PATRON'S 7th Anniversary Issue

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7th Anniversary Issue DANA SCHUTZ TWO x TWO ARTIST HONOREE

Plus: Laurie Simmons Günther Förg Balenciaga & Goya

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Portrait Tim Boole, Styling Jeanna Doyle, Stanley Korshak

October / November 2018

TERRI PROVENCAL Publisher / Editor in Chief

The influential Dallas event known as TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art turns 20 this month. In a climate when important charity benefits pop up every moment for very good causes, this one stands apart. And I’ve admired it for many years now. Partly, in much the same way the Dallas Art Fair does, TWO x TWO draws an international audience to the region from artists and their dealers to collectors. I love the way fresh eyes marvel at our city and the hardworking, passionate people who populate it. For we do have it very good here. But also amid the important fundraising for two entities—amfAR The Foundation for AIDS Research and our beloved Dallas Museum of Art—an artist gets recognized for both artistic excellence and contributions to the fight against AIDS. This year Cindy and Howard Rachofsky chose to honor Dana Schutz, whose work sometimes skirts the edge of charged or delicate subject matter. As described by Auriel Garza in A Pertinent Choice, Dana Schutz, whose Beat Out the Sun appears on our anniversary cover, is an important artist to honor now. When you walk through exhibitions on view this fall sharing a host of art movements from Precisionism, Surrealism, Dadaism, Romanticism, Abstract Expressionism, and much more, take the time to learn about what inspired the curator to assemble the works on view—it is not without great toil from the extended research to cajoling collectors and institutions to loan and ship prized pieces of art from faraway places. And costs escalate requiring much-needed additional funding. What we don’t see displayed on the walls is the labor that goes into it. As such, it’s time for these top curators to enjoy celebrity well beyond informed art patrons. Curators spend a great deal of time, manifold years even, imagining and preparing a museum exhibition for public enjoyment. They also dream up alluring show titles with just enough uncertainties remaining to inspire further exploration. During deadline, I thought about many of these curators. I marveled at Nasher Sculpture Center’s curator Catherine Craft as she deftly took the press through The Nature of Arp, an exhibition dedicated to Jean (Hans) Arp she had been preparing for a long time. And Andrea Karnes who talks of multiple visits to Laurie Simmons’ three studios in preparation for Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera at the Modern Museum of Art Fort Worth. New to the canon of Patron contributors, we love Frank Hettig’s feature on Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty opening this month at the Dallas Museum of Art. Balenciaga makes its way back to a North Texas museum, this time running concurrently with the great Spanish painter Francisco Goya who had equal prowess as a draftsman and printmaker. Both shine elegantly at the Kimbell Art Museum. In The Black takes readers through both. At-large, Chris Byrne tracks down White Column’s Chief Curator Matthew Higgs in Early to the Party. Back in Dallas we delve into Erin Cluley’s upcoming exhibition, Voyeur of the Mundane. Curated by Steve Dennie, the show features the work of Steve, alongside Vernon Fisher, Julie Bozzi, Allison V. Smith, and Nic Nicosia—a relative Texas artists’ brain trust emphasizing the ordinary. Illuminated Identity shares Jwan Yosef's Come September opening at The Goss-Michael Foundation. And Lee Cullum visits with the altruistic Tim Headington, chairman of TWO x TWO this year. Another new contributor, Elaine Raffel, assembled an “uber-talented team” including photographer Elizabeth Lavin and stylist Nelly Adham for Patron’s own translation of the beauty of ebony in The New Noir, juxtaposed with color in pages that follow, in Pretty Fabulous. And while every milestone is important, we are proud to celebrate our own. This issue marks Patron Magazine’s 7th year in print. We remain committed to showcasing what’s best about the visual and performing arts in the region. Thanks for being a part of that journey. – Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com; Instagram terri_provencal and patronmag

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CONTENTS 1

FEATURES 70 A PERTINENT CHOICE TWO x TWO makes a statement honoring dynamic and significant artist, Dana Schutz. By Auriel Garza 78 A RADICAL EXPERIMENTALIST Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty explores the complexities of the German artist’s uncategorized oeuvre. By Frank Hettig 82 THE BIG PICTURE The Modern’s Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera surveys four decades of the artist’s photographs, sculpture, and film. By Steve Carter 90 IN THE BLACK Kimbell Art Museum explores ebony ranges of Balenciaga and Goya. By Nancy Cohen Israel 96 THE NEW NOIR Timeless. Vibrant. Eternally Chic. A ruler of the runway, new iterations in black are a perennial fashion favorite. Produced by Elaine Raffel; Photography by Elizabeth Lavin

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104 PRETTY FABULOUS Get gorgeous with statement-making jewelry. Produced by Elaine Raffel; Photography by Elizabeth Lavin

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90

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On the cover: Dana Schutz, Beat Out the Sun, 2018, oil on canvas, 94 x 87.5 in. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York.

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CONTENTS 2

DEPARTMENTS 16 Editor’s Note 22 Contributors 34 Noted Top arts and culture chatter. By Anthony Falcon Of Note 40 THERE’S A PLACE FOR US Verdigris Ensemble brings new insight into the life of Leonard Bernstein. By Nancy Cohen Israel 53 COSTUME CULTURE The Dallas Opera and NorthPark Center pair up to display 22 costumes from TDO’s archives. Openings 54 ILLUMINATED IDENTITY Painter Jwan Yosef plays with the (un)importance of belonging at The Goss-Michael Foundation. By Kendall Morgan

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58 VOYEUR OF THE MUNDANE Erin Cluley Gallery hosts a star-studded group show that celebrates the commonplace. By Steve Carter Fair Trade 62 PRESENTING SEAN HORTON A New York art dealer comes home to North Texas to open a gallery in Oak Cliff. Interview by Charles Dee Mitchell Contemporaries 64 EARLY TO THE PARTY Chris Byrne visits with White Columns’ ahead-of-the-curve Director/ Curator Matthew Higgs. Contemporaries 66 ART BEGETS THE ART OF GIVING Timothy C. Headington serves as this year’s 20th Anniversary Chairman of TWO x TWO. By Lee Cullum

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Studio 68 A GLACIAL (S)PACE Off the Metaphysical Map with Brian Fridge. By Brandon Kennedy There 112 CAMERAS COVERING CULTURAL EVENTS Furthermore ... 116 SHAPE OF THINGS Dadaist, Surrealist, abstractionist, The Nature of Arp examines the fluidity of an artist’s life and oeuvre. By Terri Provencal 116

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CONTRIBUTORS

STEVE CARTER had a good time with this issue, writing two preview profiles of upcoming exhibitions—Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, and Voyeur of the Mundane, a fiveperson group show at Erin Cluley Gallery including Julie Bozzi, Vernon Fisher, Nic Nicosia, Allison V. Smith, and artist and curator Steve Dennie. “Interviewing Laurie Simmons is a treat, and this star-studded group show at Erin Cluley is going to be brilliant.”

SERGIO GARCIA is a Los Angelesbased photographer and the go-to source in the entertainment industry with a knack for capturing vivid actor, musician, on-air personalities, and those seeking the unexpected. Tapping his prowess, Sergio was assigned to capture the handsome LA-based artist Jwan Yosef as he prepared for his exhibition Come September on view now at The Goss-Michael Foundation.

NANCY COHEN ISRAEL is an art historian, curator, and lecturer. An ongoing contributor to Patron, she also writes for other national publications. For this issue, she previews the concurrent exhibitions at the Kimbell, Balenciaga in Black and Goya in Black and White. And as one who appreciates arts partnerships, she enjoyed writing about the innovative choral group, Verdigris, whose exciting second season promises collaborations between song, dance, and the visual arts. BRANDON KENNEDY is the Director of Exhibitor Relations for the Dallas Art Fair, who works year-round with international galleries and also assists with programming for the April event. This past year, Kennedy curated The Anatomy of Disquiet at The Karpidas Collection, exploring the nature of Jungian thought and the collective unconscious. He is an occasional artist, avid book collector, and peripatetic curator and writes about local artists for Patron magazine in the Studio column. For this issue, he focused on the enigmatic video and sculptural work of Brian Fridge.

Lindsay Roche

CHRIS BYRNE is the author of the graphic novel The Magician (Marquand Books, 2013) as well as The Original Print (Guild Publishing, 2002). He is co-chair of Art21's Contemporary Council and serves on the board of directors of Institute 193, Dallas Contemporary, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, and the American Folk Art Museum’s Council for the Study of Art Brut and the Self-Taught. He is the co-founder of the Dallas Art Fair and was formerly chairman of the American Visionary Art Museum.

LAUREN CHRISTENSEN has more than two decades of experience in advertising and marketing. Lauren consults with clients in art, real estate, fashion, and publishing through L. Christensen Marketing & Design. She serves on the boards of the Christensen Family Foundation and Helping Our Heroes. Her clean, contemporary aesthetic and generous spirit make Lauren the perfect choice to art direct Patron.

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LEE CULLUM is a journalist who hosts CEO, a series of interviews with business leaders on KERA-TV. For this reason she was especially pleased to write about Tim Headington, chairman of this year’s TWO x TWO benefit for the DMA and amfAR. Funding for contemporary work and AIDS research is the aim of this affair presided over by Cindy and Howard Rachofsky for the past 20 years. Connoisseurs of high and current culture, the Rachofskys have made TWO x TWO an exhilarating harbinger of autumn. KENDALL MORGAN is a Dallas-based journalist whose work has appeared in The Nasher magazine and Patron among others. Morgan examines the space where culture, art, fashion, and food align. In Illuminated Identity, Kendall visits with Jwan Yosef, a Syrian-born Swedish artist, who explores his own unique heritage through three separate figures, “legendary Hollywood actor Rock Hudson, the Syrian dictator Hafez Al Assad, and my own father, Ahmad Yosef” in his exhibition, Come September at The GossMichael Foundation.

AURIEL GARZA is an art historian and museum educator based in Fort Worth, where she works for the Kimbell Art Museum. She has a BFA with an emphasis in art history, theory, and criticism from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and an MA in art history from TCU. She has previously worked for museums, galleries, and cultural nonprofits in Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Miami Beach, and San Antonio. In A Pertinent Choice, Auriel investigates the oeuvre of Dana Schutz. ELAINE RAFFEL blames her obsession with designer fashion and opulent jewels on her years as creative head for Neiman Marcus, Bergdorf Goodman, and Stanley Korshak. Four months after leaving the corporate world, she was thrilled to have the opportunity to spearhead this month’s The New Noir and Pretty Fabulous. Armed with advice from editor Terri Provencal to “push it at Patron,” Elaine assembled a talented team to deliver the vision including photographer Elizabeth Lavin, stylist Nelly Adham, and makeup artists Paige Anderson and Gigi Coker.

FRANK HETTIG is Heritage Auction's Vice President of Modern & Contemporary Art. With over 18 years of auction experience, Frank also has a well-regarded reputation as a curator, critic, and connoisseur of contemporary art. Trained as an art historian at the University of Amsterdam, he has advised on exhibitions and museum catalogues and has lectured at a number of colleges and universities across the globe. As an art critic, he has written reviews for Archis, Art/Text, Artforum, Kunstforum, and Metropolis. JOHN SMITH holds a degree in architecture, which informs his photography. A Dallas-based Patron contributor, Smith’s lens brings out the artistic side of architecture. Renowned in the region for his work with architects, designers, and artists, he captures the distinct elements through photographs. In this issue he captured the five artists included in Erin Cluley Gallery’s Voyeur of the Mundane curated by Steve Dennie, as well as TWO x TWO champions Cindy and Howard Rachofsky, and this year’s chairman, Tim Headington.


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PUBLISHER | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com ART DIRECTION Lauren Christensen DIGITAL MANAGER/PUBLISHING COORDINATOR Anthony Falcon COPY EDITOR Paul W. Conant PRODUCTION Michele Rodriguez CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Chris Byrne Steve Carter Nancy Cohen Israel Lee Cullum Auriel Garza Frank Hettig Brandon Kennedy Charles Dee Mitchell Kendall Morgan

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CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Karen Almond Dickie Hill Tamytha Cameron Elizabeth Lavin Pierre Even Aubrey Mayer Sergio Garcia William Neal Megan Gellner Mary Simpson Josh Geyer John Smith

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Opening reception October 13th, 5-8pm Exhibit through December 15th

STYLISTS & ASSISTANTS Nelly Adham Paige Anderson Gigi Coker Elaine Raffel ADVERTISING info@patronmagazine.com or by calling (214)642-1124 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM View Patron online @ patronmagazine.com REACH US info@patronmagazine.com SUBSCRIPTIONS patronmagazine.com One year $36/6 issues, two years $48/12 issues For international subscriptions add $12 for postage SOCIAL @patronmag

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is published 6X per year by Patron, P.O. Box 12121, Dallas, Texas 75225. Copyright 2018, Patron. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without express written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. Opinions expressed in editorial copy are those of experts consulted and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors, publisher or the policy of Patron. Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs should be sent to the address above and accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope for return. Publisher will take reasonable precaution with such materials but assumes no responsibility for their safety. Please allow up to two months for return of such materials.


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The Texas Art Auction | October 27, 2018 The Texas Art Auction has been a tradition in buying important art since 1996. The auction in recent history has been held each January. This October 27th marks the second auction of 2018, with the anticipation of turning the auction schedule to Spring and Fall sales.

Major highlights include a groundbreaking painting by Texas modernist, Seymour Fogel; an important Florence McClung, Triple Underpass, 1945, which celebrates the engineering feat at the entrance of downtown Dallas; and a vibrant 1930 Harry Anthony De Young, from the featured Robert Brousseau Estate, which includes over 85 paintings from Brousseau’s 40 years of collecting important early Texas paintings.

Auction Date: Saturday, October 27th Auction & Preview Location: Wildman Art Framing, 1715 Market Center Blvd, Dallas, TX 75207 Auctioneer: Louis Murad – TXS 13362

