Country Reunion Magazine, September 2022

Page 1

Country Reunion m • a • g• a • z• i • n • e

September 2022

Malpass Brothers Fed Foley Johnny Cash Parton & Anderson

Barbara Mandrell Hall of Fame Inductees

LadyA Chapel Hart …and more December 2021


Country Reunion Magazine

Who’s inside?

Published monthly b

Country Road Managemen

Larry Black, Publisher Paula Underwood Winters, Editor, Print Layou Claudia Johnson, Writer, Online Layout/Desig Online Subscriptions $15 per yea

countryreunionmusic.com Annual Print Subscriptions $29.95; renewals $24.9 To subscribe or renew cal 1-800-8 20-5405 or mail payment to PO Box 610 Price, UT 84501

8

1

5

2

n

t

9

5

t

4

r

4

1

9

1

l

3

7

6

0

countryreunionmagazine.com

5

y

8

Page 2

2

Free Newsletter Signup

Malpass Brothers, p. 3Amy Grant, p. Johnny Cash Boyhood Home, p. 6Areeda’s Country Cooking, p. Red Foley, p. 10-1 Western Music Association, p. 9-1 American Made Music Fest, p. 1 Dolly & Bill, p. 1 Hall of Fame Inductees, p. 1 Chapel Hart, p. 1 Jeannie Seely p. 1 Nadine, p. 1 Heart of Texas, p. 1 LadyA Tour, p. 2 GoGut @ Diner, p. 2 Renae, p. 2 Show Tapings, p. 23-2

710 N. Main St., Suite B Columbia, TN 38401

September 2022


Fan Fav Malpass Brothers Set for Branson “Diner” Show By Claudia Johnso The Malpass Brothers have become one of the most beloved acts on “Larry’s Country Diner.” Videos of their performances posted on the Country Road TV YouTube channel have had almost a million views. Fans eagerly await their guest appearances for live shows like the Diner’s annual Branson, Missouri, week-long engagement. This year they are the featured act, along with Leona Williams, on Oct. 7 at Branson’s Clay Cooper Theatre As young boys growing up in eastern North Carolina, Christopher and Taylor Malpass soaked up the music of the 45 rpm records their grandfather, Robert Malpass, brought home from the honky-tonk he ran near Goldsboro, N.C Robert bought Christopher a Harmony guitar when he was around six, and the gifted young musician earned his rst talent show trophy at age 7. Taylor, born in 1989, is four years younger than Christopher. Taylor saved his money, and by the time he was 10 he had bought his own mandolin While still children, the boys were part of the Malpass Family Band that included their father, Chris, along with Brian Batten and Clyde Mattocks.

.

.

.

.

.

countryreunionmagazine.com

fi

fi

n

.

Page 3

Sometimes their mother would even sing a song or two with them. Their rst show outside their home region was in 2003 at MerleFest The duo toured with the late Don Helms, former steel guitarist for Hank Williams, whom they met in 2004. They became the opening act for music legend Merle Haggard on multiple tours beginning in 2007 until his death “They remind me a lot of myself and people that I knew when I was young,” Haggard said of the brothers. “They have their hearts into what we call ‘traditional’ country This is who we are. My brother It’s and I do the type of music we do music. valuable to because this music speaks to us, me that we and speaks to the souls of its cultivate listeners” – Christopher Malpass young talent for that kind of music. Now in their 30s with families of their own, they continue to promote the work and music of classic country artists they treasure while creating new music and making their own mark in the lineage of a rich American cultural heritage

September 2022


Gifted musicians and songwriters, the brothers have shared billing with Ray Price, Willie Nelson, Doyle Lawson, Rhonda Vincent, Marty Stuart, Doc Watson and more. “For us, traditional country music is the ‘real deal’ – every s o n g p o r t r a y s l i f e ’s j o y s , heartaches, problems and happiness,” Christopher said. “It comes from the heart, and has depth and truth. Nothing is sugar coated.” The brothers have played numerous times on the Grand Ole Opry stage and maintain a vigorous touring schedule “Our goal, really, is to see this music be revived, to help ensure it doesn’t fade away,” Christopher said. “It is so encouraging to have young people come to our shows with a new interest in our ‘old music.’ Being able to introduce what we love to another generation feels like a great accomplishment for us. We want this music to be around for our children’s children… Over the years the Malpass Brothers have attracted positive attention from traditional Country

.

countryreunionmagazine.com

.

Page 4

music media, including Saving Country Music, which stated,” Their voices are like something uncorked out of a country music time capsule, and the production and arrangement is about as close to classic country perfection as you can get in the modern context. Get tickets to the Branson show that also includes the “Diner” cast. The Isaacs, Rhonda Vincent, Leona Williams and Gene Watson at claycoopertheatre.com

September 2022


Vince Gill and daughter sing for Amy Grant After Accident

.

.

countryreunionmagazine.com

.

.

