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the bluff Fall/Winter 2013


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RIVER ROAD

Palmetto Bluff ’s first residents only village

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ART OF THE OYSTER

Tangible remains of the rich oyster beds of the May River

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LO CAL CHARACT ER: COMFORT AND JOY

Get to know Lead Spa Therapist, Angela Comfort

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THE WILD RUMPUS O F PA L M E T T O B L U F F

The scoop on our wild neighbors

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MT YM 2013

A taste of what we’re working with

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S FA P O T LI K K E R F I L M SHOWING: CUD

Meet fourth generation cattleman, Will Harris

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H AV E B I K E , W I LL T R AV E L

Palmetto Bluff has a lot to explore,

all from the comfort of your bike seat

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R E TA I L T H E R A P Y : C O O L S T U F F, WA R M N I G H T S

A lineup of essentials for a memorable fall night

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PUPP Y LOVE

The dogs of Palmetto Bluff

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HALLOWED GROUND

The history of Octagon Cemetery

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Runners gather to raise funds for BackPack Buddies

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L O W C O U N T R Y I N S P I R AT I O N

The art of Peggy Ellis

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HAPPY HOUR

Our master mixer whips up a few of his favorites

CREATED BY & FOR THOSE WHO LOVE THIS SPECIAL LOWCOUNTRY IDYLL

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EDITOR

W H AT ’ S H A P P E N I N G

Calendar of events

Courtney Hampson, Marketing Manager, Palmetto Bluff

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PHOTOGRAPHY

Anne Caufmann Rob Kaufman Bonjwing Lee Angie Moser Tim Zielenbach

SCENE

Have you been scene at the Bluff ?

WRITERS

Courtney Hampson Greg Shumaker Ellen Shumaker Mary Socci Jay Walea R E A L E S TAT E S A L E S

800.501.7405

I N N R E S E R VA T I O N S

866.706.6565

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www.palmettobluff.com 2


R R O E A V I D R Palmetto Bluff ’s First Residents Only Village

The vision of Palmetto Bluff is to create a real place and not just another, typical, community project. The vision of this special place came to life with Wilson, a waterfront village along the high bluffs of the May River. And the vision continues with River Road.

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True to Palmetto Bluff ’s founding principle of connections between

the centerpiece of Wilson Village is The Inn at Palmetto Bluff, the

people, it was originally conceived that multiple village-like centers

centerpiece of River Road will be a charming waterfront gathering place

would establish themselves over this 20,000 acre sea island. Now, a

reserved for residents of the community, a place for kindred spirits to

new neighborhood is taking shape along the pristine shores of Palmetto

relax and reconnect.

Bluff ’s inland waterway. River Road, Palmetto Bluff ’s Garden District,

Just as the architecture of Palmetto Bluff displays a generational,

is a place with many of the same features as its predecessor, Wilson

evolved quality, so too will the streetscape of River Road. The

Village, but with an eye toward more permanent residents. While

architecture will be reminiscent of the great southern coastal towns of


Beaufort and Charleston, but with a decidedly casual flair. While the

Outdoor living is central to the River Road lifestyle with front porches

existing properties in River Road are characterized by larger lots and a

serving as your welcome mat to the neighborhood, and intimate

blend of traditional architectural styles with the emphasis on a slightly

courtyards and landscaped “outdoor rooms� serving as private retreats

more formal aesthetic, the second phase will be characterized by a

for residents and their guests. River Road will feature a traditional,

more pedestrian scale streetscape where residents have easy access to

alley-loaded streetscape and plentiful outdoor living spaces. A

surrounding parks, amenities, and welcoming front porches.

thoughtful approach to sidewalks, walking paths, and parks also help to create an interactive atmosphere. Neighbors will know you by name,

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cars will be replaced by pedestrians and bicycles, and spontaneous interactions will frame your daily life. Additionally, River Road homes are being designed with the residents in mind with low maintenance and ease of living as the primary drivers. A landscape and maintenance offering will give residents the opportunity to “lock and leave� if travels call them away from home. In River Road, owners will have multiple ways to enjoy the land: the community garden, a sculpture park, and a number of common area docks...just to name a few. Additionally a community path and future boardwalk will connect each River Road resident to the water. Regardless of where your home is within the neighborhood, direct access to the freshwater trail will be close at hand.

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Parks, natural trails, and preserved green spaces are hallmarks of any

development. The River Road neighborhood is certainly a natural

real place. River Road will have a variety of parks and green spaces:

extension of the Palmetto Bluff vision. This is a place where people

from manicured lawns for picnics and recreation to walkable access to

can live in a traditional village environment with walkable access to

Palmetto Bluff ’s largest preserved open space, the River Road Preserve.

neighbors and amenities, all while in close proximity to the inland

The preserve is a rare find with over 120 acres of pristine maritime

waterway and Palmetto Bluff ’s most admired nature sanctuary, the

forest and over a mile of marsh and river frontage all protected from

River Road Preserve.

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ABOVE: A traditional oyster roast at Moreland Landing

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THE ART OF THE

OYSTER Scattered shells and tabby ruins are tangible remains of the prehistoric and historic use of the rich oyster beds of the May River.

A mysterious artifact (pictured above) excavated at Big House Island, on the south end of the Bluff, may be evidence of Bluffton’s oyster industry. The 25-inch long object resembles a rusty claw. On one end is a handle, and the other end has three claw-like fingers. A hinge near the “claw” hinted that this was only half the artifact. Although archaeologists first assumed that it was part of a tool used to pick up hot coals or nails, a review of the oyster industry in South Carolina revealed that this was an “oyster grab,” a device commonly used for harvesting oysters. The pointed claws of the oyster grab were used to dislodge oysters from their clusters. The oysters were then easily tossed into a boat or bateau anchored nearby, and when the boat was full, they were taken to the local cannery. It wasn’t until the canneries closed in the mid-20th century that oyster grabs fell into disuse. Clearly, someone at Big House Island knew that oysters weren’t just delicious, they could also be profitable!

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BELOW: May River oysters on the half shell

MAY RIVER OYSTERS:

THE JUICY DETAILS According to Chef Brandon Carter

May River Oysters are one of my favorite things in the world. Their

flavor is a perfect marriage of brine and sweetness. For me there’s

business, Pickers (people who pull the oysters from the banks)

nothing more perfect than sitting on the porch of the River House,

and Shuckers (those who, as the name says, shuck

breathing in the salty air, sucking down a dozen May Rivers and

the oysters).

drinking a glass of Albariño. •

canned oysters tainted with raw sewage, as well as minimum wage and labor laws implemented in the mid-20th century.

The preferred method of consumption in the Lowcountry is roasted, although I’ll take mine raw. (In 2012, Palmetto Bluff

South Carolina once had a thriving oyster industry, employing about 3,500 people, with factories all the way from Litchfield to Daufuskie Island. Much of the workforce was made up of African-Americans as well as Polish immigrants. Who knows, my great grandparents, the Chaykowskis, could have done a stint down here.

Bluffton Oyster Company is the oldest operating oyster factory in the state.

hosted 58 oyster roasts. In 2013, we had 69 oyster roasts slated and that was just through May!)

The demise of the oyster industry here in SC is attributed to two things: a breakout of typhoid fever that was caused by

May River Oysters are available September-April. If the month has an R in it, the oysters are perfect.

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There are two positions needed to have a successful oyster

Casanova is said to have consumed 50 oysters every morning in order to boost his libido. Recent research has shown that oysters are in fact an aphrodisiac. Oysters contain two rare amino acids (D-Asp and NMDA) that increase testosterone in males and progesterone in females.


GRILL-ROASTED OYSTERS • 2 dozen May River Oysters on the half shell • Chili Garlic Butter • Green Apple Chow Chow • 1 charcoal grill (or a gas one if you’re not into the smokey flavor)

CHILI GARLIC BUTTER

GREEN APPLE CHOW CHOW

• 1/2 lb. butter, softened • 2 jalapeños, charred and chopped, seeds in

• 1 c red onion, small diced

• 2 limes, juiced

• 1 c apple cider

• 2 tsp smoked paprika

• 1/2 c apple cider vinegar

• 2 tbsp roasted garlic

• 1/2 c sugar

• 4 c rock salt

• 3 tbsp pickling spice Combine all ingredients in a bowl and whip

In each shell place about 1 tsp of Chili Garlic

• 3 Granny Smith apples, peeled and small diced

• 1 bunch cilantro, chopped

until homogeneous.