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TUNJI ADENIYI-JONES

TED LARSEN

MARKUS AMM

HEIDI LAU

HAROLD ANCART

DANIEL LEFCOURT

KAMROOZ ARAM

DAVID LEGGETT

KORAKRIT ARUNANONDCHAI

ZOE LEONARD

TAUBA AUERBACH

ANNE LINDBERG

ANDISHEH AVINI

MATEO LÓPEZ

EDWARD BARBER AND

ISRAEL LUND

JAY OSGERBY

TSUYOSHI MAEKAWA

SARA BARKER

DASHIELL MANLEY

KATHERINE BERNHARDT

ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE

DAVID BIELANDER

STEFANO MARCHETTI

CHARLIE BILLINGHAM

CRAIG MCINTOSH

SAMANTHA BITTMAN

DOUG MELINI

CECILY BROWN

SEAN MICKA

KIM BUCK

MATT MIGNANELLI

RAISSA BUMP

TAWEESAK MOLSAWAT

SETH CAMERON

GABRIEL DE LA MORA

ELAINE CAMERON-WEIR

FRANCISCO MORENO

NACHO CARBONELL

RYAN MOSLEY

NATHAN CARTER

LEE MULLICAN

JAMES CASEBERE

TUCKER NICHOLS

MATHEW CERLETTY

MELANIE NÜTZEL

STEVEN CHARLES

DOUG OHLSON

JULIAN CHARRIÈRE

YUUNA OKANISHI

AHHI CHOI

DANIELLE ORCHARD

SANDRA CINTO

CLAUDIO PARMIGGIANI

SHACHAR COHEN

CELIA PAUL

ANNA CONWAY

ELIZABETH PEYTON

KATY COWAN

RICHARD PHILLIPS

ANN CRAVEN

HOWARDENA PINDELL

ERIC CRUIKSHANK

WALTER PRICE

PAUL DERREZ

NATHLIE PROVOSTY

GEORG DOBLER

SCOTT REEDER

TOMORY DODGE

GABRIEL RICO

STEPHEN D’ONOFRIO

CELIA ROGGE

MARCIN DUDEK

JOEL ROSS

ALEANA EGAN

SALLY ROSS

JUDITH EISLER

EVA ROTHSCHILD

JADÉ FADOJUTIMI

MAJA RUZNIC

JAMES BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

JACKIE SACCOCCIO

HELEN FRIESACHER

PHILIP SAJET

RAPHAËLLE GOETHALS

CURTIS TALWST SANTIAGO

ROCHELLE GOLDBERG

GRETA SCHÖDL

ANTONY GORMLEY

DANA SCHUTZ

ADAM GRINOVICH

JOAN SEMMEL

AURÉLIE GUILLAUME

DAVINA SEMO

WADE GUYTON

KARIN SEUFERT

CHARLES HARLAN

JIM SHAW

KNUT HENRIK HENRIKSEN

BRUCE M. SHERMAN

MARIE HERWALD HERMANN

ADAM SILVERMAN

NAOTAKA HIRO

LORNA SIMPSON

JIM HODGES

BOSCO SODI

CANDIDA HÖFER

JENNIFER STEINKAMP

CHRIS HOOD

HEDDA STERNE

TONY HORTON

CHRIS SUCCO

MATTHEW DAY JACKSON

BARBARA TAKENAGA

VIRGINIA JARAMILLO

ROBERT THERRIEN

SVENJA JOHN

MUNGO THOMSON

SAMUEL LEVI JONES

QUINN TIVEY

IKE JÜNGER

PATRICIA TREIB

KAZUO KADONAGA

FABRIZIO TRIDENTI

KIMIAKI KAGEYAMA

KIM TSCHANG-YEUL

CAITLIN KEOGH

MARTHA TUTTLE

MATT KLEBERG

LANE TWITCHELL

MIWA KOMATSU

JAMES VERBICKY

WANDA KOOP

ERIKA VERZUTTI

KLARA KRISTALOVA

THOMAS WACHHOLZ

GUILLERMO KUITCA

MIA WESTERLUND ROOSEN

TAKASHI KUNITANI

JONAS WOOD

STEFAN KÜRTEN

YUI YAEGASHI

SHINPEI KUSANAGI

MARK VAN YETTER

TAKURO KUWATA

JWAN YOSEF

SEULGI KWON

Artist list as of September 10

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NOTED 03

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01 AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM Dallas is the first city to host the updated touring exhibition Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: Paradox of Liberty, a widely acclaimed exhibition, which brings to life the story of slavery, featuring 300 objects, works of art, documents, and artifacts unearthed at the storied plantation. The exhibit includes a new feature on Sally Hemings. On view through Dec. 31. aamdallas.org 02 AMON CARTER MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART In Our Own Words continues through Oct. 7. Commanding Space: Women Sculptors of Texas continues through Nov. 18. Hedda Sterne: Printed Variations celebrates the artist’s exquisite variety of formal interests through Jan. 27. From Remington to O’Keeffe: The Carter’s Greatest Hits runs Oct. 6–May 26. Image: Mary Cassatt (1844– 1926), Woman Standing, Holding a Fan, distemper with metallic paint on canvas, Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Acquisition in honor of Ruth Carter Stevenson and the 50th Anniversary of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art with funds provided by Anne T. and Robert M. Bass, The Walton Family Foundation, Marsland and Richard W. Moncrief, and the Council of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. cartermuseum.org 03 CROW MUSEUM OF ASIAN ART Avatars and Incarnations: Buddhist and Hindu Art exhibits through Feb. 24. Immortal Landscapes: Jade, and The Art of Lacquer run through Jan. 6. Jacob Hashimoto’s Clouds and Chaos is on display through Apr. 7. Image: Jacob Hashimoto, Superabundant Atmosphere, 2013, silk, bamboo, Dacron. Photograph courtesy of Bildmuseet-Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. crowcollection.org 04 DALLAS CONTEMPORARY Three exhibitions are on view: Ghada Amer’s ceramics, Knots, Thoughts, Scraps; Boris Mikhailov’s Parliament; and a survey of Ian Davenport’s work. All three exhibitions at Dallas Contemporary run through Dec. 17. dallascontemporary.org 05 DALLAS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM Let Me Be Myself: The Life Story of Anne Frank follows the story of Anne Frank from her birth in Germany to her death at BergenBelsen Concentration Camp. It also includes a bridge to the present through a section in which six young people of today address 34

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subjects like identity, exclusion, and discrimination, through Aug. 2019. On Oct. 24, the Holocaust Museum will honor Dr. Gregory L. Fenves as the 2018 Hope for Humanity Honoree at the Hilton Anatole. On Nov. 8, Dr. Efraim Zuroff will speak as part of the Upstander Speaker Series. dallasholocaustmuseum.org 06 DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART Asian Textiles: Art and Trade Along the Silk Road draws from the DMA’s collection of ornamental hangings and garments, on view through Dec. 9. An Enduring Legacy: The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Collection of Impressionist and Modern Art shows through Feb. 3. Through Jan. 6, Cult of the Machine examines American culture from the 1910s to the Second World War and reveals how the American love affair with new technology and mechanization shaped architecture, design, and the visual culture of the US. Word and Image: Works on Paper, 15th–20th centuries, emphasizes artists who blurred the boundaries between art and text, through Oct. 21. Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty will survey the late artist’s career, Oct. 21–Jan. 27. Ida O’Keeffe: Escaping Georgia’s Shadow shares rediscovered works by the artist, Nov. 11–Feb. 24. Image: Charles Demuth, Buildings, 1930–1931, tempera and plumbago on composition board, DMA, Dallas Art Association Purchase Fund, Deaccession Funds/City of Dallas (by exchange) in honor of Dr. Steven A. Nash. dma.org 07 FORT WORTH MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND HISTORY Grossolog y: The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body and Animal Grossolog y run through Jan. 6. fwmuseum.org 08 GEOMETRIC MADI MUSEUM Ed Napolitan is the MADI’s October Artist of the Month. Oct. 26–Jan. 20 features Italian artists Reale Frangi and Piergiorgio Zangara. November’s Artist of the Month is Callandra Smith, with a champagne reception on Nov. 4. geometricmadimuseum.org 09 GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL CENTER Deck the Halls and Welcome All: Christmas at the White House 2006 will start off the holiday season Nov. 15. The exhibit will be adorned with re-creations and decorations of the Christmas White House holiday, behind-the-scenes photos, and a replica of the Blue Room White House Christmas tree, through Jan. 6. bushcenter.org


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NOTED: VISUAL ARTS

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10 KIMBELL ART MUSEUM This autumn, the Kimbell Art Museum will partner with the Palais Galliera, the distinguished fashion museum of the city of Paris, to present Balenciaga in Black, an exhibition of more than 100 pieces from the collections of the Galliera and the archives of the Maison Balenciaga, Oct. 7–Jan. 6. Concurrently, Goya in Black and White will explore the evolution of the artist’s graphic work in all media. kimbellart.org 11 LATINO CULTURAL CENTER Travel to Brazil will disseminate the historical and present-day uniqueness of the South American country by emphasizing dance, artistic folklores, and martial arts, Oct. 5–6. On Oct. 17, Cine de Oro presents the smash hit Coco. Join the LLC for their next installment of Cine de Oro featuring The House at the End of Time on Nov. 21. lcc.dallasculture.org 12 MEADOWS MUSEUM Murillo at the Meadows: A 400th Anniversary Celebration runs through Dec. 2. Dalí: Poetics of the Small, 1929–1936 is the first exhibition of the artist to focus solely on his cabinet paintings. Aliyah: A Moment in Jewish History, featuring a complete set of 25 lithographs by Salvador Dalí, runs through Dec. 9. Image: Salvador Dalí (Spanish, 1904–1989), Portrait of a Woman, 1934, oil on panel, 10 x 7.375 in. Private collection. © 2018 Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society. Photograph Courtesy of Sotheby’s, Inc. © 2016. meadowsmuseumdallas.org 13 MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera, Oct. 14–Jan. 27, showcases the artist’s photographs spanning the last four decades, from 1976 to the present, a small selection of sculpture, and two films. themodern.org 14 MUSEUM OF BIBLICAL ART Barbara Hines: Celebration of Survival is on display through Oct. 31. Hines’ work is inspired by stories from the Torah and conveys her deep commitment to sharing the beauty of Israel and using art as a way to bring understanding and peace. biblicalarts.org

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15 NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER The Nature of Arp provides a look at the achievements of Jean (Hans) Arp (1886–1966), one of the most important artists of the modern era. As a founder of the international Dada movement during World War I, Arp pioneered the use of chance, spontaneity, and collaboration as artistic processes and subsequently developed a vocabulary of curving, organic forms that was to become the lingua franca for several generations of artists. Through Jan. 6. French artist Anne Le Troter will consider the ethics of eugenics in a linguistic score and site-specific installation in Sightings: Anne Le Troter, Oct. 27–Feb. 17. Soundings: New Music at the Nasher presents Orpheus Unsung on Oct. 24. Image: Jean Arp, Plant Hammer (Terrestrial Forms), 1916, painted wood, 24.5 x 19.5 x 3.36 in. Collection of the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag © 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn. Photo courtesy Gemeentemuseum Den Haag. nashersculpturecenter.org 16 PEROT MUSEUM Ultimate Dinosaurs reveals rarely seen, exotic species that evolved in isolation in South America, Africa, and Madagascar, through Jan. 6. Dates for Sleepovers include Oct. 26 Spooktacular Sleepover and Nov. 16 the Wizarding Science Sleepover. 3D movie screenings include Museum Alive 3D through Sep. 3, Waking the T. Rex 3D through Jan. 6, Oceans: Our Blue Planet 3D through May 23, 2019, and America’s Musical Journey 3D through May 23, 2019. perotmuseum.org 17 TYLER MUSEUM OF ART Apertures of the Mind: Works by Abhidnya Ghuge, through Dec. 2, is the first large-scale museum exhibition showcasing recent works by the University of Texas at Tyler art history professor and former physician and will feature woodblock prints and 3D seaforms primarily inspired by traditional Indian henna colors and patterns. This & That: Recent Acquisitions features more than 30 works dispersed from the permanent collection of the Contemporary Austin. This exhibition will showcase the highlights of these and other recently acquired pieces for the Tyler Museum’s permanent collection, including works by Otis Dozier, Michael Frary, Larry Graeber, and Julie Speed through Jan. 6. tylermuseum.org


Courtside

Photographs by Bill Bamberger On view through January 3, 2019 Level One between Burberry and Louis Vuitton Artist Bill Bamberger, in collaboration with the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, presents an exhibition of vibrant color photographs that capture the many different settings in which basketball is played around the world. Duke undergraduate students planned the exhibition through a Curatorial Practicum class with assistant curator Molly Boarati.

MEDIA SPONSOR

Bill Bamberger, Charter school playground, Harlem, New York, 2007. Inkjet print on archival paper. Bill Bamberger, Abandoned barn, Mebane, North Carolina, 2006. Inkjet print on archival paper. Courtesy of Bill Bamberger. Š Bill Bamberger.


NOTED: PERFORMING ARTS

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01 AMPHIBIAN An artist is murdered leaving his two friends suspecting each other. Uniting them is their infatuation with Sophie. Artist Descending a Staircase runs Oct. 5–28. Why Johan Miranda Should Be Deported is a solo show mounting Nov. 1–3. Broadcast live from London’s West End, see Ian McKellen’s portrayal of King Lear, Nov. 24–28. amphibianstage.com 02 AT&T PERFORMING ARTS CENTER The Branford Marsalis Quartet performs Oct. 11. Performed by Dark Circles Contemporary Dance, Aladdin explores how time and imagination have transformed the tale as part of the Elevator Series. The Simon & Garfunkel Story is back Oct. 17. Itzhak Perlman performs Oct. 22. Tom Papa brings his comedy to the stage on Oct. 27. Join Richard Dawkins and planetary scientist Carolyn Porco as they discuss matters relating to science, reason, freedom of inquiry, and humanist values, Oct. 28. An Evening of Laughter and Reflection Where the Audience Asks the Questions features an intimate evening with Carol Burnett on Nov. 11. Chris Botti performs at the Winspear, Nov. 17. Image: Dark Circles Contemporary Dance in Aladdin. Photograph by Brian Guilliaux. attpac.org 03 BASS PERFORMANCE HALL La Mer features music inspired by water, conducted by Eugene Tzigane, Oct. 5–7. Super Diamond: A Tribute to Neil Diamond shares the classics, Oct. 12–14. From Oct. 19–20, The Illusionists take the stage. Bask in Brahms’ melodic genius when Alessio Bax returns to the FWSO to perform Piano Concerto No. 2, in Daphins et Chloé, Oct. 26–28. The Music of Harry Potter will delight fans, Nov. 1–3. Time for Three blends classical and contemporary genres, Nov. 2–4. Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella is onstage, Nov. 15–18. Image: Still of The Illusionists. Photograph by Joan Marcus. basshall.com 04 BRUCE WOOD DANCE From Nov. 16–17, Bruce Wood Dance will perform in All Bruce which features four dances: Local 126, Echoes of Enchantment, Bolero, and The Edge of My Life So Far with special guest, Nycole Ray, artistic director for Dallas Black Dance Theater Encore! brucewoodance.org 05 CASA MAÑANA The Big Bad Musical takes the notorious Big Bad Wolf to court with a class-action lawsuit by storybooks of quirky characters who want to get even. Oct. 5–21. Winner of three Tony® Awards, and the 2010 Pulitzer Prize, Next to Normal is an unflinching look at a suburban family struggling with the effects of mental illness, onstage Nov. 3–11. casamanana.org 38

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06 DALLAS BLACK DANCE THEATRE DanceAfrica 2018 is a two-day event featuring vibrant performances at Moody Performance Hall, Oct. 5–6. The DanceAfrica Marketplace takes place on Oct. 6 and features free performances and games for children at the Annette Strauss Artist Square. Director’s Choice features Tommie-Waheed Evans in Bodies as Site of Faith and Protest which draws on fierce physical language through dance set to speech excerpts by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Director’s Choice showcases the strength and stamina of DBDT dancers as they push through the layers of Lily Cabatu Weiss’ Thrown for a Loop, Nov. 2–4. dbdt.com 07 DALLAS CHILDREN’S THEATER The world premiere of Treasure Island: Reimagined continues through Oct 21. A Wrinkle in Time tells the story of strength in adversity as a young girl tries to save her father from an alternate universe, Oct. 19–28. DCT will showcase A Ghost Tale for Mr. Dickens, Nov. 16–Dec. 23. dct.org 08 THE DALLAS OPERA Set sail as The Flying Dutchman opens The Dallas Opera’s 2018/19 season, running Oct. 12–20. Carmen, the infamous woman at the center of Bizet’s seductive masterpiece, will break hearts Oct. 19– Nov. 4. dallasopera.org 09 DALLAS SUMMER MUSICALS An Evening with the Best of Broadway 2018 DSM Gala unites the talents of Jane Lynch, Matthew Morrison, and Shoshana Bean and surprise special guests from Broadway to the silver screen, Nov. 3. ELF the Musical tells the hilarious story of a human who thinks he’s an elf, Nov. 27–Dec. 2. dallassummermusicals.org 10 DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Carmina Burana astounds with extraordinary spectacle and thrilling vocals from the DSO, Oct. 4 –7. Ruth Reinhardt conducts Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3, Oct. 11–13. Relive Leonard Bernstein’s legacy when DSO performs his works from West Side Story, Candide, On the Town and more, Nov. 9–11. Andrew Grams conducts selections of Tchaikovsky’s Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, Nov. 23–25. John Williams and Friends features selections from Harry Potter and Home Alone, Nov. 30–Dec. 2. mydso.com 11 DALLAS THEATER CENTER At Truvy Jones’ salon in Chinquapin, Louisiana, women gather to swap stories, share gossip, and of course, style their hair. But when tragedy strikes, the community comes together in a bond more powerful than hairspray. Steel Magnolias continues through



OF NOTE

Left: Lenny Lenny Lenny concert poster by Stephen Zhang. Below: Artistic Director, Sam Brukhman, in performance during a Consolation of Apollo concert at Royal Lane Baptist Church in March 2018. Photograph by Dickie Hill.

There's a P lace for us

Verdigris Ensemble brings new insight into the life of Leonard Bernstein.

