités génétiques cet automne qui sont offertes lors des différentes ventes. Êtes-vous ou connaissez-vous une personne impliquée en agriculture et inscrit à un programme d'études postsecondaires ? Est-ce que vous ou votre famille utilisez des taureaux Charolais ? L’Association canadienne

Charolais offre des bourses d’études aux personnes impliquées dans la race, que ce soit un éleveur de race pure, un éleveur de bétail commercial ou un exploitant de parc d'engraissement. Soumettez votre demande dûment remplie au bureau de l'ACC au plus tard le 31 octobre pour être admissible à l'une des trois bourses d'études totalisant 3 500 $. Les formulaires de candidature sont disponibles à www.charolais.com/ association/scholarships. Veuillez accepter notre invitation à vous joindre à nous les 8 et 9 novembre à Edmonton, en Alberta, pour le concours national Charolais qui aura lieu à FarmFair International. Des éleveurs de partout au Canada se réuniront à Edmonton pour prendre part à cet évènement prestigieux. Les festivités commenceront le 8 novembre, avec le Club des futurs joueurs 2018, qui met en vedette une bourse de 50 000 $. Le concours national qui se tiendra vendredi 9 novembre, debutera avec la classe « paire de génisses » pour courir la chance de gagner 10 000 $. Un spectacle à ne pas manquer.

un troupeau. Les beuglements sont des signes de détresse ou précèdent l’arrivée de nourriture. Apprendre à contrôler votre troupeau de manière à ce que celui-ci suive volontairement vos consignes. Savoir mettre de la pression sans crier. Vous pouvez consulter ce programme en ligne qui a été crée par Merck à creatingconnections.com. Le comité

CBIC sera à Calgary du 13 au 15 août prochain. Je vous encourage à y participer. Je vous souhaite de bons résultats lors de vos ventes d’automne et bonne chance dans vos stratégies de commercialisation. J’espère vous croiser bientôt! À la prochaine, Helge

DU CHAMP, SUITE DE LA PAGE 12

du cerveau et reviens sur le côté droit pour réagir. Les animaux sont naturellement intrigués par les humains et il est favorable de s’approcher par l’avant du troupeau lorsqu’on les mobilisent. Kip nous a fait une intéressante démonstration. Une autre de ses démonstrations nous apprenaient comment les femelles chef dirigent les autres femelles dans

Suivez, moi sur Twitter! @CharolaisBanner

Follow us on Twitter! @CharolaisBanner 16

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Profile • KEN FREDERICKSON • Candace By Ken Frederickson moved from British Columbia to Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, as a teenager. His father was managing Mendel Holdings Western Livestock Intercontinental Packers Cow/Calf and Feedlot operations. He graduated from high school in Saskatoon. They had Walt Browarny out at the ranch to do some photography and Walt asked Ken if he would like to train under him. He made the commitment to start after graduation. That was in the late seventies and early eighties and it eventually evolved into his own livestock photography business called Reflections West Photography. “I told my wife that it didn’t matter where we lived because I was on the road all the time anyway. Our goal was to raise our kids on a ranch, and we were fortunate to find a place in the Wawota area. We moved out of Alberta to south-eastern Saskatchewan to raise our kids and build our ranch.” “I did photography for over 30 years. A lot of the contracts I had with exhibition associations were twenty plus years, like Lloydminster and Saskatoon. It got to be like a family reunion going to those shows. It was fun to work with the people and see the familiar faces from year to year. That was probably the hardest part of slowing down from the road work and taking pictures, I miss seeing the friends I made over the years.” “I always knew that I wanted to do three-dimensional art. I told my wife, Heather, back in the eighties that someday I was going to do bronzes, but not until I had time to focus on doing art. I think I can do it. When I was five years old, I used to sneak out of the house with my mother’s sharpest pairing knife and hide behind the trees and whittle 3-dimensional faces out of sticks and stuff until I got caught with her sharpest knife. Now, I have retired from photography and am slowly becoming less involved with the ranch as our son is taking over, so I have time to dedicate to developing my skills.” “Bronzes have always interested me but it is a tough form to do because of the three dimensional aspect. It is a challenge but it is also very rewarding.”

“I started by buying the wax, opening the package and just getting at it. I think that is the neatest thing because you find your own way. There was an art professor who stopped here as she was traveling through the area and she told me it was probably my advantage – being self-taught. I have no limitations because I wasn’t taught to be like someone else out in the art world. I was my own person, one of one. It is a definite advantage.” “If you camp in Saskatchewan in September, you are probably only one of six people in a campground. We used to camp at that time of year as we were finished haying and it was quiet. I liked to sculpt in front of the camper. One day Heather, who was sitting beside me as I sculpted on the eagles, asked me where I was going to cast these. I really didn’t know. A couple of the foundries in Canada I had spoken with wanted me to pour minimums of ten. So continued on page 22

Top of page: Bovine Series

Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

Above: Ken at work on bighorn sheep

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This progression of the water buffalo shows the oil-based clay and wax mediums combined in the sculpting process

Fancy Dancer

Pond Hockey is one of Ken’s current projects

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Air Ride

Leap of Faith

if they cost three or four thousand dollars a piece to cast, you have to put out $30,000 for every piece of art you develop. It is too cost prohibitive to do it in Canada. I know there are lots of foundries in the U.S., but without going for a drive and checking them out, I don’t know how you would know which one is the best one.” “Then out of the blue, this guy walked into our campsite and said, ‘I thought I had better say hello to a fellow artist, especially a sculptor because there aren’t many of us around. I love your eagles, I have been watching you work on them from across the campground.’ When he said his name, Richard Loffler, I knew right away who he was.”

“He asked me where I was casting and I told him I wasn’t yet. He said, Oh my God, you had better get going and you need to cast with us at this place in Montana. I will make the call and hook you up with the owner so you are set up to start casting.” “As soon as I walked in with the first piece I was going to cast, the Bear Soul, the owner said he had heard all about me. He said because I was from Canada and a ways away, they offered to keep my molds in a climate controlled building. They would look after the molds and if I only wanted to cast one and sell it, then reorder, that would be okay with them. They just wanted to help me get going. It was

Ovide Mercredi and Ken Frederickson

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continued on page 24


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Ken with the Eagles, part of the Shurniak Art Gallery permanent collection

just a chance meeting that opened the doors for me.” Six months later another chance meeting played an important role in opening more doors in the art world. “I got the Bear Soul bronze back in March and in May, Heather had a convention in Quebec. She sits on the Community Futures Board of Directors and their Canadian convention was in the Quebec City region. I went with her to tour the Old City and I was attracted to one of the key-note speakers. It was Ovide Mercredi, who speaks all over the world on human rights issues. He spoke at one of their breakfasts, so I attended just to hear him. After he spoke, the convention participants left to go on their tour and I just stayed behind. Ovide came over and we started to chat over a coffee. I thought, who better to critique the Bear Soul bronze than him. I showed him some pictures and he gave me a personal invitation to attend the Assiniboia (Saskatchewan) Art Retreat, because a very good friend of his, Jan Layh from Manitoba, was helping Bill Shurniak co-ordinate the very first retreat. I had no idea what an art retreat even was. Editor’s Note: The Shurniak Art Gallery, in Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, houses the founder's (Bill Shurniak’s) private collection of original paintings, sculptures, and artifacts from around the world. Opened in July 2005, the 8,000 square foot gallery contains seven gallery rooms, named after former and current villages in the area, that showcase the Bear Soul (front and back) permanent collection. International art provides an interesting dimension to the permanent collection, acquired during a lifetime of travel and working abroad. Paintings, scrolls and furniture from China and Southeast Asia are quite prominent. Several hand-knotted carpets from Iran, Kashmir, and Afghanistan as well as tribal rugs from Tibet are on display from time to time. A substantial Australian collection includes many paintings and carvings by Aboriginal artists. European artists are also represented. A large assortment of unique hand-crafted items, from around the globe, rounds out the collection.

