Country Reunion Magazine, August 2023

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Country Reunion m •a • g• a • z • i • n • e

August 2023

Randy Travis

Jesse McReynolds Gary Sinise Bobby Osborne Country Fashion

Patty Loveless

Bill Anderson Be amy Bro ers Jimmy Payne Guy Gilchrist

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… and more December 2021


Country Reunion Magazine Who’s inside? Stars & Horses, p. 3-5 Jesse McReynolds, p. 6 Gary Sinise, p. 7 Southern Cooking, p. 8 Bobby Osborne, p. 9 Country Fashion, p. 10-12 Nadine, p. 13 Jimmy Payne, p. 14-17 Patty Loveless, p. 18-19 Birthdays, p. 19 Guy Gilchrist, p. 20 Bill Anderson, p. 21 Renea the Waitress, p. 22 Bellamy Brothers, p. 23 Book Club, p. 24

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August 2023


Stars Believe Horses Strengthen Mental Health by Claudia Johnson No other animals have been as in uential on human evolution as horses. Horses are highly intuitive to nonverbal messages and intention, and as such can re ect aspects of ourselves that can lead to deep healing and connection. That’s why the Horses for Mental Health has garnered support from celebrities, musical artists, mental health advocates, esteemed equestrians and more, all sharing stories of horses that have positively impacted their lives, mental health and/or personal journeys.

Tanya Tucker “ T h e r e ’s n o t h i n g m o r e c a l m i n g a n d rewarding than climbing onto a saddle and taking a ride,” said two-time Grammy winner and Country Music Hall of Fame Inductee Tanya Tucker. “I can’t imagine my life without horses – they’ve done more for me than I could ever do for them. I know for a fact that going on a ride or just being around them relieves anxiety and depression. Tucker is the 2023 special ambassador for the Seen Through Horses annual campaign that raises awareness and funds for 55+ nonpro ts o ering mental health programs incorporating horses, with the goal of these programs being accessible to all who need them.

Photo: Derrek Kupish

Justin Adams Country singer-songwriter Justin Adams said he has a timeless connection to horses. There’s something about a horse. It’s so incredibly hard to explain yet at the same time it’s quite simple,” he observed. “I’ve been around horses longer than I’ve been alive. The Cherokee and Chickasaw blood that runs red in my veins gives me an ancestral connection to these beautiful creatures. I’ve often said that I’m at my closest to God on the back of a horse. There’s a spiritual connection. A healing. A sense of belonging and purpose.”

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Clayton Smalley

Photo: Chelsea Evans with Apple Blossom Way

Mikayla Lane

Clayton Smalley’s horse, Flower, became a lifelong companion to the country music artist. “Flower, the dun lly my mom got me at age four. Flower was the horse on which I learned to ride and one of the gentlest and most trustworthy animals I’ve ever known,” Smalley said. “As a famil y, we would trail ride in the mountains of Southern California. That’s where I developed my love for the outdoors and formed a bond with Flower that lasted until the day she passed away. My mom tells a story of one trip when we were riding back in the dark, and I fell asleep and fell o Flower. When I got back on, my mom made me sing the rest of the way back to the trailhead so she’d know I was still awake. I guess you could say Flower was my rst captive audience.” Smally said that Flower served as a companion to his grandmother during her retirement and returned to his life as a husband and father. “She was a cherished member of our family that brought a lot of peaceful, therapeutic rides that I will never forget,” he said.

“I think back on all the wonderful experiences I’ve had with our horses and I recognize just how much they have contributed to my happiness, my attitude, my outlook and especially my growth as it relates to becoming more responsible,” said Mikayla Lane, a country recording artist who grew up on a cattle farm. “If you have the opportunity to get involved with any equine program, I would strongly encourage you to do so because I promise it will bring so many good feelings and good times your way!” Photo: Hope Toliver and Jason Old

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Randy travis Another beloved country music star attested to the fact that the bond between horses and humans can provide emotional and psychological bene ts. “The love of a horse is pure and unaltered between man and horse,” said Randy Travis. “Since before I was able to walk, I have been on horseback – initially at my father’s insistence, and forever after due to my a ection for them. I don’t remember a time in my life when I didn’t have horses, nor would I change that luxur y. I cleared my head and escaped the world more times than I can count when I was one with the horse and the wind…they were my friend.” Travis said that following what could have been his career and life ending stroke there was much confusion and lack of recognition regarding much of the life he had once known. However, when he returned to his ranch after six months in the hospital, his horses provided the connection he needed. “When we [he and wife Mary] rst pulled up the drive to our ranch, our rst greeting came from our pasture of ponies,” Travis recalled. “We drove right up to the fence and one by one, they each came over to the window, nuzzled my neck and stood around as if they each were sharing their stories of the last 6 months. So many forgotten memories and familiar feelings came ooding back to me. They were the therapists I would understand the best.” Mental health programs involving horses have gained recognition as an e f f e c t i v e f o r m o f t h e r a p y. T h e s e programs can help individuals struggling with various mental health issues such as anxiety, depression and PTSD.

For information about participating in this initiative, visit horsesformentalhealth.org.

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Watch Randy Travis discuss the importance of horses in his life and see video footage of his ranch and horses.