Butter. Place oysters on the grill, cup-side

Combine ciders, sugar and pickling spice in

down*, over red hot coals. Cover grill with lid

a pot. Bring contents to a boil, reduce heat

and roast for 1 /2 minutes.

and cover. Allow to sit covered for 30 minutes

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to infuse. Strain liquid and add remaining

Remove oysters from grill and arrange on

ingredients. Cook over medium heat for 10

a platter covered with rock salt. Top with

minutes.

Green Apple Chow Chow and enjoy with your favorite malty beverage.

Transfer contents of the pot to a container

*

Cup-side down means the side of the shell that

with a lid, cover and refrigerate overnight. Stir

forms a cup

in chopped cilantro just before serving.

Pair it with: Do Ferreiro, Albariño, Rias Baixas, 2011

Chef Trey Dutton orchestrates the roasting at Moreland

Grill-roasted oysters

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LOCAL CHARACTER

comfort When your last name is “Comfort,” and you work in an award-winning spa near Five-Diamond accommodations, surrounded by the natural beauty of Palmetto Bluff, expectations tend to run high. But never fear – and we know from personal experience – Angela Comfort’s capable hands make any spa treatment a joyful experience.

"Local Character" appears in each issue of The Bluff, and gives readers a little insight into the mind, heart, and life of a Palmetto Bluff team member. 13

joy


Angela came to Palmetto Bluff almost 7 years ago. Barely a year later, leadership

Angela has excelled in her position at the spa where she specializes in facials,

skills and talent led to her promotion as Lead Spa Therapist. Angela attended the

massage, and body treatments and enjoys determining the spa specials. She has

Derma Clinic Academy in Atlanta to become trained as an esthetician, and soon

an office on the second floor, with a peaceful view overlooking the river and trees

discovered a love for all things “spa.” After a stint working for a plastic surgeon,

which serve as nesting grounds for egrets and herons. The Spa at Palmetto Bluff

doing, among other things, camouflage make-up, Angela decided it was time to

is an amazing place to experience the best in spa services, and Angela is among the

transition into the spa industry. She enrolled in the Atlanta School of Massage

best spa therapists around. We can honestly say, if you’re lucky enough to get an

where she received formal training in massage therapy. In fact, Angela ended up

appointment with Angela Comfort, it is sure to bring you joy!

teaching a class on massage therapy, and unbeknownst to her, one student in her class would eventually become her husband! Fast forward ten years, and they are happily living in Bluffton with sons Sage and Jonah.

Q: WHAT IS YOUR IDEA OF PERFECT HAPPINESS?

A: First and foremost, good health for my family and me. I enjoy the simple things in life, such as spending a day at the beach with my husband and two sons. Q: WHAT GOES THROUGH YOUR MIND AS YOU DRIVE TO WORK EACH MORNING?

Q: IF YOU COULD HAVE ONE “SUPER POWER” WHAT WOULD IT BE? AND, HOW WOULD YOU USE IT AT WORK?

A: I would have the power to freeze time, that way I could get everything done that I need to. Q: WHEN YOU’RE NOT HERE, WHAT ARE YOU DOING?

A: That beautiful drive in really sets my tone every day. I honestly look forward to it. I love not having to deal with traffic!

A: I’m ALWAYS here! Seriously, I’m with my family, cooking, biking, beaching, going on excursions and pretty much always at a soccer game. I would like to fish and surf more!

Q: AND, ON THE WAY HOME?

Q: WHAT WORD DO YOU USE MOST?

A: First thing, I turn on non-spa music. I appreciate the 30-minute drive from a long day’s work. It gives me time to reflect, and time to transition to “Mom mode.” And, I’m always on the lookout for all the wildlife.

A: The word “concern,” as in: “My concern is...” Or, “areas of concern you want me to work on.”

Q: WHAT IS YOUR GREATEST EXTRAVAGANCE?

A: My sense of humor is pretty dark, so it may be inappropriate for me to say! But really, it’s the things my kids say. Also, sarcasm and things that are “off the wall.” I’m always laughing.

A: Sushi and shoes. Q: MOST RECENT MOVIE THAT YOU’D RECOMMEND TO FRIENDS?

A: Life of Pi. Q: IF THERE WAS A MOVIE ABOUT YOUR LIFE, WHAT WOULD IT BE CALLED? AND, WHICH ACTRESS WOULD PLAY YOU?

A: Keepin’ it Real, starring Sandra Bullock. Q: WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER YOUR GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT?

A: Being a good mom and wife! Q: WHAT IS YOUR MOST MARKED CHARACTERISTIC?

A: I’m the Energizer Bunny...I can’t sit still! My husband says it’s that I’m stubborn. But, I’m right! Q: WHAT IS THE LAST BOOK YOU READ?

Q: WHAT MAKES YOU LAUGH?

Q: TOP FIVE SONGS ON YOUR PLAYLIST?

A: My playlist is what I exercise to. I really love all kinds of music, including reggae, rock, pop, classical and indie. Q: FAVORITE SPOT ON THE BLUFF?

A: Looking at the birds from the screened porch at The Spa. I am truly in awe watching all the egrets and herons that fly in every night. I love pointing this out to our guests. Q: BEST PALMETTO BLUFF MOMENT?

A: There are so many! Here are some off the top of my head: - The Spa’s #1 spa-resort rating in the U.S. was huge for me. - Being named Employee of the Year was such an honor. - Another honor was being part of our Palmetto Bluff Satellite Spa for “The Masters” in Augusta.

A: “The Lion, the Lamb, the Hunted” by Andrew E. Kaufman. I read all the time.

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WILD RUMPUS O E F TH

PALMETTO BLUFF The Scoop on Our Wild Neighbors

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GLAUCOMYS VOLANS Conservationist, Jay Walea, is a big man with a soft spot in his heart for a very tiny critter. Just ask him about the Eastern Flying Squirrel, and his face lights up. Jay explains, when riding through Wilson Village in the evening in Palmetto Bluff, you may see a quick flash of silver just outside the top corner of your vehicle. You might assume it was some types of insect darting through your headlights, more likely than not, you’ve just had a quick visit from a flying squirrel. While the name implies they are capable of flight, the eastern flying squirrel actually glides from tree to tree using a membrane of loose skin along its body that allows it to catch air and glide. The thick, fluffy tail acts as a sort of aerodynamic stabilizer. Their huge eyes provide more than irresistible cuteness! Because flying squirrels are nocturnal, their eyes are designed to absorb as much light as possible. With a highly-developed sense of smell, the nightly hunt includes acorns, nuts, berries, insects or an occasional egg snatched from a nest. Weighing in at only 5 to 8 ounces, these tiny creatures are prey to owls, hawks, snakes and cats. They are fully-dependent upon their mother until around five weeks, when they are old enough to forage and glide on their own. It’s hard to imagine how cute these babies must be!

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PHOTO: Tom Friedel

DASYPUS NOVEMCINCTUS A fairly new resident to the Lowcountry, conservationist Jay tells us the Nine Banded Armadillo was first spotted in Palmetto Bluff only around twenty-five years ago. Now, they can be found all over South Carolina, and their population is steadily moving north. The armadillo gets its name from the nine bands across the back of its shell. Although not as cute and cuddly looking as other Bluff creatures, the armadillo is truly an amazing animal. Originating in South America, it has successfully migrated and populated the entire southeast, some western states and has been found as far north as North Carolina and Nebraska. The armadillo has a superior sense of smell. Unfortunately, its extremely bad eyesight and hearing can mean trouble when it comes to predators, which include bobcats, coyotes, alligators and very large birds. Their lack of sight and hearing may also account for an all too common sight around these parts, the aftermath of an armadillo vs. vehicle collision. Mostly nocturnal, they tend to come out during daylight hours after a rain, to feast on insects and grubs which commonly emerge from the wet ground. If you are a Lowcountry resident, you are well aware that the armadillo is a great digger. Because their diet consists entirely of insects, they have been known to dig up more than one garden in search of an evening meal. In fact, they may dig a burrow up to 25 feet long and 7 feet deep, in which to live and have their young. Probably the most unique and interesting fact revolves around the female armadillo and her babies. After mating, a single egg is fertilized, and this single egg splits into four clones, which eventually produce four, identical, adorable baby armadillos!