“When Ovide left, he must have went straight to the conference office and looked up my wife’s contact information, because when she came back to the hotel that night, she had received a text from Ovide. “I know it is for you because it continued on page 26

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says, ‘You have an incredible gift for art that needs to be shared with the world.’ That led to the art retreat and one of the requirements was to have a piece of art on display at the Shurniak Art Gallery for a month. I only owned one bronze at the time, so I carried it into the gallery. Bill Shurniak exclaimed, ‘Where have you been hiding your whole life.’ I told him I hadn’t been hiding, I had just been busy doing other things. He told me to get casting because he wanted to be the one to host my first gallery show. A year and a half later, it came to be.” “The most exciting part about the first gallery show was the decision to merge Ovide’s poetry with the bronzes and do it together. He wrote poetry for many of the bronzes and I created bronzes for some of his poetry. It was a neat collaboration and

it was the largest gallery show they have held.” “Your progression as an artist gets faster the more you do. How you perceive things and how you go about doing them, becomes easier. It has been an incredible ride the last three year, the art community has really opened to me. Jan Layh said there is over a two-year waiting list for people to be considered to have a show at the Shurniak Art Gallery, and I was moved to the front of the pack based on my first sculpture. It is absolutely unheard of. After the first art retreat I attended, I had an order for my first commissioned bronze. Now I have done a commission for the Livestock Marketers Association of Canada as an annual prize for the competition named The Calling. The Canadian Bar Association Saskatchewan Division

uses a commissioned piece for its distinguished service award. I have done a few private pieces and won a competition to have a Calgary Stampede prize for the next five years. It has been like strapping yourself to a rocket, it has been going so fast. I only look at a commission if it is something that interests me, if I have full license to do it the way I want to do it, and it has to be something I would be comfortable we could sell more, because it is so expensive to do only one. I have been fortunate enough to be able to sell at least one other bronze from each one I have cast.“ “To do a gallery show, takes a lot of work and focus to put the pieces together. The most rewarding part is seeing people see the art. They don’t have to buy it. If they get pleasure continued on page 28

First Love

Lone Wolf Cries with Ovide Mercredi’s poem at the combined gallery show

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Male Angel


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from a piece, I am pleased. There are I have always been a big history buff five or six pieces that have been cast and a big part of the western art if that people will actually shed a tear preserving a piece of the past. A lot when they see them. It is a powerful of the First Nations stuff was done for connection between a piece of art and the gallery show to fit with Ovide’s a person if it emotes that kind of poetry. The benefit was having emotion. It is a beautiful and powerful Ovide to confer with because there thing to be able to pull something out has always been a big push that if of a person through the connection.” you aren’t First Nations, you shouldn’t be doing First Nations art. “A lady bought the Leap of Faith Ovide put my mind at ease and bronze three years after she saw it. It assured me I should continue. is one of the first sculptures I cast and is a big horn sheep just ready to lift off I want to explore more of the in a leap. The bronze was symbolic of farming and ranching pieces for my leap into the art world. people on the prairies. There You have to have the courage are also some more wildlife to make the first jump, but and birds I would like to you don’t really know where sculpt. you are going to land. She has I prefer to work from started to emerge as a painter memory. If there is something and related to the piece. It is I question in my mind, I look rewarding to sell a piece, it is it up, like the grizzly bear like selling your first piece all teeth. Once I get it figured out over again. Lots of times they in my mind, I go to sculpt it are niceties and not necessities from memory. I read a lot of in life, but if it can bring that anatomy books out of interest. much pleasure to someone, it It is important to know where is rewarding to me.” the tendon insertions are to “I am pleased with the get a naturally appearing amount I am selling, but you movement. I have the benefit end up rolling it back into of friends that are another casting. This year the veterinarians who have sales have been taking off and shared their knowledge. I had it is mostly collectors buying a friend going through vet them. It has been amazing, I college and I used to spend think I have sold 18 or 19 Saturdays with him as he did since May.” horse dissection to get an idea of the inside out. You have to Prices are set according to have a really good knowledge size, for one thing. Bronze is a of what an animal has to offer copper alloy and it trades on The teeth of the Grizzly show the detail of his work, while the in livestock photography and the open market like gold and cubs playing on the backside of the grizzly shows the contrast of the protective mother instinct and the playfulness of the cubs how to subtly tuck away the silver, so casting cost is the stuff that they shouldn’t be determining factor. It costs a creating pieces he is proud to cast, the showing. That necessary anatomy certain amount to mold it and an rest of the business will take care of knowledge is available to me now to amount to cast it. The bigger the itself. People are coming from across reach back and utilize in my piece, the more the expense. The Canada and the U.S. to purchase sculpting. There are balance points in really complicated pieces have his pieces. He believes if you do the structure that you need to recognize. multiple molds, because things that best that you can do, that is all that stick out have to be mold separately I work in wax and clay mediums. I is necessary. Heather takes care of a and cast separately then attached. started in wax because that is all I lot of the business details and has They can be quite labour intensive. knew and I thought that was what I been completely supportive of Ken’s was supposed to do. When I took the artistic endeavours. He has no agent but feels his Bear Soul bronze down to the experience in multiple businesses is Ken follows his interests in subject foundry, they commented on my all he needs to succeed. He trusts his matter for his sculptures. “Bill mastery of the old school technique. instincts. There are other Shurniak commented that I have an Not many people work in wax opportunities on the horizon, but he ability to breath life into my pieces. because it is harder. They suggested I would like to see things grow at their The Pond Hockey piece I am working try oil-based clay. I use both and I use own pace instead of being highly on is very different than the cow I promoted. His focus is on the art, just cast. It all comes from memory. continued on page 30 28

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combinations in most pieces. There are details that lend themselves more readily to wax. Once you get your rubber molds made, you get your old clay back. Since it never dries or hardens, I tend to make it into something else. The left over clay from the eagles is in the grizzly bear I am working on now. In the summer, he works at a cabin in the Artist Colony at Kenosee Lake. He is one of three permanent artists there and there is one cabin reserved for artists to rotate through in twoweek intervals. The Artist Colony is good for the park, but it is also good for the artists. “I will see about 3500 visitors at the cabin throughout the summer. They come from all over the world. It is great exposure and a great place to work in the summer months. It is also good for the public as they get something else to do while in the park.” In the winter, he works out of a studio on the farm. “At the cabin, I have to work early in the morning before people start coming, you can get 135 people per day.” The bronze is one of the most expensive arts available because of the

casting expense. The first year there was a lot of sticker shock with the people that came through. The second year, we put a few of the prices up and we would get comments like, when I win the lottery...I love that but I can’t afford it.... This year prices are on everything and people are buying it to collect it. The price doesn’t seem to scare them, they want to own it because they love it. Most of the pieces will rarely go over 20 casts and the larger pieces only have 10. I prefer to have lower edition numbers where they are sold out and more valuable for people. If you have the confidence in a piece and love it that much, not flooding the market is the least I can do. He relies on his instincts to set the number he will cast for each piece. The art is available for viewing at the farm studio in the winter. People will call and he will gladly show them around if he is available. His website (fredericksonbronzeart.com) and facebook pages (Ken Frederickson Bronze Art) are available at all times. “Everyone always asks me why I waited so long to start this. Another artist put it really well when he said