Bluegrass Pioneer McReynolds Gone Jesse McReynolds, 93, a bluegrass pioneer died on June 23 weeks after falling ill. For more than ve decades Jesse was the mandolin player for Jim & Jesse the brother duo. He'd been in assisted living for three months until he returned home on June 4 but had taken a turn for the worse. "Jesse passed peacefully with me at his bedside at 3:58 PM today," Joy McReynolds, Jesse’s wife, shared the news on her Facebook page. She'd been updating fans, friends and family there since earlier this year when had a heart scare that required a pacemaker. McReynolds was born July 9, 1929, near Coburn, Virginia. Jim & Jesse’s grandfather was fiddler Charlie McReynolds, who recorded a s a m e m b e r o f T h e B u l l Mo u n t a i n Moonshiners at the famed 1927 Bristol Sessions. Jim & Jesse were signed by Capitol Records and brought to Nashville to record in 1952. The ddler on the sessions was James Loden, later to become Country Music Hall of Fame member Sonny James. The standout tune of these recordings was one of their trademark songs, “Are You Missing Me,” written by The Louvin Brothers. McReynolds had been a member of the Opry for nearly 60 years, making him one of the most senior members. He performed regularly until 2020, but he was spotted most often with his brother and duet partner, Jim McReynolds. The brothers released more than a dozen bluegrass albums between 1962 and 1982 and several before Jim’s 2002 death after a cancer battle. They became members of the Bluegrass Hall of Fame in 1993 and enjoyed accolades with several other groups including IBMA. McReynolds was preceded in death by his parents, Claude Matthew McReynolds and Prudence Savannah Robinette McReynolds; loving rst wife of 41 years, Darlene McReynolds; son, Keith McReynolds; brother, Jim McReynolds, sisters, Stella McReynolds and Virginia Greear; and great grandson, Andrew Keith McReynolds. He is survived by his loving second wife of 27 years, Joy Tipton McReynolds; daughter, Gwen McReynolds; sons, Michael K. McReynolds and Randy Q. McReynolds; eight grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

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August 2023


Actor Gary Sinise Accepts Charlie Daniels Patriot Award Actor Gary Sinise, best known for his acclaimed role as Lt. Dan alongside Tom Hanks in “Forrest Gump,” was recently presented with the Charlie Daniels Patriot Award. “I am honored to receive this award from Charlie Daniels, in his name,” said Sinise. “To receive an award in his name is a blessing, a privilege, an honor. Why did I get so lucky?” Sinise was actually announced as the winner in autumn of 2022 at the fourth annual Charlie Daniels Patriot Awards, but he was unable to attend the ceremony due to scheduling con icts. David Corlew, longtime manager of the late Daniels and The Charlie Daniels Journey Home Project (TCDJHP) co-founder, along with Green Beret combat vet Joel Pruitt. who was last year’s recipient of the Charlie Daniels Patriot Award, presented Sinise with the honor.

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“Gary Sinise has set the ‘high water mark’ in s u p p o r t f o r o u r v e t s , ” e x p l a i n e d C o r l e w. “Foundations and support groups can learn so much from this guy. Besides creating an incredible bed of work in the lm and entertainment industry, he has utilized it to broaden the reach for all of us, a wonderful example of sel ess service. Simply put, he cares, and so do we. Charlie would be very proud that we made this happen.” The award criteria is based on the mission of the organization to support veterans in their return, rehabilitation and reintegration back into civilian life. Previous recipients include Chris Young, Darryl Worley, Mike Huckabee, Mark “Oz” Geist, Jude Seale, William Horton, Donnie Mingus, MTSU’s Daniels Center, The Shepherd’s Center and more.


Areeda Schneider Stampley's

Southern Cooking Zucchini Bread A delicious, sweet bread (my favorite!) to serve for numerous occasions. 3 eggs 1 cup vegetable oil 2 cups sugar 2 cups zucchini squash, peeled and medium grated 1 teaspoon vanilla 3 cups all-purpose our 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 & 1/8 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 3/4 cup chopped walnuts (or pecans) Preheat oven to 325 degrees Beat eggs until light and foamy. Add oil, sugar, vanilla, and zucchini, and beat well. Sift together our, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and baking powder; and add to creamed mixture. Mix well, then fold in the nuts. Pour into 2 well-greased and oured (sift our so it’s ne) 9x5x3-inch loaf pans. Bake 55-60 minutes. Cool in pans about 10 min or more. Remove to wire rack to cool. To purchase Areeda’s Southern Cooking, a collection of old-fashioned recipes, send a check for $25 and your mailing address to Areeda’s Southern Cooking, P. O. Box 202, Brentwood, TN 37024. Order online with PayPal or credit card at www.areedasoutherncooking.com.

