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01.01 – 30.06.2016

EU 2016 ARTS & DESIGN PROGRAMME ≥ THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

AMSTERDAM


We witnessed events putting our society under great pressure: the global refugee crises, terrorist attacks in Europe, (inter)national conflicts, Brexit. These events strengthened our shared conviction that culture can and should play an important role in our society, through exchange, collaboration, connection and inspiration. Throughout the whole process of developing the programme, we focused on the makers to imagine and co-design future society. We’ve asked designers, directors, thinkers, scientists, musicians, poets, artists and students to come up with answers to urgent contemporary questions in cities. Matters like sustainability, migration, affordable housing, healthcare, waste and food. We wanted a bottom-up approach and connect makers from different European countries and from different disciplines.

It was a fruitful open invitation to professionals as well as the general public, to make, imagine and narrate ideas, stories and concepts. And it led to an inspiring and very extensive programme in Brussels and the Netherlands, with Amsterdam as the solidly pounding heart. Together we created FabCity, The Wall and the On Stage-programme. This book shows a rich impression per month, a selection of all the different activities and people of which the programme consisted. A programme made by people, a lot of people, who bring their experiences into the future Europe.

INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

In Autumn 2014, we sat together for the first time to think and talk about how to create a cultural programme related to the Dutch Presidency of the European Union. Now, at the end of 2016, we look back on six incredible months, in which we’ve connected, created, (been) inspired and educated and have gotten a glimpse of the future of everyday living.

We wanted the dialogue to be stronger than debate, inclusiveness to be obvious, diversity to stimulate the creative process and people to wander off the beaten path looking for exciting and unexpected results. In the end, this all lead to inspiring contributions towards the future of Europe. Much needed in the alarming times we live in.

Egbert Fransen, Marjo van Schaik and Frans de Vries EU2016 Cultural intendants

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PREFACE

For this purpose, we started by initiating the EU2016 Creative Call. We organised a boot camp, and from April 2015 onwards we programmed two weekly meet ups at Pakhuis de Zwijger in which we generated innovative and inspiring ideas and kickstarted the execution of those ideas. Everyone could join in, every opinion counted – it had to be about imagination, confusion, wonder, connection and innovation.


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We chose an ‘open source’ method of programming, with a focus on participation, co-creation and social innovation, without losing control of artistic quality.

INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Egbert Fransen (director cultural hub Pakhuis de Zwijger) Marjo van Schaik (independent arts consultant) Frans de Vries (director events agency De Vries Productions)

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From 1 January 2016, the Netherlands presided over the Council of the European Union for six months. It was not all about politics, though. The cultural programme Europe by People, The Future of Everyday Living looked into contemporary social issues through arts and design. The programme contained of the following: an art intervention in public space The Wall, a self-sufficient and sustainable FabCity, an On Stage programme of performing arts and a programme of events in Amsterdam and Brussels.

© GERARD WESSEL

CULTURAL INTENDANTS EGBERT FRANSEN, MARJO VAN SCHAIK AND FRANS DE VRIES

The organisation, coordination and curating of the programme was carried out in a collaboration between:


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JANUARY KICK-OFF THE WALL NEW EUROPEANS / TESTSITE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE AMSTERDAM PORTRAITS / BY ROBIN DE PUY DESIGN FOR JUSTUS LIPSIUS BUILDING / BY XML AND JURGEN BEY

FEBRUARY

33 34 38 42 46

ON STAGE CROSSING EUROPE / BY POIKE STOMPS NOBODY HOME & JIHAD DE VOORSTELLING / C BY DARIA BUKVI´ IN LIMBO EMBASSY / BY MANON VAN HOECKEL SOCRATES SCHOUTEN OLFA BEN ALI LARA STAAL AND MARIJN LEMS LUC DELEAU MARCOS GARCIA HISKO HULSING GEORGE ELIAS TOBAL AND ERAN BEN-MICHAËL MICHEL BAUWENS DINA DANISH ANTONIJA EREMUT ERCEG IMAGES: CROSSING EUROPE BY POIKE STOMPS

INDEX

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Y, © MICHAL HAN OVSK´ DISCOVERY OF HEAVEN

INTRODUCTION EUROPE BY PEOPLE / THE FUTURE OF EVERY DAY LIVING SPEECH: BERT KOENDERS SPEECH: JET BUSSEMAKER SPEECH: EBERHARD VAN DER LAAN THE 5 BATTLES OF A CREATIVE GENERATION

56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70

89 90 94 96 100 108 110 112 114 116 118 120 122 124 126 128

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INTRODUCTION

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INDEX

KHADJIA MASSAOUDI MAARTEN HAJER SAMAN AMINI / MAJD MARDO / CHEMS EDDINE AMAR MAARTEN VAN TUIJL RAPHAEL RODAN FRANS TIMMERMANS PASCAL GIELEN DAVE HAKKENS FRANCESCA MIAZZO THE END OF PRIVACY IMAGES: AMSTERDAM PORTRAITS BY ROBIN DE PUY


FABCITY KICK-OFF / 11 WEEKS OF SHAPING THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING FABCITIES / SELF-SUFFICIENT: LOCALLY PRODUCTIVE AND GLOBALLY CONNECTED GASCOLAND ‘BREADDIGESTER’ / BY CASCOLAND CALAIS / BY HENK WILDSCHUT HENK OVINK EVA GLADEK FRANK ALSEMA MARTIJN DE WAAL ANASTASIIA LIUBCHENKO MICHIEL SCHWARZ MARLEEN STIKKER JOHN GRIN ANDREA VOETS ARIE VAN ZIEL AND PETER JAN BROUWER IMAGES: CALAIS BY HENK WILDSCHUT

201 202 206 210 216 220 222 224 226 228 230 232 234 236 238 240

INDEX

TINY HOUSES / SMART LIVING AND WORKING IS THE NEW WAY TO DO DESIGN PRINCIPLES FOR SUSTAINABLE AND SELF SUFFICIENT FUTURE CITIES / BY MICHIEL SCHWARZ NEW EUROPE CITY MAKERS SUMMIT / A CALL TO ACTION PARK EUROPE / BY PAUL FAASSEN BERT KOMMERIJ JOSIEN PIETERSE HESTER SWAVING ESTHER MOLENWIJK CHRISTIAN IAIONE BEN RAWLENCE AMALIA ZEPOU TANJA DEN BROEDER ALBERT HERDER ZOFIA KULIGOWSKA & DORA ÐURKESAC ILLUSTRATIONS: PARK EUROPE BY PAUL FAASSEN

258 262 266 274 276 278 280 282 284 286 288 290 292 294 296

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APRIL

146 152 154 164 166 168 170 172 174 176 178 180 182 184

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PASSA PORTE SEMINAR / NEED AND NECESSITY EU SCHOOLS / BY RAIMOND WOUDA NEW NARRATIVES FOR EUROPE EDDY VAN WESSEL SUZY BLOK MARIA TARANTINO ABDELHADI BAADDI DOMINIC HAWGOOD DAVID VAN REYBROUCK MARCO DONNARUMMA TERESA BORASINO FRANCESCA RIZZETTO THEO VAN DOESBURG IMAGES: EU SCHOOLS BY RAIMOND WOUDA

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3D PRINTING A PLASTIC MADONNA, A CONCRETE BUILDING AND A STAINLESS STEEL CANAL BRIDGE FABCITY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMME / MAKING NEW PRODUCTS OUT OF PLASTIC WASTE FABCITY STUDENT PROGRAMME / DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS URBI ET ORBI ANNETTE KOUWENHOVEN WUNDERBAUM, DE KOMST VAN XIA BART DEUSS & NITA LIEM MARIEKE DERMUL LEE FELDMAN THE ROAD OF BROKEN HEARTS THE ODYSSEY RABIAÂ BENLAHBIB MIRANDA LAKERVELD

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JUNE

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INTRODUCTION

© NICOLE SANTÉ

NEW EUROPEANS / A TEST SITE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE NEW EUROPEANS HANDBOOK ALL THAT GLITTERS IS NOT GOLD NEW EUROPE FLAGS / IN SOLIDARITY WITH ASYLUM SEEKERS HORTUS EUROPA DAVID BADE'S FRIEZE OF OUR TIME A PAPER MONUMENT FOR THE PAPERLESS PROPAGANDA BY THE PEOPLE FREEDOM MEAL GODESS EUROPA IMAGINE / A WORK BY LIEVE PRINS COLOPHON

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NEW EUROPEANS


The Arts & Design programme Europe by People, The Future of Everyday Living was based on the belief that art has the power to enrich our society, to make it a more inspiring and better place to live, with a stronger economy - whether through design, architecture, fine arts, fashion, theatre, music, dance, film, poetry or literature. The strengths of the Netherlands lie in innovative thinking, creativity and talent for collaboration, networking and enterprise. These are strengths, which best manifest themselves in our interactions with other countries. This is why co-operation and co-creation were at the core of our cultural programme, why we focused on actively engaging with the public and on fostering a truly interdisciplinary approach. We also focused on the new generation of artists

INTRODUCTION

THE WALL an interactive wall, which could be visited online as well as offline. The actual wall around the Navy base where the formal activities took place, served as a background for temporary art installations and performances. FABCITY a temporary, partly self-sufficient society at the Java Island where students, artists and professionals – worked, created, did research and came up with solutions for everyday city problems.

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TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ

Europe by People, The Future of Everyday Living consisted of four elements:

ON STAGE throughout the whole period, there was an extensive On Stage programme with theme-based performances, exhibitions and projects. BRUSSELS at the same time there was a parallel programme in Brussels, consisting of performing arts, festivals and exhibitions. 15

INTRODUCTION EUROPE BY PEOPLE THE FUTURE OF EVERY DAY LIVING

and designers – the people who will shape a new Europe in the decades to come. We asked them to come up with their answers to urgent issues and solutions, to pressing problems resulting from social, cultural, political and technological change.


FABCITY: MAKERSPACE FOR URBAN INNOVATORS

More than 400 young students, professionals, artists and creatives developed the site into a sustainable urban area, where they worked, created, explored and presented their solutions for current urban issues.On campus the fifty pavilions were divided into eight areas. Here students, professionals, researchers and artists demonstrated, developed and tested solutions for our future cities, including alternative forms of energy, new ways of transportation, different possibilities for treating water, local food supplies and re-using waste. There was also a number of performing arts shows and installations from innovative creators. Their vision of the future took shape in theatre, dance, film and music performances.

© ROSE IENEKE VAN KALSBEEK

© PHOTO BY ERIK BORST

The Wall was an on and off-line programme of art installations and performances located along the 450-metre brick wall that surrounds the Amsterdam Marine Base. This base was where, during the 182 days of the Presidency, the official EU-meetings took place. The Wall separated the politicians from the public during this period and was at the same time used to enhance the communication between these two worlds. Over the six-month period, New Europeans, a group of young European creators and thinkers co-created a physical space with artistic interventions and a cultural programme. It was a test site for everyday life, visible and open to the general public as well as the official EU programme participants. The New Europeans presented their explorations into Europe’s future on an interactive and layered art installation mounted along The Wall. Their work is presented in the attached New Europeans booklet.

INTRODUCTION

Eastern Harbour District. Conceived as a green, self-sustaining city, FabCity comprised of approximately 50 innovative pavilions, installations and prototypes.

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THE WALL

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FabCity was a temporary and freely accessible campus open between 1 April until 26 June at the head of Amsterdam’s Java Island in the city’s


ON STAGE An elaborate and ongoing programme of theme based performances, projects and exhibitions was accessible for a wide audience on stages throughout the city and beyond. Some of the programmes were especially commissioned by Europe by People, while other performances and exhibitions were included because of the way they fitted into our vision.

BRUSSELS In Brussels, Europe by People presented a selection of Dutch artists, theatre makers, dancers, designers, and programme makers, who all showed a great sense of active social involvement in their work. They shared their views on the future of Europe in performances, projects and exhibitions.

INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

NEW NARRATIVES © BOZAR PHOTOGRAPHY

The artists involved showed their views on contemporary and future Europe, in words, images, plays, dance and music. In May and June the programme reached its climax – FabCity buzzed with creative energy, while in the rest of the country several associated cultural activities took place.