"

Page 5

Amy Grant was hospitalized following a bike accident on July 27. She was taken to Vanderbilt Hospital and treated for cuts and abrasions after she fell while cycling with a friend. While she was wearing a helmet at the time of the accident she was unconscious for about 10 minutes Because of this she has postponed her fall tour dates. "She wants to be able to give 100% when she tours and, unfortunately, we do not think that will be the case by the time rehearsals would start for the fall dates," Amy Grant's manager said The announcement comes days after Gill, 65, and his and Grant's youngest child, Corinna, delivered a surprise performance. It can be seen on Grant's Facebook page During the second night of a four-night residency at the Ryman in Nashvill, Gill told the crowd he had not been playing his hit "When My Amy Prays" (which he wrote for his wife) regularly as of late, "because of her accident and everything she's been going through we've been thinking a lot about her. "I thought how sweet it would be for her youngest to sing this song I wrote for her," he said of the song, which won the Grammy Award for best countr y solo performance in 2021

September 2022


Historic Dyess Colony & the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home By Claudia Johnso A trip to Johnny Cash’s hometown of Dyess, Arkansas, allows visitors to explore the history and culture of North East Arkansas and its in uence on the legendary Johnny Cash In 2011, Arkansas State University acquired the Johnny Cash Boyhood Home, which has been restored through proceeds from the annual Johnny Cash Heritage Festival originated by his son, John Carter Cash, and his daughter, Roseanne. The Dyess Colony was established in 1934 as a federal agricultural resettlement community under the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. The colony was named for Mississippi County native and Arkansas’s rst WPA administrator, William Reynolds Dyess Dyess promoted his plan for a colony of small subsistence farms to federal relief administrator, Harry Hopkins, and located “Colonization Project No. 1,” on 16,000 acres of land in Mississippi County, Arkansas. The project was later renamed Dyess

.

fl

countryreunionmagazine.com

.

.

n

.

fi

.

fi

.

Page 6

Colony in honor of Dyess, who died in a plane crash in 1934 at age 40 The colony was laid out with a town center at the hub and farmsteads stretching out from the center. The roads leading out were simply numbered rather than named, as in “Road 14.” The men dug ditches to drain the land, and they built 500 small farmhouses Each house had ve rooms with an adjacent barn, privy, and chicken coop. The houses were whitewashed clapboard, each having two bedrooms, a living room, a kitchen and a dining room, plus a front and back porch. Apart from these improvements to the land, the colonists were expected to do the rest themselves, according to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas Families with a farming background from the state’s relief rolls were selected through the application process, which attracted thousands of hopefuls. Criteria for the all-white community required applicants be destitute from the economic crisis, come from the lowest poverty level, be of “good moral background,” and that husband and wife each have the physical ability to clear the land and farm their acreage

September 2022


The Cash house when Cash was a child & after Restoratio September 2022

n

fl

fi

.

countryreunionmagazine.com

fi

fi

.

.

fi

fi

.

fi

Page 7

fi

fl

The rst 13 families arrived in October 1934, and Ray and Carrie Cash were accepted as one of the 500 families. They moved in March 1935 with their ve children, including Roy, 13; Louise, 11; Jack, 5; J. R. (Johnny), 3; and Reba, 1. Two additional children, Joanne and Tommy, were born in Dyess. The Cash home is one of the few houses remaining in the former New Deal-era colony Each farmer would draw a subsistence advance to buy 20 to 40 acres of land and one of the new ve-room houses, plus a m u l e , a c o w, g r o c e r i e s a n d supplies until the rst year’s crop came in. In order to obtain a deed to their property, each family was expected to pay back the advance Cash’s song, “Five Feet High and Rising,” was about the ever-present threat of ooding, which Cash would have witnessed as a ve-year-old when oodwaters in approximately three years when the land had been cleared from the Tyronza River reached the colony in 1937. and the elds were producing, a mansion, the town center included a community provision that many of the settlers did not fully bank, beauty salon/barbershop, blacksmith shop, understand until they had already moved café, cannery, cotton gin, feedmill, furniture factory, The town operated as a cooperative. Seed was harness shop, hospital, ice house, library, theater, purchased and crops primarily of cotton, corn and newspaper (the Colony Herald), post office, soybeans were sold communally with farmers sharing printing shop, service station/garage, sorghum mill any pro ts from the crops and other Dyess and school. businesses A local scrip called “doodlum” was used as In time, along with a large administration currency building reminiscent of a Southern plantation


The restored Administration Building houses exhibits related to the Dyess Colony, the Cash family and the impact of Dyess on Johnny Cash and his music The Historic Dyess Colony: Johnny Cash Boyhood Home is open Monday – Saturday from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Tours can be combined with the Southern Tenant Farmers Museum in Tyronza to learn more about the histories of Arkansas, a griculture and the Great Depression. Click here for tickets, info and the musical performance schedule Ray Cash holding two of his children at their Dyess Colony home