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SIALIA SIALIS When Jay Walea talks about the Eastern Bluebird, you can see the pride in his eyes. Through ongoing research, banding and recapture efforts, the eastern bluebird is quite a Palmetto Bluff success story. This small, beautiful bird has vibrant blue feathers, of which the male has the brightest, along with a reddish brown throat and breast. While it primarily eats insects, some eastern bluebirds exist solely on wild fruits and berries. They are a cavity nester, which means they readily nest in man-made boxes, which the birds line with pine straw. The average female will lay up to four or five eggs, which are generally blue in color. Although, Jay points out, some of the Bluff females have a tendency to lay white eggs. They may have three, or even four, broods per year. There are a host of predators including snakes, raccoons, owls and house cats, that prey on adults, hatchlings and eggs. Bluebirds tend to nest in open, park-like areas and so have easily adapted to the Bluff ’s abundant open green spaces and golf course. Eastern bluebirds have a life expectancy of 6 to 10 years. Through banding and recapture efforts at Palmetto Bluff, our oldest recorded resident bluebird is over 7 years. With help and a little TLC from the Palmetto Bluff Conservancy, our eastern bluebird population continues to grow and flourish.

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ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS Found in swamps, marshes and wetlands, the American Alligator is common throughout South Carolina. It feeds on fish, turtles, small mammals, birds and other reptiles. Considered an “Apex” predator, once the American alligator reaches a length of six feet, it has no other predators to worry about (other than bigger alligators!) An adult male can grow as large as 15 feet and weigh more than 1,000 pounds. The female rarely grows bigger than 9 feet. On some summer nights at the Bluff, the bellows from males can be heard announcing to the world that it’s mating season. The mother gator will hollow out a chamber in the middle of a mound of mud, sticks and other debris, where she lays twenty to fifty eggs! Upon covering the eggs with dirt and vegetation which keeps the eggs warm, the female will stay nearby. Interestingly, the gender of the young is determined by temperature: at 93 degrees or above, the majority will be males; at 86 degrees and below, there will be more females. Upon hatching, babies are only 4.5 to 8 inches long, and easy prey to wading birds, eagles, large fish and turtles. They grow up to one foot per year until they reach maturity, and a length of six feet. Palmetto Bluff Conservationists Jay Walea and Charlie Bales stress that humans and alligators can easily live in the same environment without harmful interaction. American alligators do not have humans in their food chain. However, if they are fed by humans, they will associate humans with food. Gators cannot be relocated, they have the best homing instinct of any animal; they will always find their way back, traveling 100 miles or more to reach their home lagoon. As Jay often says “A fed alligator is a dead alligator.” By following a few simple rules and using common sense, people can enjoy, admire and coexist with the magnificent wildlife of Palmetto Bluff.

PHOTO: Michael Doherty

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THE MUSIC TO YOUR MOUTH TEAM,

ST I R C R A ZY. . . Where else can you be turned loose to create bacon forests, and beer gardens, and ice luges, and events dubbed “kiss the pig”? If you thought the answer was Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory, you were close, but Music to Your Mouth is where the Palmetto Bluff team finds their golden ticket.

We have the unique opportunity to let our imaginations run wild as we endeavor to create culinary morsels paired with memorable moments. What began as a two-day event just seven years ago, has quickly grown into one of the most lauded year-long food and wine series in the south, if not the country. It all culminates in November with a gathering of some of the most noted chefs, artisans, distillers, brewers, vintners, and culinary personalities in the country. Together, we all create a little magic. Here’s a taste of what we’re working with …

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Favorite MTYM moment: The thanks and recognition I get

Why do you think the MTYM team works well together?

from chefs I look up to.

Mutual respect for each other’s strengths ... and

Biggest stressor: Having all the product and equipment in

place for 30 different chefs simultaneously.

When was the last time you dreamt about MTYM?

Best bite ever tasted at the events: Bill Smith’s banana

Trey Dutton CHEF DE CUISINE

overwhelming fear of “Food Fest Courtney.”

April 13th, 2010, 2:43 am. It was a Tuesday...

pudding.

MTYM in three words: Love, Experience, Accomplishment.

Biggest snafu (that was, of course, fixed before guest arrival):

Most interesting tidbit about one of the other team members:

I drove 5 hours round-trip at 11 pm on Friday night, to

Jeremy has become an avid collector of unique Tervis

Columbia to get 70 pounds of pork belly out of Emile’s

Tumbler cups.

(Caw Caw Creek) freezer because one chef miscalculated his needs.

Today is your last day, and you get to choose your last meal, it is: My two-year-old daughter’s fish, bacon, banana and

Chef crush: I’m a Mike Lata disciple, need I say more?

watermelon sandwich from her kitchen. The food is all wooden, so not at all satisfying, but is incredibly cute.

Favorite MTYM moment: Meeting Allan Benton.

Why do you think the MTYM team works well together?

I would have to say it’s because we all have a special

Biggest stressor: Reconciling the budget. Best bite ever tasted at the events: David Carrier’s green

peanut and shrimp bisque. Biggest snafu (that was, of course, fixed before guest arrival):

Ah, 2011 … we pre-ordered 2,500 oysters, a month in

Brandon Carter EXECUTIVE CHEF

advance. The day before the event we called to confirm

brand of crazy in us. When was the last time you dreamt about MTYM?

This morning. MTYM in three words: Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger. Oh

is that four? My bad.

the pick-up only to find that there was no record of

Most interesting tidbit about one of the other team members:

our order.

Ashley has just about anything you could ever need in

Chef crush: Mine isn’t on a chef, but she is a MTYM

regular, Jasmine Hirsch. I’m pretty sure she’s into me too.

her purse. Seriously, I mean phone chargers, arts and crafts supplies, growlers of beer, small children, etc... Today is your last day, and you get to choose your last meal, it is: Definitely tacos pastor and chorizo, and a bowl

of posole.

F EAT U R E D C H E FS O F MTYM 2 0 1 3

JEREMIAH BACON, 2THE 3 MACINTOSH; CHARLESTON, SC

DREW BELLINE, NO. 246; DECATUR, GA

ALLAN BENTON, BENTON’S SMOKY MOUNTAIN COUNTRY HAMS; MADISONVILLE, TN

SEAN BROCK, HUSK & MCCRADY’S RESTAURANT; CHARLESTON, SC


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Favorite MTYM moment: Going down to the river at

Why do you think the MTYM team works well together?

sunrise on Saturday morning, and watching the light play

The whole is greater than the sum of our parts. (And, I

across the main tent. It’s the last quiet moment...

am grooming a Food Fest Ashley.)

Biggest stressor: Definitely the week that tickets get

When was the last time you dreamt about MTYM?

mailed and the fear that we somehow missed someone

Probably last night. The dreams come more frequently as

(even though we have a checks and balances system for

the festival gets closer.

our checks and balances system).

Courtney Hampson MARKETING MAVEN

MTYM in three words: Progressive, Eclectic, Southern.

Best bite ever tasted at the events: There is food at

Most interesting tidbit about one of the other team

the events?

members: We all have this deep love and appreciation for

Biggest snafu (that was, of course, fixed before guest arrival):

Definitely when the sprinklers went off overnight in the main tent, and then the temperatures dipped below freezing, and everything was covered in ice the next morning.

it is: Thin crust pizza at Pete & Elda’s, Neptune, NJ

(with Bon Jovi, if he is available). If I have to squeeze

Chef crush: Johannes Klapdohr. You can’t not love him. I

Mueller’s Bakery in Bayhead, NJ, for crumb cake and

road-trip to Old Edwards Inn every summer just to have

coffee (with Bon Jovi, if he is available). You can take

him all to myself. And, to actually taste his food!

the girl outta Jersey …

Favorite MTYM moment: Drinking from the special bottle

When was the last time you dreamt about MTYM?

in Julian Van Winkle’s pocket.