What role does art have in defining the European identity? How can artists help us understand Europe better? How does the generation of young makers handle social issues like migration, privacy, sustainability, urban development, social innovation and international conflicts? Most of the programmes were accessible to the audience, and the ones that weren’t were made visible on alternative platforms, both off and online. 19

WUNDERBAUM © PHOTO BY ANKE TEUNISSEN

Off campus hundreds of students worked together in multidisciplinary teams to research transformational issues in eleven study areas across Amsterdam. The teams investigated concerns and issues which are not unique to Amsterdam but are happening in cities all over Europe. Together they developed creative and sustainable solutions to tackle these problems. Students worked on-site in the study areas, doing fieldwork and talking to stakeholders. In the Learning Lab at FabCity, they met with peers to exchange knowledge and showcase their results. The participants came from various educational backgrounds, including art and technology academics, universities and vocational colleges.


SPEECH OF MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS BERT KOENDERS AT THE OPENING OF THE NEW EUROPE CITY MAKERS SUMMIT IN AMSTERDAM, MAY 27

INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Europe is not Brussels; it’s people like you.’

© MICHIEL LANDEWEERD

BERT KOENDERS MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

political commitments are not sufficient. We need your involvement. We also need openness. This means transparent political decisions, reached through dialogue. Third, we need to strengthen ways to involve citizens and civil society directly, in the decision-making process. Citizens of Europe have the right to expect effective European responses. But we can’t expect Brussels to create heaven on earth for us.

‘Europe is only Europe because of its people. People full of everyday goodness, decency and common sense. (…) make the European Union relevant people’s lives, it needs to produce results. achieve that, we need above all to follow up what we’ve agreed. But for a liveable future, 21

To to To on


SPEECH BY MINISTER OF EDUCATION, CULTURE AND SCIENCE JET BUSSEMAKER AT THE OPENING OF FABCITY, 11 APRIL

INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© ANKE TEUNISSEN

JET BUSSEMAKER MINISTEROF EDUCATION, CULTUREAND SCIENCE

from well-trodden paths offers unexpected new insights. It put emphasis on the challenges facing Europe nowadays, with culture as a means for raising questions, seeking confrontations and enable unexpected connections. A very nice example is FabCity, a temporary living lab for our future city. Here people experiment with the imaginaries of the ideal city, and this is how the ideal turns into reality. By designing, building and doing research on the ideal city, which does not exist as such today, other people will start sharing these urban imaginaries. By imagining the future it can become reality.’

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‘Europe by People has started from the conviction that dialogue is stronger than debate, diversity stimulates the creative processes and straying


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‘The future is to the smart city, however only when a responsible city government cares for a level playing field in which all citizens and companies can manifest themselves socially and economically. This requires technology that is inclusive.

Only by fully tapping into the innovative potential of all its inhabitants can Amsterdam create a flourishing society for all. This is the real objective for Amsterdam: to accelerate its assets within the context of the quadruple helix of entrepreneurs, academics, politicians and students.’

© ANKE TEUNISSEN

MAYOR OF AMSTERDAM EBERHARD VAN DER LAAN ON AMSTERDAM INNOVATION CAPITAL 2016

INTRODUCTION

EBERHARD VAN DER LAAN MAYOR OF AMSTERDAM

(…) In this new transitory and innovative city lies an urge to provide feedback to citizens on experimentations and prototypes; living labs are prominent and anyone can contribute - the city belongs to everyone. (…)


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© PHILE DEPREZ

INTRODUCTION


Even though I sometimes would rather be a scared, tunnelvisioned, I-only-care-about-myself-andthe-small-circle-around-me standard piglet and even more rarely a power-hungry, fuck the world, I-want-more-more-more boss piglet, I am not.

INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

For the project In Search Of Europe, I travelled 17 cities in 8 countries in 30 days and interviewed more than 20 young creative professionals who are trying to improve the society they live. There is a new generation awakening in Europe and they are ready to fight for change. Professor Trapman of the Erasmus University in Rotterdam said people will never change in essence, evilness and greediness will never disappear and it’s our duty to offer a counterweight. There are three types of people Trapman said: the destructive ones, the indifferent and afraid ones, and those that want to improve. I’d like to point out every person is all three, but it’s about the leading attitude. In my theatre show ‘Us Pigland’ I spoke about the boss piglets that can suckle from the first nipples, the standard piglets that drank from the middle nipples and the specials that got the rest in the back. All three types of people will always exist and they keep each other balanced.

I noticed that the battles of all these creators I met, no matter how different they are, share some common elements. Creators strive to create a society rather than a better society per se. I quote Simon Allemeersch, who we spoke to in Ghent. He literally said: I don’t want to create a better society; I want to create a society. Society is a moment in which people meet each other and share or show their story. 29

TEXT: LUCAS DE MAN

© PHILE DEPREZ

THE 5 BATTLES OF A CREATIVE GENERATION

I have the necessity not to surrender to the inequality and loneliness and unfairness of the world even though I know that it won’t go away and that this side I have doesn’t make me ‘better’ than every other. It’s just a part of me.Apparently I am somebody with a cause and I follow this cause as intensely and disciplined and vulnerable as I can. Sometimes I fail because the other piglets are in me too, but I do my best alone and together. The beauty is there are people like me all over the world. The people I spoke to also try to carry out their necessity to cause something. We, piglets from the back nipples, we creators, we share a battle and that makes the loneliness bearable: it connects us and allows us to carry on.


INTRODUCTION THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

The last battle is that of the local and the global. What we do locally reverberates globally. The local is necessary to realize the sense of belonging, while the global ensures the work itself is recognized. Social media can and must be used to offer a counter measure to globalization (that centers mostly around the economy) by presenting the power of the human and local to the world. The battle of the creators who are everywhere and in all layers of society is a difficult and everlasting but essential battle. It is of the utmost importance that they meet every now and then, to share and exchange their ideas and visions. Because the most difficult and yet the most important is to never give up the battle.

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Giorgio de Finis’ vision was to open a museum for modern art in an old salami factory in Rome occupied by 200 immigrants and outcasts. 300 top artists from Europe donated 400 art pieces. People can visit the museum and everyone works and cooperates for free; Giorgio is not making any money and even moved back to his mother’s house. I was touched walking around there, by his vision on how art can really cause something. He said: ‘Art gives these refugees a horizon, imagination, dreams, collaboration and encounters. And people would never come to the ghetto’s of Rome for a social project, but they will come for modern art. Now they meet the residents and find the human aspect in the immensely complicated problem of legal outcasts of society. Also, 200 refugees thrown out on the streets might lead to a small article in the newspaper.

But destroying 400 works of art, that’s barbaric, that is impossible.’ The fourth battle is the one of continuous kicking, biting, questioning, doubting and examining the general way things are. Real change comes from ‘confrontation’ with what is, the ruling system. Creators are the best people to do this because we are not bound to geographical, social, economical, political or other borders. We can and must, in the spirit of Erasmus, continuously and always actively (re) think and question what is happening around us. And by that I mean creators should not only think but also act, through their art. This active (re)thinking and questioning keeps the world in at least some sort of balance. © PHILE DEPREZ

Simon spoke about the necessity for a sense of belonging that is essential for a community. The second element creators everywhere share is the battle for a true public space, places of common ground. The idea of the world as something that belongs to us all has been increasingly challenged throughout history. In the 13th century the Chapter of the Forrest, declared that the forest was for all people. But in the centuries that followed more and more forest became the private property of less and less people. Thomas More revolted against this process in his Utopia. Reclaiming the common grounds, the public space is the other European battle we must fight today. A third battle is the one of having, commutating and sharing of visions. Visions are not fleeting, absurd dreams. Visions are concrete, can be executed, are achievable dreams that allow us to look beyond tomorrow. They provide insight as well as a horizon. And without a horizon you’re staring at a wall. And walls are terrifying.


SIX MONTHS OF ARTS AND DESIGN

JANUARY


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© MAARTJE STRIJBIS

JANUARY


The opening ceremony was held on 4 January at The Wall, which encloses the Marine Establishment at the Kattenburgerstraat in Amsterdam. Throughout January, The Wall exhibited Robin de Puy’s Amsterdam Portraits. Over the next six months, a group of young European artists and thinkers, New Europeans, used The Wall as a canvas to explore Europe’s future. They were joined by artists including Dina Danish, Henk Wildschut, David Bade, Raimond Wouda and Paul Faassen. The New Europeans were responsible for the opening ceremony which included a plastic pigeon, white scarves and a ukelele. They explained their choice of attributes as follows: ‘The pigeon is the dove’s

The white scarves were inspired by traditional European clothing, but they also gave a ceremonial and almost religious dimension to the ceremony, thus heightening the contrast with the sillier elements of the performance. Even so, they had a remarkable unifying effect, through the scarves we were welcoming the politicians, not excluding them. White was also for Provo, this being the colour that their policies were branded with. Speaking of whom, the smoke billowing from behind the ministers paralleled the smoke bombs released by Provo during the coronation of Queen Beatrix, it shows how things have changed that we were sharing a stage with the politicians this time. The ukulele is too small to be taken seriously.

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Dutch Minister of Foreign Affairs Bert Koenders, in the presence of Amsterdam Mayor Eberhard van der Laan, opened Europe by People, the official cultural programme accompanying the Dutch Presidency of the Council of the European Union. It started with art project The Wall.

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TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ

© MAARTJE STRIJBIS

KICK–OFF THE WALL

less appreciated cousin. But it’s the bird of the city, the bird of the people and it’s the bird we see all the time, in short, it’s the bird of everyday life. Being plastic made it all the more effective, the foreign minister gestured for it to fly away but could not consummate this symbolic gesture, having to hold onto the everyday bird rather than absentmindedly throwing it away.


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© PHOTO BY ERIK BORST

JANUARY


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Over a six-month period a group of 12 young Europeans co-created a test site in Amsterdam with artistic interventions and a cultural programme. Right at The Wall that surrounds the area where the official EU-meetings took place. New Europeans continues online, leaving room for input of the audience as well as stories from elsewhere in Europe.

Š PHOTO BY PAOLO PATELLI

NEW EUROPEANS TESTSITE FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

New Europeans is a test site for everyday life in Europe. In these six months they created alternative scenarios for the future of the continent, asked themselves how we would want to live together and discovered the values we share with others across Europe. New Europeans stand for a Europe by people. A Europe of doing, gathering, and sharing. One in which people have more in common than a yellow-starred blue flag. A Europe in which we deal with conflict by connecting personally, by testing new forms of co-existence. In an ever-changing Europe, we share values, rituals and dreams rather than borders and institutions.


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© PHOTO BY JITSKE SCHOLS

JANUARY


TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ

Commissioned by Europe by People, the young photographer was the first artist to cover the huge billboards at the Wall. She filled them with a series of group portraits, all made in Amsterdam. The series showed the diversity of the Dutch capital, which harbours some 180 different nationalities, more or less living peacefully next to each other, making it a true European, cosmopolitan city.

The exhibition showcased some familiar faces for those frequenting the glamorous night life of the capital as well as sportteams, civil servants, security guards etc.

JANUARY

Robin de Puy graduated from the Fotoacademie Rotterdam in 2009. She subsequently won the Photo Academy Award 2009 and was nominated for various photography prizes. In 2014 she won the National Portrait Prize. And in 2016 she was declared “fotograaf des vaderlands”. Her work has been published in a number of national and international magazines, including New York Magazine, Bloomberg Business Week, ELLE, L’Officiel, Volkskrant and many more. 45

Photographer Robin de Puy made cultural headlines with a series of portraits shot on her 10.000 kilometre road trip through the USA, in 2015. The series ‘If this is true… I’ll never have to leave home again’, resulted in an exhibition, a photo book and a documentary.

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© PHOTO BY JITSKE SCHOLS

AMSTERDAM PORTRAITS BY ROBIN DE PUY

About making portraits the artist said in an online diary: ‘With my portraits, I create a world of my own, in which I don’t stand out. And I communicate through these portraits.’ And: ‘My photography is not only about how I take a picture of someone, but also about the one I take a picture of.’