Plain Memory

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other artists spend their whole lifetime to evolve into who they were meant to be. Or you can go out and live your life and start at a mature state when you can draw on life’s experiences and have a really defined idea of who you are as a person, you are not trying to find yourself. It gives you memories over time that can help you pull emotion into your work. I don’t think it is ever too late in life to try something. We all need things to keep us inspired and working towards something. This for me is the next thing. I have always been able to focus on something to build what I want. I focused on photography to build a business. I focused on building the ranch and raising a family. When it is time to start something else, you do your research and work to make it happen. You roll up your sleeves and focus to get it done. I think the largest part of my success is from my past – the knowledge of paying attention to detail from photography. It is necessary for this art form. Word of mouth has been huge in promoting my work. It is going to travel – good or bad, but fortunately it has all been good.”


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HERD HEALTH

Vaccine Reactions Roy Lewis, DVM

With more and more vaccines now given subcutaneously and especially with vaccines using oil based adjuvants, reactions are not uncommon. The adjuvants are designed to protect the vaccine and give a much higher immune response but reactions in the form of lumps are an expected albeit undesirable result. As many of the pharmaceutical reps will tell us, at least we know the vaccine is working. This is true and we must keep in mind before the same reaction was probably happening with the intramuscular products, it’s just the reactions happened deep in the muscle where it was not visible to us. This is where lots of the gristle (scarring in the muscle cuts of meat) would occur. So from a beef quality assurance standpoint, there has been a huge improvement with almost all the vaccines going subcutaneous. Most of the lumps regress with time or a small egg sized lump is left which is a granuloma or basically a lump of scar tissue. You will find more reactions with the bacterins like blackleg and the other killed vaccines as they generally use the oil based adjuvant. The modified live vaccines generally use sterile water as the liquid for reconstitution so the reaction is much milder. More reactions can occur if nutritional status of the herd is low, especially the three trace minerals copper, zinc and selenium. If there are a high percentage of large reactions, nutrition should be checked as well as the producer’s administration technique. Dull, bent, dirty or burred needles increase the likelihood of introducing infection or causing more trauma. This needs to be watched, change needles when they are damaged and every ten or so animals. You can feel when they are getting dull and change them then. In my opinion, the steel

thick walled needles with the cleaning wires should be outlawed as they give the producer the impression they can be cleaned and reused. This should not happen, and I believe very few of those needles remain. Proper technique will go a long ways to minimizing the reactions. If you are seeing large swellings from vaccinations that subsequently abscess, technique is definitely a possibility. I have seen some wrecks vaccinating in the rain. The moisture seems to wash dirt into the needle hole or the process itself takes in more dirt so try to avoid vaccinating in inclement weather. The infection starts after the vaccine is absorbed so in all likelihood there has been a decent response. Keep the vaccine protected from the elements as frozen or overheated vaccine will be ineffective and it might be denatured leading to more vaccine abscesses. The egg sized reactions are of no concern to the animal but are simply a blemish noticed more in this country in the summer when the hair is slicked off. Purebred show or display animals can be vaccinated in places like behind the elbow so if there is a reaction it won’t be noticed. Vaccinate on the non-show side as well. I have never heard of these vaccine reactions being a problem on sale through an auction. The argument could be at least you can see these particular stock are being vaccinated and to me relates to good management. In the winter, they become like a brand and disappear under the hair. When slaughtered these lumps are somewhat adhered to the hide and in almost all cases come off with the hide not affecting the underlying meat in any way, so there are no trim losses. We all know if they were a concern, buyers would discount them on purchase and that is not the case, or at least I have never heard of it. A few other tricks are don’t vaccinate through manure and if the

multidose gun is hard to advance you may be too shallow and giving the vaccine intradermal (between the skin layers. You want to definitely give the product subcutaneously (under the skin) and it should be very easy to inject. Use the smallest gauge needle that still allows you to inject it quickly (16-18 gauge). If the lumps get large (baseball size or larger) over time they most likely are abscessed and may need to be lanced and flushed. To check technique if giving several vaccines, give them concisely in the same location leaving at least ten or so centimeters between. Give on opposite sides of the neck if possible. That way if there are lumps you can assess which vaccine is involved or who had given the vaccine. Sometimes twigging technique is all that is required. Certain genetic lines of cattle are more reactive to a certain brand of vaccine. This is most often because they are reacting to the adjuvant or carrier of the vaccine. This is why certain producers will have a high incidence and other farms have almost no reactions with the same vaccine. Cattle do not appear to get any more sensitive over time to repeated vaccinations, but if they reacted once, they commonly will react again. so you may see several of these same reactions. If there are too many reactions, you may need to change brands, or perhaps it is that specific combination that is the problem. In horses we often split the vaccines up and give over time, but that is not really a practical solution for our large herds of cattle. Please accept a few vaccine reactions as a normal occurrence and investigate with your veterinarian if the incidence gets too high or if abscesses are created. Rest assured the vaccine is working and offering protection. Very very rarely, just like with antibiotics, we can get allergic reactions with vaccinating so always continued on page 36

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CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

2018 Conference Offered New Opportunities Keegan Blehm, Vice President

Hi everyone, I hope your harvest is going well. On July 25-28, 2018 CCYA Conference and Show was held in Brandon, Manitoba. We had a great turn out with 71 participants attending including 12 international members from Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, Estonia, Sweden, Czech Republic, United Kingdom and the United States. The week started with three educational components focusing on vaccines and properherd health, leadership, and a tattoo demo with frozen cattle ears. That night the juniors partook in a steak cook off with everyone having good time. CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Shelby Evans sle379@mail.usask.ca Vice-President: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca Treasurer: Tyson Black blackbern@hotmail.com Secretary: Raelynne Rosso littlerosso@hotmail.ca

Thursday was focused on judging; in the morning members participated in individualjudging with oral reasons. Our new program “Little Chars” let all the peewees have a great timelearning new skills. After lunch was team judging and team marketing followed by the keep andcull at HTA Charolais. Youth members were challenged to keep three pairs and cull one pair out of a group of four cows with bull calves. Friday started out with a group picture then into showmanship, which was capped off with an international showmanship class where everyone learned how cattle were shown from different countries. In the afternoon, Director: Bret Marshall blm5012@cesd73.ca Director: Lindsay Verwey Lindsay.verwey16@gmail.com Director: Reegan McLeod Reeganmc11@gmail.com Director: Bradley Fergus bradleyfergus3@gmail.com Ex-Officio: Shae-Lynn Evans evans32s@uregina.ca

team grooming took place with youth members fitting an animal in groups of three. For supper we were entertained by a stock dog demo at the Douglas Bull Test Station. Saturday was show day, and all the members got to show off their animals. Once our champion was selected our awards banquet was held where lots of dancing, laughs and memories were shared. Thank you to all the sponsors, volunteers and parents that helped organize this conference. I hope everyone can make it to Weyburn next summer for CCYA 2019!