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August 2023


Final Osborne

Brother Passes

Bobby Osborne, the singer and mandolin player who joined with his younger brother, Sonny, to lead one of the most groundbreaking bands in the history of bluegrass, died on June 27 in Gallatin, Tennessee. He was 91. Robert Van Osborne Jr. was born on Dec. 7, 1931, in Thousandsticks, an unincorporated Appalachian enclave near Hyden, Kentucky, where he and his brother grew up. Osborne took up the electric guitar as a teenager after the family moved to Dayton, Ohio, where he also began playing in local country bands and working as a cabdriver. The Osborne brothers started their own band after Bobby completed two years of service with the Marines in Korea, where he was wounded in combat and earned the Purple Heart. He and Sonny had previously worked for bluegrass greats – Bobby with Jimmy Martin and the Stanley Brothers, his brother with Mr. Monroe. Formed in 1953, the Osborne Brothers, perhaps best known for their 1967 recording of “Rocky Top.” The band he led with his brother broke new ground with an unusually broad repertoire, unorthodox instrumentation and untraditional vocal harmonies. They were the rst bluegrass group of national renown to incorporate drums, electric bass, pedal

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steel guitar and even, on records, string sections. They were also the rst to record with twin banjos, as well as the rst to amplify their instruments with electric pickups. The Osbornes embraced country, pop and rock material associated with the likes of Ernest Tubb, Randy Newman and the Everly Brothers. Their style was vindicated over the next decade and a half for steadfastly breaking with tradition. Among other accomplishments, they were named vocal group of the year by the Country Music Association in 1971. They were also one of the few bluegrass bands to place records on the country singles chart consistently. Along the way they helped the evolution of bluegrass from rst-generation bluegrass royalty like Bill Monroe, the duo of Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs, Earl Scruggs Revue, New Grass Revival and Alison Krauss. Besides Bobby Jr., Mr. Osborne is survived by his wife, Karen Osborne; two other sons, Wynn and Robby; a daughter, Tina Osborne; a sister, Louise Wil liams; five grandchildren; and six greatgrandchildren. He lived in Portland, Tennessee.

magazine.countryreunionmusic.com

August 2023


From Cowboy Boots to Rhinestone Jackets: How Country Music Shaped Popular Fashion Through the Ages

by Claudia Johnson As the strains of country music have reverberated through the decades, so too has its in uence on popular fashion. Rooted in the rural landscapes of the American South and West, country music has spawned a unique aesthetic that captures the hearts of fans and fashionistas alike. From the humble beginnings of cowboy boots and Stetson hats to the glitz and glamour of rhinestone-studded jackets, the fashion inspired by country music icons is a testament to the genre's enduring allure.

embroider y, rhinestones and appliqués. These extravagant ensembles were worn by country music legends like Hank Williams, Porter Wagoner and Elvis Presley. The Nudie Suit became a symbol of the glitzy and glamorous side of country music and the look was immortalized in the 1975 song "Rhinestone Cowboy" by Glen Campbell. As a result, country musicians and fans alike began to embrace ashier, more elaborate out ts in the decades that followed. Manuel, who learned the craft from Nudie, moved to Nashville to serve new generations of performers and still operates today.

Gene Autry The 1940s: The Singing Cowboy In the 1940s, the image of the singing cowboy took center stage, with stars like Roy Rogers and Gene Autry wearing classic Western attire on screen and in live performances. The cowboy look—complete with boots, jeans and a button-down shirt—became s y n o n y m o u s w i t h co u n t r y m u s i c , i n s p i r i n g generations of performers and fans alike. The 1950s: Nudie Suits & Rhinestone Cowboys In the 1950s, the cowboy aesthetic was elevated to new heights thanks to the pioneering work of designer Nudie Cohn. Nicknamed "the Rodeo Tailor," Cohn was responsible for creating the iconic "Nudie Suits," which were adorned with intricate

The 1960s & '70s: Country Hippie & Denim Revolution As the counterculture movement of the 1960s and '70s swept the nation, country music was not immune to its in uence. Country musicians like Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris began to adopt a "countr y hippie" aesthetic, which combined elements of bohemian and Western styles.

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Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton


The 1980s: Urban Cowboy and Western Chic The 1980 lm "Urban Cowboy," starring John Travolta, sparked a resurgence of interest in cowboy culture and Western fashion. The movie's stylish blend of urban and country aesthetics led to a craze for Western-themed clothing, accessories and even home décor. High fashion brands took note of the trend and began to incorporate Western elements into their designs, as seen in Ralph Lauren's iconic "Santa Fe" collection, which debuted in 1981. Celebrities like Madonna and Michael Jackson were also seen donning cowboy hats and fringed jackets, proving that country music's in uence had rmly crossed over into mainstream popular culture.

EmmyLou Harris Denim became a staple of country fashion during this time, as artists like Johnny Cash, Dolly Parton and Waylon Jennings embraced the fabric in all its forms—from bell-bottoms and jean jackets to denim vests and skirts. The popularity of denim in country music helped to cement its status as a versatile and enduring fashion staple.

Urban Cowboy The 1990s and 2000s: Neo-Traditionalism and the Rise of Vintage Country

George Strait

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The 1990s saw a return to a more traditional country aesthetic, with artists like George Strait, Alan Jackson and Reba McEntire embracing cowboy hats, boots and classic Western shirts. This "neotraditional" movement was a direct response to the urban cowboy craze. August 2023


The Current Aesthetic: Individualism and Eclecticism in Country Music Fashion Today's countr y music fa shion aesthetic can be characterized by its embrace of individualism and eclecticism, re ecting the diverse range of artists and styles within the genre. This contemporary approach to country fashion incorporates a variety of in uences, from the traditional Western wear of its roots to modern streetwear and high-fashion trends.

clothing reminiscent of the '60s and '70s, combining elements of country hippie, denim and classic Western wear. Feminine and Glamorous: Female country artists, in particular, have championed a more glamorous and feminine aesthetic. Performers like Carrie Underwood, Kelsea Ballerini and Mickey Guyton often opt for sparkly gowns, sequins and bold prints on the red carpet and stage, demonstrating the lasting in uence of the rhinestone cowboy era.