JANUARY

The Presidency of the Council of the European Union changes twice a year between EU member states. During this half year, the standing EU President redesigns a number of spaces in the building of the European Council: the Justus Lipsius in Brussels.

In contrast, this project aimed to look at Europe. Through three interventions - in different shades of blue - the project tried to connect the inner world of the Council with the Europe that lies beyond the walls of the building.

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

TEXT: XML AND JURGEN BEY

The typical approach to these designs is ‘nation branding’; the type of furniture and exhibitions in the atrium, foyer and presidential chambers in the building change nationality twice a year. Accordingly, the interior of the building of the European Council is a consecutive celebration of specific national identities. Paradoxically, this practice of focusing on national identities actually keeps Europe itself out of view.

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SEEING EUROPE ATRIUM JUSTUS LIPSIUS BUILDING © XML AND JURGEN BEY

DESIGN FOR JUSTUS LIPSIUS BUILDING BY XML AND JURGEN BEY


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JUSTUS LIPSIUS COLLAGE ATRIUM © XML AND JURGEN BEY

JANUARY


The exchange of ideas is at the heart of politics. The architecture in which this exchange takes place has a powerful impact on the type of conversation. The design of XML and Bey for the Presidential Chambers offers multiple seating arrangements. Government leaders can change positions between group settings or bilateral talks, and can choose sides on opposing benches or have a dialogue in a more informal setting. 2. FOYER: EUROPEAN WATERBAR The Justus Lipsius is essentially an office building. Using a ‘tool’ that can be found in almost any office space in Europe - a watercooler - this design for the foyer aimed to create an informal open meeting place in the building. The water bar offered users water from all 28 European member states, organised in one long zig-zag element. Through this universal element – water – the bar playfully provoked questions of national and shared identity.

JANUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

3. PRESIDENTIAL CHAMBERS: UNITED IN DIVERSITY

At first, the meeting landscape appeared to be a single element, but on closer inspection, the element was composed of 28 different unique pieces, one for each EU member state. Following Europe’s unofficial subtext of ‘unity in diversity’, together they formed a landscape. After the Dutch Presidency, the 28 individual pieces were shipped to the 28 EU-members. An impression of these installations was exhibited at BOZAR in Brussels from April till May 2016. 51

WATERBAR FOYER JUSTUS LIPSIUS BUILDING © XML AND JURGEN BEY

The floor of the atrium was covered with a giant carpet of blue artificial grass. On first sight, the ‘European blue’-colour of the floor turned the atrium into an iconic European square. By hanging a camera from the roof of the atrium, the blue floor gained depth as a blue screen, turning the atrium into a canvas for artists. Another screen showed the digitally transformed European squares on the ‘floor’: interactive installations and graphic design revealing the depth and diversity of the European blue.

UNITY IN DIVERSITY PRESIDENTIAL CHAMBERS JUSTUS LIPSIUS BUILDING © XML AND JURGEN BEY

1. ATRIUM: SEEING EUROPE


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KHADIJA MASSAOUDI ON STAGE

WRITER, JOURNALIST AND THEATRE MAKER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘There are two words that are central in my work. Love and freedom. To be who I want to be and to do what I want to do. With lots of love. Unfortunately, as a creator you’re not always free to create. Mostly because of the lack of money. And I don’t have the vision of the future of the arts sector. But even if it’s difficult a real artist will go on without fear and with lots of creative hunger and fighting spirit. Human beings with similar or the opposite work background should connect more. Strenghten and accept each other despite or thanks to the differences. My motto is ‘You have something I don’t have, and I have something you don’t have. TOGETHER we can make something beautiful.’

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© JOEL FRIJTHOFF

ART, DESIGN AND SOCIETY #1 — INTERRUPTING THE CITY ≥ 7 JANUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


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MAARTEN HAJER ON STAGE

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

PROFESSOR URBAN FUTURES & CHIEF CURATOR IABR 2016

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‘Urban future is all about imaginaries. We cannot know the future, therefore we have to use the creative minds of science fiction makers, novelists and poets. If we want to be in the position to organise the future of our cities for ourselves, we need to be more imaginative than we are now. We need to reinvent the language to say what we think are the qualities of those cities. And we need the images to show what we really want from that city. And create examples, positive ideals, that can give people the confidence that they can do that too.’

BOOK COVER,‘SMART ABOUT CITIES’

ART, DESIGN AND SOCIETY #1 — INTERRUPTING THE CITY ≥ 7 JANUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


JIHAD — DE VOORSTELLING ≥ 25 JANUARY ≥ THEATER DE MEERVAART ‘We will never be perceived as natives, not even within five generations. We’ve always been a problem in the eyes of the people: media, teachers - everybody. But is this really true? Yes, it is. At first, we were an error in the statistics; we never should have been born here. Our parents should have returned to their home countries, after working their backs to the bone in the factories. Later, there was the problem of the integration. After that, the problem of the second generation Muslims. They will always be calling us names: scientific names, so we will always be distinguished from the others. We will always be a problem. Only the name of the problem will change over time. That’s all. So, no. I’m not homesick.’

ACTORS JIHAD

JANUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© SANNE PEPER

ON STAGE

57

SAMAN AMINI / MAJD MARDO / CHEMS EDDINE AMAR


CO-AUTHOR THE FLEXIBLE CITY

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘The future of everyday living will be different and the same. As it has also been in the past with shifts from a production to a service based economy, resulting in more wealth, leisure time and stimulating emancipation. Again we are at a shift. This time from a service economy to a network economy. On the one hand traditional jobs at large organisations are disappearing, on the other hand small scale self employment is on the rise. No one knows how the new balance between private live and work will exactly be in the future and what effects this new shift will have. But eternal values like family, friendship and purpose will remain important. As will eternal threats like war, hunger and social exclusion.’

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THE FLEXIBLE CITY — SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS FOR A EUROPE IN TRANSITION #1 ≥ JANUARY – MAY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

FROM ‘THE FLEXIBLE CITY, SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS FOR A EUROPE IN TRANSITION’ © TOM BERGEVOET EN MAARTEN VAN TUIJL

ON STAGE

JANUARY

MAARTEN VAN TUIJL


FESTIVAL CONTACT — FIVE QUESTIONS YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO ASK A TERRORIST ≥ 9 JANUARY ≥ THEATER DE MEERVAART ‘I wish that the pointing finger, the one that is so often used to blame “The Other” will turn itself backwards. This will be “I feel”, a remedy for the time we live in.’

STORY– TELLER

JANUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

ON STAGE

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FIVE QUESTIONS YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO ASK A TERRORIST © MARC ROODHART

RAPHAEL RODAN


‘Breaking borders is not about taking away borders it is about acknowledging borders. About being aware of the differences, loving the differences, looking at each other coming from all these different countries and backgrounds and learning from them, absorbing them and then transforming them into something you are, something closer to you. That is my personal experience in living in many different countries in Europe; all the countries leave some form of sediment in my persona and we are all people, especially the young artists here today, that are formed by layers of sediment of other artists, of other forms of art. This is my message to you today: breaking borders is not about taking away borders.’

VICE-PRESIDENT EUROPEAN COMMISSION

JANUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

EUROSONIC NOORDERSLAG — EUROPEAN BORDER BREAKERS AWARD 2016 ≥ 13 JANUARY ≥ GRONINGEN

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ON STAGE

EUROSONIC NOORDERSLAG EUROPEAN BORDER BREAKERS AWARDS 2016 FRANS TIMMERMANS © JORN BAARS

FRANS TIMMERMANS


JANUARY

PASCAL GIELEN ON STAGE

DIRECTOR RESEARCH CENTER ARTS IN SOCIETY

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘Today, the cities are organised in a way that makes us stay in our adolescence. We safeguard our own identity and stick with our own principles. We need places where we can get into conflict in a safe way. I can think of a completely other kind of city where people develop their own space under their own conditions. The commons give us freedom and tools to raise our voices. We don’t need fixed identity, but we need to become citizens to develop their identity. Art feeds this development.’

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BOOK COVER, ‘INTERRUPTING THE THE CITY’

ART, DESIGN AND SOCIETY #1 — INTERRUPTING THE CITY ≥ 7 JANUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


JANUARY

DAVE HAKKENS

DESIGNER

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‘The Future of Everyday Living is living life without worrying about the damage you might do to your environment. Everything you use, eat, do, and consume should be made in a way that it doesn’t harm the ecosystem you live in. It’s still very abstract, but getting more and more clear as years pass. Not because I get smarter or I’ve developed myself. But because (luckily) the world is moving towards this direction and more and more initiatives like this pop-up. Making it every time a bit easier to envision the future.’

© DAVE HAKKENS

THE CIRCULAR CITY #28 - THE PLASTIC ERA ≥ 26 JANUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

ON STAGE


JANUARY

FRANCESCA MIAZZO ON STAGE

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘The future of everyday living begins and ends with people: grounding city making approaches in co-creational initiatives based on collective urban process management. Cross-sector approaches to accelerate integration of circular practices in cities, developing a new level of collective socio-spatial urban ownership amongst all. We see such stimulation through our own practise. By proposing a set of tools and strategies to enact a wider spatial collective ownership, we see the future of everyday living bringing the discourse of circular city making from niche to mainstream – showing how to better implement people- centered initiatives around socio-spatial circular development.’

DIRECTOR CITIES & WASTED PROJECT

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PLASTIC RACE JAVA-KNSM © WASTEDLAB

THE CIRCULAR CITY #28 — THE PLASTIC ERA ≥ 26 JANUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


FRASCATI ISSUES

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘Are we heading for Orwell’s 1984? Should we rise up and rebel? The attacks in Paris and in other cities have given the debate on privacy a new twist. It is not individual freedom that is in the driving seat, but security. Greater powers for the police and security services are supposed to ensure that terrorists are intercepted in time, making the world a safer place. But does this approach add up? What if our data got into the hands of these very terrorists – or of a regime with shady intentions? The End of Privacy asked the question what it would mean if, in 20 years’ time, privacy were a concept consigned to the past.’

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FRASCATI ISSUES — THE END OF PRIVACY ≥ 13 - 16 JANUARY ≥ FRASCATI THEATER

THE END OF PRIVACY_FRASCATI ISSUES © DE DESIGNPOLITIE

ON STAGE

JANUARY

THE END OF PRIVACY


AMSTERDAM PORTRAITS

BY ROBIN DE PUY


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JANUARY


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FEBRUARY


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Y, DISCOVERY OF HEAVEN © MICHAL HAN OVSK´

FEBRUARY


Explicitly or implicitly, they presented their vision of Europe in their performances, projects and exhibitions, invoking a better understanding of Europe as well as new insights into the role of art in defining a European identity. A number of projects and performances emerged from the EU2016 Creative Challenge Call. Through a range of national and European networks, European creatives from the younger generation were asked to respond to the urgent issues and major developments of our time.

FEBRUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

European society is changing rapidly. To many artists and thinkers, this time of transition is an important source of inspiration. Europe by People, On Stage presented a selection of artists, theatre-makers, dancers, designers, choreographers and programme makers who actively respond to current social issues in their work.

Europe by People, On Stage, was set up as a multi-tiered programme. There were performances, projects, exhibitions and debates in Amsterdam as well as further afield. The programme included performances and projects that emerged from the boot camp as well as performances and programmes proposed by external arts organisations and selected because of their connection with the themes explored by Europe by People. The On Stage programme continued from January until the end of June. 93

TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ

SINEFORMA Š PHOTO BY ANKE TEUNISSEN

ON STAGE

Subsequently, programmes, projects and exhibitions by Dutch and European artists from various arts disciplines were reviewed to determine whether they touched on these urgent issues. From a total of circa 150 entries from the Netherlands and other European countries, around twenty projects were selected for the boot camp, where creatives from various countries collaborated on developing their projects. In the end, half of them were selected and included in the programme.


It will not be achieved overnight. It will require interest and real concern. We must meet the other with empathy. And when we go abroad, we need to keep an open mind and not bother too much about giving up some of the customs of home. Only then may we learn to truly appreciate the beautiful diversity of Europe’s countries and ways of life. I know I would be sorry to see this diversity disappear for the sake of commercial gain.’