All the time, more and more often as it get closer.

Biggest stressor: Delivery day.

MTYM in three words: Marathon not Sprint!

Best bite ever tasted at the events: Bacon Macaroon.

Most interesting tidbit about one of the other team members:

Moreland’s generator running out of gas.

BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

Today is your last day, and you get to choose your last meal,

this meal in during the breakfast hour, I’m headed to

Biggest snafu (that was, of course, fixed before guest arrival):

David Mason

everything southern, but we’re 2/3rds Yankee.

I still think it’s weird that Trey can’t feel his toes. Today is your last day, and you get to choose your last meal, it is: Real New York City pizza, not very southern

Chef crush: My crushes tend to be in a glass. Why do you think the MTYM team works well together?

but true.

Because we are all crazy and creative.

TYLER BROWN, CAPITOL GRILLE; NASHVILLE, TN

DAVID CARRIER, THE CLOISTER AND BEACH CLUB; SEA ISLAND, GA

ASHLEY CHRISTENSEN, POOLE’S DINER; RALEIGH, NC

SCOTT CRAWFORD, THE UMSTEAD HOTEL & SPA; CARY, NC

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Favorite MTYM moment: Immediately after first trolley

When was the last time you dreamt about MTYM?

arrives at Moreland and I can turn loose of the wheel and

Right after it was over, I was certain the whole thing was

relax (a little).

a dream.

Biggest stressor: Food Fest Courtney.

MTYM in three words: At least for 2012: Bourbon,

Best bite ever tasted at the events: Bill Smith’s banana

pudding! One of the few I actually got to stop and try.

Jeremy Walton FOOD & BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

Biggest snafu (that was, of course, fixed before guest arrival):

Bacon, Bliss. Most interesting tidbit about one of the other team members:

Courtney is from Jersey!

Moreland generator blackout five minutes prior to oyster

Today is your last day, and you get to choose your last

roast kick-off. (We’re all scarred for life over this one.)

meal, it is: Breakfast! Drop biscuits, grits, fried eggs,

Chef crush: More like separated at birth, when I realized

at 4:30 a.m. after a lot of ‘shine, that Sean Brock and I

homemade sausage, sharp cheddar cheese, and cane syrup! Preferably with my Dad at the head of the table.

must be related. Why do you think the MTYM team works well together?

We all love the south, we all love food, and we all do recognize it is important to do what Courtney says!

JOHN CURRENCE, CITY GROCERY; OXFORD, MS

GARY DANKO, GARY DANKO; SAN FRANCISCO, CA

EMILE DEFELICE, CAW CAW CREEK; ST. MATTHEWS, SC

FRANKIE DENMARK, HAWG WILD BBQ; RIDGELAND, SC

CRAIG DEIHL, CYPRESS; CHARLESTON, SC

JOHN T. EDGE, SOUTHERN FOODWAYS ALLIANCE; OXFORD, MS

FORD FRY, JCT KITCHEN & BAR; ATLANTA, GA

STEVEN DEVEREAUX GREENE, AN; CARY, NC

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Favorite MTYM moment: I have to say, hanging bacon

Why do you think the MTYM team works well together?

like Christmas ornaments last year was pretty awesome.

Balance. Each of us brings to the table something

People were so blown away by the thought of being able

the others do not. Whether it’s their network, their

to walk through a makeshift “forest” and pluck bacon out

organization, their insane ideas, or the unique ability we

of trees. It was a treat to see their reactions.

have to feed off of each other’s creativity and sometimes

Biggest stressor: Everyone has such a big role to play,

create MTYM gold.

whether it’s organizing chefs, purchasing, rentals, or

When was the last time you dreamt about MTYM?

Ashley Cope

timing. The thing that I always stress about is making

Typically the all-out MTYM dreams (i.e. panic attacks

PASTRY CHEF

sure everyone is still “together” and making sure that

while sleeping) come sometime around October.

each team member has the stuff they need to keep it

However, all the time I will wake up after dreaming up

that way!

some crazy dessert concoction and think ... that will be

Best bite ever tasted at the events: Last year’s chicken

perfect for MTYM.

and waffles was amazing. And I typically don’t rave too

MTYM in three words: Crazy. Creative. Cochon. (I needed

much about my department but we made these pumpkin

another C word, so I went French!)

cinnamon rolls with cream cheese frosting last year ... I could have eaten 10!

Most interesting tidbit about one of the other team members:

Chef Brandon will probably kill me for telling this story,

Biggest snafu (that was, of course, fixed before guest arrival):

but... When he first started he was determined to start

Last year’s maple bacon cotton candy. Wow. I had never

making all of our leftover dinner rolls into bread crumbs.

made cotton candy before and I thought it was a great

He was so determined to be sure this was happening, he

idea to do it in front of everyone! Luckily, Ashley (my

earned the nickname Captain Breadcrumb. To this day, I

assistant) and I were able to get the hang of it before too

still call him CB on occasion, just to see his reaction!

many guests showed up. Don’t think I’ll do that again for awhile.

Today is your last day, and you get to choose your last meal, it is: I’ve actually had this question asked to me before

Chef crush: Mine is a duo ... Matt Lewis and Renato

and my answer never seems to change. My mom’s

Poliafito: The geniuses behind the Baked Bakery in

spaghetti ... hands down. I’ve eaten some great food over

Brooklyn as well as the “Baked” cookbook series, which

the years I have worked at Palmetto Bluff, but there is

is becoming one of my all-time favorites.

just something about the comfort food you ate as a child, and that’s mom’s spaghetti.

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KEVIN GILLESPIE, WOODFIRE GRILL; ATLANTA, GA

WILL HARRIS, WHITE OAK PASTURES; BLUFFTON, GA

CHRIS HASTINGS, HOT & HOT FISH CLUB; BIRMINGHAM, AL

LINTON HOPKINS, RESTAURANT EUGENE; ATLANTA, GA

MATT JORDING, THE SAGE ROOM; HILTON HEAD, SC

JOSH KEELER, TWO BOROUGHS LARDER; CHARLESTON, SC

JOHANNES KLAPDOHR, OLD EDWARDS INN; HIGHLANDS, NC

MIKE LATA, FIG RESTAURANT; CHARLESTON, SC

EDWARD LEE, 610 MAGNOLIA; LOUISVILLE, KY

ROB MCDANIEL, SPRINGHOUSE; LAKE MARTIN, AL

ORCHID PAULMEIER, ONE HOT MAMA’S; HILTON HEAD, SC

ANNE QUATRANO, BACCHANALIA; ATLANTA, GA

TODD RICHARDS, THE SHED AT GLENWOOD; ATLANTA, GA

DREW ROBINSON, JIM ‘N NICK’S BAR-B-Q; BIRMINGHAM, AL

STEVEN SATTERFIELD, MILLER UNION; ATLANTA, GA

RODNEY SCOTT, SCOTT’S BAR-B-Q; HEMINGWAY, SC

BILL SMITH, CROOK’S CORNER; CHAPEL HILL, NC

NATHAN THURSTON, STARS ROOFTOP & GRILL ROOM; CHARLESTON, SC

JOE TRUEX, WATERSHED; ATLANTA, GA

JULIAN P. VAN WINKLE. III, OLD RIP VAN WINKLE DISTILLERY; FRANKFORT,30 KY


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MTYM 2 0 1 3 T H A N K S O U R S P O N S O R S

TITLE SPONSOR

EVENT SPONSORS

MARINE TABLES

CORPORATE SPONSORS

32


SFA POTLIKKER FILM SHOWING

To be clear, Potlikker Films are more than just movies. Southern Foodways Alliance (SFA) has created their Potlikker film festivals and series to provide a full sensory experience of the film’s subject. You watch. You eat. You drink. You commune. You dance.

