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A nutrition guide for heart patients Product # 261A


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PRITCHETT & HULL ASSOCIATES, INC. 3440 OAKCLIFF RD NE STE 126 ATLANTA GA 30340-3006 1-800-241-4925

2017 Edition Copyright © 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005 by Pritchett & Hull Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be photocopied, reprinted or otherwise reproduced without written permission from Pritchett & Hull Associates, Inc.

We do not intend to be sexist, but to keep the text simple, we often say “he” or “him” when referring to the patient. Published and distributed by: Pritchett & Hull Associates, Inc. Printed in the U.S.A.

A smart diet for your heart is low in unhealthy fats, sugar and salt. It is also well-balanced and includes many types of food. This guide will help you learn about foods and make heart smart food choices. This book is only to help you learn, and should not be used to replace any of your doctor’s advice or treatment.


ats and cholesterol Foods high in saturated fats raise the cholesterol level in your blood. When you have too much cholesterol, your heart arteries are more likely to become clogged. This can cause heart attacks and strokes. Have your blood cholesterol level checked, and follow the advice of your doctor or registered dietitian (RD) to reduce the unhealthy fat in your diet.

Fats There are 2 types of fat—saturated and unsaturated.

• Saturated fats raise your blood cholesterol level more

than anything else you eat. They are found in animal foods like meats, butter and cheese. Many other foods have saturated fats, too.

• Unsaturated fats are OK for you, in small amounts. They are found mostly in nuts, seeds and vegetable oils like olive, peanut and canola.

Trans fats are a type of unsaturated fat. They are created when hydrogen is added to unsaturated fats. These fats lower good cholesterol and raise bad cholesterol. They are the worst of all fats. For most people, 30% to 35% or less of food calories should be from fat. Less than 6% should be from saturated fats and no amount of trans fat is good for you. For heart patients, the amounts are even less. Ask your doctor or RD how much fat should be in your diet. 1


Cholesterol Cholesterol is a fat-like substance in every cell in your body. It is made in your liver and is also found in animal foods like egg yolks, meats (especially organ meats) and dairy products. There are 2 main types of blood cholesterol:

• HDL (high-density lipoproteins) is “good” cholesterol. It helps keep the coronary arteries clear of fatty buildup.

• LDL (low-density lipoproteins) is “bad”

cholesterol. It adds to fatty buildup in the coronary arteries.

HDL

LDL

HDL

LDL

LDL

HDL HDL

LDL

HDL LDL

LDL

High blood cholesterol levels can increase your risk for heart attack and stroke. These risks are even higher when combined with:

• smoking • diabetes •

high blood pressure

• obesity • 2

a family history of heart disease


Your goal is to eat well most of the time. Food choices control how much fat and cholesterol you eat. Making good choices can help lower your blood cholesterol. Don’t overeat. And, control your portion sizes. Don’t “super size” your meals. This will lead to a “super sized” you!

Eat these OFTEN:

Eat these SOMETIMES:

Eat these RARELY:

✔ fresh vegetables & fruits

✘ butter, stick or soft

(without high-fat sauces)

✔ whole wheat and grain pasta dishes with low-fat sauces

of all fat), fish, skinned chicken or turkey

 vegetable oils (Use very little. All oils have 14 g/fat per tablespoon.)

✔ whole grain or enriched breads, cereals, bagels, pita breads

✔  skim or nonfat dairy foods (skim milk, nonfat cheeses, nonfat yogurts, nonfat sour creams, egg substitutes)

lean meats (trimmed

low-fat cheeses, yogurts, sour creams or 1% milk

 olives, peanut butter (limit 2 teaspoons per day), seeds and nuts (limit 1 tablespoon per day)

✔ nonfat snacks, like air popped popcorn or carrot sticks

margarine, egg yolks, whole milk, 2% milk, cream, half ’n half, eggnog and most cheeses (unless they list 3 g fat or less per serving)

✘  red meats, sausage, bacon, fat back, goose, duck, dark meat poultry, organ meats

✘  prepared foods, fast or fried foods

✘  coffee creamers, regular salad dressings, regular mayonnaise, prepared sauces

✘ chips, fatty dips

✔ dried or fresh herbs

✘  croissants, donuts, bakery

✔ nonfat dressings or

cakes or cookies, Danish

nonfat mayonnaise

✘ anything listed as

“hydrogenated” – a man-made, trans fat

✘ sugary drinks

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odium Sodium is a mineral that helps your body balance levels of fluids inside and outside cells. Your body needs very little sodium per day, but most of us eat 3,000 to 6,000 mg. The most common source of sodium is table salt. These foods often have lots of sodium in them:

• fast foods,

restaurant foods

• lunch meats, hot dogs • snack foods • canned soups, frozen or packaged dinners

• sauces, seasonings, condiments

Many salty foods do not list “salt” on their labels, they call it sodium. People with heart problems or high blood pressure should limit their sodium intake to 1,500 mg per day or less.

One teaspoon of table salt equals about 2,400 mg of sodium.

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ood labels Most food products have Nutrition Facts on their labels. You can use these facts to choose foods that have less fats, cholesterol and sodium.

Serving Size

Serving sizes are what all other figures on label are based on.

Nutrition Facts 6 servings per container Serving size

Calories

are for 1 serving.

Amount per 1 cup

Calories

1 cup (240ml)

90 % Daily Value*

Vitamins and Minerals

The percent given is based on the daily value you need each day. Example: One serving will give you 30%, of the calcium you need for 1 day.

Products that are too small for a nutrition label should have a phone number that you can call for more information.