FEBRUARY 95

Ever wondered what people crossings streets throughout Europe look like? Maybe not, but Dutch photographer Poike Stomps did. He set out on a journey across Europe and captured the crowds getting from one side of the street to the other, right after that traffic light finally jumped to green. From Stockholm to Sofia, from Valetta to Vilnius and from Reykjavik to Rome, he managed to freeze the rhythm of the city in each of the 42 European capital cities. Not only do these images portray everyday street life across Europe, they also show the various cultures, while at the same time illustrating the continent-wide similarities. Stomps: ‘I discovered that even by watching people traverse the street we may

BUKAREST CROSSING EUROPE © POINKE STOMPS

TEXT: MARK MINKJAN

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

CROSSING EUROPE BY POIKE STOMPS

find that what makes us Europeans together is as much our similarities as our differences.’ Photographing European crossings also made Stomps think about the European Dream: ‘Europe as an idea could be realised, but it will require a great deal of effort.


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THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

NOBODY HOME BY DARIA BUKVI´ C © CASPER KOSTER

FEBRUARY


NOBODY HOME BY DARIA BUKVI´ C © CASPER KOSTER

Belgian writer Ismaël Saidi laid the foundations for this production. He himself was recruited in the past to fight in Afghanistan. This performance touched audiences everywhere because it combines both humour and tragedy. It especially appealed to young people and gave room to debates about these taboos.

FEBRUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

In 1989, four children are born in safety. One of them grows up in Iran, one in Syria and two in Bosnia. Eleven years on, all four have fled their native countries with their families and ended up in the Netherlands. In 2009, they become fellow students at Maastricht drama school and five years later they tell their incredible life stories on stage in their performance Nobody Home.

In 2016, she also staged her new performance “Jihad - de voorstelling”, as part of Europe by People. In this play, three friends are on their way to Syria to join the jihadists. During this journey, they discover each other’s motifs, as they hardly know each other apart from their time at the mosque. In Syria, the situation they encounter is far less idyllic than they expected. They realise that what they’ve been told through social media and hate mongers is not all true. The battle against the non-believers is really a battle against people like themselves. And the three friends just serve as cannon fodder.

Jihad was performed by Saman Amini, Majd Mardo, Chems Eddine Amar and Sahand Sahebdivani, who was responsible for the music. Both productions were touring throughout the Netherlands during the presidency.

99

NOBODY HOME & JIHAD DE VOORSTELLING BY DARIA BUKVIC´

Theatre maker Daria Bukvic ´ was one of these children. Together with the other three, and their families, she went in search of their roots. In the last twenty years, refugee policy in the Netherlands has changed radically; the dynamics between ‘us’ and ‘them’ is constantly changing according to current trends and events. Bukvic ´ has created a moving, sharp and humorous portrait of a young generation of refugees.


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THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© VERA DUIVENVOORDEN

FEBRUARY


FEBRUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© PHOTO BY HANS BODDEKE

IN LIMBO EMBASSY BY MANON VAN HOECKEL Initiated by Eindhoven Design Academy graduate, Manon van Hoeckel, In Limbo Embassy is a travelling office that aims to facilitate open discussion around immigration in the Netherlands. By repurposing a wooden trailer she has created an embassy for the undocumented: a neutral meeting place where migrants and refugees who are caught in legal limbo can adopt the role of ambassadors and represent themselves as they engage in direct interaction with citizens and explain their plight.

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TEXT: ANDREEA BREAZU / NEW EUROPEANS


IN LIMBO EMBASSY LETTERS

© PHOTO BY ERIK BORST

And so, to get their collective voice across the wall, they designed and installed three mailboxes along Kattenburgerstraat, providing a standard letter in support of undocumented migrants that could be signed and posted on the spot. Using symbols of flight – a carrier pigeon, a plane and a sling, they tried to convey the idea of transcending barriers.

FEBRUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Even though the New Europeans work site was meters away from the place where the EU officials met, they held no special privileges or easy access to the other side. There was no denying that there was a brick wall between them.

105

After a conversation about this initiative at The Wall, the New Europeans felt compelled to ask: ‘What can I do?’ It’s a simple question that does not have a simple answer. Together, they decided to offer one such answer. They resorted to an old democratic practice: sending letters, signed by citizens, to the Dutch authorities pleading for this situation to be resolved and the human rights of migrants in limbo to be respected.


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© ALEXANDER POPELIER

© ALEXANDER POPELIER

FEBRUARY


FEBRUARY

SOCRATES SCHOUTEN ‘The past decades have seen a gradual strengthening of economic thinking in the policy arena. Despite crises hitting society one after another, the portfolio of economic solutions used for societal problems has become bigger and bigger. This one-sided approach has come to the detriment of solutions that are based on the philosophy of care, or rather, of the commons. We urgently need to redevelop that philosophy if we are to prevent a new round of crises of capital, society and ecology.’

RESEARCHER AND AUTHOR ON CIRCULAR ECONOMY

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

THE CIRCULAR CITY #30 ≥ 26 FEBRUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

109

FROM ‘DE CIRCULAIRE ECONOMIE’, ILLUSTRATION ‘PEER TO PEER SAMENLEVING’

ON STAGE


FEBRUARY

OLFA BEN ALI

VISUAL ARTIST

111

'My true dream is that the world will show more vulnerability. The beauty resides in our human weaknesses. If we allow ourself to show our fragility then we can change the way in which we think about borders openly.’

© OLFA BEN ALI

NEW AMSTERDAM ACADEMY #2 — ON THE MOVE ≥ 16 FEBRUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

ON STAGE


FEBRUARY

LARA STAAL AND MARIJN LEMS ‘Man’s position at the centre of the world is no longer tenable. Animals and the environment are staking their claims and technology is an increasingly autonomous entity. The process of a world changing ever more rapidly can bring both danger (ecological or humanitarian disasters that could become reality at any moment) and hope (utopian visions of the future in which technology produces a better version of mankind) – or, more probably, a diffuse combination of the two.’

PROGRAMMERS FESTIVAL SOMETHING RAW

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

EXIT MAN – SOMETHING RAW ≥ 9-13 FEBRUARY ≥ FRASCATI THEATER

113

SOMETHING RAW, EXIT MAN © BAS DE BROUWER

ON STAGE


FEBRUARY

LUC DELEAU SUMMER DANCE FOREVER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘Our dream is that one day people truly exchange on a cultural level, crossing artistic boundaries and aspiring to something that is bigger then themselves. Summer Dance Forever wants to contribute by offering a platform for people all around the world to share their art form; urban dance in its many shapes and forms.’

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SUMMER DANCE FOREVER ≥ 6 FEBRUARY ≥ PARADISO

SUMMER DANCE FOREVER © SASHA BOX

ON STAGE


FEBRUARY

MARCOS GARCIA ‘I can feel a trend happening. The field of the commons is a good place for experimenting with ways of how we cooperate, how we live together, how we design and build the cities we want to live in.’

MEDIALABPRADO

117

© MARCOS GARCIA

NEW DEMOCRACY #3 - THE CULTURAL COMMONS IN THE CITY ≥ 26 FEBRUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

ON STAGE


FEBRUARY

HISKO HULSING BRUSSELS

DUTCH PAINTER, ANIMATOR AND COMPOSER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING 119

‘Europe is being split into isolated groups that all seem to have their own information channels. The classical role of the press, trying to check facts and show multiple views on subjects, seems to be overruled by an abundance of disinformation and propaganda, being spread with the speed of light on websites and social media groups. This kind of facts-free information is the perfect recipe for the growth of extreme ideologies and further polarisation. My hope for the future of Europe is that people keep on informing themselves about the others, even if that information doesn’t fit their worldview.’

HISKO HUKLSING, ANIMA FESTIVAL © GILLES MOINS

INTERNATIONAL ANIMATION FILM FESTIVAL BRUSSELS ANIMA ≥ 5-14 FEBRUARY ≥ FLAGEY


GEORGE EN ERAN LOSSEN DE WERELDVREDE OP ≥ 3-4 FEBRUARY ≥ COMPAGNIETHEATER ‘If we can live together in peace in this three legged pants, than surely our countries and people should be able to do as well.’ (..) Before, a Jew could still look an Arab in the eye, and sure, they might think the other is a bastard and an oppressor. But there was also a chance that they looked the other in the eye and realised they were the same – a human being. (..) The beauty is, all that shit that’s going on over there in the Middle East, there’s nothing like that between the two of us.(…) The time is now. We have to the solution to all the conflicts in the world: World peace.’

ACTORS

FEBRUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

ON STAGE

121

GEORGOE EN ERAN LOSSEN WERELDVREDE OP © CURLY AND STRAIGHT

GEORGE ELIAS TOBAL AND ERAN BEN-MICHAËL


FEBRUARY

MICHEL BAUWENS ON STAGE

FOUNDER OF THE FOUNDATION FOR PEER-TO-PEER ALTERNATIVES

123

‘I believe in the concept of the partner state and in transforming public services to co-operative ideas. As is happening in Emilia Romagna where the state supplies funding, but the public health is in the hands of governments, doctors, patients and users. This resulted in a strong increase of the sense of involvement and satisfaction. The participating state needs to create conditions to enable people to be independent. We need a strong left movement to make this happen - capitalism isn’t the right system for using peer-to-peer. We need a transformation to a productive, civic society, which will contribute to commons, an ethical market and a partner state. To make peerto-peer blossom in a social just way.’

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

THE CIRCULAR CITY #30 - THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY ≥ 26 FEBRUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


SEVEN EASY BLANK WALL SOLUTIONS ≥ FEBRUARY - JUNE ≥ THE WALL ‘If there’s absolutely no way to tear down walls, you might as well just decorate them with things like a nice trompe-l’oeil, for instance.’

VISUAL ARTIST

FEBRUARY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

THE WALL

125

SEVEN EASY BLANK WALL SOLUTIONS © PHOTO BY CHARLOTT MARKUS

DINA DANISH


FEBRUARY

ANTONIJA EREMUT ERCEG ON STAGE

LOCAL GOVERNMENT, CITY OF SOLIN

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING 127

‘Trust is the most important thing for all the human relationships, both professional and personal. When you are developing a project and involve as much stakeholders and people possible, when you inform them timely and ask them to help you, you will definitely get a better project. People will gain a sense of ownership over the idea and are ready to really work for it.’

© ANTONIJA EREMUT ERCEG SOLIN

NEW DEMOCRACY #2 - CO-CREATING THE CITY ≥ 25 FEBRUARY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


CROSSING EUROPE

BY POIKE STOMPS


129

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

JANUARY


MARCH


MARCH THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© ILLUSTRATIONS CHARLIEN ADRIAENSSENS

From 21 to 24 March in Brussels, for four days, 17 authors from ten countries were considering the need and necessity of literature. Among the authors were Andrey Kurkov (UKR), Neel Mukherjee (UK), Jeroen Olyslaegers (BE), Gustaaf Peek (NL) and Cécile Wajsbrot (FR). They were there for the second Passa Porta Seminar, part of Literary Europe Live and Europe by People. During the second morning of the seminar, the horrible assaults in Brussels took place and two of the scheduled public meetings were cancelled. The events underlined the relevance of the debate at the seminar.

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PASSA PORTA SEMINAR NEED AND NECESSITY

On June 18, Perdu in Amsterdam staged some of the participating authors, Frederik Willem Daem, Jeroen Olyslaegers, Gustaaf Peek, Wytske Versteeg and Rebekka de Wit, in collaboration with international literature house Passa Porta and Europe by People. They recited texts and subsequently discussed the politics of writing in a debate. When is political literature necessary (and for whom) and when do you need to abstain from politicising the art? And how does this relate to the idea of an author pre-eminently being the one who can and should make his or her heard? And what happens when the writer’s theoretical considerations become a reality?


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MARCH


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THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

MARCH


Images EU Schools supported by the Mondriaan Fund and Fund Anna Cornelis.