I

n a season bountifully celebrating the late Leonard Bernstein’s 100th birthday, a voice is rising. Verdigris, a choral ensemble under the direction of Artistic Director Sam Brukhman, begins its second season with Lenny! Lenny! Lenny! Here, Brukhman has chosen to chart new territory within the maestro’s broad canon. For this unique program, Verdigris is weaving together Bernstein’s personal correspondences into a musical tapestry that will illustrate the connection between events in his life and their subsequent influences on his music. “We are highlighting the humanity of Leonard Bernstein rather than the genius,” Brukhman says. Artistic collaboration is a hallmark of this innovative group. For this concert, their 16 singers will perform the Chichester Psalms in conjunction with the Temple Emanu-El choir, led by director Chris Crooks. According to Vicky Glikin, Senior Cantor at Temple Emanu-El, “This gives us the opportunity to work with an exciting and emerging choral organization and to bring them into our beautiful space.” “It is especially meaningful,” Glikin adds, “as synagogue music served as Bernstein’s earliest inspiration.” For musicians, this season of tribute is fitting. According to Bernstein protégé Joseph Alessi, who is Principal Trombone of the New York Philharmonic, “Bernstein was, quite simply, a musician’s musician. Maestro in Italian means “teacher” and Maestro Bernstein

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taught us the deepest levels of meaning behind each piece we were performing.” He adds, “He cared about the players and developed a personal rapport with them.” Brukhman and his board also share a strong rapport. Inspired by Brukhman’s contagious enthusiasm, their collective expertise is fostering the growth of the organization. Among them, artist Stephen Zhang, a creative director in branding, designed this year’s marketing materials. His watercolors provide the visual tenor for each concert. Kyle Stewart, another board member and co-owner of The Cultured Cup, worked with the ensemble to create a unique tea blend, with 100% of its sales flowing back to Verdigris. Stewart’s own training in voice performance gives him a profound appreciation for Brukhman, whom he credits with revitalizing choral music. Part of this revitalization includes working with non-vocal groups, including Avant Chamber Ballet and Arts Mission Oak Cliff. Verdigris has also forged a partnership with the SOLUNA festival, which is the commissioning sponsor of their concert, Faces of Dallas. At this spring’s SOLUNA festival, the ensemble will perform Julia Wolf’s Anthracite Fields, in collaboration with the chamber ensemble, Bang On a Can All-Stars. With such a varied season ahead, Brukhman advocates, “Take a chance and experience choral music.” –Nancy Cohen Israel


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NOTED: PERFORMING ARTS

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Oct. 21. DTC’s A Christmas Carol reimagines Dickens’ classic tale, Nov. 21–Dec. 30. Image: Ruth Reinhardt conducts the DSO. Photograph by Sylvia Elzafon. dallastheatercenter.org 12 EISEMANN CENTER The Richardson Symphony Orchestra opens its 57th season with German music from the height of the Romantic Era, featuring three orchestral pieces from the world of opera, Oct. 6. Jaston Williams, Greater Tuna creator, will perform in his one-man show Clear to Partly Craz y, Oct. 19–20. From Brooklyn to Broadway presents an evening with Steve Solomon, Nov. 16–17. From Nov. 23–25, Chamberlain Performing Art’s Nutcracker will kick off the holiday season. eisemanncenter.com 13 KITCHEN DOG THEATER When a young couple is offered an ideal house by a mysterious stranger, it prompts the question: How far would any of us go to get our dream home? A fast-paced, black comedy, Radiant Vermin is a provocative satire about consumerism, gentrification, and inequality. Radiant Vermin launches KDT’s 2018/2019 season, Oct. 4–28. kitchendogtheater.org 14 LYRIC STAGE Lyric Stage invites you to enjoy splendid songs from the glory days of The Majestic Theatre, unamplified by electronics, in the magnificent acoustic space of the national landmark, Nov. 16–18. lyricstage.org

17 TEXAS BALLET THEATER The magical Christmas Eve where everything comes to life and a Nutcracker Prince battles an Evil Rat King turns the Winspear Opera House into a Sugar Plum kingdom as The Nutcracker takes the stage Nov. 23–Dec. 2. Image: Alexandra Farber in The Nutcracker. Photograph by Steven Visneau. texasballettheater.org 18 THEATRE THREE Once, telling the story of following your dreams and the power of music, ends Oct. 7. Next, two Victorian-era sisters, Agatha and Huldey, and their languid mastiff live out their lives in a manor house on the bleak English moors. The Moors runs Oct. 25–Nov. 18. theatre3dallas.com 19 TITAS Stephen Petronio is regarded as one of the leading dance-makers of his generation. Onstage Oct. 19–20, Petronio combines new music, visual art, and fashion in a modern landscape for the senses. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet features a dazzling collaboration with acclaimed pianist Joyce Yang, Oct. 26–27. Complexions represents one of the most recognized and respected performing arts brands in the world. On Nov. 9–10, the renowned group will perform at Moody Performance Hall. titas.org 20 TURTLE CREEK CHORALE Join TCC for an evening of decadent desserts, fabulous cocktails, and a stunning performance by Matt Alber. The Third Annual After Dark will take place in the heart of Dallas’ premiere culinary hot spot, Trinity Groves, on Oct. 26. The Chorale’s annual fundraiser will also feature a big-board auction that supports the programing and a chance to win great prizes. turtlecreekchorale.com

15 MAJESTIC THEATRE Comedian and actor Felipe Esparza brings his talents to Dallas, Oct. 12. The Official RuPaul's Drag Race World Tour! returns Oct. 14. Instagram’s favorite poet, Rupi Kaur, will perform Oct. 21. Adam Devine performs his Weird Life Tour, Oct. 23. Iliza brings her standup special Elder Millennial on Nov. 1. Flying Steps presents Flying Bach, Nov. 4. Sweetheart of the Rodeo 50th Anniversary show takes place Nov. 9. Comedian Sebastian Maniscalco performs Nov. 10. Christmas with Michael W. Smith and special guest Melinda Doolittle opens the holiday season, Nov. 28. A Charlie Brown Christmas Live on Stage mounts Nov. 30. majestic.dallasculture.org

21 UNDERMAIN THEATRE How is it That We Live or Shakey Jake + Alice traces the arc of the lives of two lovers through the years from the first kiss to the last goodbye, and everything in between through Oct. 7. The Lady From the Sea by Henrik Ibsen will be onstage Nov. 8–Dec. 2. Ibsen’s classic continues his exploration of the imbalances of marriage and a woman’s need for freedom. undermain.org

16 TACA TACA’s annual Party on the Green takes place Oct. 5. The evening offers fine cuisine and entertainment, and supports the arts community. Signature plates will feature dishes by local star chefs such as Chef Stephen Pyles, Chef Janice Provost of Parigi Restaurant, and Chef Sebastien Archambault of Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek. The night will also include live performances from some of TACA’s 2018 Grant Recipients. taca-arts.org

22 WATERTOWER THEATRE Henrik Ibsen shocked the world in 1879 when A Doll’s House became the first play of its kind, and now WTT Artistic Director Joanie Schultz has taken Ibsen’s immortal words and wound them into an updated thriller, Oct. 12–Nov. 4. Boy has an unyielding imagination. But when the rigidness of growing up begins to stifle it, Boy sets out in search of his own home in The Great Distance Home, on the Main Stage, Nov. 23–Dec. 16. watertowertheatre.org

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NOTED: GALLERIES

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01 ALAN BARNES FINE ART An exhibition for British impressionist Matthew Alexander opens Oct. 11 and runs through Nov. 9. alanbarnesfineart.com.

Oct. 18 and Conduit Gallery on Nov. 15. CADD will celebrate the Mystery Brunch Fundraiser annual fundraising event Sunday, Oct. 21. caddallas.net

02 AND NOW Michele Rawlings continues through Oct. 13. Next, the gallery will host an exhibition featuring the work of installation artist David Flaugher, Oct. 20–Nov. 24. andnow.biz

09 CARLYN GALERIE Carlyn Galerie has established itself as a store devoted to the sale of fine American art glass, clay, fiber, metals, and jewelry. carlyngalerie.com

03 ARTSPACE111 Closing Oct. 6, Long Form Life features the work of Devon Nowlin. Opening Oct. 11, AS111 will show the work of Dennis Blagg, JC Pace III, and William Grainer. The exhibition will run through Dec. 1. artspace111.com

10 CARNEAL SIMMONS CONTEMPORARY ART Complicit is a group show featuring works by artists Jessica Bell, Johannes Boekhoudt, Lisa Cardenas, Lindsey Dunnagan, Jennifer Morgan, Yelizaveta Nersesova, Jen Rose, and David Wilburn, among others. The exhibit tackles critical social issues that have come to a boiling point. Oct. 13–Nov. 10. Image: David Wilburn, Something Like a Door (07), 2018, acrylic on muslin and map pins, 36 x 36 x 1.75 in. carnealsimmons.com

04 BARRY WHISTLER GALLERY John Wilcox: Arena Paintings, Drawings, and Studies (1982–2012), through Oct. 13, features his deductive and iconic works in this survey exhibition. A Texas native, Wilcox (1955–2012) lived and worked in California (1980–83), Texas (1983–85), New York (1985–89), and Texas again (1989–2012). Andrea Rosenberg: New Paintings and Drawings mounts Oct. 20–Nov. 24. barrywhistlergallery.com 05 BEATRICE M. HAGGERTY GALLERY Shape-shifter: Drawing from Observation, continuing through Nov. 9, features drawings by Trevor Bennett, Walter Early, Mayuko Ono Gray, and Shelby Shadwell. Each artist turns the common notion of observational drawing on its head with pictures that make reality seem uncommon, if only for a moment. udallas.edu/gallery 06 BIVINS GALLERY Bivins Gallery represents over 25 globally significant artists, as well as emerging artists. Currently on view are new works by anonymous French artist Punk Me Tender, featuring live flowers, feathers, and his trademark butterflies. bivinsgallery.com

11 CHRISTOPHER MARTIN GALLERY With two additional galleries in Aspen and Santa Fe, the Dallas gallery will exhibit Buzoku: New reverse paintings by Christopher Martin, steel casts and bronzes by Jim Keller, metal sculptures by Michael Sirvet, and stoneware works by Brandon Reese. christophermartingallery.com 12 CONDUIT GALLERY Humid Futures, showing alongside W. Tucker’s I am this big / I am this small, and Drew Liverman’s work in the Project Room, continues through Oct. 13. Hope Is The Thing With Feathers will exhibit the work of Margaret Meehan, addressing contemporary feminist protests and the legacies that they draw from, Oct. 20– Nov. 24. Image: Rosalyn Bodycomb, DC Metro VIII, 2018, oil on linen, 27 x 36 in. conduitgallery.com

07 BLUE PRINT GALLERY Blue Print is dedicated to the presentation of established, midcareer, and emerging artists of Texas, featuring artwork from contemporary paintings and works on paper to photography and sculpture. blueprint-gallery.com

13 CRAIGHEAD GREEN GALLERY David Crismon New Works closes, alongside Jeri Ledbetter’s All’aperto, and Danna Ruth Harvey’s The Sparrows, on Oct. 6. Next, Craighead Green opens Pancho Luna’s Written on Transparent Pages, Damian Suarez’s Unconscious Language, and Faith Scott Jessup’s Moving Day on Oct. 13, running concurrently through Nov. 10. Image: Pancho Luna, Circle, 2018, lucite and mixed media, 26 x 40 x 10 in. craigheadgreen.com

08 CADD CADD’s Third Thursday Happy Hour will be held at Erin Cluley on

14 CRIS WORLEY FINE ARTS Harry Geffert’s posthumous retrospective Look Up There closes Oct.

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THE RESIDENT EXPERT

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3617 CRESCENT AVENUE HIGHLAND PARK | $13,950,000

6. Paul Manes returns with his latest body of work in Desire, featuring large-scale paintings, many inspired by his new home in Colorado. Alongside, Anne Allen’s first solo show, Beach Salad...and Other Watery Adventures, mounts a series of works on paper inspired by her recent travels, through Nov. 10. Marc Dennis displays subtly suggestive hyper-realistic florals; while Rusty Scruby will present photo tessellations inspired by family memories, Nov. 17–Dec. 29. Image: Marc Dennis, Pa-Twaing!, 2017, oil on linen, 74 x 60 in. crisworley.com 15 CYDONIA Battle Cry, a non-commercial solo exhibition featuring the Guerrilla Girls, continues through Oct. 28. Marman and Borins will debut in Texas in The Fourth Wall, a multi-media show that includes a new film and a script that provides context for sculptures that function as props and characters. Paintings offer backdrops to the setting, Nov.–Feb. 2019. Image: Marman and Vorins, Bottles, 2010, acrylic on canvas, 18 x 22 in. cydoniagallery.com

4440 BORDEAUX AVENUE HIGHLAND PARK | $8,995,000

16 DADA The Dallas Art Dealers Association is an affiliation of independent gallery owners and nonprofit art organizations dedicated to promoting the highest standards of ethical practice within the profession and increasing public awareness of art and the responsibilities of its membership. dallasartdealers.org 17 DAVID DIKE FINE ART David Dike Fine Art will hold a semi-annual auction Oct. 27 featuring Texas paintings. Florence McClung’s Triple Underpass is back and is up for auction for the first time. The October 27 Texas Art Auction additionally features over one hundred uniquely selected pieces for first-time collectors. Image: Florence McClung (Am. 1894–1992), Triple Underpass, 1945, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in. daviddike.com

3656 STRATFORD AVENUE HIGHLAND PARK | $5,995,000

ERIN MATHEWS

18 ERIN CLULEY GALLERY Mexico closes Oct. 7, featuring works from or inspired by Mexico and works by Mexican artists. Voyeur of the Mundane runs Oct. 13–Nov. 24. The exhibit presents photographic and painted works from the 1970s to the present that feature the more forgettable details of life in center frame by Julie Bozzi, Steve Dennie, Vernon Fisher, Nic Nicosia, and Allison V. Smith. erincluley.com

214.520.8300 ERIN@ERINHOME.COM ERINHOME.COM

October2018-PatronAd-ErinMathews-HalfPage.indd 5

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NOTED: GALLERIES

Kittrell/Riffkind Art Glass Gallery 4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, Texas 972.239.7957 n www.kittrellriffkind.com

25 19 FORT WORKS ARTS Life In Analog: A Juried Film Photography Exhibition runs Oct. 17–Nov. 3. The exhibition will feature the work of photographers chosen from submissions sent into the gallery. fortworksart.com 20 FWADA Fort Worth Art Dealers Association organizes, funds, and hosts exhibitions of noteworthy art. fwada.com 21 GALERIE FRANK ELBAZ Group Show features artists Ketuta Alexi-Meskhishvili, Jean-Michel Atlan, Davide Balula, Sheila Hicks, William Leavitt, Ari Marcopoulos, Mangelos, Kaz Oshiro, and Mungo Thomson through Oct. 13. Next, Paul Galvez curates the sculpture show Locally Sourced opening on Oct. 23 with works by Isabelle Cornaro, Davide Belula, and Rachel Harrison. Image: Mungo Thomson, Rods and Cones (YB 007428 Thousand Oaks/Simi Valley 2016–2017 P220 CMYK) (detail), 2017, transparent pigment on panel, 46.13 x 35.88 in. Photo by Sebastiano Pellion di Persano. galeriefrankelbaz.com 22 GALLERI URBANE Heath West’s Villas continues alongside Slightly Altered, a solo show of new work by the Ukrainian artist duo, Synchrodogs, through Oct. 6. Jessica Snow’s exhibition, Master of the Nets, opens Oct. 13 and continues through Nov. 10. Donald Martiny’s Epistrophy runs concurrently. Image: Jessica Snow, Master of the Nets #13, 2018, oil on canvas, 54 x 60 in. galleriurbane.com 23 GINGER FOX GALLERY Ginger Fox Gallery includes two contemporary art galleries in Dallas, featuring paintings by Ginger Fox and select emerging and mid-career artists. gingerfox.myshopify.com

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24 THE GOSS-MICHAEL FOUNDATION Come September presents a newly curated selection of Jwan Yosef’s work that focuses on materials and our relationship to them. Working with “holy” mediums such as oil paint and “unholy” material such as acrylic glass, the combination becomes a substitute for portraiture. Come September runs through Nov. 16. g-mf.org


Now Representing

P OTEET VICTORY

Oil on Canvas

“Shards of the First People”

SOUTH WEST

GALLERY

4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, TX 75244 972.960.8935

WWW.SWGALLERY.COM

Offering Fine Art and Framing in Every Style

72x72 in.


NOTED: GALLERIES

10 25 HOLLY JOHNSON GALLERY Dornith Doherty’s The Flood Project, Deluge was initiated by photographing the changes within the Trinity River basin north of Dallas/Fort Worth from 2015 to the present, by tracking changes in the landscape during the floods and their aftermaths. Through Nov. 10. Kim Squaglia: New Paintings, Oct. 13–Dec. 15, features biomorphic forms, webs, and tendrils. Jackie Tileston: New Work continues to bring a global sensibility to her work by drawing from many different cultures, Nov. 17–Jan. 19. Image: Dornith Doherty, First Night, 2013, archival ink jet print, Edition 1/3, 30 x 40 in. hollyjohnsongallery.com 26 KIRK HOPPER FINE ART Keri Oldham’s newest series, Night Fortress, depicts hauntedhouse-looking fortresses and female warriors that draw on medieval art, folk stories, and quilting traditions. The artist is interested in how fear is intimately linked with our sense of home, safety, and origin stories. Night Fortress has been extended through Oct. A solo exhibition featuring work by Texas sculptor Mac Whitney runs Nov. 3–Dec. 1. kirkhopperfineart.com

Saturday, October 13, 2018 Opening Reception, 5-8PM Artist Talk, 6:45PM

27 KITTRELL/RIFFKIND ART GLASS The 27th Anniversary, One of a Kind, is an exhibit of glass works created especially for this celebration by 50 of the gallery’s favorite artists. Festivities will continue throughout the month of October. Ornament Extravaganza! explores shape, color, and the holiday season, Nov. 11 through the month of Dec. kittrellriffkind.com

Artists in Attendance Exhibition on display through November 10, 2018

28 KRISTY STUBBS GALLERY Kristy Stubbs brings experience and expertise to the global art trade, often bringing notable artists to the US from abroad. stubbsgallery.com

1130 Dragon St. Dallas, TX 75207 214.761.2000 LauraRathe.com

29 LAURA RATHE FINE ART Zhuang Hong Yi: In Full Bloom closes Oct. 6. Stallman Studio & Chris Wood: On Different Wavelengths runs Oct. 13– Nov. 10. Stallman and Wood create dynamic compositions that incorporate energetic forms, patterns, colors, and light. Next, Meredith Pardue returns with new large-scale

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LISA SCHULTE

OPENING RECEPTION OCTOBER 20 FROM 5-8PM

22 compositions featuring colorful abstract forms derived from nature. Meredith Pardue: New Works runs Nov. 17–Dec. 29. laurarathe.com 30 LILIANA BLOCH GALLERY Simón Vega: Hot Capsules from the Cold War closes Oct. 13. Ann Glazer: Big Drawings fills the gallery Oct. 13–Dec. 30. lilianablochgallery.com