Traditional Western Wear: Many country artists continue to draw inspiration from the genre's heritage, donning cowboy hats, boots, denim and classic buttondown shirts. This nod to tradition can be seen in the styles of artists like Jon Pardi, Miranda Lambert and Midland.

Mickey Guyton

Midland Modern Streetwear and High-Fashion: As country music has evolved and expanded its reach, so too has its fashion sense. Younger, more genre-blending artists like Lil Nas X, Kacey Musgraves and Maren Morris have incorporated elements of streetwear and high-fashion into their looks, showcasing a more urban, contemporary side of country. Vintage and Retro-Inspired: Many country musicians are also embracing vintage and retro-inspired styles, drawing from various decades and subgenres. Artists like Chris Stapleton, Brandi Carlile and Jason Isbell often wear

The current fashion aesthetic in country music is diverse and multifaceted, re ecting the genre's rich history and ongoing evolution. From traditional Western wear to modern streetwear and high-fashion trends, today's country artists demonstrate a wide range of in uences and styles, embodying the spirit of individualism and eclecticism that defines contemporary country music.

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Custom and Statement Pieces: In keeping with the individualism that characterizes modern country fashion, many artists collaborate with designers to create custom and statement pieces that showcase their unique personalities. For example, Dolly Parton's signature style often features bright colors, fringe and rhinestones, while Eric Church is known for his signature aviator sunglasses and leather jackets.


Nadine’s Corner

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August 2023


by Natalie Hartford How do you say goodbye to someone who is woven into your life’s fabric? I’ve been working for a week on the words to say here, on what is the best way to honor such a special person like Jimmy Payne. I mean, I can’t literally say that would not be standing here if it weren’t for my sweet Uncle Jimmy, mainly because he introduced my parents in 1961, at a radio station event at KSTL in St. Louis. (Natalie’s father is John Hartford and her mom is Betty, Jimmy’s niece.) Now, so many of you know the career highlights, of his chart-topping success with “Woman, Woman,” co-written with Jim Glaser and recorded over 100 times and in 15 di erent languages, most notably by Gary Puckett and the Union Gap in 1968. You probably also know about Charley Pride’s #1 hit, “My Eyes Can Only See As Far As You,” which Jimmy cowrote with Naomi Martin. Honestly, I’m only going to be able to cover a small fraction of the things that could be told because Jimmy was such a hard working and proli c writer, and he knew basically everyone. My hope today is to tell you some great little stories you may not know. Back before the pandemic he heard that I’d been recording my mom’s stories, and he asked if I would record his to turn them into a book. We got started and spent so many hours just talking. Many of them

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How to Say Goodbye to a Legend were on Zoom when we couldn’t leave the house during COVID. I cherish that time even more now and I want to share some of these stories with you. I suspect you will love them just as much as I do. Jimmy Payne, the youngest of 12 children (9 living), was born to Oscar and Stella Payne on Easter Sunday, (April 12) 1936, somewhere between Leechville and Manila, Arkansas, not too from where Johnny Cash was born. Originally his dad owed a gas station and grocery store, but he sold them when Jimmy was little, took his wife and the nine kids, and started sharecropping in southeast Missouri. They moved to Gideon, in the bootheel, around 1944. Jimmy said some of his earliest memories were waking up to the sounds of his dad ling the hoes that they used to chop cotton. Back in that day, the fabric for their shirts came from our sacks. Jimmy would pick the patterns he liked and my grandma would make them for him. He recalled one day being on the school bus with his sisters and sat down next to a girl only to realize they were wearing the same pattern of our sack. His music making started when he was around 11 years old when he got the idea to name some at-head tacks to a board, then wrap wires around them that he pulled from the screen door. He put something under the wires to tighten them, then strummed them with a knife. He actually got it to play a song, but admitted his instrument didn’t tune up very well. Their family lived in the country about three miles from town and so one day when he was about 12, he walked down to the road and waited for the postman so he could buy a money order because he planned to buy a mandolin. Just before the postman came, his dad pulled in the driveway and said, “Son, what are you doing out here?” When Jimmy told him he said, “You’re gonna need your money for school clothes.” That was that, and the mandolin was never purchased. August 2023