MARCH THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

The bell rings, it's break time. Students rush out of classrooms, stairs get clogged and every corner of the building is being seized by groups of youngsters chatting, laughing and eating their sandwiches. These are images of high school still engraved in my memory. Photographer Raimond Wouda captured these very moments in his exhibition School, which was presented at The Wall. ‘School’ is a long-term project that Wouda initiated in 2003. At that time Dutch media focussed mainly on the negative side of high schools. ‘Articles about violence and poor quality of education were dominating the

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TEXT: TESSA DE VRIES

To the question if his experiences in high school are different from what he has seen in the European schools, Wouda answered: ‘It’s the same in many ways, but a lot has changed as well. The role of social media for example is fascinating. It plays such a large role in a student’s life nowadays; it’s their main source for news. Schools have to act upon this. But in general, students are still struggling with the same things as I used to do.’

LICEUM XXIV OGÓLNOKSZTAŁC CE IM C.K. NORWIDA © RAIMOND WOUDA

EU SCHOOLS BY RAIMOND WOUDA

newspapers.’ A very one-dimensional view in his opinion: ‘The role of social life was completely neglected, even though it’s such an important period of a young person’s life.’ A blind spot, he concluded, so he took action. Wouda approached each school almost as a micro cosmos. ‘It’s life in its extremes, it’s all about hormones, finding your own personality. That’s why it is so interesting.’He aims to ‘mind-map the lives of today’s youngsters, to reveal the main questions they’re dealing with, how they feel about their future and Europe’. In that sense Wouda takes on the role of an anthropologist: observing the social structures and unwritten rules within the borders of different European schools, but reflecting upon universal themes.


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NEW NARRATIVES © BOZAR PHOTOGRAPHY

MARCH


© XML

MARCH THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

NEW NARRATIVES FOR EUROPE

In the New Narratives exhibition a new generation of European artists reflected on issues such as immigration, the financial crisis and the ecological footprint of Europe. The work sprung from a series of roundtable discussions, which the European Commission organised in 23 countries. Artists, scientists, thinkers and policy makers shared thoughts and visions on the (near) future of Europe. This exhibition was about shared values, such as human dignity and human rights, as well as about economy and growth. A collection of new stories about Europe, a much needed necessity in today’s political climate.

Three exhibitions opened at BOZAR in Brussels for the EU presidency: ‘Theo van Doesburg, A New Expression of Life, Art and Technology’, ‘Rembrandt in black and white’ and ‘Imagine Europe In Search of New Narratives’. Sparking off each other in intriguing ways, each one of these exhibitions highlighted another aspect of the Netherlands’ innovative strength.

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TEXT: XML & JURGEN BEY


MARCH THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING 159

© XML

Part of the New Narratives exhibition was a room with work by the Sandberg Institute’s master programme Designing Democracy, directed by architecture office XML at the Marine Establishment in Amsterdam. In addition to the master students’ contributions, this exhibition also linked with XML and Jurgen Bey’s installations at the Council of Europe building.


MARCH THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© XML

In the room that Designing Democracy created for this exhibition seven student projects were presented. Each one addressed issues that confront the future of democracy: from the experimental medicine Anapatin - a pill to overcome voter fatigue - to transforming political speeches into Youtube-vlogging and the possibility of a democracy run by algorithms. Through free experimentation, irreverence, confrontation and humour, the student projects open up questions for the future of democracy in times of European crisis. Opening up these issues allows imagination into the dynamic that is necessary to overcome these issues collectively.

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© XML

In a time when confidence in democracy is under increasing pressure – from the Euro crisis to the US Elections and from the Occupy movement to the streets of Athens – the Sandberg master program ‘Designing Democracy’ investigates the role of art and design in reshaping democratic politics. Design used to be one of the self-evident tools to shape politics, but today the role of design in large-scale politics is either underestimated or controversial. Directed by architecture office XML, students of this interdisciplinary studio worked on the role of design in activating possible forms of collectivity – the quality or state of being collective  – and on developing new democratic imaginaries.


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NEW NARRATIVES FOR EUROPE © GD-DR

MARCH


MARCH

ON STAGE

‘In the future the issue on refugees will only polarise more, if the European Union continues to use its power to keep people out. In the history books this period will go down as a dark grey page. At the same time I think our youth is being milder and more relaxed about the future than the generation of the established powers. I only hope they will be able to turn thing around. The only solutions for problems like the refugee issue is making people feel responsible for the society they live in and its values.’

PHOTOGRAPHER AND WINNER OF ‘ZILVEREN CAMERA’ 2015

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

FOTOKRONIEK #30 ≥ 14 MARCH ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

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IRAQ SEPTEMBER, 2014. AT MOUNT SINJAR, A YAZEDI GIRL ESCAPED ISLAMIC STATE. SHE HAS BEEN USED AS A SEX SLAVE. SHE IS RECEIVED BY OTHER YAZEDI, WHO HAVE FLED INTO THE MOUNTAINS © EDDY VAN WESSEL

EDDY VAN WESSEL


MARCH

SUZY BLOK ON STAGE

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR DANSMAKERS AMSTERDAM

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‘Makers should stay true to themselves and to their honest urgency to create. Some will coincide with community aims and some may not it shouldn’t be a “must”. The basic question you should ask yourself is theTriple Why-question: Why do I want to make work? Why do I want to make this work? Why do I want to make it now?’

DANCER FERNANDO BELFIORE © GIANINNA URMENETA OTTIKER

THE RELEVANCE OF DANCE ≥ 11—13 MARCH ≥ AMSTERDAM


MARCH

MARIA TARANTINO ‘I went to look for what makes Brussels’ heart beat. For its sorrows and the things which will be on record within twenty years, things we don’t see now because of lack of perspective.I went looking for elements which are essential for a debate about Brussels: what are we building? What does the Brussels of tomorrow look like? Do we like what we see?’

FILMMAKER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

URBAN MOVIES #15 — OUR CITY ≥ 22 MARCH ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

169

MARIA TARANTINO, OUR CITY

ON STAGE


MARCH

ABELHADI BAADDI ON STAGE

THEATRE MAKER AND DANCER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘Everything revolves around meeting each other. Only then we realised that we have much more in common than we are different’

171

‘I know you can not imagine I left everything I owned for a better future. For security. Everything for my children. For me it is hard to understand you throw away this security for your dreams. While I threw away my dreams for security.’

IK GA OP REIS © STUDIO BREED

IK GA OP REIS EN NEEM MEE ≥ MARCH ≥ ERASMUSPARK


MARCH

BRUSSEL

‘I wonder about the renewed importance of psychedelics as we slip into an experience age. A yearning for connectivity with nature seems to be driving current trends in hallucinogens. How will these compounds shape the future of psychology, and what have they to teach us about compassion in a time often described as empathy deficit?’

PHOTOGRAPHER AND WINNER FOAM PRIZE 2016

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

FOAM TALENT SHOW ≥ MARCH - APRIL ≥ DE MARKTEN

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FOAM TALENT FROM THE SERIES UNDER THE INFLUENCE © DOMINIC HAWGOOD, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

DOMINIC HAWGOOD


MARCH

DAVID VAN REYBROUCK ON STAGE

CULTURAL HISTORIAN

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘Across Europe there is growing awareness that the current democratic system has reached its limits. There is a huge dislike of political parties and politicians. They are on the verge of drowning in a sea of suspicion. Small member states like Belgium, The Netherlands and Denmark, are starting to think about democracy in an innovative way. The larger member states are watching them closely before they renew themselves. The vertical system is falling apart.’

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‘I can imagine a future where compulsory citizen consultation is in place for important matters, much like jury service operates today. The government decides in certain cases that people will have to show up to contribute and they will be compensated for giving their opinion on key issues.’

BOOK COVER, ‘TEGEN VERKIEZINGEN’

NEW DEMOCRACY #4 - WHOSE EUROPE IS IT? ≥ 30 MARCH ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


MARCH

MARCO DONNARUMMA ‘Europe, in my view, has always been about constructively confronting the fear of others, other bodies and other ways of living, which is typical of the human being. Right now, the future does not look good, what is needed is radical reflection, brave political choices and, above all, the ability to acknowledge the importance of difference in our everyday living.’

ARTIST AND WRITER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

BIG, OPEN & BEAUTIFUL #9 — HACK THE BODY ≥ 23 MARCH ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

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MARCO DONNARUMMA, OMINOUS © UGO DALLA PORTA

ON STAGE


ARTIST AND CLIMATE DEFENDER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘We are killing the possibility of a decent future for all life forms. But there’s still hope. We can start building the alternatives for a long-term resilient and communal life beyond capitalism and outside of the structures that nourish domination. We need to start imagining how those alternative structures could look like in the broader sense. The future will only become better if we radically change the system.’

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NEW AMSTERDAM ACADEMY #3 — LET’S KEEP OUR HEADS ABOVE WATER ≥ 15 MARCH ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

TERESA BORASINO, GIVE A SHIT © DANIELA PAES LEÃO, 2015

ON STAGE

MARCH

TERESA BORASINO


MARCH

FRANCESCA RIZZETTO ‘We have to rethink the concept of a city as a whole. It should be a space where people can feel at home, where they can grow their plants and flowers. Where they integrate and the population develops consciousness about the place they are living in, so they can take responsibility.’

URBAN DESIGNER UNLAB

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© UNLAB

DUTCH DESIGN INSPIRES EUROPE: THE ITALIAN CHALLENGE ≥ 7 MARCH ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

ON STAGE


Theo van Doesburg (1883-1931)

ARTIST

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘There is an old and a new consciousness of the age. The old one is directed towards the individual. The new one is directed towards the universal. The struggle of the individual against the universal may be seen both in the world war and in modern art. In place of the dream, the future will put art on a scientific and technical basis.’

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NEW NARRATIVES FOR EUROPE — A NEW EXPRESSION OF LIFE, ART AND TECHNOLOGY ≥ MARCH — MAY ≥ BOZAR

THEO VAN DOESBURG, THE CONSTRUCTION OF SPACE-TIME III, 1924, PRIVATE COLLECTION

BRUSSELS

MARCH

THEO VAN DOESBURG


EU SCHOOLS BY RAIMOND WOUDA


APRIL


203

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

FABCITY © MAARTEN ESSENBURG

APRIL


FabCity generated a lot of attention from (international) media, Amsterdam citizens, educational institutions and politics. For a lot of the participants FabCity proved a useful stepping-stone; many of the initiatives were continued after it closed its gates at the end of June.

Together with Amsterdam Mayor Eberhard van der Laan (‘This is a city for citizens’), she visited some of the pavilions. They marvelled at the manufacturing plant of the Wikkelhouse and the 3D steel printing robot of MX3D, after which the mayor left and Bussemaker continued her tour, meeting participants and jumping on a Witkar for a short spin.

APRIL 205

‘This is the best the Netherlands has to offer.’ This is how minister Jet Bussemaker described FabCity at the official opening on 11 April. At the sun-drenched kick-off at the Head of Java Island, the minister couldn’t (and didn’t have to) kerb her enthusiasm.

© BOUDEWIJN BOLLMAN

TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

FABCITY KICK-OFF 11 WEEKS OF SHAPING THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

It was the start of 11 weeks of intense collaboration, research, education and actual fabrication, shaping the future of everyday living has started. There were 50 pavilions, among which several versions of tiny, self-sufficient houses; containers for 3D-printers - steel, plastic and concrete; places where solutions for excess water were shown; a bread-digester/stove for baking bread and sharing multi-cultural stories; a learning lab for sharing knowledge, research and experience; a multifunctional round stage for performances and debates and a greenhouse/ cafe where participants and visitors could get together for locally grown food and drinks.


APRIL THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Š FABCITY RESEARCHLAB

FABCITIES SELF-SUFFICIENT: LOCALLY PRODUCTIVE AND GLOBALLY CONNECTED

The Fab City is an international initiative started by IAAC, MIT's CBA, the Barcelona City Council and the Fab Foundation to develop locally productive and globally connected self-sufficient cities. The project is connected to the global Fab Lab (Fabrication Laboratory) Network and comprises an international think tank of civic leaders, makers, urbanists and innovators working on changing the paradigm of the current industrial economy where the city operates on a linear model of importing products and producing waste, to a spiral innovation ecosystem in which materials grow inside cities and information on how things are made circulates globally.

More than 200 years since the Industrial Revolution, global urbanisation keeps accelerating. United Nations projections indicate that 75% of the human population will be living in cities by 2050. Newly created cities and the urbanisation process in rural areas replicates a lifestyle based on consumerism and the linear economy, causing destructive social and economic impact, while compromising the ecological systems of the planet.