LEA FISHER

OPENING RECEPTION NOVEMBER 17 FROM 5-8PM

31 LUMINARTÉ FINE ART GALLERY An exhibition featuring the work of Albena Hristova, Gina Rossi, and sculptor Robin Antar closes Nov. 13. luminartegallery.com 32 MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES MLG specializes in original paintings, sculpture, and limited-edition graphics from Marc Chagall, Robert Deyber, Keith Haring, Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, to Rembrandt, and many others. martinlawrence.com 33 MARY TOMÁS GALLERY Ethereal Horizons and Paradise Lost continue through Oct. 6. Family Stories, featuring guest artists David Connolly and Jonathan Millet, opens Oct. 13–Nov. 10. The two-person show explores various family tales interpreted through artistic language. Focus opens Nov. 17, featuring new works by rostered artists that include Blair Vaughn-Gruler, Masri, and Kenneth Schiano and others. marytomasgallery.com 34 MERCADO369 Latin American artists are well represented in this Oak Cliff jewel. Nine galleries offer sculpture, jewelry, textiles, and home décor from Mexico to Argentina. mercado369.com 35 PHOTOGRAPHS DO NOT BEND Elliott Erwitt’s solo show continues through Nov. 10. Delilah Montoya: Women Boxers presents photographs recently exhibited at MOMA PS1 this summer. These large prints on aluminum are striking reminders of her powerful document, Women Boxers: The New Warriors published in 2006. Alongside, Paul Sokal: Before iPhone takes a look back at

SAMUEL LYNNE GALLERIES

1105 Dragon St. | Dallas, Texas 75207 www.SamuelLynne.com | 214.965.9027

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NOTED: GALLERIES

DAMIAN SUAREZ UNCONSCIOUS LANGUAGE

21 objects from our not-too-distant low-tech culture. Both run Nov. 17–Dec. 29. pdnbgallery.com 36 THE PUBLIC TRUST Exhibiting contemporary work by mid-career and emerging artists, the gallery’s program extends into publishing art publications, limited-edition prints and multiples. trustthepublic.com

PANCHO LUNA WRITTEN ON TRANSPARENT PAGES

37 THE READING ROOM Yellow Tablets, an exhibition of large incised-plaster tablets by Dallas artist Thomas Feulmer, continues through Oct. 6. Opening Nov. 17, works on paper by Nida Bangash engage and challenge the tradition of Persian miniature painting. Through Dec. 15. thereadingroom-dallas.blogspot.com. 38 RO2 ART Ro2 Art is a contemporary fine art gallery located in The Cedars representing a diverse group of emerging, midcareer, and established contemporary artists—many with ties to the North Texas Region. Ro2art.com 39 ROUGHTON GALLERIES Featuring fine 19th- and 20th-century American and European paintings, the gallery is distinguished for its scholarship and research. roughtongalleries.com

FAITH SCOTT JESSUP MOVING DAY

OPENING

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 5-8PM 10.13.18 - 11.9.18

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40 RUSSELL TETHER FINE ART RTFA manages estates and features renowned national and international artists, along with select artists from North America. russelltether.com 41 SAMUEL LYNNE GALLERIES An opening reception mounts Oct. 20 for American sculptor and light artist Lisa Schulte. Known as The Neon Queen, this exhibit will feature a juxtaposition of her current work in white light and wood, and colored light and line through Nov. 10. Reflectionist artist Lea Fisher opens Nov. 17 with new works from the artist’s studio, including her increasingly popular Self-Portrait series. Through Dec. samuellynne.com


CONTEMPORARY ART

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43 SITE131 Clay & Things runs through Dec. 14 and gathers Texas clay couple Eric and Morgan Grasham’s idiosyncratic clay composites, Julia Jalowiec’s jolly figurative groupings, Jessica Kreutter’s global composites, Shelby David Meier’s stacked porcelain plates, Brian Molanphy’s wall-hung invented shapes, and Angel Oloshove’s brilliantly colored globes. site131.com 44 SMINK Two openings run concurrently from Oct. 13–Dec. 15, featuring two museum-collected modernist Santa Fe artists. New Work by Dara Mark, showcases her gouache on Yupo paper alongside painter Zachariah Rieke. sminkinc.com 45 SOUTHWEST GALLERY Igor Samsonov introduces the globally known Russian artist. His paintings are rich with symbolism and tell stories, some well-known, but others created by Samsonov himself, through Oct. 31. Poteet Victory is one of the most in-demand and collectable contemporary Native American artists. Although Victory’s work is abstract, his CherokeeChoctaw influence shines through. Poteet Victory continues through Nov. swgallery.com

Artist Mary Tomás, detail: Whisper, oil on canvas, 67 x 82.5 in.

42 SEAN HORTON (PRESENTS) With the curator and critic Joseph Wolin, Sean Horton will produce a series of two-person exhibitions coupled with a critical essay. The first pairing, Claire Fontaine (Paris, France) and Leo Gabin (Ghent, Belgium), present a collective practice as the product of a single sensibility. Oct. 26–Dec. 15. seanhortonpresents.com

46 TALLEY DUNN GALLERY David Bates: Portrait of Flowers continues through Oct. 13. Opening Oct. 27, new work from photographer Ori Gersht will be displayed. Gersht’s concerns are with the relationships between history, memory, and landscape where the viewer is visually seduced before being confronted with darker and more complex themes, presenting a compulsive tension between beauty and violence. Through Nov. talleydunn.com

www.marytomasgallery.com

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NOTED: GALLERIES

interior design + art

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47 VALLEY HOUSE GALLERY Bob Stuth-Wade: Painting in Earnest is the 10th solo exhibition for the Texas artist at the gallery. The exhibit includes paintings, watercolors, and drawings from the past four years along with a series of 31 shell compositions in homage to Morandi’s bottles stemming from Stuth-Wade’s practice of drawing and painting shells at the beginning of each day, to sharpen his vision. Oct. 6–Nov. 3. valleyhouse.com 48 WAAS GALLERY The first weekend in Nov., WAAS will present works by a Dallas collective formed by Brandy Michele Adams in partnership with the biennial AUROR A: Future World. waasgallery.com 49 WILLIAM CAMPBELL CONTEMPORARY ART JT Grant’s walking the horizon continues through Oct. 13. Working in drawing, painting, and sculpture, Chicago artist John Fraser will be featured in Time Well Spent, Oct. 19 through Nov. 24. williamcampbellcontemporaryart.com AUCTIONS

Photography by Danny Piassick Christopher Martin, “Sparks”

MARY ANNE SMILEY, RID, ASID maryannesmiley.com 214.522.0705

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01 DALLAS AUCTION GALLERY The Fine Art Auction begins Nov. 28. The sale will feature paintings, works on paper, and fine prints, including pieces by Clark Hulings, Robert Wood, Stephen Edlich, and Lowell Nesbitt. Consignments are welcome through Oct. 29. dallasauctiongallery.com 02 HERITAGE AUCTIONS The fall auctions include the Illustration Art Auction Oct. 12, the Photographs Signature Auction Oct. 12, Design Signature Auction Oct. 21, Prints & Multiples Modern & Contemporary Art Auction Oct. 22, Manuscripts Auction Oct. 25, Definitive KAWS: The Toy Collection of Ronnie K. Pirovino Auction Nov. 8, American Art Auction Nov. 8, Texas Art Auction Nov. 10, 20th-Century American Prints Auction Nov. 13, Ethnographic Art: American Indian, Pre-Columbian, and Tribal Art Signature Auction Nov. 16, and the Modern & Contemporary Art Auction Nov. 29. ha.com


OF NOTE:

COSTUME CULTURE Left: Amneris struggles with Radames’ love for a captive Ethiopian princess, Aida, in costumes by Peter J. Hall for The Dallas Opera. Photo credit: Karen Almond, Dallas Opera.

Right: Peter J. Hall’s illustrations for Aida’s Amneris.

No matter the aria, opera’s full-throttled vocals indulge the ears. However, dramatic and comedic performances amplify through elaborate set designs and lavish costumes that further enhance the passionate spectacle. To reach a broader audience outside the Winspear, The Dallas Opera and NorthPark Center, the presenting sponsor of The Dallas Opera’s FIRST SIGHT Fashion Show and Luncheon through 2036, have teamed up to present The Fabric of Opera, a historic 22-costume exhibition from the collection of TDO’S Wardrobe Department on view through November 4 at NorthPark. Though other costume designers are included in The Fabric of Opera, the standouts are the creations of the late Peter J. Hall whose historic imaginings for characters from captives to royalty began through illustrations before ever applying needle and thread to sumptuous fabrics. Serving as TDO’s resident costume designer for more than four decades, Hall was also tapped by many important opera houses including The Metropolitan Opera along with an eminent clientele that included the likes of David Bowie, Elizabeth Taylor, and Mick Jagger. Inspired by depictions of tomb walls and papyrus scrolls, Hall’s exotic costumes for Giuseppe Verdi’s Aida, including the Egyptian princess, Amneris, are on display alongside the King of Egypt and two standardbearers wearing characteristic animal-head masks. Spanning Ancient Egypt to the Victorian Era, nearly two-dozen opulent costumes have been curated by Dallas Opera prop, set, and costume designer, Tommy Bourgeois, who worked alongside Hall for decades. Worn by operatic legends of the 20th and 21st century, The Fabric of Opera is displayed near CH Carolina Herrera boutique on Level One between Neiman Marcus and Nordstrom. dallasopera.org –P

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OPENINGS

ILLUMINATED IDENTITY

PAINTER JWAN YOSEF PLAYS WITH THE (UN)IMPORTANCE OF BELONGING AT THE GOSS-MICHAEL FOUNDATION.

BY KENDALL MORGAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY SERGIO GARCIA

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Jwan Yosef in his studio.


A

IMAGE FROM UNTITLED #142 , OIL ON CANVAS, BY ALLEN KIRSCH EXCLUSIVELY AVAILABLE THROUGH HOLLY HUNT

n undercurrent of duality runs through the oeuvre of artist Jwan Yosef. Be it man or materiality, inclusion or exclusion, or sculpture or painting, the artist’s vision must always be viewed through multiple lenses. Syrian by birth, Swedish by upbringing, the 34-year-old Yosef was born into a world where his identity was somewhat in flux. Because his Kurdish father and Greek Orthodox mother came from different backgrounds, it became necessary for the Yosefs to relocate to a place where they could raise their family without barriers. “My family moved to Sweden when I was two years old, so I had no recollection of my life in Syria,” says Yosef. “My immediate family had a very protective point of view for us as children, but later we discovered the taboos of the culture we came from and the taboo of my parent’s marriage. It led to a very complex but very joyous upbringing.” Trained at Konstfack in Stockholm, it wasn’t until he moved to London to earn his Masters in Fine Arts at Central Saint Martins in 2011 that Yosef “faced down his duality,” both in life and in art. “People would ask me where I was from, and say, ‘You don’t look Swedish.’ To me, London became this turning point. In a way, the more I’ve worked, the more I understand this search. (My work) touches on both the religious and political movements that have been going on in the Middle East, but it’s also a search… PHOTO CREDIT: MARC VOLKMAN for identity.” Initially eschewing painting because “it felt too heavy,” Yosef began his career by gravitating to materials such as paper or Plexiglas. Defining each as “holy” (aka oil paint) or “unholy” (acrylic glass), he landed on a tactile yet non-traditional methodology, one that garnered him both the Columbia Threadneedle Prize and the Beers Contemporary Award for Emerging Art in 2013. Allowing the medium to drive his message, the artist’s latest works in his current show, Come September, at The Goss-Michael

PHOTO CREDIT: MARC VOLKMAN

DALLAS 1025 N STEMMONS FREEWAY SUITE 590

Jwan Yosef, Hafez, 2018, oil on linen and aluminum, 18 x 15 in.

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OPENINGS 2 0 18 I 2 0 19 S E A S O N in association with AT&T Performing Arts Center

STEPHEN PETRONIO CO M PA N Y

OCTOBER 19.20 2018 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

LIVE M USI C

A S PE N S A N TA F E B A L L E T

A N E V EN I N G W I T H PA I N I S T J OYCE YA N G OCTOBER 26.27 2018 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

COMPLEXIONS CONTEMPORARY BALLET NOVEMBER 09.10 2018 MOODY PERFORMANCE HALL

CALL

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Top to bottom: Jwan Yosef, Rock, 2017, oil on linen and aluminum, 72 x 54 in.; Jwan Yosef, Rock, 2018, oil on linen and aluminum, 27 x 22 in.


H O S P I TA L I T Y . R E S I D E N T I A L . C O M M E RC I A L

Foundation is figurative—Syrian dictator Hafez Al Assad, Yosef’s father, Ahmad, and movie star Rock Hudson—though crushed so far down on their wooden frames, they’re almost unrecognizable. “Rock Hudson for my mother was her biggest idol, but for me, he was almost a sad, fallen figure. I’m choosing to show these figures in a way that they are distorted images of a person. By destroying (the canvases), it becomes portraiture in these cases of unfortunate or fortunate fallen figures.” A second group of painted masking tape laid across acrylic sheets reference a poorly repaired rupture, while Yosef’s gilt canvases stenciled with phrases such as “Cash for Gold” recalls both the pawn shops that surrounded the artist’s London abode and the jewelry his family stashed in their belongings as they fled their native country. “My parents left everything and came with nothing. The little we had were these pieces of gold. As a child, you don’t see the value in gold; it’s just shiny objects. (With the paintings), the idea of gold becomes completely worthless, but the canvas itself has its own value.” Come September, which runs from September 27 through November 17 at Goss-Michael, is just one of four shows that Yosef is staging before the end of 2018. The artist is also exhibiting similar canvases at Stene Projects in Stockholm, Guerrero Projects in Houston, and Praz-Delavallande in Los Angeles. Thinking of the work as “one big show in four venues,” Yosef’s prolific output is a partial outgrowth of his expansive new studio in his new home of Los Angeles. After spending a nomadic year on the road with his nowhusband, the singer and actor Ricky Martin, Yosef put down roots in the City of Angels, allowing its Kelig-illuminated atmosphere and spacious landscapes to supersize both his scale and productivity. “It’s a pretty big move; I was in London for seven years, which is a long time to never see light,” Yosef laughs. “I was aware my work was going to change, but it became way large. I thought this is great; I’m in America, there is light, there is space, there are all these things that naturally make your practice a little bit larger. In six months, everything tripled in size, and I felt like ‘Wow, I have arrived!’” P

T H E A R T of VISIONARY C U R AT I O N

MK Semos

Jen Mauldin

SEMOSMAULDIN B E S P O K E A R T C O N S U LTA N T S

Jwan Yosef, Masking, 2018, oil on acrylic glass, 10 x 16 in.

semosmauldin.art

888.585.2950

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VOYEUR OF THE MUNDANE

ERIN CLULEY GALLERY HOSTS A STAR-STUDDED GROUP SHOW THAT CELEBRATES THE COMMONPLACE.

Artists Nic Nicosia, Allison V. Smith, Vernon Fisher, Julie Bozzi, and Steve Dennie at Erin Cluley Gallery. Photography by John Smith.

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CONTEMPORARIES

BY STEVE CARTER

To see a World in a Grain of Sand And a Heaven in a Wild Flower, Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand And Eternity in an hour… –William Blake, Auguries of Innocence

Vernon Fisher, Mona Monalisa, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 61 x 61 in., Courtesy of Vernon Fisher and Talley Dunn Gallery.

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CONTEMPORARIES

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Top to bottom: Nic Nicosia, Pink House, 1980, Courtesy Nic Nicosia and Erin Cluley Gallery; Steve Dennie, #4.29.18.00726, 2018, Hahnemuhle photo rag paper with archival inks, 4 x 6 in., printed on 12 x 12 in., Edition 10, Courtesy of Steve Dennie, Barry Whistler Gallery, and Hiram Butler Gallery; Julie Bozzi, Cinderblock Shed—Morning, 2009, gouache on paper, 7 x 10 in., Courtesy of Julie Bozzi and Talley Dunn Gallery.