W h e n t h e co l o n y w a s p l a ce d u n d e r t h e management of t h e Fa r m Security Administration (FSA) in 1940 due to a political dispute between the state and federal governments, farmers felt they had become subservient to larger entities that undermined their independence. With the coming of World War II, about half the residents left Dyess for war work, never to return. From its 1936 high point of 2,500 residents, only 295 remained at the time of the 2020 census Johnny Cash lived in Dyess until he graduated from high school in 1950. His music was greatly in uenced by his experiences in Dyess, including such songs as “Pickin’ Time,” about the nancial insecurity of waiting until crops were in and sold, and “Five Feet High and Rising,” about the ever-present threat of ooding, which Cash would have witnessed as a ve-year-old when oodwaters from the Tyronza River reached the colony in 1937 In 2009, the Arkansas legislature directed Arkansas State University to determine the feasibility of developing the town as a heritage tourism site The City of Dyess, which was incorporated in 1964, donated the Administration Building, along with the adjacent theatre center shell, to Arkansas State University.

.

fi

.

.

countryreunionmagazine.com

fl

.

fl

.

fi

fl

Page 8

Cash and his older brother, Jack, in 1926

September 2022


Areeda’s

southern cooking by Areeda Schneider Stampley

Tangy Vegetable Sala Dressing: 1 teaspoon sal 1 cup suga 1 teaspoon peppe ½ cup vegetable oi ¾ cup apple cider vinega 1 tablespoon wate Bring to a quick boil; remove from heat and set aside. Make this rst so it can cool

While dressing is cooling: Drain following vegetables & combine in a large bowl 1 (11-oz.) can white kernel corn, shoe pe 1 diced green bell peppe 1 (14 ½ oz.) can French style green bean 1 (4 oz.) can chopped piment ½ cup grated carrot 1 cup diced onio 1 cup diced celery (2 ribs 1 (8 ½ oz.) can tiny green English pea Pour cooled dressing over vegetables. Cover tightly. Refrigerate overnight or longer to reach peak avor. When transferring to a serving bowl, use a slotted spoon (to avoid the oil that it marinated in). Serves 10-1

.

d

g

s

s

o

.

2

r

)

r

s

l

r

r

n

t

fi

r

fl

To purchase Areeda’s Southern Cooking, a collection of old-fashioned recipes, send $24.45 check (no credit cards) and mailing address to Areeda’s Southern Cooking, P. O. Box 202, Brentwood, TN 37024. Order online with PayPal or credit card at www.areedasoutherncooking.com. Page 9 September 2022 countryreunionmagazine.com


By Claudia Johnso Since its launch in 1924, WLS Radio in Chicago became and still remains a very powerful station. It was also a star-maker with many of the rst stars of Country and other genres of music beginning their careers as performers on live daily or weekly programs In the early days of radio larger stations produced a magazine to promote their stars and shows. Browsing the digital collections of these old magazines o ers glimpses into the careers of edgling entertainers, some of whom made it to stardom and some who never did. The WLS publication, Standby Magazine, was issued weekly from February 1935 until it merged in July 1938 with Prairie Farmer, America’s oldest, continuously published farm newspaper, which began in 1841 The April 20, 1935, issue of Standby Magazine featured 24-year-old Clyde Julian Foley on the cover and a feature about him on page 11. The text of that feature is reprinted here in its entirety.

many an hour (when maybe he should have been unpacking new stock) by playing his guitar and singing the old songs of the southern hill country Red's ambitions went further than that. He attended Bradley Kincaid's Alma mater, Berea college, the famous school for mountain boys and girls. He devoted himself seriously to the study of classical music and voice culture. In a heavy baritone voice, Red won a regional Atwater Kent audition contest and went to WCKY, Covington, Kentucky He learned, however, that both himself and his listeners enjoyed the simple old-time songs of the mountains. He's been singing them ever since After a few months at WCKY, Red came to Chicago, determined to get an audition with John Lair and the Cumberland Ridge Runners. John, who knows as much about folk music and the way it should be sung as anyone else in the country, heard Red sing a number of songs and signed him with the Cumberland Ridge Runners, immediately

“If a certain Kentuckian hadn't been a mite short of cash when he was settling up his bill at Ben Foley's general store at Berea, Kentucky, some years back, radio listeners might never have heard the voice of Ramblin' Red Foley It was a common custom for the elder Foley's customers to pay o their debts in produce instead of cash One customer, however, had a di erent plan "Ben," he said, "I can't spare any corn this fall, but, tell you what I'll do. I got me an old guitar that I'll trade in on my bill. Ben Foley hesitated. What would he do with a guitar, he wondered A red-headed stripling who was busy helping his Dad tend store, left the customer he was waiting on and rushed over "Go on, take that gittar, Dad," he said. "I want to learn to play one. That was how Clyde Julian (Ramblin' Red) Foley acquired his rst musical instrument. He took to that old guitar as the proverbial duck to water Things were lots brighter in the dull moments between customers after that. Red whiled away

.