Fab City is about building a new economy based on distributed data and manufacturing infrastructure. In 2011 IAAC, the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms, the Fab Foundation and the Barcelona City Council launched the Fab City project at the FAB7 conference in Lima. In 2014 at FAB10 the mayor of Barcelona invited his colleagues around the world to join the Barcelona pledge: a countdown for cities to become at least 50% selfsufficient by 2054.

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TEXT: TOMAS DIEZ


The first city to become self-sufficient simultaneously increasing employment by creating opportunities through open innovation, and radically reducing carbon emissions by re-localising production - will lead the future of urban development globally. We have a unique opportunity to build cities from the ground up by synchronising philosophies, visions and objectives together with existing distributed innovation ecosystems, to consolidate and nurture a knowledge based economy that has been developed during the last decade around open source innovations, digital fabrication technologies and distributed digital networks in Fab Labs, Makerspaces and open communities. The Fab City is about radical transformation; it is about rethinking and changing our relationship with the material world, in order to continue to flourish on this planet.

APRIL THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

FAB CITY RESEARCH LAB, IAAC 2016, CONCEPT AND DIRECTION: TOMAS DIEZ, GRAPHIC DESIGN : MARIANA QUINTERO

We need to reinvent our cities and their relationship to people and nature by re-localising production, so that cities are generative rather than extractive, restorative rather than destructive, and empowering rather than alienating, where prosperity flourishes, and people have purposeful, meaningful work that they enjoy, that enables them to use their passion and talent. We need to recover the knowledge and capacity on how things are made in our cities, by connecting citizens with the advanced technologies that are transforming our everyday life.

The Fab City project will help civic leaders to develop locally productive cities in collaboration with local communities, companies and institutions, revitalising manufacturing infrastructure and incentivising a new economy. In this way, the citizens and the city are empowered to be the masters of their own destiny, their resilience is increased and a more ecological system is developed with movements of materials and associated energy consumption and carbon emissions typical of the current economy drastically reduced. In order for this to be possible, the city must be locally productive and globally connected to knowledge, economic and social networks, making cooperation between cities, citizens and knowledge centers the basis of the scientific knowledge.

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In 2015 in FAB11 at Boston, 7 new cities joined the Fab City project, including Boston, Cambridge, Ekurhuleni and Shenzhen. In 2016, Amsterdam city joined the program, and we expect new cities to commit to the Barcelona pledge at the FAB12 conference in Shenzhen, potentially: London, Copenhagen, Paris, Santiago de Chile, and more. The Fab City initiative is open for other cities, towns or communities to join in order to collectively build a more humane and habitable new world.


© EMMA ANDREETTI

Gascoland is a project by Cascoland: an international network of artists, architects, designers and performers sharing a fascination for interdisciplinary interventions in public space. Together they aim at a more ecological and socially sustainable society.

APRIL At FabCity they demonstrated the Gascoland ‘BreadDigester’, which turns surplus bread into biogas, used to fuel a bread oven. It connects issues like energy production and food preservation from surplus, the social aspects of cooking and eating together and the international sharing of knowledge, experience, and tastes. Cooks from very different cultures – like Morocco, Pakistan, Eritrea and Italy - showed traditional techniques of baking gas-saving bread (on the stove) and shared their preserved foods; all people with extraordinary stories. The project aimed to share the knowledge of the cooks with the public, as well as their stories. FabCity was also an opportunity for the cooks to extend their networks and develop their skills. The BreadDigester generated a lot of attention and after FabCity the project travelled to other places.

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TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© ANKE TEUNISSEN

GASCOLAND ‘BREADDIGESTER’ BY CASCOLAND


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THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

© CASCOLAND

PINKY PONY EXPRESS / ENKI ENERGY © ILLUSTRATION JORRIS VERBOON/ HET PAROOL

APRIL


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© ILLUSTRATIONS BY EMMA ANDREETTI

APRIL


YOUR FIRST TRIP TO CALAIS WAS IN 2005, AND SINCE THEN YOU’VE BEEN GOING REGULARLY. WHAT MADE YOU GO THERE IN THE FIRST PLACE AND WHY DID YOU KEEP GOING BACK? ‘I’ve always been interested in what I call secondary societies — people or situations which are in between two worlds. Illegal immigrants are the most visible people who are in between two worlds. And Calais was the place where they made a mark, they surfaced above the ground almost,

APRIL THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Henk Wildschut has been closely following the development, and the impending demolition, of the refugee camp in Calais for ten years. Taken individually, the photographs seem removed, distant from the subject they’re portraying, but together they are a moving testament to human endurance. During the opening, we had the privilege of asking Henk a few questions. Here are his answers.

‘No, this is totally unique, but I think we will see it more often in the future. As we all know the situation worsened last year, but still there were a lot of new developments. I saw it improve in the past year, because there was a lot of involvement on the part of the volunteers, like nothing I have seen in the past ten years since I have been following Calais. The immigrants build shelters in a very fast way, so they use branches and stuff from junk yards, they also go buy stuff. But suddenly something changed, people started bringing a lot of stuff, so all the volunteers had trucks full of stuff. There was one action after the festival season in Holland when they collected all the festival tents. I think only from Holland alone there was something like 500 cubic metres worth of goods went into Calais.

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TEXT: ELISA GRASSO & DEVIKA PARTIMAN / NEW EUROPEANS

THE CAMP IS WELL DEVELOPED, THERE’S A CHURCH, A MOSQUE, SHOPS, SHOWERS, A WAREHOUSE WHERE DONATIONS CAN BE DROPPED OFF. IS THIS A NORMAL DEVELOPMENT, IS IT HAPPENING IN CAMPS EVERYWHERE?

© PHOTO BY ANKE TEUNISSEN

CALAIS BY HENK WILDSCHUT

by building structures in the forest of Calais. Illegal immigration was really visible there, so that made me go back every time. To see what was going on in the world, you have to go to Calais.’


© PHOTO BY ANKE TEUNISSEN

But as I said, one of the most important reasons is they don’t want to. It’s not in their interest to be visible, because ultimately they want to enter England in an illegal way, they don’t want to get their picture everywhere. Now the images are so big, I can’t help but think, ‘my god, this guy will be so angry when he sees this photo.’

APRIL

‘Nothing. Everything you see in these images is gone. Except for the church, the church is still there.’ WHAT DOES THAT MEAN TO YOU? ‘Well, I knew when I started that it was going to end, it was inevitable. It only happened a little sooner than I expected. I was there last Saturday when the main street of the camp burnt down. It was a shock for me because I’d been taking a lot |of pictures of this street for a long time, and it just burnt down. By accident or on purpose, I don’t know, but the police and the demolition team let it burn; it saved them a lot of work. It was still smoking until the early morning when I asked someone, ‘what do you make of this,’ and all he said was ‘well, you know’ and shrugged. It was then that I realised they’re not attached to this place. The only reason they’re there is because they want to go to England; this place is temporary. The only ones who are sad are people like me and the volunteers, we are attached. I think that’s very interesting, it’s something I really appreciate about them because it also shows strength and power when you can just create something and leave it because you have a next goal. It’s only a step on their path.’

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘It’s because they don’t want to be photographed, that’s one very important reason. Another reason is my photographs are very distant from the subject. I want to leave it to the imagination, as to who built this, what kind of person is behind this. I want to trigger the imagination of the viewer. In my opinion, a portrait can sometimes be misleading. You can take a picture, and everybody will think, ‘oh, that’s so sad,’ but maybe it’s not true. Maybe somebody is happy, and it was the photographer who asked them, ‘please don’t look so happy.’ I always do it, when I do shoots for a magazine, I always ask people not to smile, because a smile isn’t a truthful moment, no one smiles the whole day. I think portraits are very complicated.

UNDERSTANDABLE. PART OF THE CAMP HAS BEEN BULLDOZED OVER IN THE LAST FEW WEEKS BY THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT BECAUSE THEY WANTED TO MOVE EVERYONE IN CONTAINERS. A LOT OF PEOPLE DIDN’T WANT TO MOVE BECAUSE THEY ALSO HAD TO REGISTER AND I ASSUME THEY WANTED TO REMAIN ILLEGALLY. WILL WE STILL FIND ANYTHING FROM YOUR PHOTOS THERE?

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IS THERE A REASON WHY THERE ARE NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE FEATURED IN YOUR PHOTOS AND NO PORTRAITS?


APRIL

HENK OVINK FABCITY

SPECIAL ENVOY FOR WATER AFFAIRS

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘The world has to step up for a five year trajectory of transformation, if we want to safeguard the future for the next generations and reach the pledged goals of Paris COP21 and the SDG's. Five years to change the world is the best opportunity we have for innovation, partnerships and capacity for all. For this we need a transformational approach where comprehensive long term strategies align with short term innovations, with inclusive partnerships among all stakeholders, transparency and accountability and capacity building through a programmatic approach. A design driven approach can help get us there if only we dare to start, test, and set aside our risk averse politics. We need to change on all levels, there is no other way!’

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HENK OVINK © OLIVIA LOCHER

INTRODUCTION WEEK STUDENT PROGRAMME — DAY #1 ≥ 11 APRIL ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


APRIL

EVA GLADEK

FOUNDER METABOLIC

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘Sustainability is one of the only passages to personal freedom in our society. It is an inspiring direction which we should embrace. We’re reinventing the structure our society has in a way it is beneficial to all us, and give us time and flexibility to work out of passion. A society where you don’t have to worry about food, energy water or basic expenses that ensure your life. You would work out of passion and interest. That’s what we are trying to achieve at large.’

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INTRODUCTION WEEK STUDENT PROGRAMME — DAY #1 ≥ 11 APRIL ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

DE CEUVEL© METABOLIC

FABCITY


APRIL

FRANK ALSEMA FABCITY

CITYMAKER AT LIVING LAB BUIKSLOTERHAM CIRCULAR

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘I do see CityLab Buiksloterham, the new working and living area of around 100 hectares in North Amsterdam, as the ideal location for playing with the principles of the Hackable City. To redefine urban transformation to more circular systems, where flows of energy, water, building and food are kept as short as possible. The ideal scale for experiments based on a Manifesto contributing to a more circular economy embedded in the discourse on future cities.’

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© THE HACKABLE CITY

CASE OWNER - STUDENT PROGRAMME ≥ 11 APRIL — 26 JUNE ≥ BUIKSLOTERHAM


APRIL

MARTIJN DE WAAL

WRITER AND RESEARCHER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘From Nextdoor to Facebook, from Uber to Airbnb, and from Tinder to Strava, all kinds of digital platforms have started to play an important part in the organisation of our everyday lives. Most of these platforms have been invented in Silicon Valley, funded by venture capitalists, and collect our data to make a profit for their shareholders. The challenge for the future, is to find ways to safeguard public values in a nascent European platform society, serving and empowering citizens.’

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FABCITY SUMMIT — EXPERT MEETING ≥ 20 APRIL ≥ LEARNING LAB

CITYMAKING, THE HACKABLE CITY © MARTIJN DE WAAL

FABCITY


APRIL

ANASTASIIA LIUBCHENKO ON STAGE

VISUAL ARTIST & PERFORMER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘Europe by People gave me chance to make two performances this year. As an artist I was more than ever inspired by the topic the Future of Everyday Living. All things around me which happened during the first six months of 2016 (lectures, workshops, and FabCity on Java Island) make me think about our daily living in long term perspective, and had a big influence on my art and personal life: We should do something all together!’

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© MIME WAVE

METAMORPHOSIS ≥ 19 — 21 APRIL ≥ TOLHUISTUIN


APRIL

MICHIEL SCHWARZ FABCITY

CULTURAL RESEARCHER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING 231

‘FabCity showed us the power of placemaking: connecting things and people, sharing knowhow, building community, and collectively creating places that are altogether more socially and environmentally sustainable. It inspired — in my vocabulary — to imagine everyday urban living in a sustainist mode: more circular, connected, collaborative, locally-rooted, human scale, and co-designed from the ground up. FabCity made me appreciate the cultural value of the ‘commons’, where civic communities of practice — rather then theories or top-down urban blueprints — are spearheading the future for sustainable and liveable cities. It’s sustainist design in the making.’