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e have a tendency to overlook the everyday, the quotidian, the banal. We pass by the same visual stimuli daily, and it might as well not exist. The familiar, in context, numbs perception and lulls us to ignore. But take those same commonplace sights, filter them through the sensibilities of five acclaimed artists, recontextualize the commonplace by hanging the resulting works on gallery walls, and then look again—the invisible becomes visible, the ordinary becomes extraordinary, and a grain of sand just might look like a world. Erin Cluley Gallery’s Voyeur of the Mundane, opening October 13 and running through November 24, is just such an exhibition. Featuring photographs by Nic Nicosia, Steve Dennie, and Allison V. Smith, and paintings by Vernon Fisher and Julie Bozzi, the group show elevates the overlooked. Voyeur of the Mundane challenges viewers to really look, engage, and commune with the everyday subject matter, and to find the hidden poetic lurking in the prosaic. “I don’t think anyone’s ever done a show that focused on the mundane,” says Steve Dennie, featured photographer and curator of the exhibition. “It’s five different interpretations of the mundane—every one of them is showing work that’s their interpretation of things that people take for granted. And the fact that it’s both painting and photography makes for a more interesting impact.” A key aspect of the group is that all the artists are long-standing friends. Back in the day, Dennie and Nic Nicosia were contemporaneous classmates at North Texas State University (now UNT), while at the same time Vernon Fisher was a Professor of Art there. Renowned painter Julie Bozzi, who’s married to Fisher, is also a longtime friend, and the youngest of the five, celebrated photographer Allison V. Smith, completes the circle. “Another thing is that we all like each others’ work,” Dennie adds with a laugh. “It doesn’t really matter one way or another, but that’s always nice…” Gallerist Erin Cluley fell in love with the concept immediately. “Steve Dennie came to me with this and I said, ‘yes, yes, yes, absolutely!’” she recalls. “Having these five artists under one roof is pretty cool. I also loved the idea of coming back around to one of my artists, Nic Nicosia. I’m really honored to be hosting this.” The exhibition is also an admirable exercise in reaching across the aisle, since Dennie and Smith are aligned with Barry Whistler Gallery and Bozzi and Fisher are both represented by Talley Dunn Gallery. The show includes 40+ pieces from the five artists, some new, some older, and in Nicosia’s case, a collection of 38-year-old fabricated photos that are on view for the first time. Little Houses, Personal Landmarks is a series Nicosia created in Denton back in his grad school days. The six images began as black-and-white photos he shot for a class, but his nascent instincts led him down a nontraditional path. “I took this old-school subject matter, sort of what everybody who gets a camera for the first time does—they go out in the country and photograph old farmhouses,” he says. “But my thing was to screw up the black-and-white image with colored paper and paint, fabricate what I wanted it to look like, and then re-photograph it. So definitely mundane subject matter...hopefully changed into something else.” In addition to the bucolic scenes, Nicosia also captured exteriors of Denton’s long-gone Tom and Jo’s Café and the iconic Mr. Frosty root beer drive-in—personal landmarks that were his preferred haunts in 1980. Tarted-up and timeless through Nicosia’s lens and imagination, they’re a nostalgic window on a long-since-faded era.


Steve Dennie’s photographic world is comprised of sites— the under construction, the abandoned, the off-limits, and occasionally the inexplicable. There’s a conspicuous absence of people, although the scenes resonate with human echoes and purposefulness. Prolonged exposure to his vision can be a bit disconcerting, as if you the viewer have entered a Twilight Zone episode in which all human life has mysteriously vanished overnight. Dennie shoots mainly in his Oak Cliff neighborhood, usually early Sunday mornings, observing life’s vestiges before life wakes up for the day. “I look for things you’d never pay attention to if you walked past them,” he reveals. “That’s the way it started for me, and still to this day that’s the way I see things, the way I frame them…I think I’m romanticizing in a way, but not intentionally.” There’s a sense of voyeuristic happenstance in the paintings of Julie Bozzi, a drive-by quality of capture that’s hauntingly evanescent, blink-and-you’ll-miss-it. In her work the mundane is a matter of fact, a whispered, Wait, where is that? I know I’ve seen that place, but I’ve never really seen it. The much-celebrated Vernon Fisher has himself long celebrated the everyday, the obvious, the iconography of pop culture, often with confounding juxtapositions of imagery. Fisher’s virtuosic technique and wry wit are on view in three paintings, one an update of his earlier work, American Landscape; it makes its premiere here. And Allison V. Smith’s vibrant take on the mundane is anything but—from the vividly hued angularity of the Ruscha-esque Truck. June 2014. Fort Stockton, Texas (also visible in Bee Keeper) to the Marfa-magical mystery of Parked. May 2011. Marfa, Texas and beyond, there’s an atmosphere of absolute color, lively geometry, and the familiar reframed. For her part, Erin Cluley couldn’t be happier. “I think artists are so good at redirecting us to things that might be overlooked,” she observes. “They have this way of making things interesting, even exciting, and so poetic.” And Nic Nicosia cuts to the chase: “I can’t wait to see it—I think it’ll be a good one.” P

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Allison V. Smith, Bee Keeper, 2015, Rockport, Maine 1/7, Courtesy Allison V. Smith and Barry Whistler Gallery.

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INTERVIEW BY CHARLES DEE MITCHELL

PRESENTING SEAN HORTON

A New York art dealer comes home to open a gallery in Oak Cliff.

From left: Sean Horton at his Dallas gallery, September 2018. Leo Gabin, When Bout it Bout it Fails, 2015, lacquer, acrylic, spray paint, and silkscreen on canvas, 81 x 58 in. Courtesy of the artist & Sean Horton (presents), Dallas.

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regional destination for quinceañera dresses, West Jefferson, too, is a generous host for the art-minded. A few blocks away from The Kessler and The Texas Theatre, tucked between Lucky Dog Books (yes, a real bookstore) and a tuxedo shop and salon, gallerist Sean Horton just opened shop in September with his eponymous gallery. Curator and art writer Charles Dee Mitchell shares the details. Charles Dee Mitchell: Welcome back to Dallas, Sean. How long have you been working on this return to your home state? Sean Horton: Thank you, Dee. I actually explored the idea of opening a gallery in Texas back in 2006 before I opened on the Lower East Side of New York City. It’s a long story with a twist of fate; a sneaker shop on Eldridge Street skipped its lease and the building super named Rodrigo told me that Jesus wanted me to have the space. I was slightly confused, but the price was right. And of course I couldn’t say no to Jesus. That decision set me on course for owning and operating the gallery in New York for over a decade. About two

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years ago my wife and I found ourselves at Buc-ee’s doing some last-minute Christmas shopping when the idea of spending more time in Texas seemed appealing. It wasn’t until we bought a little 20s bungalow in Oak Cliff earlier this year that I really committed to opening a gallery in Dallas. CDM: Are you still involved with galleries elsewhere? Do you think it’s important to have multiple sites in today’s market? SH: The new gallery dubbed “Sean Horton (presents)” on West Jefferson Boulevard in Dallas will be the only exhibition space. It is important to me for the gallery to have a connection to a place, a neighborhood. I enjoy operating in residential areas alongside other small businesses that share an entrepreneurial spirit. Our industry is one of the last to grapple with the shift away from brick and mortar to online; I think we are all redefining what it means to operate a contemporary art gallery today. While a certain level of portability is required of galleries in this new virtual field, making compelling gallery shows is still the most rewarding aspect of what I do. Art fairs, temporary exhibitions, having a presence in different cities—


FAIR TRADE

those are all facets of promoting art and artists, but there needs to be a headquarters where art can be viewed in person and in the proper context…and for now that will be in Dallas. CDM: What changes do you see in the Dallas art scene? SH: It’s been remarkable to see how the Dallas Art Fair has established an expansive culture of collecting by attracting galleries from around the world. The fair has really become a rallying point for collectors who are interested in discovering of-the-moment art from the Lower East Side or Europe, which seem to be two of the most popular sources. Not too long ago Texas collectors sometimes felt like they didn’t have access to the best artwork that galleries had to offer. Now the best galleries in the world bring great art to Dallas. I have been surprised by how many of my colleagues do business here year-round. For a gallery like mine that worked so hard to carve out a niche in a highly competitive city like New York, it’s refreshing to be part of such an enthusiastic and supportive community. CDM: Here’s the first question everyone asks when they hear you are opening a new gallery, and I’ll make it my last. Who are you going to show? What will be the program? SH: My focus will be on bringing the work of nationally and internationally established artists, as well as emerging figures, to Texas audiences. I have been working with my friend, the curator and critic Joseph Wolin, to produce a series of two-person exhibitions coupled with a critical essay. The first pairing is Claire Fontaine (Paris, France) and Leo Gabin (Ghent, Belgium); both present a collective practice as the product of a single sensibility. In addition to working directly with artists, I am looking forward to collaborating with other galleries, curators, and critics to introduce new art and ideas to Dallas. P

Claire Fontaine, Untitled (Sell your debt), 2012, three-color neon on framework (Tecnolux: Ruby Red Argon No. 18, White 6500K No1S and Ultra Blue No. 122), 8mm glass tube, back-painted, electronic transformer and cable and framework, 3.5 x 42.33 x 1.5 in., Edition of 5 plus II AP. Wall- or window-mounted. Courtesy of the artist & Sean Horton (presents), Dallas.

ABOUT THE INTERVIEWER: Charles Dee Mitchell is a retired bookseller who has also been a freelance art writer. His reviews and essays have appeared in The Dallas Morning News, Artforum, and Art in America. He has contributed essays to exhibitions at the Dallas Museum of Art, the Columbus Museum of Art (Ohio), and the Armand Hammer Museum at UCLA. He has also curated exhibitions for both commercial galleries and non-profit venues.

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CONTEMPORARIES

BY CHRIS BYRNE Matthew Higgs. Photograph by Aubrey Mayer.

EARLY TO THE PARTY CHRIS BYRNE VISITS WITH WHITE COLUMNS’ AHEAD-OF-THE-CURVE DIRECTOR/CURATOR MATTHEW HIGGS.

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hris Byrne: You grew up near Manchester in the north of England at a time now lauded for its post-punk scene. Your early interest in music led you to publish a fanzine—how did this sonic fixation transition into the visual? Matthew Higgs: I was born in 1964, which makes me 53 now. Like many people of my generation I became interested in art through music. Music functioned as a kind of ‘gateway drug’ to other ideas/ cultural forms. I was too young to have had a meaningful relationship with punk (i.e., 1976–1977), but I became very interested in what followed (c. 1978–1981): the DIY/Independent cultures of postpunk and ‘new wave.’ Through my interest in groups such as Cabaret Voltaire, The Fall, Joy Division, Throbbing Gristle, Human League, Scritti Politti, etc., and record labels such as Fast (Edinburgh), Mute (London), and especially Factory (Manchester), I developed a nascent interest in art, which eventually led me to art school in 1984–87. I published a fanzine called Photophobia named after a Cabaret Voltaire song in 1979–1980 when I was 14–15 years old. It was an attempt on my part to articulate my (adolescent) interests, and also to get closer to the things that interested me. CB: This past year, you seemed to revisit this early fascination via your exhibition “True Faith” at the Manchester Art Gallery. Although I regret that I wasn’t able to see the show in person, I was intrigued that you seemed to transcend the usual Joy Division/New Order memorability approach. How did these bands, with Peter Saville as the graphic designer for Factory Records, directly influence painters and sculptors? MH: As I mentioned above, many artists of my generation arrived at art via music. Someone like Peter Saville was crucial; as a designer he operated largely autonomously from the groups and labels he worked for; he enjoyed a freedom to do his own work that was unprecedented. To all intents and purposes he was an artist, who just happened to work—at the time—in the music industry. And I think through a kind of ‘osmosis,’ this attitude was conveyed through his designs, through his record sleeves, which in turn had a profound impact and influence upon many people—myself included—who would go on to become artists, designers, etc. His works acted as a kind of catalyst for so many people. The exhibition ‘True Faith’—which I curated with Jon Savage and Johan Kugelberg—was an attempt to consider the ongoing nature of the influence of Joy Division, New Order, and Peter Saville on subsequent generations of artists and designers (including Mark Leckey, Raf Simons, Martin Boyce, etc.). CB: When you founded your own press, Imprint 93, was your initial desire to publish multiples and editions to keep a consciously democratic approach to fine art alive? MH: Imprint 93 was a small press that started in 1993 and ‘faded away’ around 1999. I eventually published around sixty projects by artists including Billy Childish, Elizabeth Peyton, Peter Doig, Hilary Lloyd, Chris Ofili, Ceal Floyer, Jeremy Deller, and Martin Creed, among many others. My idea was to publish new works by artists in a format that could be distributed by mail. The projects were sent free-of-charge and unsolicited to people that we felt were doing something interesting. (The mailing list for each project was developed by myself and the collaborating artist—i.e., you couldn’t buy them, and they weren’t stocked in bookstores, etc.) So in that regard they were possibly ‘undemocratic’! But I was interested in


AND NOW / JAMES COPE finding a form of distribution/circulation that would bypass the existing structures of gallery/bookstore, etc. And it was important—to me at least—that they were free. The project was informed by the earlier strategies of Fluxus Publishing and Mail Art, as much as it echoed my teenage experience as a publisher of a fanzine. CB: You have been making artwork regularly since you attended Newcastle-upon-Tyne Polytechnic in the mid-80s—what do you consider to be the most important difference between your practice as an artist and that as a curator? I’m specifically thinking of your exhibition, Lost For Words, at Murray Guy in 2016. MH: I was always interested in the ‘hyphenated’ artist: the artist-writer, the artist-musician, the artist-curator, and so on. In my own work over the past 25+ years I’ve tried to maintain a practice as an artist, as a curator, as a publisher, and as a writer (although I write far less these days). Each of these disciplines interests me a great deal, but what interests me most is where they overlap. Artists such as Mike Kelley or Dan Graham have always been role models. CB: I’m a big fan of Judith Scott. Could you talk about how the show, Bound and Unbound, came about at the Brooklyn Museum? Did you have the opportunity to meet the artist before she passed away in 2005? MH: I lived in Oakland in the early 2000s when I was working as a curator at the Wattis Institute, and ‘discovered’ Creative Growth around this time. (I was very late to the party as the organization had been founded in the early 1970s!) I met Judith Scott on my first visit there, and we would see her regularly and had an opportunity to watch her at work. She had an extraordinary, contagious energy. Her work, of course, is among the most important of the 20th Century. The Brooklyn exhibition—Judith’s first retrospective in the U.S.—was curated by myself and Catherine Morris for the Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum. I couldn’t imagine a more perfect context for Judith’s radical vision. CB: I recently reread your post about Jessie Dunahoo’s work on view at Yukiko Koide’s booth during the 2017 Outsider Art Fair... MH: I was blown away when I first encountered Dunahoo’s work at the Outsider Art Fair. It has such an extraordinary, visceral presence despite the modesty of both its materials and construction. It is tempting to think about it in relation to, say, Robert Rauschenberg’s work of the mid 1970s (e,g., the Hoarfrost series), but Dunahoo’s work remains defiantly idiosyncratic. CB: What can we look forward to at White Columns? MH: Next up at White Columns will be the first New York solo exhibition by the Athens, GA-based artist, Katya Tepper, and a rare New York exhibition by the Oaxaca, Mexico-based artist, Dr. Lakra, which will be only his second-ever solo show in the city. In 2019, among other projects, we will present a solo exhibition of the work of Beau Dick (1955–2017), a project we initiated shortly before his untimely death in 2017. CB: Can you tell me about your involvement (if any) with The Matthew Higgs Society? MH: I had no involvement with The Matthew Higgs Society. I don’t think it was meant kindly! P

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Cindy and Howard Rachofsky with Tim Headington at Mirador.


CONTEMPORARIES

BY LEE CULLUM PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN SMITH

ART BEGETS THE ART OF GIVING TIMOTHY C. HEADINGTON SERVES AS THIS YEAR’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY CHAIRMAN OF TWO X TWO.

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track down Cindy Rachofsky easily, tracing her by phone to Napa Valley, where she is hiding out from the Dallas heat but not from TWO x TWO, the extraordinary seated dinner and auction she and her husband Howard have staged for 20 years to benefit amfAR, the Foundation for AIDS Research, and the Dallas Museum of Art. She answers herself, clearly expecting me, and no doubt a dozen others after that, dealers and artists eager to donate their work to this unexpected pairing of imperatives—cultural and medical, linked for too long as too many makers of art of all kinds have fallen to this dread disease, still far from cured. “When amfAR declares victory on that front,” says Cindy, “hopefully they’ll put us out of business. Howard and I can retire from this.” But not now; the Rachofskys are hard at it, determined that this 20th anniversary gathering, emceed by the brilliant actor, Alan Cumming, will be more than spectacular. What they want is renewed affirmation of art as the great elixir of the good and healthy life. Last year, TWO x TWO raised $7.5 million. Half went to the war on AIDS and half to the Dallas Museum of Art, which has bought 260 contemporary works over the past two decades, thanks to this collection of collectors, many of them newly attracted to the joys of acquisition by Cindy and Howard and the artists they bring to the occasion. Those artists flock to The Rachofsky House because all the money raised there for the museum must be spent with them and their dealers, nowhere else. For this reason I learn from Howard, who by now is on the phone, “TWO x TWO has maintained a high level of donations. They get something back. While other museums doing similar events may get sporadic quality, we are not getting metoo products. [The art we auction] is significantly better. Sending a great work of art is the best way of marketing and showcasing.” “Dealers,” Cindy adds, “know the quality of collectors in Dallas.” The quality is so high that this year 135 of the 480 guests are coming from other parts of the country and other parts of the world. Great collectors themselves, Cindy and Howard are also great controllers of cost. This extravaganza is not extravagant at all, despite its unmistakable elegance. Howard points out that “30 to 40 percent [of the take] is typical of these gala events” but theirs is costing only 13 percent. That’s due, he explains, to “arm twisting, generous donors, and we’re frugal.” It has all added up to $75 million net over the span of the project, thus far. One of those ongoing generous donors is Tim Headington, chairman of TWO x TWO this year and the presenting sponsor

of First Look on the Thursday night before the Saturday gala, October 27. We meet at Mirador, Tim’s restaurant on the fourth floor of Forty Five Ten, an astonishing emporium he imported from McKinney Avenue to Main Street and made of it a harbinger of 21st-century retailing. The big box store may be over, lost to online shopping, but that’s not necessarily the end of real stores with extraordinary shoes, clothes, cosmetics, and sundries that delight the eye. What Tim Headington has developed is essentially a boutique, with a boutique feeling, but expanded, with more choices, more merchandise, and, for TWO x TWO this month, a pop-up shop fashioned by Cindy featuring, among other originals, T-shirts designed by celebrated fashion designers branded with two words of their choosing. That’s not all. Also on Main Street is Tim Headington’s Joule Hotel, which also houses great restaurants and retail, celebrating its tenth in this year of anniversaries. Alive with art on all sides, it is in the sightline of Tony Tasset’s The Eye, an enormous sculpture in the pocket park Tim installed next to Forty Five Ten. “I didn’t care if they loved it or hated it,” he tells me. But certainly everybody responds to it. “It’s become a landmark,” he explains. “It’s amazing how many people take pictures there every day.” Tim fell in love with art under the tutelage of Marguerite Hoffman when she directed a gallery and was a private dealer herself. He was drawn first to impressionism, and then Marguerite’s passion for contemporary work “didn’t make sense...but she explained a lot, how one period was reacting to the previous period, and it got interesting.” He’s been collecting ever since. “Art talks to you, tells different stories to different people,” he points out. “Music does that in a different way, which is why I appreciate it so much too.” Tim Headington is not one you’d necessarily pick out of a room as a lover of art. He grew up in Oklahoma, went to OU, then Fuller Theological Seminary in California, a fascinating detour from what looks like a natural trajectory into the oil business. “I’m an oil guy at heart,” he states. But energy for him has many meanings. “It’s enabled me to do other things,” he notes. Those other things have included work in film production, along with dramatic development in downtown Dallas, and a trio of restaurants in the Design District. He’s on the board of the Dallas Museum of Art and, through his gift, Leaf, an important 1970 Sam Gilliam “drape” painting, is now in the DMA’s coffers. Visionary and creative to the core, he’s the perfect chair for this year’s 20th Anniversary of TWO x TWO. P

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BY BRANDON KENNEDY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEGAN GELLNER

Artist Brian Fridge in his live/work efficiency.