2019 CCYA Conference & Show Exec. President: Dale Weinbender Vice-President: Shelby Evans Treasurer: Raelynne Rosso Secretary: Kylie Beck CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Jill Debenham kidsandcows@sasktel.net ON: Karen Black blackbern@hotmail.com MB: Jeff & Jackie Cavers tobbagirl@yahoo.ca AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca Youth Coordinator: Kirstin Sparrow kp.sparrow@hotmail.com

HERD HEALTH, CONTINUED FROM PAGE 34

have epinephrine on hand anytime you are processing or working cattle. This is why it is always good to check your cattle a short time after vaccination for any heavy breathing or swollen faces. Allergic reactions, if

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severe, usually occur within the first thirty minutes after vaccinating. The future may see needleless vaccination, or oral or more intranasal vaccines given, which do eliminate this lump issue. Also, a needle does create a

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little pain so try to use as small a bore needle as practically possible. Product must flow through the needle with only minimal pressure.


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CHAROLAIS

Success

Charolais Heifer Reserve at Whitewood 4-H Regional McCaw Pandora 4E, sired by Grant’s Anchor 311A and exhibited by Madison Petracek, Whitewood, SK was Champion Yearling Heifer and Reserve Grand Champion overall at the Whitewood 4-H Regional show, July 5th in Whitewood. The judge was Chad Hollinger and there were 19 heifers and 3 cow/calf pairs in the show. She was Grand Champion female in the Whitewood club show the day before.

Charcross Steer Tops Virden 4-H Regional Out of 19 steers, Terry and Sara Hepper slapped Ricki Hill’s steer Grand Champion at the Lenore, MB 4-H Beef Club Achievement Day held on July 2 in Virden. The next day, at the Virden Interclub Show & Sale, Lee and Cynthia Wirgau also chose Ricki’s steer Grand Champion out of 30 steers. Renards Meat Services Ltd., Virden purchased the Champion Steer weighing 1470 lb for $2.55/lb. Ricki’s steer also placed 3rd in the carcass class out of 9 steers.

Charolais Heifer Supreme at Swift Current 4-H Borderlands Essence 9E, shown by Wyatt Ching, Rockglen, SK and sired by LHD Cigar was named Supreme Champion Female of the Swift Current 4H Regional Show June 30th. Judge Jonah Biensch, Marsden, placed her over 42 females of all breeds for the win.

Charolais Win Melfort 4-H Left: RPJ Butterball 614D by MVY All Star 61A and her bull calf at side RPJ Manchee 814F by Sparrows Sanchez shown by Shanese Martin, St.Brieux was Grand Champion Two-Year Old and Supreme Champion Female at the Melfort (SK) Regional 4-H show on July 9th. Judges Blair and Lois McRae also made Manchee Reserve Champion Bull Calf of the show. Middle: HBC Echo 614D, by TR PZC Mr Turton 0794 ET and her bull calf at side HBC Justify 812F, by WC Milestone 5223 P, shown by Justin Harcourt, Quill Lake, was Reserve Grand Champion Female at the Melfort (SK) Regional 4-H show. Right: Justify was Champion Bull Calf of the show.

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CHAROLAIS

Charolais Heifer Wins at Prince Albert 4-H show Owen Beaulac, Wild Rose 4-H Beef Club, had Champion Charolais Heifer at the Prince Albert (SK) Exhibition Regional 4-H Show June 10th.

Success

Charolais Steer Reserve at Neepawa 4-H Neepawa, MB Fat Stock Show Interclub Reserve Champion Steer was a Charolais steer shown by Madisyn Robertson, of Neepawa. The show was July 4th, the steer weighed 1,403 lb and was the high seller going for $2.90/lb to Neepawa Veterinary Clinic & Coyote Ridge Contracting.

Charcross Steer Wins ADG of Hillmond 4-H Cooper Sissons, Hillmond, SK, with his home raised Charcross steer won Reserve Champion steer and had the highest rate of gain at 3.35 lb/day in the Hillmond 4-H club. Judged by Toby Noble, he weighed 1,445 lb and sold for $2.60/lb to Pinder Farms. Charcross Steer Wins Weyburn 4-H A Charcross steer shown by Ben Saffery, of Midale, SK, was Grand Champion at the Weyburn Regional 4-H Show, July 3rd. Beating nearly 175 steers, he weighed 1,446 lb and sold for $3.75/lb to Holdstock Livestock, Weyburn. The judge was Tyler Smyth of Swift Current. Ben works at Wilgenbusch Charolais and the steer was sired by a Wilgenbusch bull from the herd of Terry Iluk and Jodi Hawken.

Above: Charcross steer tops Flagstaff 4-H Regional A 13 month old Charcross calf of Elizabeth Harty, Strome, AB won the Interclub Rate of Gain in the Flagstaff District Beef Show over 64 steers judged by Tyson Bieleny, at 4.2 lb/day. Her steer started at 715 lb and finished at 1,571 lb and sold for $2.80/lb to Edge On Ventrues, Daysland. Right: Charcross Steers Win Stettler 4-H Hannah Elines, Big Valley, AB, won Grand Champion Steer at the Stettler & District Regional 4-H Show and Sale June 5th, judged by Danny Skeels. Her steer weighed 1,362 lb and sold for $4.70/lb to TJ Tankers, Stettler. Hannah’s brother Eric had the Reserve Grand Champion Steer with one weighing 1,670 lb and sold for $2.60/lb to Hanna Motor Products, Hanna.

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CHAROLAIS

Success

Charolais Steer & Female top Saskatoon 4-H Left: Calina Evans, Kenaston, SK had Champion Cow/Calf pair and Grand Champion Female at the Saskatoon Regional 4-H show on July 8th with LAE Calypso 555C (Circle Cee Legend daughter) and her HBSF Diesel bull calf. Shelby Evans had Reserve Champion Bred Heifer with LAE Ebony 797E (Circle Cee Legend daughter). Right: Shelby Evans had Grand Champion Steer out of 88 with her tan Charcross steer on July 9th. The steer weighed 1,511 lb and sold for $3.75/lb to Pinnacle Builders RTM, Martensville Building and Nienhaus Contracting. The judge was Kirk Hurlburt of Saskatoon.

MANAGEMENT

Innovation Saved Calves

The beginning of April in 2018, the weather was abnormally cold on the prairies. In fact, in some areas it was minus 30 in the morning, and some ranchers got creative. Starting the calving period the first of April usually isn't a problem as the weather is fine. When you don't have the facilities, you only have a short period of time to save the newborns from death or frostbite. Bryce Weiss, Diamond K Ranch at Maple Creek, pulled an old horse trailer out and equiped it with a rented 350,000 BTU industrial heater. 44

The floor of the trailer had rubber matts in it and it was thoroughly covered with straw. The trailer was also plywood lined. They set the temperature at 90 degrees and opened the back door an inch and since the heat came in the front, it created airflow. The cow was allowed to partially lick the calf for 15-20 minutes before the calf was taken to dry in the trailer. They were tagged with the numbers of their dam so they were easy to match up with their mothers. The mothers often followed Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

the sleigh to the trailer and waited for the calf to return. In about four hours the calves were dry and could go back with their mothers. All of the cows mothered up when the calves were returned. It was labour intensive, but saved the lives of calves. One night they had fourteen go through it. No calves suffered illness and most ears were saved.