.

fi

ff

.

countryreunionmagazine.com

.

.

ff

"

.

fi

n

ff

.

.

.

.

.

Page 10

.

fl

Red Foley Was Cover Story in 1935 Magazine

September 2022


What the story from Standby Magazine reprinted here does not disclose is that Foley’s rst wife, Axie Cox, had died on Feb. 5, 1933, at age 20 while giving birth to their daughter, Betty, who became a Country music artist. The second wife mentioned in the article, Eva Overstake, went on to bear two more daughters, Julie and Jenny, in addition to Shirley, who married pop crooner Pat Boone. Foley and Overstake married Aug. 9, 1933, when she was 16 and he was 23. Eva took her own life on Nov. 17, 1951. A year later on Oct. 28, 1952, Foley wed comedienne Sally Sweet to whom he remained married until he died of respiratory failure at age 58 Unlike so many others featured in Standby Magazine and other early radio publications, Foley would become a legend, selling more than 25 million records Foley was co-founder of the Renfro Valley Barn Dance in Rockcastle County, Kentucky, which has been in operation since 1939. On Jan.17, 1945, Foley w a s t h e f i r s t C o u n t r y p e r f o r m e r to r e co r d in Nashville, Tennessee. During the session at WSM-AM's Studio B, he recorded radio hits "Tennessee Saturday Night," "Blues in the Heart" and "Tennessee Border.” His 1951 recording of "Peace in the Valley" was among the rst million-selling gospel records. Foley’s trademark song, "Chattanoogie Shoe Shine Boy,” stayed at No. 1 on Bi board's Country chart for 13 weeks and hit the pop chart as well

Not only was he a popular live entertainer and radio performer, he hosted several nationally broadcast radio programs and television shows. His t w o s t a r s o n t h e Ho l l y w o o d w a l k o f f a m e commemorate both his television and recording careers He was honored with induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1967, having been a member of and active performer with the Grand Ole Opry since 1946,

.

.

.

ll

countryreunionmagazine.com

ff

.

.

fi

Page 11

.

fi

How sound and trustworthy was John's judgment is borne out by the thousands of Foley fans throughout the country. Red's sweet voice and the sincerity with which he "puts over" his songs assured him of success Red had been at WLS for a little more than a year when he su ered a malady often found among boys and girls. He fell in love The girl who took Red's eye was little Eva Overstake of the Three Little Maids sister harmony trio. Red and Eva were married in the early summer of 1933. Right now they're devoting a great share of their time and attention to one Shirley Foley, who came along to make their family a threesome a little over eight months ago.

September 2022


Festival Features American Made Music Travel back in time for award-winning traditional country, bluegrass and gospel music and small-town hospitality. Dailey & Vincent’s American Made Music Festival on Oct. 7 and 8 in Gainesboro, Te n n e s s e e , w i l l f e a t u r e p e r f o r m a n c e s b y D a i l e y & Vi n c e n t , Jo s h Tu r n e r, S h e n a n d o a h , T h e Is a a c s , G e n e Wa t s o n , Ma l p a s s Brothers, Kentucky Just Us, Shenandoah and a salute to the Grand Ole Opry with The Isaacs, Dailey & Vincent and Gene Watson. Presented by Springer Mountain Farms, the festival will be held outside on the Jackson County Airport grounds and o ers unforgettable views with the airport nestled in the Tennessee hills right on the banks of the Cumberland River. One-day passes start at $59, while two-day passes start at $89. Aside f rom the festival, Jackson County is one of Tennessee’s best kept secrets and newest destinations for all outdoor enthusiasts and explorers. The Jackson County Chamber of Commerce invites festivalgoers to arrive a few days early and take time to hike to gorgeous Cummins Falls State Park, take a stroll through the small-town streets of Gainesboro, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and experience the historic river town of Granville. Jackson County has several museums and a variety of places to enjoy the local cuisine. For tickets and information, visit americanmademusicfestivals.com/

.

ff

countryreunionmagazine.com

Page 12

September 2022


Parton and Anderson Record First Collaboration Countr y Music Hall of Fame and Songwriters Hall of Fame members Whisperin’ Bill Anderson and Dolly Parton have made a music video debut together in their rst-ever collaboration. The song is called “Someday It’ll All Make Sense.” “Working with my ol’ buddy Bill Anderson was the most meaningful fun I’ve had in years,” said Parton. “I love the song we sang. I love how we sounded together on it, and getting to do a video with him was just icing on the cake. I hope the fans enjoy it as much as we enjoyed being together on it. Someday the picture will come into focu And we’ll see it all plain and clea When we come together in the place He has for u Where the pain and the hurt disappea Someday we’ll laugh at these roads that we’ve travele I am completely convince That hope never dies or goes out of fashio Someday it’ll all make sens “Hopefully, our song can help bring a bit of levity to a world that seems upside down and sideways so much of the time these days. If it can, music will have once again proven itself to be the optimal healer,” said Anderson. “Someday It’ll All Make Sense” was co-written by Anderson with Bobby Tomberlin and Ryan Larkins and is on Anderson’s most recent release, As Far As I Can See: The Best Of, released earlier this year by MCA Records. The song’s poignant lyrics are brought to life under the masterful direction of Trey Fanjoy, who has produced Taylor Swift, Paul McCartney, Keith Urban, Reba McEntire, George Strait, Loretta Lynn and many others, as the video shows the two country music icons journey down the road to hope.