3 3 BY ANGIE MOSIER PHOTO


The Potlikker series gives SFA the opportunity to take their show on the road, and we’re excited to welcome the “show” back to Music to Your Mouth, where we dedicate our Friday night Block Party to all things Potlikker. There, we’ll pay tribute to the star of the film. This means we’re getting up close and personal with Will Harris of White Oak Pastures, from the other Bluffton. Bluffton, GA, that is. Will Harris is a fourth generation cattleman, who tends the same land that his great-grandfather settled in 1866. Born and raised at White Oak Pastures, Will left home to attend the University of Georgia’s School of Agriculture where he was trained in the industrial farming methods that had taken hold after World War II. Will graduated in 1976 and returned to Bluffton where he and his father continued to raise cattle using pesticides, herbicides, hormones and antibiotics. They also fed their herd a high-carbohydrate diet of corn and soy. These tools did a fantastic job of taking the cost out of the system, but in the mid1990s Will became disenchanted with the excesses of these industrialized methods. They had created a monoculture for their cattle, and, as Will says, “nature abhors a monoculture.” In 1995, Will made the audacious decision to go old school and return to the farming methods his great-grandfather had used 130 years before. Since Will has successfully implemented these changes, he has been recognized all over the world as a leader in humane animal husbandry and environmental sustainability. Over 30% of the energy needs of the plants come from solar panels. The beef and lamb are Certified Grassfed. The farm is USDA Certified Organic. And both processing plants are Animal Welfare Approved. Certified Humane Pastured eggs and USDA Certified Organic Vegetables are now produced on the farm. Eighty employees are employed, and in the truest sense of community, they all enjoy lunch together on the farm every day. Will lives in his family home on the property with his wife Yvonne. He is the proud father of three daughters, Jessi, Jenni, and Jodi. His favorite place in the world is out in the pastures, where he likes to have a big coffee at sunrise and a “750ml glass of wine” at sunset.

FIND IT White Oak Pastures grassfed beef and poultry are available in Whole Foods Market stores from Miami, FL to Princeton, NJ. Their grassfed beef is available in Publix Supermarkets in Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, and South Carolina. Buckhead Beef, Halpern’s, and Destiny Organics make these products available to foodservice throughout the Deep South. All products are available through www.whiteoakpastures.com.

Will Harris

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JOURNALIST AND PHOTOGRAPHER, BONJWING LEE, TOOK TO THE TRAILS ON TWO WHEELS DURING A BREAK IN THE 2012 MUSIC TO YOUR MOUTH FESTIVAL AND HAD THIS TO SAY ABOUT THIS MOMENT... “BETWEEN A BARBECUE LUNCH AND AN OYSTER ROAST DINNER, THE SUN SET ON SOUTH CAROLINA, SENDING ROSY DUSK TO CHASE AWAY THE BLUE OF DAY. DURING THAT QUIET, MAGICAL MOMENT, I PAUSED MY BICYCLE RIDE TO 3TAKE 5 THIS PHOTO OF THE WILD AND BEAUTIFUL LOWCOUNTRY OF PALMETTO BLUFF.”


Green Acres:

Dolphins travel along the banks of the May River, their fins break the surface of the water and then disappear as quickly as they appeared. An alligator lies patiently in the thicket of the tidal marsh, while a nearby egret catches an early dinner. The trees of centuries-old forests intertwine with each other under blankets of Spanish moss. Ancient ruins of previous generations share their land with new structures and developments of modern times. These are just a few of the things that make Palmetto Bluff a unique and remarkable escape, but what’s more remarkable is that these things can all be seen simultaneously from the comfort of a bike seat. With an area that’s larger than the island of Manhattan, it’s hard to experience everything Palmetto Bluff has to offer, but by canvassing the contours of the land by bike, riders are able to encounter the many different aspects of Palmetto Bluff.

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The private pathways of Palmetto Bluff are available only to members and resort guests. It is no coincidence that guests to the Inn are greeted with bikes when they arrive at their cottage or Village Home. And, you’ll find that residents also opt for the power of two wheels to get around. There are four main bike trails in Palmetto Bluff, and each one has something different to offer.

The Main Road Trail, the longest of the four trails in Palmetto Bluff, is a

The 3-mile long River Road Trail begins just south of Wilson Village near

3.7-mile paved trail that runs along Old Palmetto Bluff Road and stretches

the spa. This trail takes riders along the length of the river, which provides

all the way from the Greeter’s Cottage to Wilson Village. The path is quite

beautiful scenery through the entirety of the trail. The trail splits toward the

some distance off the road, and trees bridge the gap between them, so

beginning, one side leading along the river, while the other winds through

while cars may be traveling nearby, bikers still have the feeling of riding

the South Wilson neighborhood. This residential development used to be

through pristine maritime forest. Near the entrance of The Bluff lies a bridge

the home of the Pettigrew Plantation back in the 1860s, and located in

that runs over the May River headwaters, which provides picturesque

this area is the High Bluff overlook, providing a striking view of the May

scenery and an opportunity to spot one of the many gators, birds, or other

River. The two paths converge once again and head south past a few more

wildlife that reside within Palmetto Bluff. As the path continues eastward,

scenic views of the May River, until eventually reaching Moreland Road.

Lake Haynes appears to the north. Lake Haynes Loop, the first of two gravel

There are two historic cemeteries, the Moreland Cemetery and the Landings

trails along the larger Main Road Trail, is a path that runs along the banks of

Cemetery, that are located near the end of the trail. These were part of the

Lake Haynes. There are signs posted along this loop that give information

old Moreland Plantation that was located on this land over a century ago. As

on local wildlife as well as markers that direct hikers and bikers to the best

the River Road Trail comes to an end near the banks of the May River, bikers

locations for bird watching. While these gravel loops are entirely optional,

are rewarded with the Moreland Treehouse, which offers stunning views in

they provide a great opportunity to experience and learn more about the

a secluded and serene part of Palmetto Bluff. The 6-mile round-trip of the

nature of the Lowcountry. Further down the Main Road Trail is the Sand Hill

River Road Trail can be exhausting, especially in the heat of summer, but the

Loop, the second section of gravel trail that gives riders the opportunity to

beauty of the landscape is well worth the work.

cruise beneath a canopy of Spanish Moss while taking in the serenity of the forests, which remain as untouched as they were decades ago. As the gravel turns back to asphalt, the Main Road Trail continues east, where it ends near the entrance to Wilson Village.

The Wilson Village Trail takes riders through the heart of Palmetto Bluff. It’s hard to stay on your bike on the Wilson Village Trail because there is so much to do in Wilson Village. The north end of the trail features Wilson Landing, the chapel, the history center, and the conservancy, which are all

Calder Trail, begins to the north of Wilson Village and takes bikers along

attractions worthy of exploring. In the center of Wilson Village are the ruins

the north section of Mt. Pelia Road, showing the more developed side of

of the R.T. Wilson’s mansion. Completed in 1915, the mansion contained 72

Palmetto Bluff. As riders begin on this 2.8-mile paved path, they first come

rooms and was notorious for lavish parties before it burned down in 1926.

across the May River Golf Course. This 18-hole Jack Nicklaus Signature

Just south of the ruins is the pet cemetery, created in memory of the many

course is one of the most exclusive golf courses in the region, and its paths

hunting dogs that died on the plantation centuries ago. The trail continues

intertwine with the Calder Trail. The meticulously planned course and

south through the cottages of the Inn at Palmetto Bluff, where bikers can

elegantly green fairways provide a beautiful backdrop for biking and give

stop to see the ruins of the oldest octagonal building documented in the

riders an appreciation for the design and size of the 7,200-yard course. The

United States. Near the ruins on the inland side lies Bird Island, an incredible

trail also takes bikers through the May River Forest neighborhood, where

opportunity to watch many of the unique birds of the Lowcountry in their

many of the plots of land within Palmetto Bluff have been and are currently

natural habitat. Bird Island is a breeding ground for birds, and thousands

being developed. Be sure to stop by the May River overlook, located near

of them can be spotted there at any given time. From there, the trail loops

the end of Calder Trail, to get a scenic glimpse of the May River. The trail

back up north past the Wilson treehouse and toward the entrance to Wilson

ends about a mile west of Wilson Village, back on the Main Road Trail.