A Glacial (S)pace Off the Metaphysical Map with Brian Fridge.

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few weeks back, in preparation for the screening of a video work at AND NOW, my nine-year-old son and I joined artist Brian Fridge and gallerist James Cope while they were troubleshooting the projection of one of his Vault Sequence videos in a gray void adjacent to the gallery. While I had seen works from this series many times, I chiefly wanted to introduce my son to these curious passages, waiting for his response and subsequent questions. I asked him what he saw: “sand falling down a hole, like time,” then he shifted his response again and paused with a “Hmmm…” The first image I remember by the artist was a photograph of a reddish-orange spherical marker on a power line, a warning to the potential danger of proximity for those helicopters wishing to approach. The artwork, Untitled, 1992/1993, approx. 16 x 20 inches, was presented in an antique, oval, stained-wood frame complete with convex glass, with a pure blue sky cut in half by the linear object from which it was designed to protect, as well as protect from. It had a pulsating yet quiet energy within it, something known yet unknown, calling from within and extending out towards the viewer with nothing so much as a visual hum. At this early moment in his artistic journey, Fridge was thinking about Robert Smithson and Ed Ruscha and “all manner of ‘figure/ground’ relationships: 68

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spatial-temporal, geographical, cultural, semantic, etc.” From the outset, Fridge calls into question the basic tenets of what it is to truly see, and then in turn has the viewer question what it is we’re really seeing. Something familiar with open-ended questions: An invented personal cosmos? Outtakes from the outer limits? Investigations into the unknown? The sonogram margins of a coming being? All, some, or neither it seems. When first exploring the medium of video in the mid-90s, Fridge relied on a homespun solution to positing his queries. The Vault Sequence series began as quiet galaxies collapsing in the artist’s freezer aided into annihilation by the draw of a vacuum’s suction off-screen. Filmed in black and white, minute ice crystals swirl about in tandem, calling forth greater mysteries in the silence of this alchemical kitchen investigation. As you breathe in the cosmic wonderment of Fridge’s work, the only sounds you hear are the ones for which you and others in the room are responsible, making one feel both minuscule and grand at once. These quiet projected moments loom larger than the personal, yet they are also quite intimate in their delivery. Fridge began these works decades ago by shooting one long take and then eventually editing the sequences into shorter connected vignettes, giving the viewer an opportunity to compare and contrast the varied imagery


STUDIO

Left: Printed stills from video work and reference materials. Below: Work in progress

caught through his lens of imaginary and constructed worlds. These works have strongly resonated with viewers over the past two decades, earning Fridge a coveted spot in the 2000 Whitney Biennial and inclusion in Digital Worlds: New Media from the Museum’s Collection at the MFAH in Houston currently. While looking at the various components and fixtures Fridge has assembled and rearranged to capture the images he seeks, one wonders how the process itself informs the glacial pace towards the sought images of the artist. There is a quiet tinkerer aspect to all of it, while also evocating forgotten rituals of yesteryear. These quiet piles of homemade tech all stem from Fridge’s residency in Dusseldorf, Germany in 2013. Since the early imagery of star-stirring swirls and deep space, Fridge has found himself gravitating towards more physical and sculptural forms, while also slowly incorporating color into his work. Ice floes, masses of magma, and broken sheets of granite are all evocated, but nothing is fixed or concrete, just as the artist intends…. Fridge lives in a very modest live/work efficiency in an unassuming North Dallas apartment complex, a spartan testament to his dedication of personal investigation and exploration. There’s a single long bookshelf that hangs near the ceiling over his bed, holding a telling selection of scientific, alchemical, magical, and religious texts, channeling the margins of Fridge’s own constant questioning and exploration of boundaries and methodologies. While I browsed his shelves, he shared the thought that he’s most concerned with “being in a situation that’s very typical, while art is coming from a personal need and everyday situation, being interested in the individual pursuit of investigation, rather than trying to establish a law.” From his early frozen proposals, Fridge has expanded his repertoire to include video works in color and also sculptures of sorts. While no viewer has had the opportunity to witness the

former, AND NOW has exhibited one of his three-dimensional sculptures recently (at Cope’s insistent urging), which are in fact, the physical manifestation of his searching and capturing images for his video works. These assembled contraptions consist of wooden frames, various plastic sheets, and convex lenses amid other connecting hardware. Up on the wall, there are diagrams of these lens/platform constructions and mini-storyboards of sequences tacked up with other assorted papers. The bulletin boards are placed between shelves of what appears to be archival research and working files. There are also three photographic renderings of video works: offset galaxies in a Vault Sequence, two grids of some kind of tendril-like growth or ice crystals as well as cells of a retina itself, which resemble the flattened petals of a striated flower. As we closed out our conversation that morning, I noticed how pauses had become more drawn out and lingered after questions. I glanced towards the open sliding-glass door and on the right glimpsed a golden square in a black frame beckoning me towards the daylight. It shone like a bronze circuit board against the asis chipboard backing and frame rivets. When I inquired about its origins, Fridge stated without a beat, “It’s a Yantra, a Hindu letter form.” This mystic Tantric diagram translates to “support instrument,” representing the body intertwined with the cosmos and is thought of as a tool of meaningful contemplation. I looked closer again and paused deeper, all the while probably emitting an inquisitive “hmmm….” P

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Dana Schutz, Building the Boat While Sailing, 2012, oil on canvas, 120 x 156 in. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York.

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A PERTINENT CHOICE

TWO X TWO MAKES A STATEMENT HONORING DYNAMIC AND SIGNIFICANT ARTIST, DANA SCHUTZ.

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allas’s annual TWO x TWO benefit for AIDS and Art will be celebrating its 20th anniversary when this year’s sold-out event takes place on October 27th. To date, TWO x TWO has raised over $75 million supporting both amfAR (the Foundation for Aids Research) and the contemporary art program at the Dallas Museum of Art. A portion of the proceeds have funded the acquisition of over 260 works at the DMA, as well as recent major exhibitions dedicated to Jackson Pollock, Jim Hodges, and Laura Owens. Each year TWO x TWO honors a single artist with the amfAR Award of Excellence for Artistic Contributions to the Fight Against AIDS. The selection of Dana Schutz as this year’s honoree marks the fifth time the award has been given to a female artist. In receiving the honor, Schutz also joins such celebrated artists as Cecily Brown, Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Rauschenberg, and Ed Ruscha. Since the earliest stages of her career, Schutz’s work garnered a wealth of public attention and demonstrated exceptional promise. Her first solo museum exhibition was held just two years after she completed her graduate studies at Columbia University in New York City. After MoMA acquired one of her large-scale paintings in 2005, she rapidly began checking off a number of additional milestones. To date, she has been the subject of thirteen museum exhibitions across North America and the UK. Her work is also in the collections of the Whitney, the Guggenheim, the Met, SFMOMA (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art), MOCA (Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles), as well as both the ICA (Institute of Contemporary Art) and Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, among others.

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Dana Schutz, Fight in an Elevator, 2015, oil on canvas, 96 x 90 in. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York.

"It demonstrates TWO x TWO stands by freedom of expression and that they don't just hide behind nice, decorative works that also raise money. This, in a way, is a political, cultural, and aesthetic stamp of approval, and I applaud them for it..." –Friedrich Petzel

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Friedrich Petzel, Schutz’s gallerist since 2011, first encountered her work when he was invited to attend graduate critiques at Columbia. Petzel was immediately struck by a guiding principle, which he believes continues to unify Schutz’s output today: “It’s this question of how do you make a picture of something that cannot be depicted, that the photograph cannot render, and which cannot be represented in any other shape or form other than an oil painting?” Schutz’s Sneeze paintings (2001–2002) dramatically capture the gesture, force, and physicality of a sneeze expelled from the body. Rendered in a disorienting high-key color palette, the figure’s nostrils flare to the point of resembling a pig nose. The combined facial distress and projectile mucus summarily prove the subject to be most ideally rendered in paint. Sure, it’s sort of disgusting, but it’s also amusing and brilliant. In Men’s Retreat (2007), Schutz depicts a bit of fun, mystery, and social commentary by featuring a number of men in suits and in various stages of undress that appear to be lost in the jungle. The work’s grand scale mimics the effect of a history painting. Men’s Retreat is in the collection of Eric Green who lives in Dallas and first encountered Schutz’s work while serving on the board of the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University. There he helped organize one of Schutz’s early museum exhibitions. He now owns several examples of her work and describes being continually drawn to it for its sense of ambiguity and shifting emotions. He says, “Dana has an extraordinary ability to combine emotions, often two, three, or more, such as a sense of horror with humor, or grief with relaxation. Her work is not just beautiful or colorful. It draws emotions out of the viewer. You’re trying to puzzle it out and determine what it is that you’re feeling in response to the work.” Paintings like Men’s Retreat also signal an important shift in Schutz’s work. Both Petzel and Green agree that not always, but more frequently now, Schutz generates images that contain more recognizable figures and metaphors concerning social issues or

contemporary events. A more recent monumental work, Building the Boat While Sailing (2012), demonstrates Schutz’s exceptional deftness at layering figures in a fractured picture plane. Like many of her recent works, it presents a collection of mise en scenes. As the title suggests, the figures are trying to build a ship while sailing, a task made no less inconceivable by Schutz’s skillful rendering. Petzel believes the work offers a general, yet apt, metaphor for the current state of our country. He says, “The deluge definitely strikes a chord with a large audience. It points to the contemporary situation in which we live. But the viewer can still apply it however they want. She doesn’t insist on some personal meaning that everybody must share.” Schutz’s Elevator paintings (2015) demonstrate another approach that seems influenced by our contemporary moment. The series features large crowds of Kirchner-esque figures cramming into elevators, acting as individuals, and fighting to make room for themselves. In these colorful scenes of dramatic struggle and contorted movement, Schutz seems to be saying something once again about society, politics, or contemporary life in general. Schutz continues to show her skill, humor, and confidence by also exploring more intimate subjects on an expanded scale. Shaking Out the Bed (2015) takes a very cozy scene, a couple in bed enjoying a pizza and coffee, and blows it up to a compelling and engaging work that’s twelve feet wide. The painting is now a promised gift to SFMOMA. Perhaps the most impressive aspect of Schutz’s work is the incredibly rich range of forms and continually evolving color palette she’s explored throughout the course of her career. It would appear that she has fearlessly propelled forward into an expansive body of work that knows no bounds. Schutz’s color palette and approach to form often shifts depending on the subject. In her hands, art historical references and forms reminiscent of, for instance, German Expressionist paintings by such artists as Kirchner and Beckmann, feel worthy of reexamination and connect the artist’s work to a larger

Dana Schutz, Shaking Out the Bed, 2015, oil on canvas, 114 x 213.75 in. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York.

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art historical dialogue. Schutz admits that, in terms of intention, the process of painting never seems so stable. “You’re constantly responding to something that’s changing in front of you. It’s like a person. It has its own kind of conversation, and ultimately, the painting will have its own logic, so you don’t really have much choice in terms of what happens towards the end of a painting. You don’t really know where it’s going to end up.” In 2017, Schutz found herself at the center of a contentious and well-documented controversy over a painting she exhibited at the Whitney Biennial titled Open Casket (2017). The work offered an abstract interpretation of Emmett Till’s corpse as it was displayed and photographed during his open-casket funeral service. Till was a fourteen-year-old boy from Chicago, who was lynched in Mississippi while visiting relatives on summer vacation in 1955. Till’s murderers were never brought to justice, and this horrific event stands as one of the greatest examples of racial injustice in the history of the United States. Till’s death became an emblem of the Civil Rights Movement, and protesters at last year’s Whitney Biennial argued that, as a white woman, Schutz had no right to depict this enduring image of black trauma and that the Whitney would do

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This page: Dana Schutz, Men’s Retreat, 2005, oil on canvas. Green Family Collection. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York. Opposite: Dana Schutz, Beat Out the Sun, 2018, oil on canvas, 94 x 87.5 in. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York.

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Dana Schutz, Spit, 2015, oil on canvas. Green Family Collection. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York.

better to remove and/or destroy the artwork. Though many individuals continue to side with the Whitney protesters, harboring deep reservations about the painting, a few thoughtful appeals were made responding to the request to censure and destroy Open Casket. Some of the most well-respected leaders in contemporary art issued statements arguing that whether or not the painting Open Casket held merit, Schutz’s right to depict such a subject should not be forfeited based on the color of her skin. Additionally, over the course of the following year, both the ICA Boston and the

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Cleveland Museum of Art seemed to issue their support by presenting major exhibitions of Schutz’s work that further emphasized its importance but also engaged audiences in critical dialogue about some of the work’s more challenging and timely themes. The naming of Dana Schutz as 2018’s TWO x TWO honoree is far from a naïve gesture. Given today’s social and political climate, it can be said that now, more than ever, we need artists to feel empowered to select and respond to subjects of their choosing. Acknowledging the significance of this year’s selection, Petzel said,


“I think that their choosing Dana acknowledges that she is an extraordinary artist. It also demonstrates that TWO x TWO stands by freedom of expression and that they don’t just hide behind nice, decorative works that also raise money. This, in a way, is a political, cultural, and aesthetic stamp of approval, and I applaud them for it, and we are quite thankful for their confidence.” Each year, the TWO x TWO benefit features a live and silent auction of artworks donated by some of the world’s most influential artists and galleries, including one by the event’s honoree. Schutz’s contribution, Beat Out the Sun (2018), is yet another example that’s sure to thrill and intrigue audiences. The painting envisions a group of travelers that comes to, as the title suggests, beat out the sun, but when they arrive at the task, it seems to be very different from what they anticipated. Their intentions appear disrupted. Emerging from darkness, the figures carry pieces of wood and bones, presumably as weapons, and yet, the viewer can’t really tell if their intentions are good or bad. The work is big and bold and seems to propose another metaphor about things that unite groups of people. The painting has the potential to elicit many references, including climate change deniers, illustrations from the popular children’s book Where the Wild Things Are, and disturbing photos that recently surfaced from a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, VA. With careful reticence, Schutz neither confirms nor denies these associations, but we wouldn’t want her to anyway. This is part of the

brilliance and success of her work. Like so many great artists, pinning down a definitive meaning would, in a sense, ruin the fun and the expansive pool of interpretations yet to be discovered. Schutz says, “I am open to people making their own connections. I think I have to be. I wouldn’t want to control any interpretations. I don’t think that artists really have that much control.” As is the case with all works of art, but particularly in the case of Schutz’s paintings, Beat Out the Sun must be seen in person to be fully comprehended. Apart from being made available at auction through TWO x TWO, the work is also promised to go on view during Schutz’s next exhibition at Petzel’s gallery in Chelsea in January of next year. For the moment, it would appear that no Texas museums own works by Dana Schutz. Given her clear success as an artist, paired with her ability to create works that promote social dialogue, this is unfortunate. The TWO x TWO event has put forward an artist who has been shown to be creatively mobile in her approach to depicting a striking array of subjects. Green shares this sentiment stating that, “One of the marks of a great artist is how successful are they as they maneuver from one period to the other. Is that second, third, or fourth period as interesting, successful, and dramatic? Does it say something as important as the prior periods? I think Dana certainly qualifies in that regard.” Hopefully, this year’s TWO x TWO will inspire more interest in collecting, preserving, and exhibiting Schutz’s work within the Lone Star State and beyond. Here’s hoping. P

Above: Dana Schutz, Sneeze, 2001, oil on canvas, 19 x 19 in. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York. Right: TWO x TWO Artist Honoree Dana Schutz. Courtesy of the artist and Petzel, New York.