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MANAGEMENT

A Two-Prong Deworming Strategy Pays Off Naomi Paley, BSA, PAg, Regional Livestock Specialist, Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture

Pour-on dewormers have been a mainstay in the North American cattle industry for over 25 years. Because they can be inconsistently absorbed in the bloodstream, insufficient amounts of the active ingredients may be delivered to the parasitic infection in the stomach and intestinal tract. Parasites surviving a treatment may become resistant to those compounds and, because the compounds used in pour-on dewormers are all in the same drug class (macrolytic lactones) and have similar modes of action, there is potential for the parasites to develop resistance. Deworming products containing fenbendazole provide a way for producers to combat parasite resistance to macrocyclic lactone (ivermectin) de-wormers. These products have not been widely adopted by beef producers due to a lack of awareness that parasite resistance is a growing problem in Western Canada. In an effort to raise producer awareness, Saskatchewan Agriculture, working with Merck Animal Health, set up three demonstrations across the province. Backgrounding cattle were divided into two groups (Treatment and Control). The Control group was treated with an ivermectin pour-on and the Treatment group was treated with ivermectin and SafeGuard Suspension 10 per cent oral drench (2.3 ml/100 lb.). Fecal samples were taken before and after the treatment to determine the efficacy of each deworming treatment. All samples underwent fecal egg count reduction tests. Animals in both groups were weighed upon entry to the pen and then again approximately 110 days later to demonstrate any effects on weight gain and performance. A cost analysis was done to determine if there was an economic benefit to 46

using the Safe-Guard de-wormer as part of the deworming strategy. All deworming products reduced fecal egg counts (by 75 per cent in two of the demonstrations and by 30 per cent in the other), but the cattle that received the ivermectin/SafeGuard treatment showed a more consistent trend, with egg counts reduced by between 96 and 100 per cent. In general, calves in the Treatment groups gained an average of 15.14 lb. more than those in the

Control groups. Based on Saskatchewan feeder cattle prices at the time (March 2017), the net return to using the Safe-Guard treatment as part of a deworming strategy was calculated as $33.83 per head. For more information contact Naomi Paley, Regional Livestock Specialist, at 306-786-1686 or naomi.paley@gov.sk.ca; or call the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1-866-457-2377.

SafeGuard oral suspension being administered to a steer at Evergreen Cattle Co. near Ituna, SK

Backgrounding calves in the demonstration trial at Whitehall Cattle Co. near Swiftcurrent, SK

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MANAGEMENT

Understanding the Effects of Ergot-Contaminated Feed in Beef Cow-Calf Operations David Goodwillie, Information Officer, david.goodwillie@gov.sk.ca, Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture

Toxic to both humans and animals, ergot is a fungal pathogen that infects essentially all grasses and cultivated grains across Canada and around the world. It is an ancient problem, with the first reference to ergot toxicity appearing in 857 A.D. Today, ergot poisoning in humans is uncommon due to stringent graingrading standards, but it still poses a substantial risk to livestock, which may be exposed while grazing contaminated pastures or consuming rations with contaminated ingredients. Ergot contamination has become a particular problem for Canadian farmers and livestock producers in the past five to 10 years, due to wet weather conditions that favour the spread of ergot in pasture and cereals. Substantial outbreaks were reported in Manitoba in 2005 and across the Prairies in 2008 and 2011. More grain being graded as Feed due to ergot contamination has resulted in more problems with ergotism in the livestock industry. Clinical symptoms of ergotism include lameness, swollen hooves, nectrotic lesions and lost extremities (e.g. hooves or the tips of ears and tails). The severity and reversibility of the symptoms depend on the concentration of alkaloids in the feed and the duration of exposure. Even if the level of ergot exposure was too slight to result in symptoms, there will still be an effect on blood flow, constriction of peripheral blood vessels and hormone levels which may have implications for pregnant cattle and their calves. There is also a concern that there may be a cumulative effect to long-term, lowlevel exposure to ergot which could eventually lead to clinical symptoms. To date, there is limited data on subclinical ergot exposure in cattle. The current Canadian recommended tolerance level for ergot consumption 48

in cattle is two to three milligrams per kilogram of feed (2,000 parts per billion ergot alkaloids in feed). However, this concentration may still produce the blood and hormone changes that could lead to toxicity over time. With the financial support of the Saskatchewan Agriculture Development Fund (ADF), researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine studied the dose-response relationship between ergot alkaloids in feed and changes in the tail artery of cattle and two internal vessels (median sacral and internal iliac artery) that supply blood to the tail artery. They also examined the effect of low levels of ergot alkaloids in feed on hormone levels and weight gain in early postpartum beef cows. As well, the project looked at whether subclinical contamination of feed affected the reproductive performance of lactating beef cows or the weaning weight of their calves. Two separate experiments were set up: one to look at the effect of shortterm (one week) ergot alkaloid exposure on the cardiovascular system and hormone levels of individual animals; and the second to study the effects of long-term (eight weeks) group feeding of ergot on cow-calf performance. The eight-week experiment was also designed to address two other important questions: 1) Do ergot alkaloids accumulate in

Cows involved in the project

Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

the body over time, causing delayed effects; and 2) What is the maximum level ergot contamination to have no economic impact on the Saskatchewan beef industry? For the short-term study, the researchers fed the animals feed containing no ergot alkaloids (the control), 80 parts per billion (ppb) (low exposure), 319 ppb (medium exposure) and 1,275 ppb (high exposure). The researchers observed constriction of the tail artery at 1,275 ppb ergot alkaloids, but there was no effect on either the median sacral or internal iliac arteries inside the pelvic cavity. The study was conducted during the hot summer months, however, and ambient temperature has a significant effect on caudal artery diameter. The researchers suspect arterial constriction at this dose level may be more significant during the winter months, but this theory needs to be tested. They observed no significant reduction in body weight gain at any level of short-term exposure. For the long-term exposure study, recently calved cattle were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: five ppb (the control), 47 ppb (low), 201 ppb (high) and 819 ppb (very high) total ergot alkaloids on a dry matter basis for eight weeks. The cows’ and calves’ weight gain was