Village. RT’s Market is located at the entrance for any bikers looking to replenish with a snack or some water, or they can head just down the road to Buffalo’s for a post-ride breakfast or lunch, the perfect way to end a memorable, historical, and unique ride around the Bluff.

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L E GE N D

The bike trails within Palmetto Bluff allow bikers to slow down and appreciate the beauty and history of the Lowcountry. It’s a place that provides a refuge from the busy lifestyle of the outside world, where guests and residents alike can relax in the serenity of the Lowcountry lifestyle. In a world that’s so busy and fast-paced, it’s important to slow down every now and then to appreciate what’s around us, and there is no better way to appreciate the 22,000 acres of Palmetto Bluff than by a good old-fashioned bike ride.

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Retail Therapy

COOL STUFF, WARM NIGHTS Find our favorite picks and other treasures tucked away at RT’s Market, The Boutique Spa, Tennis and Golf Shops, and Buffalo’s. Happy Shopping!

IN CASE OF SNAKE BITE …

be prepared, with one of these beautiful woodgrain flasks. Choose from three styles designed with the gentleman in mind. Made by SFG, each comes in its own handsome gift pouch.

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AWWW, SHUCKS

Middleton Made Oyster Knife combines beauty with exceptional quality. Locally crafted, it’s a must-have knife to have for any chef or foodie. Perfect for shucking our famous May River Cluster Oysters and making oyster shooters! (These fine folks will be “cutting up” with us at Music to Your Mouth in November.)

DON’T LET THIS BE “THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY”

LOOKING FOR DIRECTIONS?

Clever for decor, yet well-made and functional! Lightwood

This “Bar Compass” could be your new best

fish corkscrew is crafted from heavy-duty stainless steel to

friend! Impress guests with your bartending

get the job done. Features corkscrew with cutter plus solid

skills as you whip up popular beverages like a

wood grip.

pro. Keep behind your bar for quick reference, we’ll never tell.

OPEN FOR DISCUSSION

Grab your to-go deck of “Wine Table Topics,” and let the conversation begin. Show off your wine wisdom, or start the great debate. Either way, you’ll uncork tons of fun.

TIME TO STIR THINGS UP

Like multi-tasking? These Sable & Rosenfeld “Tipsy” Cocktail Stirrers can help you make a marvelous Martini, gorgeous Gibson or beautiful Bloody Mary. Or, plate them for instant hors d’oeuvres.

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D

O

T

TO

E TH

BLU FF

PU

P

L OV Y E P

G

M S O L F PA

E

When your four-legged friend joins you on your trip to Palmetto Bluff, for a month, week, day or even just an hour, that pup is made to feel right at home. Recently, a Palmetto Bluff property owner proclaimed,

“Every day here is like Halloween trick-or-treat for my dog.” An apt description, with the emphasis on treat! Although some dogs like to show off their tricks, i.e., sit-up, roll-over, shake hands, it’s never required in order to earn a pat, tummy rub or biscuit. Start at Wilson’s Landing Marina for doggie treat #1 (tricks are always optional.) From there, head to the real estate office for doggie treat #2 (or should we say, treats – the office staff tend to be very generous!) You can also grab a nice cold drink of water from the dog bowl right by the front door. Continue on to RT’s Market and you’re sure to snag a snack or two. The term “dog-friendly” simply does not do us justice. For instance, the pups that stay at the Inn are privy to particular pampering, including scrumptious dogs-only dining and a menu of amenities, including massage, fit for a king (or King Charles Spaniel.) Typically, the only good thing about packing up and leaving the Bluff, is looking forward to being reunited with your canine companions. Next time, bring them along; you may just decide to stay forever!

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PA L M E T T O BLU F F ’ S F U RM I L I A R FACE S

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BY BY DR. DR. MARY MARY SOCCI, SOCCI, PALMETTO PALMETTO BLUFF BLUFF ARCHAEOLOGIST ARCHAEOLOGIST

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NESTLED AMONG THE COTTAGES OF THE INN AND SHADED BY LIVE oaks and palmettos is a small antebellum cemetery. Nearly two hundred years ago, Dr. Samuel Fairchild, owner of Octagon Plantation, was laid to rest within the cemetery’s brick and tabby walls. Fairchild had lived in the octagonal house that gave the plantation its name for over 15 years when he died in 1826. He had grown rice and cotton on the plantation’s 900 acres and he had consulted on medical cases in Savannah. From family letters, we know that the plantation was a much-loved home for Fairchild and his adopted children, including Theresa Halsey Parkman, who is also buried in the cemetery. Theresa was married to Samuel Parkman, a prominent merchant in Savannah, and the Parkmans spent much of their time at Octagon Plantation. In a letter to his wife on November 1, 1818, Parkman, who had returned to Savannah, wrote, “I wish I could come out to May River and spend a day or two, how I should admire to set down with you to an oyster supper tonight.” Parkman’s letter brings to mind our own idyllic lifestyle at the Bluff, but in the first half of the 19th century, a family’s happiness was often muted by loss. And, as the Octagon Cemetery reveals, the Parkman family was beset by tragedy. Two of the Parkman children are buried in the cemetery: four-month-old Samuel died in 1819, and eight-year-old Catherine died in 1829. Their shared gravestone is a reminder that surviving childhood was far from certain on a Lowcountry plantation. Diseases such as whooping cough, tetanus and diphtheria were not only common, but also frequently fatal in the 19th century. Yellow fever and cholera epidemics had high mortality rates and were recurring threats. It is quite possible that Samuel and Catherine Parkman were victims of illnesses that today are prevented by vaccines and other public health initiatives.

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The large monument in the cemetery is the gravestone for

The ship began service in May 1838, and the trip from Savannah

Theresa Halsey Parkman, who died in 1837. Letters from her

on June 13 started as smoothly as the Pulaski’s three previous

family in the 1830s reveal that Theresa had been seriously ill

voyages. The steamer arrived in Charleston without incident, and

several times. Her health deteriorated even more after the birth

most passengers disembarked to enjoy the evening in the city. The

of her ninth child, a son, in November 1836, and she died the

following morning, the ship departed for Baltimore.

following fall.

That night, off the coast of North Carolina, the boiler exploded.

Theresa Parkman left behind seven children, the youngest only

The ship sank rapidly, and of the 197 passengers and crew, fewer

11 months old. Perhaps her husband felt that a trip to visit their

than half were rescued. Samuel Parkman and his children were

Northern relatives would help the children recover from the

among those lost in the disaster.

heartbreak of their mother’s death. Leaving the three youngest children in Savannah with their aunt, Samuel Parkman and his four older children left for Baltimore on the steamship SS Pulaski on Wednesday June 13, 1838. There were many of their fellow Savannahians on the ship, heading north to enjoy the cooler summer weather. In the 1830s, steamship technology was in its infancy and boilers were prone to failure. Frequent accidents left the public demanding safer equipment and wary of the new mode of transportation. Therefore, the SS Pulaski, a new steamer designed

The tragedy hit the Lowcountry hard. Many local people had family and friends aboard the Pulaski. The city of Savannah set aside July 5, 1838 as a public day of mourning. All businesses were closed, the bells of the churches tolled and there were religious services to commemorate those who died. At the Octagon Cemetery, the names of Samuel Parkman and the four children who perished with him, Allethena Phebe, Caroline, Theresa, and Whitney, were added to Theresa Parkman’s monument. Their names were the last additions to the cemetery.

for the Savannah-Charleston-Baltimore route, was outfitted

Julia, Lucy, and Breck, the surviving Parkman children, remained

with specially-made, reinforced, copper boilers “of great strength”

in Savannah under the care of their aunt. Eventually, Julia and

to prevent any mishaps. Newspaper advertisements for passage

Lucy married and moved away; Breck went to Harvard and

on the Pulaski promised that, “Her qualities for ease, safety

returned to Savannah to practice law. At the start of the Civil

and speed are superior to any steamer that ever floated on the

War, Breck enlisted in the Confederate army. He died at the

American waters.”