BOOK COVER, ‘A SUSTAINIST LEXICON’

INTRODUCTION WEEK STUDENT PROGRAMME — DAY #2 ≥ 12 APRIL ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


APRIL

MARLEEN STIKKER ‘FabCity shows the combination of the maker movement and circular economy is presenting solid alternatives that are ready to scale. The shared starting point is that we have to take responsibility for our own behaviour. We cannot wait for systems to change. We have to be the change. This Do It Ourselves, or rather Do It Together, mentality unleashes a powerful dynamic in society. It shows that civic movements are at the heart of change. We need an innovation paradigm shift. Not shareholders value but social value, open instead of closed, cooperative instead of competitive. Smart citizens instead of smart cities.’

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

INTRODUCTION WEEK STUDENT PROGRAMME — DAY #2 ≥ 12 APRIL, PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

DIRECTOR AND CO-FOUNDER OF WAAG SOCIETY

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SMART CITIZEN KIT © FAB LAB BARCELONA, 2014

FABCITY


APRIL

JOHN GRIN ON STAGE

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

PROFESSOR OF POLICY SCIENCE AT UNIVERSITY OF AMSTERDAM

235

‘There’s a new generation that likes to express themselves. If you want transition, you need to inspire those people. And then you can take all the thinking that’s already here and use it. But don’t make the mistake of thinking you don’t need a dialogue, thinking the elite, which I’m part of, knows best. You need a broad debate. And in this debate you also need political parties, who need to let go of old ideologies and old ways of thinking.’

© ANKE TEUNISSEN

CITY MAKERS SUMMIT — NEW DEMOCRACY AND THE CO-CITY ≥ 30 MAY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


APRIL

ANDREA VOETS ON STAGE

UNCONVENTIONAL HARPIST AND PROGRAMME MAKER

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

‘I think the one that I miss most is the feeling of being relaxed. But completely. Without having any in depth thoughts of “what are you going to do in the future”. You feel really comfortable, because it is always your home. This is what I miss most. And I think I'll keep on missing it for my whole life.’

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XENITIA © ANDREA VOETS

XENITIA ≥ 30 APRIL ≥ COMPAGNIETHEATER


APRIL

ARIE VAN ZIEL AND PETER JAN BROUWER

BIOMEILER

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‘Young children participating in a biomeiler design course said: “composting is the respiration of nature”. We believe good quality food is the foundation of a healthy society. Composting is the missing link in a circular approach to food production. It is not only the most logical way to solve current environmental problems, but also a tool for social cohesion in local communities. By embracing the biological cycle our current society can find space to breath again.’

BIOMEILER © NICOLE SANTÉ

BIOMEILER ≥ APRIL – JUNE ≥ FABCITY

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

FABCITY


CALAIS

BY HENK WILDSCHUT


241

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

JANUARY


MAY


FabCity showed a variety of self-sufficient, sustainable, mobile and smart houses - some tinier than others. The Heijmans One - developed by the international building company Heijmans contained solar panels, a battery and rainwater purifying technology. Sustainer Homes showed how obsolete sea containers could be turned into a self-sufficient home with solar panels, wind turbines and a circular water system. One of the smallest houses was Tiny Tim, made from (burnt) wood and built on three principles: mobile, autarchic and low budget. It also premiered the first water-purifying wall, based on different kinds of plants. In the last week of FabCity, the Tiny Tim team showed how an even smaller version of the home was easily constructed. More pioneering came from Woonpioniers, who developed the first biobased mobile house in the Netherlands, the Porta Palace. At FabCity it was used for workshops, but also to provide other participants with a roof over their head, like Florian Beukeboom, who was building a home entirely from waste building materials.

MAY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Š FINCH BUILDINGS B.V.

TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ

SELF-SUFFICIENT HOUSES

259

TINY HOUSES SMART LIVING AND WORKING IS THE NEW WAY TO DO

FabCity was all about creating a self-sufficient society and leading the way, by showing examples. A part of FabCity was actually off-grid, with tiny houses and mobile offices connected to a smart grid; a closed energy network for producing and consuming energy.


MAY At FabCity, Zown, part of energy provider Alliander, created a closed microgrid, connecting several pavilions as an example of energyexchange and as a research project to enhance and extend these kinds of grids. One of the energy producing participants was The Biomeiler - a large wooden barrel filled with woodchips and water, which was turning into compost releasing heat in the process, which can be used to heat buildings and water. And on the river IJ, surrounding FabCity, two solar panels were floating, courtesy by Sunfloat, who produces these much more efficient panels. At night, FabCity was illuminated by the special streetlights of Zumtobel, which were equipped with smart sensors, adjusting the light to the situation or need of its users.

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

WIKKELHOUSE © PHOTO BY NICOLE SANTÉ

ENERGY

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Another example of flexible housing was shown by the Wikkelhouse. Two prototypes were in use at FabCity, while in a giant hall on the premises the production of the cardboard elements was continuing. The huge truck with its cardboard roll and rotating mould caught a lot of attention. And then there were the charming offices of Kantoor Karavaan - small vintage caravans transformed on the spot - with the help of students, architects and technicians - into self-sustaining office units.

HEIJMANS ONE © PHOTO BY NICOLE SANTÉ

The luxurious apartments of Finch Buildings were also occupied - people were actually living and working in the modular containers, which are sustainable, healthy to live in and can be adjusted to owners housing wishes.


How do we collectively design our cities and communities to live environmentally and socially sustainable? The process of ‘placemaking’ connects the social to the physical and the ecological. By shifting our vantage point from ‘space’ to ‘place’, it recasts how we envisage the future of our living environment. In doing so it prompts us to re-think the future agenda for citizens, policy makers and entrepreneurs.

How might we design for urban life by connecting the “ecological” principles of the circular economy to the social sphere?

MAY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Circularity

Placemaking How might we shift our strategies from the planning of urban space to a civic design of sustainable and liveable places?

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DESIGN PRINCIPLES FOR SUSTAINABLE AND SELF SUFFICIENT FUTURE CITIES BY MICHIEL SCHWARZ

The Sustainist Design Principles provide students at FabCity in their research with a framework for re-envisaging and re-designing our civic ecosystems. In addition to placemaking, these principles also included: circular, local, connected, shared, human scaled and co-designed.


MAY How might we design communities that value nearness and local relationships?

How might we design urban innovations based on collaborative practices that favour sharing resources in an urban “commons” over private ownership and public authority governance?

Connectedness How might we design cities like living networks, valuing the power of connectivity and smart citizenship?

Proportionality How might we design liveable and sustainable neighbourhoods that value appropriate size over upscaling?

Co-design

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Commons

How might we organise the collective design of our living environments, with citizens rather than for citizens?

The sustainist design principles are based on ‘a Sustainist Lexicon’ (2016). Concept and text by Michiel Schwarz, Symbols Design by Joost Elffers

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Local


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THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

CITY MAKERS FROM ALL OVER EUROPE © MICHIEL LANDEWEERD

MAY


TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ In February, European City Makers met in Amsterdam for a pre-Summit, preparing for a massive meeting in May. This New Europe City Makers Summit was the most important moment for City Makers from all over Europe. Seven hundred City Makers, from 150 cities all over The Netherlands and Europe, came to Amsterdam for four days. The world is changing rapidly and even more so in its big cities. Universal problems concerning affordable housing, climate change, poverty, healthcare, food and energy manifest themselves more prominent and urgent in our exponentially growing cities. At the same time, this is where bottom-up solutions are being created and executed - by so called City Makers.

The summit officially took off with the launch of the first New Europe magazine. This edition contained articles written by City Makers from all over Europe. One of the articles called upon the ministers responsible for the Urban Agenda for the EU to add the so-called (Im)Pact of Amsterdam, initiated by the City Makers network, to their Pact of Amsterdam. The first copy of the magazine was handed over to Bert Koenders, minister of Foreign Affairs, and Nicolaas Beets, Special Envoy for the European Urban Agenda. Following, minister Koenders gave an inspiring speech, praising the power of the City Makers and calling them indispensable for Europe’s future. Subsequently, several City Makers took the stage to talk about their initiatives at home.

MAY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

NEW EUROPE MAGAZINE

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NEW EUROPE CITY MAKERS SUMMIT A CALL TO ACTION

The City Makers movement started in 2012 as an initiative of Pakhuis de Zwijger from Amsterdam with the first City Embassy in Berlin. It was the start of a European platform called New Europe, now consisting of 28 city embassies in all of the capitals of the EU-member states, representing hundreds of City Makers improving their cities by the power of bottom up initiatives. The movement actively links City Makers to the universal contemporary problems and connects them to governments on all levels in order to collaborate on creating the cities of the future: sustainable, self-sufficient, healthy, inclusive, save and clean. The first day of the City Makers Summit was all about meeting each other, the second about getting connected, the third day was about learning from each other and the final day was about taking action.


MAY CYCLING ACROSS AMSTERDAM

BUIKSLOTERHAM

On day 3, the City Makers cycled across Amsterdam to visit its most inspiring examples of social innovation and the thriving forces behind it. Simultaneously, the programme ‘We Make Europe: Cities and City Makers enhancing the (Im)Pact of Amsterdam’ was held at FabCity. A co-production of URBACT, Eutropian, Agora Europe, Pakhuis de Zwijger, the Committee of the Regions, ECF and EUROCITIES, to discuss the ‘Urban Agenda for the EU’. This agenda argues that the EU should do more to support European cities by working on better regulation, workable financial instruments and knowledge exchange between cities. The aim of this session was to connect the City Makers Movement to the Urban Agenda for the EU.

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Stories about design and architecture were told in Maastricht and Zaanstad. Talks about co-creation and democracy took place in Zwolle. Social cohesion was the topic of discussion in Lelystad. In The Hague, the focus was on greening the city. In Eindhoven, numerous upcoming incubators were visited. In Rotterdam the programme was curated by the re:Kreators network. Finally, the expedition in Utrecht went to the Campus Party and Vechtclub XL. Prominent participant on the last two mentioned expeditions was Markku Markkula, the President of the Committee of the Regions.

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On the second day, the most inspiring projects of eight Dutch cities were visited. Every city expedition had its own theme, from co-creation, transformation, creative industry to design and technology.

© MICHIEL LANDEWEERD

CITY EXPEDITIONS


THE CALL

The following day, New Europe project leader, Charlot Schans, and deputy mayor of Athens, Amalia Zepou, presented the City Makers Agenda. This call to action was part of the informal minister meeting on the Urban Agenda for the EU under presidency of Ronald Plasterk, minister of Internal Affairs. Parallel to this meeting hundreds of City Makers gathered at the Wall and in Pakhuis de Zwijger to connect.

The City Makers Call for Social Innovation and Collaborative City-Making, which should lead to actual measures in 2018, stated the following:

City Makers are the pioneers exploring, shaping and defining this new way of working.’ The European government was asked, among a list of other demands, to acknowledge the vital role of City Makers in sparking social innovation, to co-create the city with a multiplicity of stakeholders and to re-design democracy for more direct, inclusive and tailor-made decision-making.

WWW.DEZWIJGER.NL/SUMMIT

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‘The complex challenges of our time demand innovative solutions and above all, a new way of working. Urgent matters like climate change, increasing poverty and inequality, housing or food supply demand an approach characterised by experiments and integrated collaboration, rooted in ownership and participation of the city’s users.

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URBAN AGENDA FOR THE EU © EGBERT FRANSEN

Later that day, exiting news reached the City Makers; the ‘Urban Agenda for the EU’ was adopted and the contribution of the City Makers Movement would be attached as an annex. A great result.

MAY

ACTION


‘After some sketching and drawing, I decided to start from the perception of society as a park. A confined space, surrounded by fences, like Europe, in which people meet each other and have to find a way to communicate with each other. A place where you can chose to ignore each other, or where you have accidental or chosen interaction. A place where you’re not at home or working, but where you try to find rest or adventure. The exhibition at The Wall started with a fence and ended with a fence; every scene shown contained poetic and

MAY THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Park Europe at The Wall showed scenes from a park, drawn by illustrator Paul Faassen, who works for among others de Volkskrant, Vrij Nederland and Elle.