fi

d

s

n

s

r

r

e

September 2022

countryreunionmagazine.com

d

Page 13


Barbara Mandrell Makes Surprise Grand Ole Opry Appearance Country Music Hall of Famer and Grammy winner Barbara Mandrell stepped away from showbiz nearly two decades ago, but the country legend made her triumphant return to the Opry stage on July 30 It has been 50 years since Mandrell became a member of the Grand Ole Opry. She was only 23 years old back on that day in 1972, but she had already spent most of her life dedicated to playing music. By the time Mandrell turned ve, she was reading sheet music and playing the accordion. Mandrell’s professional career took o when critically acclaimed guitarist Joe Maphis noticed Mandrell’s extraordinary talents at a music trade convention in Chicago. Maphis set things in motion for Mandrell’s leap to stardom, by o ering her a spot in his Las Vegas nightclub show. Over her career, Mandrell, the multi-instrumentalist and singer turned millions of fans onto country music in the '70s and '80s, not only through her popular TV show "Barbara Mandrell and the Mandrell Sisters," but also through hits like "Sleeping Single in a Double Bed," "If Loving You is Wrong (I Don't Want to be Right)" and "I Was Country When Country Wasn't Cool. She became the rst countr y artist to earn back-to-back entertainer of the year awards from the Countr y Music Association, having crossover R&B covers and bringing glamour and showmanship to the genre. Her performances were a showcase of her musicality Mandrell hasn't played music or sung – other than in church – since she retired in 1997. Her last concert ever was held at the Opry House and made into a TV special called, "Barbara Mandrell and the Do-Rites: The Last Dance. Mandrell posted on her Instagram following the performance To my fans, thank you for celebrating my 50th Opry Anniversary with me last evening. Whether you were there in person or watching from home, I felt so much love from each of you and I wish you could know how you made me feel. Thank you to @carrieunderwood, @cecewinans, @lindadavisnashville, @suzybogguss, @seelyo cial, @ r e a l co n n i e s m i t h , @ m a n d y b a r n e t t m u s i c & @janellearthur for all of the beautiful songs you sang last night. Thank you to the @opry for celebrating me and welcoming me home. Lord knows I love the Opry! Love, Barbara. September 2022

.

ff

"

ffi

fi

"

countryreunionmagazine.com

.

fi

:

ff

Page 14


Hall of Fame to Induct Three in October

The Country Music Association in inducting Joe Galante, Jerry Lee Lewis and Keith Whitley into the Country Music Hall of Fame “Our new inductees come from three very di erent places, but in October they will be enshrined in the very same place,” says Kyle Young, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum Chief Executive O cer. “Jerry Lee Lewis is a God-fearing rabble-rouser from a Mississippi River town, way down South. Keith Whitley was a Lefty Frizzellloving Country boy from rural Kentucky. And Joe Galante is a game-changing executive from the urban northeast. They all lled our worlds with music. They are all deserving of our respect and adulation, and their elections into the Country Music Hall of Fame ensure that respect and adulation will endure through the ages. Galante will be inducted in the “Non-Performer” category, which is awarded every third year in rotation with “Recording and/or Touring Musician” and “Songwriter” categories. Lewis will be inducted in the “Veterans Era Artist” category and Whitley will be inducted in the “Modern Era Artist” category “When I heard the news, I was being inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, it was the rst time in my entire career I was speechless,” said Galante. “I’m humbled, beyond honored and honestly, I’m still trying to wrap my head around this. “This year’s inductees are trailblazers who each paved their own unique path within Country Music,” says Sarah Trahern, CMA Chief Executive O cer. “Jerry Lee, Keith and Joe each found their musical callings early in life and displayed a strong-minded and erce passion for music making. In ver y

.

fi

ffi

.