Battle of Antietam (Sharpsburg) in 1862 and is buried in Laurel Grove Cemetery in Savannah.

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THE PET CEMETERY

Richard T. Wilson, the wealthy New York banker, who in 1902 bought the 20,000 acres of Palmetto Bluff as his southern Lowcountry retreat, was an avid horseman and outdoorsman. Some of the dogs in the cemetery may have been companions on rides or hunts at the Bluff, but historical documents reveal that it was his wife, Marion, who owned several of the dogs buried here. The 1910 American Kennel Club records list eleven dogs belonging to Mrs. Wilson: four smooth fox terriers and seven pointers. Tommy, who died December 3, 1912 and whose headstone reads “A fine terrier and much loved companion,” was one of the dogs registered as Mrs. Wilson’s. Whether they were working animals or pets, the cemetery is evidence that dogs were cherished members of the Wilson family. And, as any morning stroller around the Village can attest, little has changed over the last hundred years — dogs continue to be beloved companions of many of our Bluff residents.

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With the spectacular live oak canopies and expanses of internal waterway vistas, longdistance runners loved the inaugural Palmetto Bluff Half Marathon, and inquiries for the 2014 event began just about the time folks started crossing the finish line in March.

13.1: RUNNING FOR GOOD

Scheduled for Sunday, March 9, 2014, the race is shaping up to becoming a favorite in the region. The 13.1 mile course is flat, but remarkably picturesque and peaceful because of Palmetto Bluff’s topography of wooded glades, expansive equestrian fields, riverfront village, and intricate mazes of internal lakes. The course – all 69,168 feet of it – really showcases the raw and refined beauty of Palmetto Bluff.

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RUNNING PAYS OFF. LITERALLY.

LASTING IMPACT

The race benefits BackPack Buddies, a program of the Lowcountry Food

Sue Kroupa, who heads up the BackPack Buddies effort in Bluffton, said:

Bank, sponsored in Bluffton by Crossroads Community Support Services.

“We’re extremely grateful Palmetto Bluff selected BackPack Buddies as

The mission of the organization is to assist children in Bluffton who are on

the fundraising recipient of their new event and we’re absolutely thrilled

free or reduced-cost breakfast and lunch plans at school and are likely to

with the results. It was a terrific event and the funding will be focused

go home to a house with no food. BackPack Buddies are developed to help

on expanding our Bluffton program from 175 to 200 children in the fall

those most “food-insecure” children by sending backpacks full of food home

semester, adding a new school and increasing our summer program.”

with the children each weekend. BackPack Buddies is making an impact in With volunteer support provided by local organizations, churches, and

Bluffton on a daily basis.

businesses, the BackPack Buddies initiative is the signature program of The 473 runners who participated in the 2013 race each dedicated $25 of

Crossroads Community Support Services, an all-volunteer, non-profit group

their race registration to BackPack Buddies yielding a $9,460 contribution

organized just two years ago. BackPack Buddies exists as a partial solution

to the organization. And that contribution will feed a lot of hungry children

to the growing problem of hunger among school children caused by poverty

in Bluffton. In fact, it will purchase food for 2,374 backpacks which will feed

in the Lowcountry.

the 175 children currently in the program every weekend for 14 weeks.

WE DIDN’T BREAK ANY RECORDS, BUT WE DID HAVE SOME NOTABLE FINISHES FOR 2013:

HALF MARATHONS: DID YOU KNOW? A half marathon is a road running event of 13.1 miles, 352 yards (21.243 kilometers). It

First Place Male, Ben Vaught - 1:17:15

First Place Female, Rachel Ditto - 1:33:13

is half the distance of a marathon and usually run on roads. It is a challenging distance,

Bob Meighan, Palmetto Bluff Member - 1:23:12

but half marathon does not require the same level of training that a marathon requires.

Gerrit Albert, Palmetto Bluff General Manager - 1:24:52

The current biggest half marathon in the world is held in Gotenburg, Sweden, called

Stephanie Gentemann, Palmetto Bluff Design Review Administrator - 1:49:10

the “Göteborgsvarvet.” It had 59,417 announced runners and 43,026 finishers in 2011.

Stacey Johnson, wife of May River Golf Course Superintendent - 2:01:09

Finishing times for most half marathons range from just beyond an hour for elite runners

David Smiley (his first half!), Inn at Palmetto Bluff Director of Rooms - 2:08:08

to 3-plus hours for slower runners or walkers. The current world record is 58.23 minutes

Courtney Hampson (her first half!), PB Marketing Manager - 2:21:28

for men and 1:05.50 for women.

Christine Wrobel (a personal record!), Inn at PB Marketing Manager - 2:21:41

SAVE THE DATE

Save the date for the Half Marathon 2014 on Sunday, March 9th. (Yup, we’re sticking with Daylight Saving Time. There was just something magical about watching the sun come up over the trees....) Registration is open on active.com

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As a small child, perched on the tailgate of her family’s station wagon, Peggy Ellis loved to watch her father paint. Ray Ellis had become an accomplished, internationallyrenowned artist, and she marveled as each stroke of the paintbrush added new dimension to his watercolor. In Ray’s case, the apple didn’t fall far from the tree.

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Ray Ellis’ parents met in art school and at a young age it became obvious

Peggy dabbled in art, drawing and doodling, as most kids are apt to

that both he and his sister, Peg, had inherited the artistic gene. In fact,

do. But she never felt particularly enticed to artistic endeavors. She

just recently, Ray shared with his daughter an imaginative little booklet

continued to observe and admire the beautiful artwork of her father and

he created back in 1934 for a school project on careers. Reminiscing, 92-

her Aunt Peg, who had become an artist and art teacher. Peggy grew up,

year old Ray mentions, it was just about that time his father warned him

got married and raised three terrific children. When she turned 40, her

not to go into art because he could never hope to make a living. Known

husband suggested she might enjoy taking an art class. She signed up for

throughout the world, and with galleries in both Savannah, GA, and

a once-a-week class with art teacher, Nancy Russo, who had been using

Martha’s Vineyard, MA, Ray has certainly proven his father wrong.

a book about Ray Ellis as a classroom guide. She was amazed to discover Ray’s daughter had become her pupil! After only one or two classes,

Works by Peggy Ellis, clockwise from top left Full Moon Rising, oil on canvas Picking Blackberries, watercolor Marsh Reflections, oil on canvas Dune Dreams, oil on canvas

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Works by Ray Ellis, clockwise from top left Across the Marsh, oil on canvas Marsh Meets Sky, oil on canvas Mean Low, oil on canvas Oysterman’s World, oil on canvas

Peggy’s intrinsic talent began to blossom. Once unleashed, her passion for painting exploded. In addition to studying with Ms. Russo and being mentored by her remarkable father, she continued her art education and attended the New School in New York City, and the deCordova Museum School in Lincoln, Massachusetts. While some might consider her a late bloomer, Peggy has truly made up for lost time. A prolific artist, fascinated with the ever-changing Lowcountry seascape , she’s settled in Charleston, SC where she paints from her studio overlooking the Cooper River Harbor. In fact, the beauty of the area has become a definable part of her paintings. Peggy works in both oil and watercolor, which allow a multitude of choices in which to depict the region’s magnificent clouds and sunsets, in addition to landscapes, animals and flowers. Recently, her works reveal vibrant coastal scenes, rich in both color and atmosphere. She has been represented by the Willoughby Gallery in Martha’s Vineyard, the Nash Gallery on Hilton Head Island and numerous private collections. She is also represented by Four Corners Gallery just down the street from Palmetto Bluff, in Old Downtown Bluffton.

The Palmetto Bluff Arts Commission has just announced that Peggy Ellis has graciously agreed to come and spend an entire weekend at the Bluff in October. The schedule includes a Friday night social event, with an informational session on Saturday. Although it’s diff icult for Peggy’s dad to travel, the Commission is hopeful Ray will be joining his daughter for the festivities via computer.