monitored during the feeding period and for six weeks after. Cow or calf performance did not appear to be affected by any level of ergot concentration. The weaning weight of calves was similar regardless of whether their mothers were fed ergot or not. There was no apparent effect on lactation as calf weights were not affected. There was a minor reduction in diameter and blood flow in the caudal (tail) artery at the very high level of ergot exposure, indicating potential vasoconstriction during the summer months in Saskatchewan. These effects may start to appear at lower levels of ergot concentration during the severe winter conditions in Prairies. Subtle changes in hormones were observed at 201 and 819 ppb of ergot, but, due to the small number of animals in the study, the results could not be confirmed by statistical analyses. Hormone levels appear to return to normal within six weeks of the end of ergot feeding, so the effects may be partially reversible. There was no effect of feeding ergot alkaloids at any concentration on the animals’ return to cyclicity after parturition. There was no apparent effect on fertility or the ability to maintain subsequent pregnancy, but these results need to be confirmed with a larger group of animals. In conclusion, it appears that lactating beef cows in the early postpartum period can tolerate ergot alkaloids up to 800 ppb in feed (based on total dry matter intake) for up to two months without becoming sick or losing reproductive performance. A secondary, but equally, important benefit of this research was a significant increase in the province’s research capacity. Prior to this project, feed samples were sent to the United States for analysis, but now the provincial veterinary diagnostic laboratory has sufficient expertise to conduct the work locally. The researchers determined that the common field methods of establishing ergot infection (the weight method and the count method) are inaccurate at levels of less than 350 ppb, and they recommend that regulatory agencies should adopt the analytical assay

method as the standard for evaluating through Growing Forward 2, a ergot contamination. The assay to federal-provincial-territorial initiative. measure six ergot alkaloids in feed is For more information visit now available through Prairie Saskatchewan.ca and search for ADF; Diagnostic Services in Saskatoon. As then enter the report number well, two graduate students and four 20130258 into the search function. undergraduate summer students were trained through the project. The Agriculture Development Fund provides funding to institutions, companies and industry organizations to help them carry out research, development and valueadded activities in the agriculture and agri-food sector. The results produce new knowledge, information and choices in technologies, techniques and varieties for farmers, ranchers, processors and input suppliers, to improve the competitiveness of Saskatchewan’s agricultural sector. In 2018, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada committed $17.3 million in new funding for Dopler ultrasound showing the effect of ergot on the 55 ADF research projects arteries

ergot incidence map

Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

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MANAGEMENT

Calving Nutrition: Focus on the Minerals Leah Clark, BSc, Regional Livestock and Feed Specialist, Saskatchewan Minitry of Agriculture

The importance of feeding a source of properly balanced minerals to our cow herd is increased during late gestation until breeding. During this time, we need our cows to perform at their best. Throughout this stage of their production cycle, they need extra nutrients to support fetal growth, lactation, and fertility. The nutrient needs of a cow are highest during this period, since 70 per cent of fetal growth occurs the three months prior to calving. After calving, lactation continues to increase the nutrient demands of the animal. During this crucial time, a cow is expected to become pregnant within 83 days of calving to reach a goal of one calf a year. Eighty-three days is not a lot of time, considering it

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takes about 40 days after calving for the uterus to be in a condition that facilitates pregnancy. These issues are compounded in heifers because they are still growing during this time. Therefore, the animal must be healthy and in good body condition before all of these events occur. When deciding on a mineral that best complements your ration, there are a few things to consider. Cows need to be supplied a ratio of calcium to phosphorus at levels of at least 1.5:1 and not higher than 7:1. Grains tend to be high in phosphorus; alfalfa hay tends to be higher in calcium, while grass hay tends to have lower levels of both. Typically, mineral is identified by the calcium to phosphorus ratio that is supplied to the cow. Remember that if you have a specific mineral

problem that needs to be addressed in your herd, such as low selenium, custom mineral formulation is always an option. Experience and research have proven that proper mineral balance is essential to maintain growth, fertility, immune status and overall performance. This balance can be offset by the availability of the mineral to the animal, other mineral interfering with absorption, and the minerals supplied through feed and water. Testing both water and feed can help you to choose a mineral that compliments your feeds and results in better herd performance overall. For more information contact the Agriculture Knowledge Centre at 1866-457-2377 or visit saskatchewan.ca/agriculture.

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CHAROLAIS INTERNATIONAL

Understanding Cattle Prices Steve Duff, Chief Economist, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

Farmers are faced with a wide range of market information and opinions on market prices. These sources of market information and opinion often offer conflicting views which can make marketing decisions for individual farmers quite difficult and stressful. It is useful for each farmer to have a general understanding of how prices are both determined and discovered. Price determination refers to the big picture or overall price levels for a commodity. Price discovery pertains to how an individual farm or business arrives at a transaction price for their commodities. These two concepts are fundamentally different things. Every farmer should have some basic understanding of the factors that affect price determination for the commodities they produce. This will help you anticipate the direction of price movements over time. Understanding how prices can be discovered and anticipated gives you the best chance of maximizing sales price. This in turn, gives you the best chance of being as profitable as possible. None of these pieces of knowledge or understanding are a guarantee and sometimes the price discovery mechanisms farmers use, tell something quite different than the price determination factors. Being able to observe and understand why price discovery is telling you something different is key to being able to avoid such situations in the future. It will also improve your chance of maximizing sales price. Price determination is the interaction of the broad forces of supply and demand that determine the overall market price level. Feeder cattle supply in Ontario is driven by several factors including: cow inventories, lagged feeder cattle prices, time of year, and availability of feed. Feeder cattle demand in Ontario is driven by several factors including: fed cattle prices, feed prices, time of year, retail beef prices and frozen stocks of beef. 52

For Canadian livestock producers, price determination is based on global, but mostly United States (US), meat supply and demand forces. These forces, such as livestock inventories, production, competing meat prices, consumption and trade, all come into play to determine a base price level. As long as trade in meat and livestock is free and open, Canadian pricing is going to be determined through US markets. If Canadian prices get too out of line with US markets, supplies will either move into or out of Canada, rapidly. This process is called arbitrage. In the case of cattle, the overall price level is ultimately expressed as a representative, or widely quoted US cattle price. This might be futures contract price or a regional price such as Nebraska steers. The representative price chosen and used for price determination is really determined based on where your farm is located and the major US markets most influential to your local market. Price discovery is a transaction that can take place at the market or individual farm level. In general however, price discovery in Canadian agriculture and in this case cattle, takes the form of this formula: Canadian Price = US Price ÷ US/Canada Exchange Rate – Basis Whether the observed market price is an auction transaction, a formula price for a contract, or a spot market negotiation, the final price is going to follow this basic formula. In the Ontario cattle sector context the US base or representative price is almost always the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) futures market price for feeder or fed cattle. Note that market prices reported are in US dollars per hundredweight of live animal and further details on each futures contract are available at the links below: Nearby Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) feeder cattle futures price www.cmegroup.com/trading/agric Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

ultural/livestock/feeder-cattle.html Nearby CME live cattle futures price www.cmegroup.com/trading/ agricultural/livestock/live-cattle.html The basis is in many ways the most difficult part of the price discovery process. This is the local or regional component of the price. It’s the difference in price between one region and a CME futures contract. Regions that have excess cattle will be on an export basis. This is often referred to as a negative basis where the local price is lower than the reference price (CME contract) adjusted for exchange rate. Normally, Ontario feeder cattle are on an export basis for most of the year. At times, local shortages for example can flip prices to an import basis and this has widely been the case for the last two years. The tricky part about the basis is that it is something that is only observed or understood after the cattle are sold. It is not known before you sell your cattle what the basis will be, rather all you know is what the basis has been lately, the factors that affect the basis and what the basis is normally for that time of year. Understanding these factors is key to helping you maximize the sales price you receive for your cattle. OMAFRA does a weekly calculation of Ontario feeder and fed cattle basis and provides it on its statistics website: www.omafra.gov.on.ca/ english/stats/livestock/weeklycattlep rice.xlsx The following is an example basis calculation for November 15, 2017: BFO average 500 to 599 pound steer price $225.5 per hundredweight CME Nov 2017 close $158 USD per hundredweight CDN dollar exchange rate 0.783 Nov 15, 2017 basis = $225.5 – $158 ÷ 0.783 = + $23.72 Note that the average feeder cattle basis for at or on Nov 15 for 2011 to 2015 was -$10.5, an export basis. And the basis on this day in 2017 was +