.

fi

.

countryreunionmagazine.com

fi

ffi

ll

fi

ff

ff

Page 15

di erent ways, they all have left a lasting impact on the industry and generations of fans alike. I am thrilled to welcome this deserving class into the Country Music Hall of Fame. Jerry Lee Lewis is, as music historian Colin Escott has noted, “a rock ‘n’ roller who could never quite get the Country out of his soul, and a Country singer who could never forget rock ‘n’ roll. “To be recognized by Country Music with their highest honor is a humbling experience,” said Lewis. “The little boy from Ferriday, Louisiana, listening to Jimmie Rodgers and Hank Williams never thought he’d be in a Hall amongst them. I am appreciative of all those who have recognized that Jerry Lee Lewis music is Country Music and to our almighty God for his never-ending redeeming grace. Four years, seven months and 10 days passed between Keith Whitley’s rst appearance on the Bi board Country singles charts, and his death on May 9, 1989, at 34. It’s the briefest chart span of any Hall of Famer during their lifetime, nearly six months shorter than Hank Williams’ “In my heart, this feels like an absolutely appropriate honor, but at the same time, I know that Keith would be painfully humbled, and even shy about accepting an induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame,” said Grand Ole Opr y star, Lorrie Morgan, who was married to Whitley until his untimely passing. “Music was all about emotion to Keith. It was personal. There were so many great artists he admired, even worshipped. To stand in their company in the Hall of Fame would’ve been overwhelmingly emotional for him. I am thrilled to see him honored this way, and for what it means to my children, Morgan and Jesse Keith; to Keith’s grandchildren; the Whitley family; and to the many, many fans who continue to point to Keith as one of the all-time greats. A formal induction will take place at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in October. Click for more information September 2022


Chapel Hart Gets Goldern Buzzer on AQT By Claudia Johnson

In 2021 CFR News featured Danica and Devynn Hart, along with their cousin Trea Swindle, who make up Chapel Hart. The Mississippi natives had just released their Dolly Parton– inspired "You Can Have Him, Jolene," in which they decide to let the cheating husband go. When they performed the song during this year's auditions for "America's Got Talent," not only did they capture the Golden Buzzer Awards, sending them straight to the televised competition, they heard from a new fan – Parton herself. “What a fun new take on my song, @ChapelHartBand! Dolly tweeted. “Carl's birthday is today, so I think I'll hang on to him, and I'm not notifying Jolene that today is his birthday." The ladies were overwhelmed. "Can somebody call the mortician, 'cause we just died a little bit?" they responded. In 2021 Chapel Hart was inducted into CMT’s Next Women of Country. They were named “International Group of the Year” and won “International Song of the Year” for the single “You Can Have Him Jolene” in Scotland. They were also nominated in multiple categories by the British CMAs, including “Group of the Year” and “Album of the Year” for their sophomore release “The Girls Are Back in Town.” However, during their AGT audition they told judge Simon Cowell that they weren't gaining the success in the music industry that they had hoped because of the way they look. "You just got to break down that door, and you may have just broken down the door with that performance, tr ust me," Cowell said. When their single, "The Girls Are Back in Town," hit the No. 1 spot on iTunes they posted a screen shot of the chart with the comment, "Y'all really tr yna give ya girls a heart attack!! Not #1 on iTunes?!?!?" Ne x t c a m e a n i n v i t a t i o n t o perform at the Grand Ole Opry on Sept. 17. "The trio has a natural ability to make people join together in song and dance in their live performances,” stated the Opry website in announcing their upcoming performance. “They often note music's incredible power to unite people of all nationalities, religions and walks of life.”

September 2022

countryreunionmagazine.com

Page 16


As a trailblazing GRAMMY® awardwinner, Grand Ole Opry member Jeannie Seely makes history again as the artist with the most appearances on the show that made country music famous. Thanks to technology and the dedication of independent Opry historian Byron Fay, research shows Seely has made more performances on the Grand Ole Opry than any other performer in the 97year history of the Opry. Seel y will celebrate this historic achievement during her 55th Opr y anniversary on Saturday, September 17. “Jeannie Seely’s commitment to the Grand Ole Opry is truly remarkable,” said Opry Executive Producer Dan Rogers. “I’ve been a liated with the Opry less than half of her time as an o cial member, and even in those two decades I’ve witnessed so many examples of her dedication to this show we love: performing in borrowed clothes on the rst Opry show after the 2010 ood inundated both the Opry House and her own home, making her way to the show in sta members’ vehicles after a major snowstorm, and simply being here night after night to lend her voice to this one-of-a-kind show. Since her debut in 1966, Seely has become a mainstay at the Grand Ole Opry with more than 5,000 performances to her name. While Opr y membership performance requirements have changed over the course of Seely’s 55 years with the show, her commitment has not, building continuity, a sense of family, and an unmatched performance record “Jeannie is hands down the coolest member of the Opry. I hope and pray every time I play that beautiful stage that she is there. Her presence in the room is unlike any other. Every time I am around her I laugh until my stomach hurts. I hope I can be a fraction of what she is to the Opry someday. In my opinion, she represents the Opry and country music awlessly. We are lucky to have her,” shared Grand

Ole Opry member and multi-platinum selling artist Lauren Alaina. “I have known Jeannie Seely since she rst came to town,” shared the newest member of the Grand Ole Opry and Country Music Hall of Fame member, Charlie McCoy. “I played on her rst hit, ” Don’t Touch Me” and we toured Japan together. She is the constant star of the Opry and is so welcoming to newcomers. I’m proud to be on the same team with Jeannie.” To quote her, “The Opry is a way of life, my way of life, and I wouldn’t have it any other way! This is where my heart is. In September, I will have been here 55 years, but it’s not long enough” she laughs

.

fi

fi

countryreunionmagazine.com

ffi

fi

ff

ffi

.