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Y P HAP R U HO Our master mixer, David Mason, shares the ‘how to’ for a few of his signature Palmetto Bluff cocktails.

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Blackberry Sage Lemonade

Garden Margarita

• 1 ½ ounce Bacardi Limon

• 1 ½ ounce Sauza

• 1 ounce simple syrup

• ½ ounce triple sec

• 2 ounces of water

• Juice of 1 lime

• Juice of 1 lemon

• Juice of ½ lemon

• 2 sage leaves

• 1 strawberry

• 3 blackberries

• 4 sprigs of cilantro

In a shaker, combine blackberries, sage leaves and simple

• 1 ½ ounce agave syrup

syrup and muddle until all berries are crushed. Add ice,

Muddle strawberry, cilantro, and agave syrup in a pint

Bacardi Limon, water and lemon juice. Shake well and

glass. Add all other ingredients and shake. Do not

pour into tall glass. Garnish with a sage leaf.

strain. Serve in tall glass and garnish with strawberry and cilantro.

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Benton’s Bourbon

Milk Punch

• 2 ounces Benton’s Bacon-infused Maker’s Mark

• 1 ½ ounce Maker’s Mark

• 1 ounce maple syrup

• 4 ounces milk punch base

• 2 ounces ginger beer

In a shaker, combine Maker’s Mark and milk punch

Combine bourbon, maple syrup and ice in a shaker.

base. Shake well, strain into snifter, and dust with

Shake well and serve over ice in a rocks glass. Top with

nutmeg and cinnamon.

ginger beer. MILK PUNCH BASE INFUSED BOURBON

• 2 cups milk

Sauté 2 pieces of Benton’s Bacon. Add both pieces and

• 2 cups heavy cream

drippings to one bottle of Maker’s Mark. Let sit for a 2 days

• ½ cup simple syrup

and strain through a coffee filter. Repeat straining. Rinse

• 1 tablespoon vanilla

Maker’s Mark bottle thoroughly with hot water and add

• 2 teaspoons nutmeg

infused bourbon back to the bottle.

• 2 teaspoons cinnamon

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Cucumber Gimlet

• 2 ounces Hendrick’s Gin

• 1 ½ ounce Maker’s Mark

• 1 ½ ounce rock candy syrup

• 3 ounces lemonade

• Juice from ½ lime

• 3 ounces peach cider

• Slice of cucumber Combine gin, lime juice and rock candy syrup in a shaker filled with ice. Shake well and strain into a martini glass over sliced cucumber.

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Peaches and Bourbon

Combine ingredients in collins glass filled with ice. Garnish with a slice of peach or lemon twist.


Fig Martini

BEVERAGE DIRECTOR

DAVID MASON • 1 liter bottle of Firefly Vodka • 1 pound dried black mission figs

A.K.A. MASTER MIXER

• 1 cup Grand Marnier • 1 cup lemon juice • 1 cup simple syrup • 1 cup triple sec Cook figs in Grand Marnier until soft. Add to vodka and let infuse for at least a week. Strain out vodka to remove seeds. Combine vodka, lemon juice, simple syrup, and triple sec in a shaker filled with ice. Shake well and strain into martini glass. Garnish with lemon twist.

When it comes

to cocktails, Da vid Mason is a man on a miss ion. David is resp onsible for concocting th e ideas and rela tionships that bring life to our menus, year -long wine dinner series, Fir st Friday dinner s, and the Music to Your M outh Festival vin tner, brewer, and distiller lineu p. Yes, the Beer Garden was his idea (and he let us add a bacon forest!) Suffice it to say, his gig in volves a lot of tasting.

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what’s around the corner With dozens of different and diverse activities every day on the Bluff, your calendar can quickly fill. We’ve shared a few of our favorite on-property and off-property events worthy of a big circle on your calendar!

october 4&5 ANNUAL BEAUFORT SHRIMP FESTIVAL A yearly celebration of local wild-caught shrimp includes live entertainment, competition for best shrimp dish, contests, craft market and much more. Tons of fun for the whole family, admission is free. www.beaufort.com.

5 BUFFALO’S FIRST FRIDAY WINE DINNER Three courses all about pizza and the wines that love it!

11&12 ARTIST IN RESIDENCE WEEKEND WITH PEGGY ELLIS

13-20 HISTORIC BLUFFTON ARTS & SEAFOOD FESTIVAL

september 1 MUSIC TO YOUR MOUTH DINNER It’s our Labor Day Weekend Annual Beer Dinner & Oyster Roast at Moreland Landing. Family-friendly event features food, music and local brews.

6 BUFFALO’S FIRST FRIDAY WINE SERIES Bubblelicious! Three course-dinner featuring champagne and sparkling wine.

14 4TH ANNUAL LT. DAN WEEKEND Appearing in Beaufort, Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band, presented by the Independence Fund to benefit injured veterans. www.LDW3.com.

22-28 SAVANNAH JAZZ FESTIVAL In its 32nd year, the largest free festival in the southeast celebrates jazz as a living art form. The festival boasts the best in international, national, regional and local jazz talent. www.savannahjazzfestival.org

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The ninth annual festival is a week-long event offering many activities, showcasing the locally harvested seafood, delicious Lowcountry cuisine, rich history, culture and art of the area. Experience Southern hospitality, Bluffton-style! www. blufftonartsandseafoodfestival.com

22 CONSERVANCY FIELD TRIP TO DAUFUSKIE Take a boat ride over to Daufuskie Island and enjoy a buffet-style lunch and a tour of the Island.

25&26 MUSIC TO YOUR MOUTH WINE DINNER One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, a dinner based on the books of Dr. Seuss. For a whimsical time with wine of an incredible line. Oh my, sounds divine! Join us for an evening of wine and dine sure to surpass these rhymes.


26 HALLOWEEN HUNTER PACE A festive Hunter Pace with a twist! The course will be decorated in a Halloween theme, and riders can “Trick or Treat” along the course.

26-2 Nov SAVANNAH FILM FESTIVAL Hosted by the Savannah College of Art and Design, the festival features the best in independent and innovative films from around the world. From feature-length to two-minute shorts, the annual festival presents cinematic creativity from award-winning professionals as well as student filmmakers. www.filmfest.scad.edu

november 1 BUFFALO’S FIRST FRIDAY WINE DINNER “Talkin’ Turkey!” Three courses with wines perfect for Thanksgiving.

9 SAVANNAH ROCK ’N’ ROLL MARATHON AND 1/2 Runners will set out on this scenic course highlighting one of our favorite host cities and her famous sites. Live, local bands play along the race course to keep everyone on pace. Marathon, plus new this year: Half Marathon and 2 person half marathon relay. www.runrocknroll.competitor.com/savannah

9 GIRLS GONE WILD The Conservancy’s all-girl event teaches survival techniques from fire-building to shelter-building to catching fish and cooking outdoors.

19-24 MUSIC TO YOUR MOUTH FESTIVAL The 7th Annual Music to Your Mouth Festival features the South’s best chefs and artisans, and the best vintners, distillers and brewers in the country. They’re all on hand to take guests on a week-long journey of WOW! Join us. For tickets and info, visit www.musictoyourmouth.com.

29 5K TURKEY TROT Burn those post-feast calories by getting up and out on your feet. This friendly 5K meanders through the serene maritime forest.

december 7 MEMBER SCAVENGER HUNT AND BURN FESTIVAL The “hunt” crafted by the Conservancy is the culmination of years of Bluff knowledge, paired with years of studying Survivor and Amazing Race footage, for a cross-property conservation immersion challenge like no other. Each year, the tasks get more and more clever, and the stakes get higher. After the competition, we celebrate with an outdoor fireside dinner under the stars.

13 CHRISTMAS IN THE VILLAGE Get in the holiday spirit with festive live music and a Christmas movie on the big screen in the Village Green. Sip hot toddies and munch on s’mores under the stars.

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HAVE YOU BEEN SCENE?

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Did we spot you out and about exploring the Bluff? Got a great shot? Email your high resolution images to champson@crescentcommunities.com and you just may be scene.


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the bluff fall/winter 2013