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A RADICAL EXPERIMENTALIST Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty explores the complexities of the German artist’s uncategorized oeuvre.

Günther Förg, Untitled, 1984, color photograph, © Estate Günther Förg, Suisse VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn.

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orks by the German artist Günther Förg (1952–2013) are certainly not known to a broad audience, though he did have an exhibition in 1992 at the Dallas Museum of Art. Given today’s blockbuster exhibition culture, where “big name” artists dominate, it is exceptional that the DMA has organized a retrospective of Förg’s work in collaboration with a European museum, the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Both are copresenting Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty, on view from October 21, 2018, until January 27, 2019 at the DMA. Unlike a traditional traveling show, which is essentially identical from city to city, Günther Förg: A Fragile Beauty offers a comprehensive view of the artist by having each museum focus on different aspects of his life, working methods, media, and themes.

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Of the exhibition’s title, Anna Katherine Brodbeck, The Nancy and Tim Hanley Associate Curator of Contemporary Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, describes: “Throughout art history, beauty has been held as an absolute quality, one that is immutable and immediately recognizable. Günther Förg’s works undeniably fascinate, with their vivid plays of color, spatial relationships, and material exploration. Yet his multi-media practice frustrates a monolithic understanding of beauty. Surfaces imply destruction, reproductions are deliberately imperfect, paint is applied quickly and unevenly. This is not to say that Förg’s works are not beautiful, but more poignantly, that they contend that the notion of beauty itself is fragile.” It is not easy to pin down Förg. A painter, photographer, sculptor, and installation artist, he was part of the German postwar generation


BY FRANK HETTIG

Günther Förg, Untitled, 2005, acrylic on canvas, Collection of Dr. Ramiro del Amo, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2018.

Günther Förg, Untitled, 2009, acrylic on canvas, private collection, Courtesy of Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin | Paris, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2018.

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of artists who questioned the idea of modernism with their utopian idea that the use of pure materials contributes to a better society. Yet Förg resisted being pigeonholed by this movement and challenged the utopians’ strict definition of color, material, and space. He intentionally blurred the boundaries between art disciplines and between figuration and abstraction. “Ambiguous” would be an apt term for Förg’s work, particularly his novel utilization of various materials. Förg’s fascination with space is reflected in many ways in his works. He photographed architectural spaces, and he also incorporated physical space into his work. For example, he displayed his large photos in a particular way, above a partially gray-painted wall, and he employed high-reflective glass so that the viewer is always aware of his body in his work and in the actual exhibition space around him. In his photo series Ledoux from 2000, which will be shown in Dallas, Förg documented three buildings in Eastern France whose designs were based on sketches from circa 1790 by the utopian architect Claude Nicolas Ledoux, who was planning to complete the site of the Royal Saltworks at Arc-et-Senans with an “ideal city.” Förg was intrigued throughout his career by utopian models,

their “delusional” concepts, and failed execution. He approached these buildings and their unconventional shapes from different perspectives and was most fascinated by their windows, the central focus of these gigantic photographs. Windows are an important theme in the visual arts. You look at “reality” through a window, and the window offers a framework for the viewer for this reality. Förg took photos of windows and through windows, and he included the structure of the windowpanes—a grid or raster—in many of his works. The window motif emerged in 1983 in his architectural photographs, and in 1985 it appeared for the first time in his paintings. His grid and window paintings took inspiration from Edvard Munch. During this timeframe, he also experimented with various media, including fabric, aluminum, copper, and lead. Universal concepts of form, mass, proportion, rhythm, and structure constitute a common thread in his work. Förg always painted in series, for example, geometric patterns shifting in color, which create a harmonious, beautiful rhythm. Both his figurative and abstract pieces are intensely expressionistic, revealing a “personal handwriting” of sorts. In the seventies, he balked against the trend of figurative

Günther Förg, Untitled, 2007, acrylic and oil on canvas, Courtesy of Matthew B. Gorson, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2018.

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Clockwise from left: Günther Förg, Stairwell, Munich, 1984/1998, color photograph, Deutsche Bank Collection, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2018; Günther Förg, Untitled, 1974, acrylic on muslin, Estate Günther Förg, Suisse, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2018; Günther Förg, Color-Field, 1986, acrylic on wood, Gayle and Paul Stoffel, © 2018 Estate Günther Förg, Suisse / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2018.

painting predominant in Germany by making a series of monochrome paintings, one per week in a different size. A Fragile Beauty showcases an important gray painting from 1973. In contrast with other color-field painters, he used cheap material like plywood, where the textural back is still visible. His color-field uniformity soon shifted to gestural marking: from monochrome gray to vividly colored canvases, and from sleek lines to relaxed strokes. The broad color of these paintings is reminiscent of Barnett Newman’s large-format horizontal canvases, and their seriality and technique evoke the late acrylic-on-aluminum works of Blink Palermo. Too, the dabs of paint, scribbles, and blotches recall the oeuvre of Cy Twombly. Förg also references Clifford Still and Robert Ryman in his handling of material, color, and space and in his range and juxtaposition of colors. Another series shown in Dallas is his bronze-cast “masks” from 1990. These archaic-looking sculptures with rudimentary facial features could be used to cover the face, but, on the other hand, they are unusable because they do not have openings for the eyes. But they also aren’t death masks, which were originally designed to preserve the individuality of the person, because they lack personal traits. Here again, Förg blurs the boundaries between figuration and abstraction.

Not included in the Dallas exhibition are his black, monumental, abstract, and heavy bronze reliefs with gestural traces. Forg designed them to hang on the wall, a seeming contradiction: while hanging, these massive and dark objects seem to float on the white wall. Förg here confuses the traditional definition of sculpture and painting. Are these sculpted paintings, or painted sculpture? Förg analyzed color, form, and movement until the end of his career. In the early 2000s, he used the grid to create sketchy, “spot paintings,” layering thin, rapidly applied strokes of one color over another. He explored the brushstroke as the abstract form. Abstraction asserted gestural technique, spontaneity, and looseness in approach. One of his final paintings, before he suffered a stroke in 2010, was conceived initially as a chromatic spot painting, but he then obscured the broad range of colors with a thin layer of tonal gray pigments resembling his first works. This dichotomy is clearly shown in Förg’s working method: he relied on a calculated system of formal variations as part of the painting process, while allowing his mood at any given time to shape pivotal decisions. Günther Förg was certainly a searcher, and he loved to provoke and hold the title of “bad boy.” His work intermingles color and form, abstraction and figuration, anonymity and individuality. P

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BY STEVE CARTER

THE BIG PICTURE

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This page: Laurie Simmons, Baby, 1991, gelatin silver print, 23.5 x 15.5 in., Bill Miller and Marilyn Minter. Opposite, from left: Laurie Simmons, Big Camera/ Little Camera, 1976, gelatin silver print, 5.25 in. x 8 in., Courtesy the artist and Salon 94; Laurie Simmons, Walking House, 1989, pigment print, 83.5 x 47.5 in., Collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Museum purchase, The Friends of Art Endowment Fund.

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Laurie Simmons, Orange Hair/Snow/Close Up, 2014, pigment print, 20 x 28.75 in., Courtesy the artist.

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aurie Simmons, the self-described “artist who picked up a camera,” has been busy. Not just recently, and not just for the past three years that it’s taken to consider and collate her oeuvre for Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera, opening October 14 at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. But “busy” as for the past 40+ years—nonstop-creative busy. “She’s a worker bee,” says the Modern’s Senior Curator Andrea Karnes, who curated the monumental survey exhibition. “Since she first picked up the camera in a serious way in 1976, she’s never stopped, even through having children, through times when her work had no market, through 9/11, through everything, she’s continued making series after series.” The scope of Big Camera/Little Camera is epic, reflecting the breadth of the artist’s storied career, featuring 200+ photographic images, culled from more than 30 series, two films, and a peek at never-seen behind-the-scenes ephemera. Exhaustively revelatory, the show elucidates Simmons’ obsessions and evolution; it’s a sine qua non for grasping her singular vision. The show runs through January 27, 2019, and then travels to the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago where it will play February 23 through May 5.

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“The interesting thing about the exhibition, which when you’re walking through will look like so much work, is that it’s just the tip of the iceberg,” Simmons observes. “It’s the strangest feeling, because when you’re putting it together you have to make so many choices…” Karnes visited Simmons’ studio and home several times as the exhibition developed, in Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Connecticut, and the show reflects both the years-long scholarship and camaraderie. While including many of Simmons’ best-known images, it’s much deeper than a greatest-hits survey; the exhibition also features seldom-seens and never-seens that fill in the blanks of the artist’s trajectory. Karnes is especially excited about an informal series of early portraits, dubbed “cherry wallpaper” images for the background in Simmons’ bedroom. “They foretell her entire career,” Karnes reveals. “She was experimenting with her interest in creating an environment, in skewing scale, in creating this interior feminine space. She really created this kind of stage, this theater that she’s since explored for 40 years.” Simmons enthuses, “Andrea has a really good sense of the scope

Laurie Simmons


Above: Laurie Simmons, Blonde/Pink Dress/Standing Corner, 2014, pigment print, 70 x 48 in., Amanda Wilkinson Gallery, London. Left: Laurie Simmons. Courtesy of Salon 94. Photography by Mary Simpson.

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This page: Laurie Simmons, New Bathroom/Woman Kneeling/First View, 1979, Cibachrome print, 3.5 x 5 in., Courtesy the artist. Opposite: Laurie Simmons, The Love Doll/Day 23 (Kitchen), 2010, Fuji Matte print, 52.5 x 70 in., Courtesy the artist and Salon 94.

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and range—how lucky am I to work with such a knowledgeable, sympathetic, and copacetic curator? She’s the best.” Laurie Simmons (born Queens, NY, 1949) came to photography somewhat circuitously. She studied painting, sculpting, and printmaking at Tyler School of Art, graduating in 1971, but photography wasn’t a focus. That changed once she was out of school and self-supporting as a photographer for Shackman, a dollhouseminiature company. “Growing up I was neither a dollhouse kind of kid nor a photographer,” she recalls. “But when I had that commercial job photographing miniatures for Shackman, I was already interested in the idea of the miniature, and it was a toy from Shackman that I put in front of some old wallpaper that I consider my ‘photo #1.’ It’s called Sink/Ivy Wallpaper (1976), and it will be at the beginning of the show.” Over the decades, Simmons has utilized props of all sizes in staging her photographs: dollhouses and furniture, toy figures, ventriloquist dummies, full-scale Japanese “love dolls,” live models, and cardboard cutouts, among others. Her early series in particular are redolent with Baby Boomer ideation, and there’s a Mad Men-esque quality of gender stereotype and traditional male/ female roles. And while the shelf life of a stereotype outstrips even a Twinkie’s, new ones emerge daily, and Simmons’ work continues to address new realities. “I took on early the notion and deconstruction of gender stereotypes,” she says. “It’s always what I was exploring—how strict they were, the representation of women versus men, the illustration in both high and low culture. But I had no idea when I started exploring that I’d live to see the era of gender fluidity, the breaking down of gender stereotypes, and the idea that one didn’t have to identify as male or female, how a younger generation would be totally comfortable and conversant in the idea of non-binary gender—visually there’s so much to explore.” Exhibition highlights are numerous, but Walking House, 1989,

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Top: Laurie Simmons, Cowboy Pattern, 1979, flex print, 13.5 x 20 in., Courtesy the artist. Bottom: Laurie Simmons, Long House (TV Room), 2004, Cibachrome print, 48 x 60 in., Courtesy the artist.

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Laurie Simmons, Country Road, 1984, pigment print, 60 x 40 in., Amanda Wilkinson Gallery, London.

is brilliantly emblematic of Simmons’ Walking and Lying Objects series. Harkening back to an ad age of walking cigarette packs, the image’s absurdity nonetheless speaks to Gen X, Y, and Z. “I think this kind of nostalgia is a little bit in the DNA of younger people,” Simmons posits. An outgrowth of The Love Doll and Kigurumi, Dollers series, the How We See series features live models with their eyes closed; Simmons brought in makeup artists to paint open eyes on top of their eyelids, and the otherworldly results are a discomfiting commentary on a self-obsessed culture. How We See/Ajak (Violet), 2015, is a striking example. Simmons explains the genesis: “I started to explore on YouTube and I saw that there was this whole group of girls doing makeup tutorials, painting their eyes while closed, painting anime eyes. Painted-on eyes, seeing through closed eyes, eyes being the window to the soul—it was just so rich with metaphor

for me.” Simmons’ two films, The Music of Regret, 2006, and My Art, 2016, are also on view; the latter was inspired by her daughter Lena Dunham’s indie gem Tiny Furniture. “This is bittersweet for me,” Andrea Karnes admits. “The opening will be amazing after three years of working with her, but it’s the end of me going to see her all the time. But I couldn’t be happier to be presenting this, and to have gotten to work with her has been amazing.” Don’t miss Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera, or these exhibition-related events at the Modern: On October 9, 7:00 p.m., Karnes and Simmons will discuss the creation of Big Camera/Little Camera, and then on November 13, 7:00 p.m., Simmons and her acclaimed artist husband, Carroll Dunham, will talk about their creative lives and the role art plays in their life together. P

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BY NANCY COHEN ISRAEL

In The Black Kimbell Art Museum explores ebony ranges of Balenciaga and Goya.

Cristóbal Balenciaga, Design by Eisa Dress, detail, summer 1956, ruffled silk taffeta, Crin petticoat lined in organzacovered silk taffeta; Palais Galliera, Fashion Museum of the City of Paris, Paris Musées, Photograph © Pierre Even.

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n a country famed for sunny skies and azure waters, Spanish art has deep roots in the extremes of black and white. These stark contrasts serve as the premise for concurrent exhibitions at the Kimbell Art Museum, Balenciaga in Black and Goya in Black and White. While independent exhibitions, they are informed by one another. Their genesis came from Deputy Director George Shackelford’s trip to Paris last summer where he saw Balenciaga in Black at the Musée Bourdelle. Here the designer’s work was interspersed with the sculptor’s plaster casts. “I started wondering what kind of imagery we could adapt in a Fort Worth installation that would be as good or better than Bourdelle. Goya, a great Spanish master with lots of coloristic and stylistic connections to Balenciaga, came to mind,” he says. The Palais Galliera, the Fashion Museum of the City of Paris, organized Balenciaga in Black at the Musée Bourdelle. When Shackelford approached co-curators, Véronique Belloir, from the Palais Galliera, and Gaspard de Massé, archivist for the House of Balenciaga, with the idea, he says, “They were thrilled. They know how much Balenciaga admired Goya, and could appreciate how the two ideas could work really well with each other.” An ambitious lecture series will further link the exhibitions. Highlights include talks by Guillaume Kientz, from the Louvre, and Hamish Bowles, from Vogue.

Top left, Cristóbal Balenciaga, Hat, 1955, Black “Bird of Paradise” feathers and silk net, UNT Texas Fashion Collection, Gift of Claudia Heard de Osborne. Goya: Top right, Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, No grites, tonta. (Don't scream, stupid.) Caprichos 74, 1797–99, etching and aquatint with burnishing; first edition, Gift of Sylvester Rosa Koehler. 98.1842, Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Black layered dress: Cristóbal Balenciaga, evening dress, circa 1952, tiered black-lace ruffles, UNT Texas Fashion Collection, Gift of Claudia Heard de Osborne. Goya: Bottom left: Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, Banderillas de fuego (Banderillas with firecrackers) Tauromaquia (Bullfighting) 31, 1815–16, etching, direct tonal etching with burnishing, drypoint, and burin; first edition, Bequest of W. G. Russell Allen. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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Renowned as “the couturier’s couturier,” Balenciaga stands alone in the world of design. “While there have been other Balenciaga exhibitions, this is the first one to really focus on this one aspect of his work and his use of black,” says the Kimbell’s Jennifer Casler Price, who is overseeing the installation in Fort Worth. Trained as a tailor in his native San Sebastián, Balenciaga held his first runway show in 1937. From that time until he closed his Paris Salon in 1968, the designer became renowned for his architectural styling and meticulous attention to detail. Price explains, “It is important to understand his foundations as a tailor. Throughout his career, he could design but he could also cut the dress and sew the dress by hand. He could do it all from start to finish.” She clarifies that he spent as much time constructing the interior as he did the exterior. And while Balenciaga incorporated color into many of his collections, the garments in black have a gravitas that reflect the present while drawing inspiration from the past. Portraits of clerics and nobility by Spanish 17th-century painters such as Velásquez, Ribera, and Zurbarán inform Balenciaga’s ebony garments. According to De Massé, the designer’s inspirations from his homeland run deep. He says, “It is in the smallest corner of the Iberian peninsula that Balenciaga draws his inspiration. In Andalusian skirts, in the jackets of toreros, mantillas, layers of lace, and fisherman’s hats, he links classicism, tradition, and modernity as a poetic homage to the customs of his country.” Edwards adds, “He never lost sight of his Spanish heritage, and it comes to fruition in these incredible works.” The effects of light also intrigued Balenciaga, which makes the Piano Pavilion an ideal space to showcase his work. De Massé says, “Light is extremely important in the dark. Balenciaga uses velvet that absorbs light, others that light it. It’s a game of transparency, embroidery, lace, and nuance. Everything is subtle in his work.” According to Belloir, “He uses these particular fabrics to create garments that are not exclusively conditional upon body type. In that way he works like an architect or a sculptor and plays with volumes, light, and space.”