Page 17

fl

fl

Seely Makes The Grand Ole Opry History

September 2022


Well, h e we e already in Septemb , and I am ab t ready f N emb ! It has been so hot, I can't h dly go tside to get in the c ! Talked to Gus and he said they w e feeding the chickens ushed ice to keep ‘em laying h d b led eggs! I was l king t my kitchen wind this m ning and saw b ds pulling w ms t of the nd with poth d s! O Baptist Ch ch is st ting to sprinkle; the Methodists e using wet wipes; and the Presbyt ians e giving t rain checks. I he d the Cath ics e praying f the wine to t n back into wat . I bet s e pe le e ge ing the life s aightened t. This heat will make y realize y s e d 't want to go to hell! H t k me t to eat at this real g d Japanese resta ant. Y kn the es that c k right in t of y . I w d if they have resta ants in Japan that c k an Am ican meal in t of y with a lawn cha and a ill? I enj this eating t a li le t much. I'm at the p nt wh e my knees will buckle and my belt w 't! Well, it's f tball time! I am so cited – NOT! F ev y f tball game H watches, he has to watch a Hallm k m ie with me. We was watching a m ie and this lady was ying a broken he t, and I was ying, and H said, “Why in the w ld e y ying a TV sh that's not real” and y d 't even kn these pe le.” I said, “F the same reas y s eam and h l when a guy y d 't kn makes a t chd n!” T ché! L e ya'll,

Nadine

ir

om

er

cr

cr

fr

oo

ou

or

on

ou

tt

or

ar

oo

er

er

ou

ow

ow

om

or

ou

or

ov

ou

ou

August 2022

op

or

ar

ov

tr

ow

cr

ar

ol

ur

oy

oo

on

ir

ow

ou

ow

ur

er

er

ir

on

or

ar

tt

gr

om

ar

er

ou

on

ol

ou

ar

oo

er

ou

ir

er

oo

er

cr

ex

on

on

om

ov

er

ou

ou

gr

ar

ol

ou

ur

ou

ar

er

ou

ou

er

ar

ou

ur

on

ar

ar

oi

ou

ar

fr

ow

cr

oi

on

oo

or

ar

ou

oo

fr

er

er

ou

er

on

ur

om

er

er

oo

ov

op

Nadine bonding with the dog countryreunionmagazine.com from Hot Club at Cowtown

Page 18

ur

ov

ov

Nadine’s Corner


Heart of Texas Roadhouse Show in Branson Tony Booth, Mary Lou Turner, Barbara Fairchild and Allison Crowson will be featured in the Heart of Texas Roadshow at the Mickey Gilley Theater in Branson, Missouri, on Tuesday, October 4. The show will begin at 2 p.m. and admission is $20 per person. Booth gained fame by working for Buck Owens as a front man and bass player. He branched out on his own with major hits including “Cinderella” “Keys In The Mailbox” “Close Up The Honkytonks” and “Lonesome 7-7203. After a twenty year absence, he signed with Heart of Texas Records and released “Is This All There Is To A Honky Tonk,” “Old School,” “The Other Side of Love” and his rst gospel album, “I Love To Tell The Story.” He was awarded the Male Vocalist of the Year award by the Academy of Western Artists in 2011. He tours throughout the Southwest and has recently performed in Scotland, England and Japan Born in Hazard, Kentucky, Turner began her successful career as a Country Music Artist in 1974, with her rst popular song, “All That Keeps Me Going.” She followed that success with several other songs that reached the top 50 on the U.S. Country Charts, including “It's Di erent with You” “Love It Away” and “Cheatin' Overtime”. Turner may be best known for the duets she sang with Bill Anderson that reached the top 25 on the U.S. Country Charts, including “Sometimes” “I'm Way Ahead of You” and “That’s What Made Me Love You.” She has two albums o n He a r t o f Te x a s Re c o r d s i n c l u d i n g Turner “ Fr i e n d s And Me m o r i e s ” a n d “A S e n t i m e n t a l Mu s i c Journey Fa i r c h i l d b e g a n singing country music at a young age and by 1965 was a singing star, at least locally, in St. Louis Missouri. After her High School graduation in 1968, she decided it was time to

.

ff

countryreunionmagazine.com

fi

.

.

fi

.