About four years later he tried again, this time to order a $16 guitar from Sears Roebuck. His sister (my grandmother) Bertha, who was very supportive of his music pursuits, went with him to the mailbox to get the money order and to make sure his dad didn’t talk him out of it again. And that was the beginning of his o cial musical journey. I wonder what kind of stories we’d be telling if he’d gotten that original mandolin instead. My grandmother was the oldest of all the kids and Jimmy was the youngest. Because of their di erence in age, he and my mom (Betty) are only about four years apart, which means they basically grew up as siblings. Coming from tenant farmers in southeast Missouri, they spent a great deal of their youth in the cotton elds, and they passed the time singing gospel and country songs. Turns out they were quite good at it. They were invited as guests to sing a regular sport on KTCB in Malden, with friends Jack and Dottie Rose. They started getting a lot of requests and mail and the radio manager asked if they’d like their own radio show which they did for about a year. They also entered a Payne’s Lyrics talent show on a Kennett radio station sponsored by Jack Sprat canned foods. The winner was determined by who could collect the most Jack Sprat can labels, so they saved labels, petitioned relatives for their labels, and searched the dump for whatever they could nd, and ultimately came in third. Jimmy credited so much of his early musical mentoring to Jack Campbell who played at Bethel Assembly of God church in Gideon, and allowed Jimmy and his friends Billy Walker, and Kenneth Meadows to play for the ser vice with him. Jimmy remembered Jack patiently laying his hand on Jimmy’s guitar strings to deaden them when he was noodling around too much during the service. Jimmy also remembered being inspired from his dad listening to the Grand Ole Opr y and other countr y shows on the radio. He credited his own mother for spurring his interest in the harmonica, because she also played, a fact my own mother learned for the rst time yesterday.

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All these dreams and inspirations took place alongside the cotton farming he told me, and I quote, “I would pick a long cotton row and then I would sit down on my cotton sack and look toward the east and dream about someday I’ll be in Nashville. And I didn’t know how I was going to get there. But that was part of my early dreams. I would sit and look east. And on a good day, in my mind’s eye, I could see Nashville.” Now, as Jimmy grew older, his siblings began marrying and moving out which meant fewer farm hands. Jimmy had no interest in a life of farming, much to his dad’s disappointment. So, in 1959, the Army did him a solid and drafted him. At rst it seemed like a disruption to his life but ended up being a major turning point. His rst time playing on a real stage was in the army, starting at Ft. Gordon in Georgia. After transferring.to Ft. Lewis in Washington he met a guy looking for talent to start an Army band. The guy’s name was Chuck Glaser. Jimmy knew who Chuck was right o the bat from the Glaser Brothers work on the Grand Ole Opry with Marty Robbins. So this is where Jimmy really started to hone his skills singing and playing on stage. This Army band played all over the country on weekends, which even earned him enough money to y home to St. Louis to visit. He did this for about 18 months, playing in a few other groups during that time. After two years in the Army, he came back to St. Louis and back to his job at the metal- nishing shop at Dyna-craft, spray painting parts for the aeronautics industry. Of course, this was just a temporary job while pursuing what he really loved. There’s so much I could say about his music career, but it would take all day, so I’m going to rattle o some quick but amazing stories he told me. Jimmy traveled with a USO tour to southeast Asia, including South Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, Iwo Jima. They played one show close to North Korea, and after boarding the bus they were joined by a group of soldiers pointing guns at them. Thankfully, the soldiers turned out to be South Korean and nally let them go. He also remembered playing a show on Iwo Jima right before the US gave the island back to Japan. He said there was smoke coming up from the ground the entire time they were there, and the whole place smelled of sulfur. He debuted on the Grand Ole Opry one night while the Glaser Brothers were hosting and got three encores. Another night on the Opry, Bill Monroe introduced him and talked so fast that Jimmy didn’t even know he’d been introduced and didn’t go out until Bill started looking for him and another band motioned to him to go on stage. After he signed with Epic Records as an artist in the mid-60s, he was pitched a bunch of songs by the great Kris Kristo erson. He was a part of the early Music Row scene where songwriters hung out in alleyways and placed like Linebaugh’s, with tapes in hand, and producers and singers would go looking for them, searching for songs to record that day.

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Tammy Wynette often asked him for songs and cut a few of Jimmy’s co-writes, including “Broadminded,” which he wrote with Leona Williams, and “I Did My Best To Fall In Love Last Night,” which he originally pitched to George Jones. There was the time that he was doing a session for Glaser Publishing, singing a song he wrote with Gene Brandley called “Rags for Amos,” about a guy who just picked up rags in the neighborhood. Dolly Parton was at the session that day and later told Chuck Glaser that it inspired her to write “Coat of Many Colors.” Jimmy was good friends with the Glaser Brothers ever since his days in the Army. He signed a publishing deal with his Army buddy Chuck, who was also introduced to John Hartford, my dad. He co-wrote “Woman, Woman” and many other hits with Jim Glaser. He also remembered being in Tompall Glaser’s publishing o ce one day when Johnny Cash came by to hear a song, still dazed and distracted from the night before. Tompall had to literally wrestle Johnny to the ground to get him to sit still. He began touring England with Tompall after the brothers went their separate ways musically and became a big hit there. It was in England where he met Ann and Bill Trice, presidents of his fan club, who later became Jimmy’s daughter Amanda’s Godparents. And he was also a big hit at the Wembley Festival where he played several times. He wrote “My Eyes Can Only See As Far As You” with Naomi Martin in February 1967, around the same time he co-wrote “Woman, Woman” with Jim Glaser. Apparently, he was visiting Naomi and her family, and they were all sitting around eating and playing music. He was smoking back then, and his cigarette fell out of the nearby ashtray and burned a hole in the top of her Ethan Allen table. She said not to worry, but he felt bad about it, so the next visit he said, “Here’s a song title, let’s write it,” which I guess was penance for burning a hole in her table. And apparently Naomi’s daughter still has the table. Bill Holmes got to call Jimmy and tell him that Charley Pride recorded the song. Jimmy gured it would just be an album cut, but it turned out to be the single, and a very big hit for Charley. And now there’s even a reggae version. How many of you know that Jimmy has a co-write with T.I. the rapper? It’s on a song called “Who Want Some,” and Jimmy had no idea until he noticed a signi cant increase in his royalty check. Apparently, T.I. took a sample from “Woman, Woman,” and wanted to give proper credit, so if you look the song up, the writing credits list T.I., Cedric L. Young, DJ Toomp, Jimmy Payne and Jim Glaser.”