Top left: Cristóbal Balenciaga, evening gown, circa 1964, black velvet with bustle trimmed in ermine tails, UNT Texas Fashion Collection, Gift of Claudia Heard de Osborne. Goya: top right: Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, Disparate Claro (Clear Folly) from the Disparates series (Proverbios 15), 1816–19, etching, aquatint with burnishing, direct etching (lavis), and tonal scratching; working proof, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. G. Peabody Gardner and Museum Purchase Funds. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Goya: bottom left: Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, Bellos Consejos (Pretty Advice) Caprichos 15, 1797–99, etching and aquatint with burnishing and burin; first edition, Gift of Miss Katherine Eliot Bullard. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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The elusive designer himself once said, “A couturier must be an architect for design, a sculptor for shape, a painter for color, a musician for harmony, and a philosopher for temperance.” To achieve this sculptural effect, Balenciaga turned to the Swiss fabric supplier Abraham, who created gazar, a moldable material that allowed Balenciaga to create added definition to the form. “Gazar is a bit like if the greatest of all the cooks invented a new taste. Among all the couturiers, Balenciaga is the only one to develop a tissue all in contradiction. Flexible and rigid, soft and rough, shiny and matte, the gazar allows him to carve the material,” De Massé explains. While over 100 pieces are coming from Paris, four pieces from the Texas Fashion Collection at the University of North Texas will supplement the exhibition. The Denton pieces once belonged to Claudia Heard de Osborne, the Texas-born oil heiress and one of Balenciaga’s most devoted clients. This loyalty may stem from Balenciaga’s ability to construct garments to fit many body types. A section of the exhibition devoted to the silhouette, Price says, “will explore how Balenciaga saw the female body. He saw it in a different way from other designers of his time. In the 1940s, others outlined the female form. He wanted to design clothes that any woman could wear.” The exhibition also features archival material such as original sketches made by Balenciaga, atelier sketches as well as final sketches, which include details of how the garment will be made and shown. Price notes that there will also be collector’s sketches. “These were sent to clients if they couldn’t come to the salon for the fashion show,” she explains. While Balenciaga’s clients included nobility and first ladies, his inspiration also came from the clothing of the working classes that populate Goya’s print work. “Goya’s interest in fashion permeates his portraiture. He uses fashion to designate status,” says Stephanie Stepanek, Curator Emerita for Prints and Drawings at the Museum of Fine Arts,

Top right: Cristóbal Balenciaga, dress, winter 1957, strip of machine-made silk lace, inset trim, silk satin ribbon, underskirt in crêpe; Balenciaga Archives, Paris, Photo © Pierre Even. Goya: bottom: Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, Temeridad de Martincho en la plaza de Zaragoza (Martincho's recklessness in the ring at Zaragoza) Tauromaquia (Bullfighting) 18, 1815–16, Etching and aquatint with burnishing; first edition, Gift of Miss Ellen T. Bullard. 25.1173, Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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Boston and Shackelford’s former MFA colleague. Using Balenciaga as a touchstone, Stepanek carefully selected over 85 prints and drawings from the museum’s outstanding collection of Goya’s works on paper. She says, “It’s an exciting idea to work in black and white with Balenciaga. Given the exhibition title, I went with my notion of what black and white can be. It can be color as well as metaphors for goodness and evil or day and night.” As a celebrated painter, Goya’s commissions depict the era’s notables, including the Kimbell’s Portrait of the Matador Pedro Romero (1795–98). Goya renders Romero in sartorial splendor, largely attired in black and white, incorporating accents of a gray vest, red-lined jacket, and mauve cape. And while he was an avidly sought portraitist, Goya used his considerable skill as a draftsman and printmaker in his four major print series, Los Caprichos, Disasters of War, Los Disparates and Tauromaquia, to capture the folly of Spanish life as well as the futility of war. “He wants to show the full experience of humanity,” says Stepanek. Often shown in their complete suites, for this exhibition, the curators divided the print work as well as drawings from his albums into thematic sections. “It’s fun to see these works broken up and not in sequence or a chronology of when and how he may have created them,” says Nancy Edwards, the Kimbell’s Curator of European Art and Head of Academic Services. In addition to the full range of his print work that includes drawings, early states, proofs, and final proofs, the exhibition also features multiple impressions of the same image. The opening section, Fashion and Folly, looks at the attention he paid to contemporary and traditional dress. “Goya learned to etch by copying the Velásquez paintings in the royal collection,” says Stepanek. She adds, “He’s so rooted in Spanish history and costumes.” His own visions of the feminine are

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, Ya es hora (It is time.) Caprichos 80, 1797–99, Etching and aquatint with burnishing, drypoint, and burin; first edition, Museum purchase with funds by exchange from the Gifts of Miss Katherine Eliot Bullard and the Bequest of Eleanor A. Sayre. 2014.812, Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Bottom: Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, Pedro Romero matando á toro parado (Pedro Romero killing a bull that he has subdued) Tauromaquia (Bullfighting) 30, 1815–16, Etching, aquatint, drypoint, and burin; first edition, Bequest of W. G. Russell Allen. 1974.286, Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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also evident in this work. “Goya is great about silhouetting and in how he made images of women so multidimensional,” adds Edwards. In a section titled Black and White, “he deals with blacks and whites but he also contemplates the nuances in between. Black and white and grays are the central part of this exhibition,” says Stepanek. These nuances continue to be explored in Night and Day, where, she adds, “The focus is on what happens at night, what happens during the day, and what happens in between.” While Balenciaga provided the seed for the Goya exhibition, the MFA has been extraordinarily generous in this loan. Stepanek says, “Thirteen very important drawings are coming that are rarely lent.” Iconic images include Goya’s self-portrait from Caprichos in which he depicts himself as a late 18th-century dandy as well as his nightmarish Sleep of Reason from the same series. Also coming is Seated Giant, the rarely shown aquatint. Stepanek says, “It plays with ideas of power and the paralysis of power. It is about ambiguity and ambivalence.” Finally, Shackelford says, “We hope that visitors will come away with an awakened appreciation of the power of the color— or non-color—black. It’s everywhere, but when it’s isolated and studied for itself it becomes fascinating. ‘Why is it that it works the way it does, and what are the conditions for it to be appreciated?’ In Balenciaga, it’s about silhouette and drape and reflection; in Goya it’s about intensity and transparency and texture, all of which require white as a contrast. So, Balenciaga in Black meets Goya and Black in White, not as a contest but as a partnership.” P

Top left dress: Cristóbal Balenciaga, Sleeveless dress and jacket, Winter 1965, Gore and flounces in mechanical silk lace, satin ribbon belt, horsehair lace ribbon, dress lining in silk pongee with crêpe de chine edging; Palais Galliera, Fashion Museum of the City of Paris, Photo © Julien Vidal/Galliera/Roger-Viollet. Right dress: Cristóbal Balenciaga, Dress, 1960, Machine-made silk-lace flounces mounted on silk tulle, bodice in machine-made lace layered over organza, skirt lined in silk pongee, hem accentuated by a crin mesh ribbon tulle petticoat; Palais Galliera, Fashion Museum of the City of Paris, Paris Musées, Photo © Julien Vidal/Galliera/ Roger-Viollet. Bottom: Cristóbal Balenciaga, Evening gown, detail, 1965–66, Bodice in silk velvet, dyed bronze, sequined coxcomb, skirt in silk taffeta, bodice lining in silk crêpe, skirt lining in organza; Palais Galliera, Fashion Museum of the City of Paris, Paris Musées, Photo © Pierre Even.

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This page: Tom Ford Disco Hoops Earrings, Tom Ford cut-out jumpsuit, Tom Ford, Highland Park Village. Opposite: Saint Laurent Tuxedo-Style Sequin Blazer, Saint Laurent Iris 105 sandals in slack leather and black ostrich feathers, Forty Five Ten on Main. Hair and Makeup: Paige Anderson, RR&Co.; Model: Magdalene Groves, The Campbell Agency

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the new

NOIR

Timeless. Vibrant. Eternally chic. A ruler of the runway, new iterations in black are a perennial fashion favorite.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELIZABETH LAVIN, RR&CO. PRODUCER & CREATIVE DIRECTION BY ELAINE RAFFEL STYLING BY NELLY ADHAM, RR&CO.

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Vionnet black draped one-shoulder dress with asymmetric neckline and shift silhouette, Carla Martinengo, Plaza at Preston Center.

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Valentino hooded duster with fringed bottom, Valentino VLTN Sock Boots, Valentino, Highland Park Village; Rich Hippie vintage ring, Rich Hippie, Inwood Village.

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Bill Blass vintage bubble cape and gloves from Jan Strimple, Balenciaga black pointed-toe Heels, Forty Five Ten on Main.

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Eric Javits black velvet and satin hat, stylist’s own; Comme des Garçon black sheer top, Forty Five Ten on Main.

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Akris sleeveless sheath dress with secret curtain and St. Gallen embroidery, Akris, Highland Park Village; Benincasa Milano Ferrara shoes in black, benincasamilano.com.

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Roberto Cavalli cropped black-striped caban jacket, Roberto Cavalli black jersey handkerchief skirt, Roberto Cavalli, NorthPark Center; Gabriela Hearst Linda over-the-knee boots, Forty Five Ten on Main.

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PRETTY FABULOUS

Get gorgeous with season stunners in jewelry.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELIZABETH LAVIN, RR&CO. PRODUCER & CREATIVE DIRECTION BY ELAINE RAFFEL HAIR & MAKEUP BY PAIGE ANDERSON, RR&CO. AND GIGI COKER

Eiseman Collection 18 in. strand of 11 mixed-cut ruby beads (1250 ctw.). Exclusively at Eiseman Jewels, NorthPark Center. Creative consultant, Nelly Adham, RR&Co. Model, Makayla Harmon, Kim Dawson Agency.

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Third finger, Michael Tracy, large oval Tanzanite dome ring with multi-colored sapphires and tourmaline; index finger, Michael Tracy, fancy yellow diamond ring; Michael Tracy, padparadscha sapphire, diamond, and garnet dome ring. All exclusively at Stanley Korshak, The Crescent.

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Amulette de Cartier necklace, large model, 18k yellow gold, onyx, diamonds. Cartier, Highland Park Village.

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de Boulle Collection Kaleidoscope earring in 18k white gold, sapphires, emeralds, and diamonds. Exclusively at de Boulle, Dallas.

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Harry Winston Avenue Classic Aurora 18K white gold timepiece featuring diamonds and sapphires on a blue pearl alligator-leather strap, Harry Winston, Highland Park Village.

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Sharon Khazzam Denny Bracelet in 18k white gold, dendritic opal, diamonds, aquamarines, and quartz and Sharon Khazzam Black Norma earring in 18k blackened-white gold with diamonds and gemstones. Exclusively at Ylang 23, Plaza at Preston Center.

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Nak Armstrong Pleated Rivière Necklace at Forty Five Ten on Main.

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Erykah Badu at DC40 Ruby Gala at Dallas Contemporary. Photography by Tamytha Cameron


DC40 RUBY ANNIVERSARY GALA AT DALLAS CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY BY TAMYTHA CAMERON

Director Peter Doroshenko

Jeny Bania, Muffin Lemak

Karla McKinley

Gary Cole, Leisa Street, Jo Marie Lilley

Laree Hulshoff, Jason Valdivia

Bill Hutchinson

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THERE DALÍ: POETICS OF THE SMALL MEMBERS PREVIEW AT MEADOWS MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPHY BY TAMYTHA CAMERON

Susan Perkins, Kent Wittman, Dr. Mark Roglán

Dalí Poetics of the Small

Janet Kafka, William Custard, Linda Custard, Daniel Malingue

Kevin Vogel

LAURIE SIMMONS: Big Camera/Little Camera October 14, 2018–January 27, 2019

MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH 3200 Darnell Street Fort Worth, Texas 76107 www.themodern.org

Follow the Modern

Lead support for the presentation of Laurie Simmons: Big Camera/Little Camera at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth is generously provided by Harper’s BAZAAR, Jimmy Choo, and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Additional support is provided by the Kleinheinz Family Endowment for the Arts and Education and Salon 94, New York. Pictured: Still from The Music of Regret, 2006. 35mm film (transferred to HD Cam). Dimensions variable. Courtesy of the Artist

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David McCullough

Shelley DeMaria


THE FABRIC OF OPERA PRESENTED BY THE DALLAS OPERA AT NORTHPARK CENTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILLIAM NEAL

Ian Derrer, Tommy Bourgeois

Kristin Casner, Kristen Gibbins

Nancy Nasher, Sarah Haemisegger

Joyce Goss, Maxine Trowbridge, Shelle Sills

Ellen Winspear, Nancy Marcus

Meredith Marceau, Shelby Foster

Undermain Theatre Presents:

The Lady From The Sea

OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2018

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FURTHERMORE

BY TERRI PROVENCAL

i was born in nature. –Jean (Hans) Arp from Strasbourg Configuration

shape of things DADAIST, SURREALIST, ABSTRACTIONIST, THE NATURE OF ARP EXAMINES THE FLUIDITY OF AN ARTIST’S LIFE AND OEUVRE.

I

n 1967 Patsy Nasher’s birthday present to her husband Raymond Nasher, a bronze by Jean (Hans) Arp titled Torso with Buds, 1961, is considered “the founding work” of their modern and contemporary sculpture collecting journey. Fortuitously, in 2011, Torso with Buds came up in discussion when Catherine Craft interviewed with Director Jeremy Strick for a curatorial position at the Nasher Sculpture Center. A Dada expert among other movements, Craft expressed the desire to formulate an exhibition for the artist. Strick who describes Arp as “one of the key figures of the modern era” agreed it was long overdue. A successful interview combined with their shared vision spurred The Nature of Arp on view through January 6, at the Nasher Sculpture Center. Born in the Strasbourg, Alsace, known as the “town at the crossroads” (today a part of northeastern France), Arp’s citizenship was informed by the struggle for control between France and Germany. In the first half of Arp’s life as Hans, he was a German citizen, due to one war, and in the second half of his life, under French rule, he was Jean, a French citizen, following World War II. Straddling identity and nationality, Arp spoke three languages including the Alsatian dialect of his boyhood. Disapproving of human arrogance and the destructiveness of war, Arp rejected the idea of imitating nature in art and instead defined his practice through processes similar to nature—growth, decay, gravity, and chance. Craft said the exhibition title is partly derived in thinking that “nature as a kind of a creative principle was really important to Arp.” Though an artist of great flexibility, a founder of the Dada

movement following his escape to Switzerland, a Surrealist, an abstractionist, and a poet who preferred to write in lowercase (rejecting the capitalization of nouns in German), he is best known for his influential visual vocabulary of fluid, curvilinear, organic forms. Says Craft, “Often, people know one aspect of his art—his achievements as a sculptor, or his participation in a movement like Dada or Surrealism—but experiencing the full range of his achievements reveals an artist of protean creativity.” Arp was also a great collaborator and formed friendships and alliances with other artists and writers of different nationalities and backgrounds. Examples of these are visible through collaborative books, magazines, and works on paper including those with his wife Sophie Taeuber-Arp. Drawn from esteemed international and national museums and collections across the globe, The Nature of Arp displays 80 objects including his much-hailed sculptures in plaster, wood, bronze, and stone. But beside these, viewers will also discover painted wood reliefs, collages, drawings, textiles, and illustrated books that reveal his radical ingenuity. Arp was the winner of Venice Biennale’s top prize in 1954, the Golden Lion for sculpture. Fittingly, the show will travel to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, where through her long acquaintance with the artist, examples of his work are included, April 12–September 2, 2019. This will be their central exhibition during the 58th Venice Biennale opening May 11, 2019. As often happens, one work of art can inform an entire show. Auspiciously for us, Patsy Nasher chose well. P

From left: Jean (Hans) Arp, Human Concretion, 1934, marble (carved before 1949), 13.25 x 16 x 15.50 in., Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, Virginia, Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr. 71.3208 © 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Photo: Ed Pollard/Chrysler Museum of Art; Jean (Hans) Arp, Plant Hammer (Terrestrial Forms), 1916, painted wood, 24.5 x 19.5 x 3.13 in., Collection of the Gemeentemuseum Den Haag © 2018 Artists Rights Society (ARS), NewYork/VGBildKunst, Bonn, Photo courtesy Gemeentemuseum Den Haag; Jean (Hans) Arp, Torso with Buds, 1961, Bronze, 74 x 12.63 x 11.88 in., Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, Photo: David Heald.

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7th Anniversary Issue DANA SCHUTZ TWO x TWO ARTIST HONOREE

Plus: Laurie Simmons Günther Förg Balenciaga & Goya

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