Total Fat 0g Saturated Fat 0g Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 5mg Sodium 130mg Total Carbohydrate 13g Dietary Fiber 0g Total Sugars 12g Includes 0g Added Sugars Protein 8g Vitamin A 90mcg Calcium 390mg Iron 0g Vitamin C 3.6mg

0% 0% 1% 5% 4% 0% 0% 10% 30% 0% 4%

The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Skim Milk

Nutrients and % Daily Value (based on 2000 calories)

This area shows what part each nutrient is of a whole day’s worth. Example: 500mg=milligrams of cholesterol allowed in 1 day on a 2000 calorie diet 5mg=grams of cholesterol in 1 serving of food (or 1% of total milligrams of cholesterol you should have in 1 day)

Daily value footnote This shows you that the daily values are based on 2000 calories. Your daily values may be higher or lower based on your calorie needs.

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ix it up! No food group can give your body all the nutrients it needs. It is a balance of many foods and exercise that helps you feel good and stay healthy. Grains — includes all foods made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal or barley. At least half of all grains eaten should be whole grains. Vegetables — includes all fresh, frozen, canned or dried vegetables and vegetable juices. Vegetables are sub-divided into dark green, orange, legumes (beans), starches and all others. A variety of vegetable types should be eaten each week. Fruits — includes all fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruits and fruit juices. Oils — includes fats from many different plants and fish. Fats that are liquid at room temperature include canola, corn, olive, soybean and sunflower oil. Some foods are naturally high in oils, like nuts, olives, fish and avocados. Some processed foods are mainly oil, such as mayonnaise, some salad dressings and soft margarine. Some plant oils, such as coconut and palm kernel oil, are high in saturated fat and should be avoided. Milk — includes all fluid milk products, yogurt and cheese. Other foods made from milk, like cream cheese, cream and butter, are not part of the group (they have little to no calcium in them). Meat and Beans — includes 1 oz of lean meat, poultry or fish, 1 egg, 1 Tbsp peanut butter, 1⁄4 cup cooked dry beans or 1⁄2 oz of nuts or seeds (equal to 1 oz of meat or beans).

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Choose my plate Choosemyplate.gov is a guide to help you make changes to your diet by balancing calories, increasing fruits, vegetables and whole grains, while decreasing sodium and sugar.

To learn more, visit choosemyplate.gov *Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture. USDA does not endorse any products, services or organizations. 7


Calories 1,600

1,800

2,000

2,200

2,400

2,600

2,800

Grains

5 oz

6 oz

6 oz

7 oz

8 oz

9 oz

10 oz

Vegetables

2 cups

2½ cups

2½ cups

3 cups

3 cups

3½ cups

3½ cups

Fruits

1½ cups

1½ cups

2 cups

2 cups

2 cups

2 cups

2½ cups

Oils

5 tsp

5 tsp

6 tsp

6 tsp

7 tsp

8 tsp

8 tsp

Milk

3 cups

3 cups

3 cups

3 cups

3 cups

3 cups

3 cups

Meat & Beans

5 oz

5 oz

5½ oz

6 oz

6½ oz

6½ oz

7 oz

How many calories are right? How many calories you need are based on activity levels by gender. Activity levels are: I = inactive; M= moderately active; A = active

Activity Level

I

M

A

Women’s Age

Calories

Calories

Calories

19–30

2,000

2,000–2,200

2400

31–50

1,800

2,000

2,200

51+

1,600

1,800

2,000–2,200

19–30

2,400

2,600–2,800

3,000

31–50

2,200

2,400–2,600

2,800–3,000

51+

2,000

2,200–2,400

2,400–2,800

Men’s Age

8

Spread out over 3 meals per day


ips for cooking Meats and fish

• Bake, broil, steam, roast

or poach meats. Don’t fry. Stir frying is OK, but use very little oil.

• Use nonstick pans to cook without oils. • Buy tuna and salmon packed in water, not oil. • Trim extra fat before cooking. Smaller It’s OK to cook chicken and scoops turkey with the skin, but don’t eat the skin.

• Drain all meats on a paper

towel after cooking to soak up extra grease and fat.

Eggs and dairy foods

• Use skim or 1% milk for

creamed soups and sauces.

You can stay heart smart and save food by serving smaller portions to yourself and others. Many people simply eat until their plates are empty—so put less food on the plates.

• Use low-fat cheeses in

casseroles and other recipes.

• Use 2 egg whites in place of 1 whole egg in recipes. Salt and seasonings

• Rinse canned foods in a strainer under running water

before cooking or eating them. This removes some of the sodium.

• Season foods with fresh or dried herbs, vegetables, fruits or no-salt seasonings. Do not cook with salt or add salt to foods after they are on the table.

• Do not eat products with more than 150–350 mg of sodium in a serving.


eviewers Debbie Walls, RD, LD, CDE North East Georgia Health Systems Gainesville, GA Thanks to previous reviewers: Doris Adler, RD, LD, CDE Leslie Stewart, RD, LD

We believe that you have the right to know as much as you can about your health. Our goal is to give you enough facts to get the main points clearly in mind. We do this with medical accuracy, warmth and humor. The result for you: less tension, more healing and a good idea of what to ask your doctor, nurse or others.

Please let us know

how this booklet is helping you or your patients. Share your comments at p-h.com/261 Pritchett & Hull Associates, Inc. ÂŽ

3440 Oakcliff Road, NE, Suite 126 Atlanta, GA 30340-3006 1-800-241-4925 • www.p-h.com

We also have other health information materials on a variety of topics. Call for a free catalog of product descriptions.

The Love Your Heart Diet  

The Love Your Heart Diest