Watch “My Eyes Can Only See as Far As You,” a number one single for Charley Pride in 1976. It was written by Jimmy Payne.

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I asked Jimmy one day about his songwriting process. He told me so many things about how he comes up with a song, and part of it was looking at the people in his songs as characters he is observing. Waiting to see what they do, so he could write about it. I think my favorite quote is this one: “I came alive when the characters came alive. In fact, I think about these songs with these characters and they’re real people. And sometimes I try to not get an idea late at night because I create these people that don’t want to go to bed when I do.” Now, I know I’ve talked a lot about Jimmy’s early life and career, and he’s done so many cool things, but he would tell you that none of it compares to his love for his family. He married the love of his life, Virginia Jo Holmes in 1969; I was there, but only six weeks old, so I don’t remember much. She was completely supportive of his career, and a balancing force in his life. His precious daughter Amanda was born in 1977, and Jimmy’s life completely refocused. He absolutely adored her. It’s possible that he could have gone on to be more of a household name, but he was unwilling to sacri ce his family for all that. In fact, a promoter in England tried once to get out of paying for Jo to join him on tour, and he got up and walked out of the room and said, “No deal.” Jo and Amanda often accompanied him, whether it was on his tours of England, or playing at the Commodore Lounge in Nashville. He enjoyed just being with them and also later with his wonderful sonin-law Matt, and his two grandpups, Buddy and Sissy. Matt and Amanda took such good care of Jimmy and Jo in their later years. Jo passed away in May. Jimmy loved Jesus and I believe they are with him now. Jimmy was kind, he was accepting, and he truly wanted to do the right thing, always. There are so few people in this world, from my observation, who are as pure hearted as Jimmy Payne. He was funny, had an amazing sense of humor, and I always knew he would get the joke. I don’t think he had any natural enemies. He was a gentle soul. He valued everyone he knew, no matter what they looked like, where they came from, or what they believed, as long as they were in tune, he held space for them. He knew who he was, and he pursued the talents and gifts he had been given. He lived a faithful life of over 87 years and was busy enough with projects and ideas to have lled another 87.


Loveless Career Highlighted by Hall of Fame “Patty Loveless: No Trouble with the Truth,” a new exhibit opening Aug. 23 at the the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum explores the in uential career and enduring music of Patty Loveless. “My journey into a career of music all started out on an Epiphone acoustic guitar my father bought for me in 1969,” said Loveless, who will be inducted into the Hall of Fame in October. “As a 12-year-old, I didn’t want to set the world on re, I just wanted to play and sing music. By the age of 14, I wrote ‘Sounds of Loneliness’ and ‘I Did’ on this guitar, two songs that in 1986 ended up on my debut album for MCA records. Now that guitar will be displayed in my exhibit of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum where it truly belongs with other memorabilia of the many people that supported me throughout my musical journey to whom I’m forever grateful.” From staking out a distinctive place in country music beginning in the 1980s to her talent for nding memorable material and her embrace of traditional in uences, this exhibit illustrates Loveless’s role in the genre through personal and career artifacts, photos, interviews and more. “Patty Loveless achieved lasting success by merging traditional countr y music styles with a modern sensibility in her song choices and musical arrangements,” said Kyle Young, CEO of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, in a media release. “As one of country music’s most accomplished song interpreters with immense vocal power, she has remained focused on conveying deep emotion through her lyrics and recordings, and her in uence resonates throughout today’s generation of country artists.” Events planned for the opening weekend include the lm screening of a 1989 USO Celebrity Tour starring Loveless and a live performance and interview with the artist. The museum exhibit traces Loveless’ story, from a musical prodigy to a Grammy award-winning country music star who carries forward the sounds of her Appalachian roots. Visitors will see stage wear, tour memorabilia, manuscripts, setlists, instruments, photographs, videos and more.