$23.72, an import basis. This is a clear indication of the short supply of Ontario feeder cattle and the strong demand for what feeder cattle supply is available. There are two very unique aspects about cattle that make using price discovery formulas and basis very challenging. First, feeder cattle, are one of the only agricultural commodities that are primarily sold by auction. The majority of other agricultural commodities, including fed cattle, tend to be sold on a spot cash market, a direct negotiated contract or a direct formula price. Second, cattle are not a homogeneous or standard product. Homogeneous products like a bushel of corn that are generally very similar can be easily standardized in terms of pricing and grades. Cattle have several attributes that greatly affect market price such as weight, sex, breed, frame, precondition (dehorned, castrated, vaccinated, age verified, etc.) and ability to be grouped and sold with one or more other cattle that have similar attributes. Auction markets bring cattle buyers and sellers together and for feeder cattle provide the best method of price discovery. Market summaries are available online and for some of the auctions in farm newspapers such as the Ontario Farmer or BFO website on a daily and weekly basis. But as a

potential seller, it is important to understand the characteristics each market has relative to the feeder cattle you are planning to sell. For example, some sales do not place requirements on the characteristics of the cattle being sold which can result in more variable numbers of buyers, sellers and available cattle from one week to the next. In many parts of Ontario there is a growing number of “special” sales that are designed to bring together a larger number of buyers and sellers and in turn provide buyers with a larger availability of feeder cattle that are very consistent in terms of a quality feedlot prep program [castrated, dehorned, bunk adjusted, vaccinated] and presentation. Previous virtual beef articles have shown these type of sales can be quite beneficial. Regardless of where you sell your cattle or the characteristics of your cattle, the following are some key pieces of information that should be tracked every year to help you manage price expectations and hopefully give the greatest chance for success: • Know your per sold animal cost of production and track over time • Record your market prices received and the attributes your cattle had and if these attributes have changed over time • If you sold at a specific auction, record the weight and frame category,

Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

low, high and average price and the volume sold and where your cattle fit into that range. • If you didn’t sell at a specific auction, pick one close to your area and record every year, using it as a reference, and relate the price you received to the average price. • Record the CME feeder cattle futures and exchange rate for the day your cattle sold and calculate your own basis and compare to the weekly basis provided by OMAFRA www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/stats /livestock/weeklycattleprice.xlsx In summary, Canada’s cattle sector is part of a highly integrated North American market. One benefit of being a small price taker in this North American market is that it enables quite clear linkages for price determination and discovery. The CME futures prices provides Ontario farmers with a solid tool to help plan and manage price expectations. Using CME futures prices, coupled with local market info from the BFO, OMAFRA or your own sales results, producers can help see for themselves where their cattle fit into this broader market picture over time. Doing so provides each producer with the best possible chance for pricing success in a cattle world with clearly no guarantees.

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Charolais Connection • Fall 2018


GOOD ANCHOR CHAROLAIS HOME OF “GOOD” CATTLE! Don Good and Marion Smyth Box 3261, Vermilion, AB T9X 2B2 780.853.2220 • Don.marion.good@gmail.com

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Barry & Lee-Ann Kaiser & family 403.787.2489 Box 209, Hussar, AB T0J 1S0 Barry 403.334.2489 Lee-Ann 403.334.2155 kaiserbarry@gmail.com

Kasey, Arlana, Kord & Peri Phillips Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0

T 780.358.2360 • C 780.656.6400 • kphillips@mcsnet.ca KREATING KONFIDENCE

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IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events September 29 Land O’ Lakes Charolais Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., Hoard’s Station, Campbellford, ON October 5 -7 Expo Boeuf, Victoriaville, QC (A BOSS Show) October 6 Sunrise Charolais Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Stayner, ON October 8 M & L Cattle Company Complete Simmental & Purebred Charolais Dispersal Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Indian River, ON October 13 Autumn Prestige Sale, 6:30 p.m., Hoard’s Station, Campbellford, ON October 20 Uppin’ the Ante Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auction, Hanover, ON 60

October 26 Ag-Ex Charolais Show, Brandon, MB (A BOSS Show) November 2 Toronto Royal Charolais Show, Exhibition Place, Toronto, ON (A BOSS Show) November 8 Charolais Players Club, 5:00 p.m. at Farmfair International, Edmonton (AB) Northlands Hall B November 9 Canadian National Charolais Show, 1:00 p.m. at Farmfair International, Edmonton (AB) Northlands (A BOSS Show) November 15 Wood River Charolais/Blake’s Red Angus “Proven Producer” Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

November 22 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Sale, 3:30 p.m., Regina, SK November 23 Canadian Western Agribition Charolais Show, 2:00 p.m., Regina, SK (A BOSS Show) November 28 Genetic Edge Sale, 2:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Cow Palace November 28 Acadia Colony Charolais and Angus Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Oyen, AB November 29 Nelson Hirsche Purebreds Bull & Female Sale, 12:30 p.m., Del Bonita, AB November 30 Sterling Collection Sale, 1:30 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales


December 4 No Borders Select Sale, 1:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB December 5 Western Elite Charolais Sale, Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB December 6 Alberta Charolais Association Annual Meeting 4:00 p.m. & Individual Bull Show 7:00 p.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 7 Pen of 3 Bull Show 11:00 a.m. & Alberta Select Charolais Sale, 1:30 p.m., Red Deer (AB) Westerner Park December 8 Working Girls Female Sale, 1:30 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Market December 10 Diamond K Cattle Co. Bred Heifer Sale, 2:00 p.m., Bircham Ranch, Piapot, SK December 12 Steppler Farms “A Piece of the Program” Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB December 15 Angle H Stock Farm Complete Charolais Dispersal Sale, Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sale December 21 Char-Maine Ranching 14th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange, Fort McLeod, AB 2019: February 9 Myhre Land & Cattle Co./Bar J Charolais Bull Sale (Denbie Ranch & Guests) Ste. Rose du Lac, MB February 15 Muscle Up at Stephen Charolais and Guests Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart February 19 Rawes Ranches 36th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the ranch, Strome, AB February 23 Springside Farms/SanDan Charolais 22nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Erskine, AB February 27 Beck Farms & McCoy Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Milestone, SK March 4 Coyote Flats Charolais 4th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coaldale, AB March 8 CK Sparrow Farms Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Vanscoy, SK

March 10 Steppler Farms 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB March 11 Palmer Charolais 8th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Bladworth, SK March 14 Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle Co. 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Yellow Creek, SK March 15 High Bluff Stock Farm Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Inglis, MB March 16 Pleasant Dawn Charolais 17th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB March 19 Diamond W Charolais, Red & Black Angus 17th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Minitonas, MB March 20 HTA Charolais & Guest Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB March 21 Elder Charolais 9th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coronach, SK March 22 McTavish Farms and Guest 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Moosomin, SK March 26 Prairie Distinction Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB April 1 North of the 49th 16th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite, SK April 2 Cedarlea Farms at Git ‘R Done Bull Sale, at Windy Willows Angus, Hodgeville, SK April 4 Hunter Charolais 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Roblin, MB April 6 Saunders Charolais 14th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Keady (ON) Livestock Market April 9 Top Cut Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Stockman’s Weigh Co., Mankota, SK April 11 Sliding Hills Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Canora, SK April 20 Brimner Cattle Co. at Cornerstone Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

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LOOKING TO FIND SOMEONE?