.

fi

Page 19

move to Nashville. Her big break was being signed by Producer Billy Sherill, the same guy was working with the legendar y Tammy Wynette. Fairchild had a few minor hits, but it was 1973 that turned her career around and made her a bona de Country Star. 1973 was the year of million selling “The Teddy Bear Song”. She followed that with Booth more hits including “Cheatin Is” and ‘Kid S t u f f. ” She most recently has been working in Branson, Missouri. Roy Morris will join her on stage for some duets and special moments Crowson is a Texas based singer who has enjoyed success with both her classic countr y and polka influenced music. She formed the Bluebonnet Opry in 1998 and hosted many legendary acts during the monthly show including Kitty Fairchild Wells, Billy Walker, Bil l Anderson and Johnny Bush. Crowson currently owns the White Horse in Burton, Texas, and performs throughout the state of Texas Texas Countr y Music Disc Jockey Hall of Famer Tracy Pitcox will MC the show. Advance tickets are available by calling (417) 336-0888 Crowson

September 2022


Lady A Cancels Remaining 2022 Tour Dates The award-winning country band Lady A – composed of Charles Kelley, Hillary Scott, and Dave Haywood – has been quietly canceling several shows. By August 1st, they had cancelled at least ve performances including Choctaw Indian Fair, Porter County Fair, Great Jones County Fair, Atlantic Union After Hours at The Meadow Event Park and Lancaster Festival, Lancaster Following the release of the reason for the cancellation by the venue of the Choctaw Indian Fair, the band nally broke their silence and revealed that their entire Request Line Tour has been postponed until next year. They also revealed the reason as to why “We are a band, but more importantly…we’re family,” they wrote in an Instagram post. “We’re proud to say that Charles has embarked on a journey to sobriety. So, right now in order to be the healthiest, strongest and most creative band we can be, Lady A will take the time with the support of o u r f a m i l i e s a n d te a m o f professionals to walk through this together. The band continued, “It’s early on this road, but we are determined to do what will best set us up for many more years together. We’re grateful for your patience. Their Request Line Tour had the band scheduled for shows all the way until Oct. 20. In the coming days, fans will be receiving a refund from their point of purchase. Turner

Visit their website

.

.

fi

September 2022

countryreunionmagazine.com

fi

Page 20


A few months ago Larry Black introduced a new sponsor for "Larr y's Countr y Diner." GoGut Microbebiotic, a chemical-free, gluten-free, nonGMO, avorless ber supplement that mixes easily into any beverage or food. Country Family Reunion News caught up with Basil White, co-owner of GoGut, to get some answers about this remarkable product CFR: How did your company get involved with this product White: A Japanese Scientist reached out to us to do clinical trials on the product to see all of the amazing bene ts GoGut has. CFR: Why is this product important to gut health White: Healthy gut microbes are the foundation for improved health. Our ndings con rmed that ber promotes healthy gut micro ora by eliminating bad bacteria in the gut and colon CFR: Is there science behind it

White: GoGut Microbebiotic is produced using a patented method that allows us to extract soluble fiber from a vegetable host in its PURIST form. Alex White MD and his research team conducted research trials around our proprietary super ber supplement, and the results were fantastic. Dr. White lost 15 pounds while taking the product CFR: Is weight loss the only goal of the product White: A healthy gut can help build a strong immune system, heart health, brain health, improved mood, healthy sleep and better digestion. Our goal is to help our clients achieve a healthy gut and enhance overall health CFR: How have users been responding to it White: Healthy changes occurred for many of the patients and customers that are taking it, including weight loss, healthy glucose levels, and metabolism. Better digestion, lower A1C and overall better gut health CFR: What are the future plans for the product and the company White: We want to get our product out all over the world so we can help people become healthier CFR: Are there other ways to use GoGut than mixing in a liquid White: In addition to dissolving in liquids such as co ee or room temperature water, it can be blended into smoothies or other drinks. It can also be sprinkled in broths or on food. We use it in our cookies and chocolates we have for sale on our website www.gogut.com CFR: How can people who need it get it White: We ship it internationally. Order anytime at www.gogut.com or call us at 866-321-4648. For locals near Port Orange, Florida, we have a store open Monday-Friday “Diner” fans can o r d e r f r o m Re n e a reneathewaitress.com Nadine REALLY loved the GoGu Cookies Basil gave her

fi

?

.

?

fi

?

.

.

fl

.

?

fi

.

.

countryreunionmagazine.com

!

!

fi

?

?

fi

.

?

t

fl

?

.

Page 21

ff

fi

GoGut Microbebiotic Introduced on “Diner”

September 2022


New Page 22

September 2022


Mark Wills with Hannah Dasher & Ben Hall

Mark Wills with Ben Hall

Check out Hannah Dasher’s cooking show on Tik-Tok, “Stand By Your Pan”

Ivy Phillips, Page 23 Jake Vanove & Jimmy Fortune

September 2022


T. Graham Brown with Michelle Capps

Paul Overstreet

Page 24

Watch for new shows on “Larry’s Country Diner” beginning in September. All episodes from the past are on Country Road TV, and many performances are on YouTube.

September 2022


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.