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Among the items on display at Country Music Hall of Fame & Museum is the jacket and floral-print dress, accented with rhinestones and beads, that Loveless wore when Porter Wagoner inducted her into the cast of the Grand Ole Opry on June 11, 1988. Photo: Bob Delevante, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

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August Birthdays 2 5 7 8 9 10 Visitors to the Loveless exhibit will see the original handwritten manuscript by songwriter Kostas Lazarides for “Timber I’m Falling in Love,” Loveless’s first No. 1 hit in 1989. Photo: Bob Delevante, Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

Some of the items on display are: The 1968 Epiphone FT-30 Caballero acoustic guitar Loveless used when she performed with her brother Roger Ramey as The Singing Swinging Rameys in the early 1970s. The jacket and oral-print dress, accented with rhinestones and beads, that Loveless wore when Porter Wagoner inducted her into the cast of the Grand Ole Opry on June 11, 1988. A black velvet dress, with oral pleats and velvet sleeves, worn by Loveless in the 1991 music video for “I’m That Kind of Girl.” The 1987 Gibson J-200 acoustic guitar Loveless used extensively for stage work An original handwritten manuscript by songwriter Kostas for “Timber, I’m Falling in Love.” The song became Loveless’ rst #1 hit, in 1989. The Givenchy black jacket and pants Loveless wore when she and Country Music Hall of Fame member Vince Gill performed “Go Rest High on That Mountain” at the funeral service for Country Music Hall of Fame member George Jones at the Grand Ole Opry House, May 2, 2013. The monogrammed USO jacket Loveless wore during the USO Tour that Randy Travis and Patty Loveless made of the United States military bases in Alaska, Japan and South Korea in 1988. The beaded, oral-print Black Tie Oleg Cassini dress Loveless wore at the CMA Awards in 1998 when she received the Vocal Event of the Year award for her recording of the Jim Lauderdale-penned “You Don’t Seem to Miss Me.” George Jones sang backing vocals on the record and was also honored with the award. The exhibit will be open Aug. 23 through October 2024 and is included with museum admission.

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Hank Cockran Terri Clark Vern Gosdin B.J. Thomas Rodney Crowell Mark Wills Mel Tillis Webb Pierce Merle Kilgore Jimmy Dean Jimmy Martin John Conlee Porter Wagoner Buck Owens Andy Griggs Keith Bilbrey Connie Smith Billy Joe Shaver Molly Bee LaDonna Gatlin Eddy Raven Lee Ann Womack Clay Walker Rudy Gatlin Justin Tubb Jim Reeves Harold Reid Kenny Rogers Collin Raye Holly Dunn Woody Paul Billy Ray Cyrus Jo Dee Messina JD Crowe Jeff Cook Shania Twain Jake Owen Lee Ann Rimes Billy Grammer Taylor Malpass Jimmy C Newman Don Schiltz Shawn Camp The Hager Twins Kitty Wells


“Nancy” cartoonist Gilchrist, includes “Diner” in cartoons When you hear the name Guy Gilchrist, most Guy comes from a working-class background. “It people go, “who?” But when you say “the guy who does wasn’t always the happiest of childhoods,” he says, “and, the Nancy cartoons” they know exactly who you mean. looking back, I believe my drive to create fun, humor, Guy recently included “Larry’s Country Diner” in one of and positive energy all come from a place of wanting to his Nancy cartoons. It seems that Guy has been a thank God for seeing me through!” Larry’s Country Diner fan for a while and has even He learned to draw from his mother and by copying attended a taping before, so when he came back to visit pictures from Walt Disney Golden Books and Dr. Seuss the set again, he completed another drawing of Sluggo stories; he was making money from his work before he and Nancy and presented it to Larry. was a teenager. Guy worked for an animator and Guy is known rst and foremost for his work as played in a rockabilly band, and his life had found a writer and artist for the classic newspaper cartoon direction—or, more accurately, several of them. Nancy, (with its millions of followers in nearly 400 “I always tell kids that once upon a time I had this newspapers in 80 countries around the world), but he is idea, this desire to express all of the feelings that I felt also an author, songwriter, musician, storyteller, teacher, inside and to make people smile. I loved that as a little and one-man entertainment conglomerate. boy that I could tell jokes or funny stories and make His other strips have people forget about their i n c l u d e d Ji m He n s o n’s worries and I could forget about Muppets, (which helped launch mine.” his career at age 24), Your Angels He was in his early 20s when a Speak, Screams, and the widely song he wrote became a syndicated Night Lights & Pi ow regional hit and broke into the Fights and Today’s Do . He is the Billboard Top 100. Soon, he author of 48 children’s books began hearing from major and was co-creator of The Nashville publishers. Muppet Babies. “I was wondering which path Guy did work for classic I would travel, whether I would cartoons such as Tom & Jerry, write with music or with Bugs Bunny and Looney Toons, and artwork,” he says. “Then, Jim The Pink Panther, drew envelope Henson came along and hired artwork for the launch of the me after I auditioned to work U.S. Postal Services iconic 1986 on the Muppets comic strip, “Love” stamp, and designed and I went down a wonderful four logos for minor league road to a wonderful life.” te a m s , a m o n g m a n y o t h e r He moved to Nashville after projects. 10 Years Ago This Month years of including countr y Guy has entertained school singers in his strips and with the children, col lege students, e n co u r a g e m e n t o f Ha l l o f seniors, members of civic clubs and concertgoers. He Famer Bill Anderson and former WSM-AM air has helped raise money for a number of worthwhile personality Keith Bilbrey that he pursues his charities over the years. Since moving from his native songwriting. fans and friendships, include Charlie Connecticut to Nashville in 2009, Guy has also Daniels, (who has a Nancy wall in his museum in established himself as one of the city's most exciting downtown Nashville), and Kris Kristo erson called to performers, singers and songwriters. thank Guy for his drawing when Johnny Cash died. He has played The Grand Ole Opry and many of the It featured Aunt Fritzi crying and listening to city's nest clubs and night spots, written with some of Kristo erson’s “Why Me,Lord?” Guy was touched, “I its best songwriters, shared stages with Charlie Daniels, cannot say how much that means to me,” he says. “I’ll The Marshall Tucker Band, Little Jimmy Dickens and never get over that one.” Tommy Cash, among many others, and released songs “I’ve been fortunate enough that every dream I including the well-received holiday singles “Christmas really had come true,” he says. The fact that his life and Light” and “Merry Christmas, Sluggo,” which raised work are helping others ful ll their own dreams is money to support Boys Town. simply an added blessing.