Advertisers Index Acadia Colony ..............................................38 Alberta Charolais Association .....................39 Alta Custom Programs .................................54 Amabec Charolais ...................................35,57 Angle H Stock Farm .....................................43 Annuroc Charolais........................................57 B Bar D Charolais..........................................57 Baker Farms ..................................................57 Bar H Charolais .............................................59 Beck Farms...............................................17,59 BeRich Farms ...............................................55 Blackbern Charolais .....................................58 Blake's Red Angus ........................................35 Bob Charolais ...............................................55 BoJan Enterprises ........................................59 Borderland Cattle Co. ..................................59 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. .............................54 Bricney Stock Farms .....................................59 Bridor Charolais............................................58 Brimner Cattle Company ........................11,59 Buffalo Lake Charolais ................................55 By Livestock ...................................25,27,35,47 Carey, Brent ..................................................54 Cedardale Charolais .....................................58 Cedarlea Farms..........................................7,59 Charla Moore Farms.....................................59 CharLew Ranch ...........................................55 CharMaine Ranching ..................................55 Charolais Journal..........................................54 Chartop Charolais ........................................59 Charworth Charolais Farms .........................55 Chomiak Charolais ......................................55 Circle Cee Charolais Farms ...........................55 Cline Cattle Co..............................................57 Cockburn Farms............................................58 Cougar Hill Ranch ........................................57 Coyote Flats Charolais.............................31,55 Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co. ..............10,59 C2 Charolais.............................................18,57 DavisRairdan ...............................................54 Defoort Stock Farm ......................................57 Demarah Farms ............................................59 Diamond K Cattle Co. ..................................32 Diamond W Charolais .............................25,59 Dorran, Ryan ................................................54 Double P Stock Farms ..................................57 Dowell Charolais ..........................................55 Dubuc Charolais ...........................................58 DudgeonSnobelen Land & Cattle ..............58 Eaton Charolais ............................................60 Echo Spring Charolais ..................................58 Edge, Dean ...................................................54 Edmonton Northlands .................................38 Elder Charolais Farms..............................15,59 Fergus Family Charolais ...............................58 Ferme Palerme .............................................58 Fischer Charolais...........................................55 Flat Valley Cattle Co.....................................55 Fleury, Michael .............................................54

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Flewelling, Craig ..........................................54 Footprint Farms ...........................................55 Future Farms.................................................55 Gerrard Cattle Co. ........................................55 Gilliland Bros. Charolais ...............................59 Good Anchor Charolais................................55 H.S. Knill Company Ltd. ...............................54 Happy Haven Charolais................................57 Harcourt Charolais .......................................59 Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co. .......................57 Harvie Ranching ..........................................55 HEJ Charolais ...............................................55 Hicks Charolais .............................................58 High Bluff Stock Farm ...............................5,57 Holk Charolais ..............................................55 Hopewell Charolais ......................................59 Horseshoe E Charolais..................................59 Howe Family Farm .......................................59 HTA Charolais Farm ..................................3,57 Hunter Charolais ...................................57,IBC JMB Charolais ..............................................57 Johnson Charolais ........................................55 Johnstone Auction .......................................54 June Rose Charolais .....................................59 Kaiser Cattle Co............................................55 KayR Land & Cattle Ltd...............................55 KCH Charolais ...............................................56 Kirlene Cattle ..........................................35,58 La Ferme Patry de Weedon .........................58 Land O' Lakes Charolais ..........................25,58 Langstaff Charolais ......................................58 Laurel Creek Ranch ......................................59 Leemar Charolais..........................................55 Legacy Charolais...........................................56 LEJ Charolais.................................................57 LindskovThiel Charolais Ranch ...................60 M & L Cattle Co. ......................................27,58 Mack's Charolais...........................................58 Maple Leaf Charolais ...................................56 Martens Cattle Co. .......................................59 Martens Charolais ........................................57 McAvoy Charolais Farm ...............................59 McKay Charolais ...........................................57 McKeary Charolais .......................................56 McLeod Livestock .........................................54 McTavish Farms........................................13,59 Medonte Charolais.......................................58 Miller Land & Livestock................................58 Murphy Livestock .........................................56 Mutrie Farms ................................................59 Myhre Land and Cattle ...........................41,57 Nahachewsky Charolais ...............................59 NelsonHirsche Purebreds ............................33 No Borders Select Sale .................................47 Norheim Ranching .......................................54 P & H Ranching Co. ......................................56 Packer Charolais ...........................................58 Palmer Charolais ................................20,21,60 Parklane Charolais .......................................56

Charolais Connection • Fall 2018

Phillips Farms................................................60 Pleasant Dawn Charolais ..........................9,57 Potter Charolais.......................................35,58 Prairie Cove Consulting ...............................54 Prairie Gold Charolais ..................................60 ProChar Charolais .......................................56 Qualman Charolais ......................................60 Raffan, Don ..................................................54 Rawes Ranches ........................................37,56 Rebuild with Steel ........................................54 Reeleder, Andrew.........................................54 Rollin' Acres Charolais .................................58 Ross Lake Charolais ......................................56 Rosso Charolais.............................................60 Royale Charolais ...........................................58 RRTS Charolais ..............................................56 Saddleridge Farming Co. .............................56 SanDan Charolais Farms ..............................56 Saunders Charolais ..................................47,58 Scarth Cattle Co............................................57 Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co........................60 Sharodon Farms ...........................................58 Skeels, Danny ...............................................54 Sliding Hills Charolais..............................29,60 Southside Charolais......................................56 Southview Farms ..........................................58 CK Sparrow Farms .......................................IFC Springside Farms .....................................23,56 Spruce View Charolais..................................56 Stach Farms Charolais ..................................56 Stephen Charolais Farm ..........................45,60 Steppler Farms Ltd. ..................................6,57 Stock, Mark...................................................54 Stockmen's Insurance...................................54 Sugarloaf Charolais ......................................56 Sunrise Charolais ..........................................27 Sunshine Oak Charolais ...............................57 T Bar C Cattle Co. .....................27,38,43,54,61 Taylor Farms..................................................35 Temple Farms................................................60 Thistle Ridge Ranch......................................56 Transcon Livestock Corp...............................55 TriN Charolais ..............................................57 Turnbull Charolais ........................................56 Twin Anchor Charolais .................................56 Wendt & Murray Farms Ltd. ........................56 Western Litho ...............................................55 White Lake Colony .......................................56 White Meadow Charolais Ltd......................57 WhiteWater Livestock..................................58 Wilgenbusch Charolais ........................60,OBC Wilkie Ranch.................................................56 Windyview Farms .........................................35 Wood River Charolais .............................35,60 Wrangler Charolais ......................................56


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Fall 2018 Charolais Connection  

Fall 2018 Charolais Connection