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Longest-Serving Opry Member Bill Anderson Celebrated The Grand Ole Opry celebrated Country Music Hall of Fame member Bill Anderson as the longest-serving Opry member in the show’s history on July 22. Anderson, one of the most awarded songwriters in the history of country music and a highly successful performer in his own right, was inducted i n t h e O p r y f a m i l y o n Ju l y 1 5, 1 9 6 1 . Hi s membership has not lapsed in those 62 years, eclipsing the membership run of past Opr y member Herman Crook, who joined the Opry in 1926 and remained with the show until his death in Anderson recently released “1984” for streaming. 1988. The Opry celebrated “Whisperin’ Bill” with a Saturday night performance that included Anderson and fellow Opry members Vince Gill, Jamey Johnson, Jeannie Seely and Ricky Skaggs, among others. “The Grand Ole Opry continues to be built on the shoulders of Opry members such as Bill Anderson,” said Dan Rogers, Opry vice president and executive producer. “Singling Bill out as the Opry’s longest-tenured member in our history among so many greats who came before him as well as so many contemporaries he calls his friends is a tremendous honor for all of us.” The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum currently features the life and illustrious career of Anderson in the exhibition, Bill Anderson: As Far as I Can See, which has been extended through Mo n d a y, S e p te m b e r 2 5. T h e e x h i b i t i s a n exploration of his life and musical legacy, from Jeannie Seely with her Opry sister Connie Smith at childhood through his contributions as one of the the Sunday Night Opry on July 2, 2023. Connie will most decorated recording artists, songwriters, and be celebrating her 58th Opry anniversary in August, entertainers in history. Learn more about the and Jeannie will be celebrating her 56th Opry anniversary in September. exhibit and tickets on the magazine.countryreunionmusic.com museum’s Pagereserve 21 August 2023 Photo: Ron Harman website.


Renae the Waitress Happy Birthday to Rio!! She will be 10 years old on the 16th of August. Where does the time go?

Out of Stock I have sold out of the new Malpass Brothers CD. Sorry!

Branson Show Oct. 2-6 Don’t miss this last opportunity to meet the cast of “Larry’s Country Diner” in Branson. There are still some tickets available to see your favorite artist. Call the Clay Cooper Theater for tickets. See you there!

We were in Arizona visiting family in July. Love that 112º degree weather. I am a desert rat! I always check on our son’s grave when we are there and can’t resist going by Waylon Jennings gravesite. He is in my book “Precious Memories Memorial.”

What happened to the Diner? I am working on a new book about the past 14 years of “Larry’s Country Diner” TV show. So much has happened, not only with our shows and special events…but to us personally. It will be available soon!

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Bellamy Brothers Roll Out their Old Hippie Stash Mobile

As their Smart & Safe Florida campaign to implement safe and common- sense cannabis regulation blazed on to more than one million signatures, the Bellamy Brothers rolled out their Old Hippie Stash Mobile in April. The duo enlisted artist Mark Hannah, known for his sign painting and mural work in many local and regional areas in Central Florida, for the psychedelic transformation of a 1978 Volkswagen Westfalia. Their most recent project, “40 Years: The Vinyl Album,” celebrated the Bellamy Brothers’ journey to fame that started on the pop music charts in the ‘70s and took a winding turn into country music in the ‘80s, paving the way for duos to come, such as Brooks & Dunn, Montgomery Gentry, Big & Rich and The Judds. The project includes “If I Said You Had a Beautiful Body,” originally scrawled on a dinner napkin by David, which rocketed them to the top of the country charts the way “Let Your Love Flow,” the project opener, had done in the pop market just a few years earlier. It proved to be the rst of a string of 14 No. 1 singles in the U.S. alone. The Bellamy Brothers hold the record in both the Academy of Country Music (ACM) and the Country Music Association Awards (CMA) for the most duo nominations. The Bellamys are also opening up their lives to television audiences with their reality show, “Honky

To keep up with the Bellamy Brothers, follow them o n F a c e b o o k , I n s t a g r a m , Tw i t t e r a n d visit BellamyBrothers.com. August 2023

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Tonk Ranch.” Each episode captivates viewers by the unpredictable misadventures the Bellamys face while balancing their globe-trotting touring schedule while running their sprawling family ranch in south Florida. Widely known as an “international symbol of country music," the Bellamy Brothers recently wrapped the nal leg of their World Reboot Tour. They’re the only U.S. country music act who’ve toured in Dubai, India, Sri Lanka, New Caledonia and Qatar.


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