So I think, even though I also cannot stand people as a species from time to time, the bottom line is we all want to create a better and more liveable world. A world where there will always be tension, as no one can really and fully understand someone else. Sometimes we feel the urge to understand each other, sometimes we won't even try. But we certainly want to live together. This is what keeps us going.’

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TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ

My work is always ironic. I want to put things into perspective and irony helps me do that, even though it can be a curse these days. I think as a society we are still progressing. It is a shame people are thinking otherwise, they seem convinced good people are hard to find. But if you look at the facts and figures you will see the progression: there’s less violence overall and the position of minority groups has advanced significantly.

© PHOTO BY ERIK BORST

PARK EUROPE BY PAUL FAASSEN

visual ideas about human interaction. You can see them as tableaux vivants of a day in the park, of everyday life. I also incorporated some details about the future of everyday living: drones, privacy, strange sex and robots - small insights in the future.


MAY

BERT KOMMERIJ FABCITY

ACTIVE CITIZEN OF JAVA ISLAND & FOUNDER OF MEET THE LOCALS

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‘The Future of Everyday Living is happening in our Keet, shared by many. This “Keet” is a chameleon: a dining room, theatre, meeting room, disco and shelter. All at the same time. It can be everywhere: a square, a park, at the edge of event grounds. People enjoy sitting in the Keet, especially when it rains and storms outside. It is like being in a wagon, on the road together, without anyone knowing where to.’

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© BERT KOMMERIJ

MEET THE LOCALS ≥ 11 APRIL — 26 JUNE ≥ KEET


MAY

JOSIEN PIETERSE FABCITY

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CO–FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR NETWORK DEMOCRACY

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‘When we talk about a ‘sustainable society’, we should also take into account how we apply sustainability to the ways in which we interact with each other and in decision-making processes. The aim of Network Democracy is to create open spaces in which a wide variety of people can meet up and enter into a dialogue with one another, co-defining amongst themselves what sustainable living can and should look like in a bottom-up democratic society.’

© DOME, NETWORK DEMOCRACY

NETWORK DEMOCRACY ≥ 11 APRIL — 26 JUNE ≥ THE DEMOCRACY DOME


MAY

HESTER SWAVING FABCITY

PROJECT MANAGER WE ARE DATA

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‘We are moving towards a data-driven society and therefore we - the citizens of Europe - need to think about what privacy means for ourselves. What personal information is being collected and stored? And what do we accept to reveal if new technology can read our emotions and physical behaviour? We feel challenged by the rapid technological development to research the positive and possible negative impact of data on our everyday lives. We want to help the people to better understand the subjects of data, technology and privacy and make them aware. That way we engage the public in the debate about our very near future.’

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© WAD

WE ARE DATA ≥ MAY – JUNE ≥ MIRROR ROOM


MAY

ESTHER MOLENWIJK FABCITY

CO–FOUNDER HEMP COLLECTIVE

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‘Green leaves waving in the wind, open-minded people drinking hemp tea on our terrace, the calming sound of the energy generating wind mill, inspiring debates and innovative projects all around at FabCity. Could this be the Future of Every Day Living?’

THE HEMP HOUSE

HEMP DISTRICT ≥ APRIL – JUNE ≥ HEMP DISTRICT PAVILION


MAY

CHRISTIAN IAIONE FABCITY

FOUNDER OF LABORATORY FOR THE GOVERNANCE OF COMMONS

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‘We are talking about a cultural shift. The new governance model proposed is a new way for us to relate to almost everything, from economy to society as a whole and to other people, in other words: our vision of the world changes. Whether this cultural paradigm takes expression in sharing a car, or caring about where the trash ends up, this is all part of a 21st century way of living: a way of sharing things, sharing services, sharing spaces, sharing production and sharing responsibilities.’

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NEW EUROPE CITY MAKERS SUMMIT ≥ 27 — 30 MAY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


MAY

BEN RAWLENCE AUTHOR CITY OF THORNS

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‘The definition of “everyday living” will, I am afraid, be highly contested. I think what is normal for some will be a dream for others and this will make it harder for human beings to understand each other.’

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CITIES OF THORNS: THE FUTURE OF REFUGEE CAMPS ≥ 13 MAY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER

BOOK COVER, ‘CITY OF THORNS’

ON STAGE


MAY

AMALIA ZEPOU ON STAGE

ATHENS VICE MAYOR FOR CIVIL SOCIETY

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‘None of us would be able to make it without each other, the municipality and the people that are active. In Athens more and more people are active at the moment, helping out with the refugees. It is quite phenomenal. It is a civic culture that surfaced during the crisis. The rising number of new organisations is almost impossible for us to keep up with. At the moment they are filling a huge gap left by the government of Greece.’

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CHARLOT SCHANS AND AMALIA ZEPOU

NEW EUROPE CITY MAKERS SUMMIT ≥ 27 — 30 MAY ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER


MAY

TANJA DEN BROEDER FABCITY

FOUNDER ONS ETEN

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‘Europe by People' is an utopian exclamation and we’d better be real about this. We should wake up to reality and be both receptive as well as defensible in case we feel the need to truly take faith in our own hands. We do not need to be enslaved or blackmailed by antisocial, ecological destructive, abrasive power structures. The alternative is to connect with each other: ‘people’ as ‘nodes’ can face and embrace ‘free will’ in a liable manner. First of all: let’s unchain our food. Liberate and democratise it with the working of a sensible and sensitised governing network.’

GROENTE WORKSHOP © ANKE TEUNISSEN

ONS ETEN ≥ APRIL — JUNE ≥ FABCAFÉ


TRUE TALKER ≥ JUNE ≥ FABCITY ‘Dynamism through proximity The city of the future? That is undoubtedly the irresistible temptation of working on a circular city. I find it particularly inspiring to transform areas into future-proof and resilient districts. In these neighbourhoods, more and more is resolved locally, densely developed and intensively used. It is, therefore, vital that good collective spaces are created. I want to design unique spatial translations for social, collective needs. Because I love the city, the power of the city. I love those places where energy is tangible, where something exciting happens, preferably unexpectedly.’

ARCHITECT

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FABCITY

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STUDIO NINEDOTS, THE TRUE TALKER © PETER CUYPERS

ALBERT HERDER


MAY

ZOFIA KULIGOWSKA & DORA DURKESAC

SPACEHUNTERS/ VISITING ARTISTS OF ELIA

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‘In our everyday life we encounter different rules for behaviour: how to live, how to earn money, how to use the space, how to be an artist or how to have fun. The rules and limitations brought us possibilities for arranging our working and research space through spontaneous activity in public spaces. Our presentation was a collection of experiences we gathered along the way we went together and things we created to go further.’

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ELIA NXT RESIDENCY — YOU HAVE A BRIGHT FUTURE BEHIND YOU ≥ APRIL – JUNE ≥ THE DEMOCRACY DOME

© ANKE TEUNISSEN

FABCITY


PARK EUROPE

BY PAUL FAASSEN


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JANUARY


JUNE


© HANS PETER FÖLLMI – I SEE FOR YOU


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JUNE


3D PRINTING A PLASTIC MADONNA, A CONCRETE BUILDING AND A STAINLESS STEEL CANAL BRIDGE TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ One of the eye-catching themes at FabCity was 3D printing. Several participants were printing products using different materials: sand, plastic waste and steel. The steel printer by MX3D never failed to impress. Visitors would happily use a welding mask to look at the machine print steel structures. The pavilion was set up to showcase products like a bicycle frame and vases. But it also served as a research base on the nodes for a fully functional steel bridge. Joris Laarman Lab designed the bridge for the city of Amsterdam use over one of its oldest canals.


Next door to MX3D, a team of engineers of BAM and students were celebrating a novelty - the world’s first 3D builder entered service on FabCity. This ‘building machine’ is the first of its kind where free-form print technology is linked to automotive industry robotics. It makes free-form architecture possible, as well as the creation of complex ornamental exteriors. The large printer head, developed and constructed in Italy,

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© ARCHITECT JANJAAP RUIJSSENAARS (UNIVERSE ARCHITECTURE) ISM BAM

At their building site at the NDSM shipyard, the team developed the Bridge Project, whilst exploring other possibilities of 3D printing on an architectural scale. Their maker space at FabCity included live research on nodes, so 3D printing can finally enter the world of largescale, functional objects and sustainable materials, while allowing unprecedented freedom of form.


was printing objects from sand - in research of con-structions for the self-sustaining Landscape House designed by architect Jan-Jaap Ruijssenaars.

MX3D Š PHOTO BY JITSKE SCHOLS

At the hall of Makerversity, small 3D printers were used to create toys, games, shoes and statues out of plastic. One of those statues was a 1.20-metre large scale model of the Plastic Madonna, which was revealed On June 8th, World Ocean Day. The actual Plastic Madonna - an initiative by Peter Smith and Stichting Klean will be 12 meters long and made out of recycled plastic from over a 100.000 plastic bottles,


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PLASTIC MADONNA Š PETER SMITH

picked up from the streets. In Rio de Janeiro, another larger than life Madonna was placed at the Olympic Boulevard to make people aware of how they can be part of the solution to the ever-growing amount of plastic waste. At FabCity, a workshop XXL printing was organised to inform and inspire people on the possibilities of recycling plastic, using 3D printers.


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL KIDS © DE BIËNKORF


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JUNE


FABCITY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMME MAKING NEW PRODUCTS OUT OF PLASTIC WASTE TEXT: CHRISTEL VAN DE CRAATS PRIMARY SCHOOLS Primary school kids were offered a unique opportunity; they could visit FabCity, the city of their future. The educational programme started at May 11 and continued for ten weeks. Over 2.000 elementary school kids (groups 7 and 8), from 62 different schools of the metropolitan region Amsterdam, came to FabCity to learn. The programme combined knowledge and creativity. Playfully, the pupils were informed about the world of waste, materials, sustainability and circularity. Up front, they were requested to bring their own household waste to the premises.


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© ROSE IENEKE VAN KALSBEEK

At the Pretty Plastic Plant, the plastic factory by Overtreders W and Bureau SLA, they were told about all the different kinds of plastic and the different ways to re-use them. The kids would visit the Plastic Expo, where WASTED showed all the different products being made out of recycled plastic. The kids themselves helped to make new products out of the plastic they brought. Following, the pupils were taken for a guided tour of FabCity, learning about the different aspects of the future city. Kids of the ‘Kleine Kapitein’, the school adjacent to FabCity, were especially involved with FabCity. Every week another school class would visit, bringing along the plastic waste collected by the school as part of the Plastic Race (a race in which Java Island and KNSM Island were competing for the highest amount of collected plastic waste).


© LISA VLUG

EU IN THE CLASSROOM Not only primary schools visited FabCity; secondary schools also made use of the guided tours. During the Dutch presidency, the municipality of Amsterdam organised the programme EU in the Class Room for more than twenty secondary schools. The programme consisted among other things of debates between the students about Europe. European officials would visit the schools for guest lessons. In collaboration with the city of Amsterdam Europe by People organised a final programme. On 9 June 2016 the students came to FabCity to watch a performance by dance group ‘Don’t Hit Mama’ and to learn about FabCity.


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© ROSE IENEKE VAN KALSBEEK

Over a hundred students of MBO schools, located in the province of North Holland, who are specialised in building and infrastructure, came to FabCity for a guided tour. They were assigned by their school to talk to different FabCity participants relevant to their studies, in order to broaden their knowledge on circular building. The students were also brought in touch with FabCity partner De Nijs BV, who offered them the opportunity to intern to gain work experience. Students from the ROC-school ‘Facilitating Services’ worked at the FabCafe, powered by Ons Eten, on a daily basis.

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ROC-STUDENTS


FABCITY STUDENT PROGRAMME DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS OPENING FABCITY © ANKE TEUNISSEN

TEXT: NICOLE SANTÉ


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STUDENTS AT HALFWAY FESTIVAL © ANKE TEUNISSEN

The programme kicked off with an introduction week at Pakhuis de Zwijger and included a performance of Lucas de Man’s ‘In Search of Europe’, different lectures and workshops on urban development by amongst others Henk Ovink (water ambassador), Eva Gladek (Metabolic) and Michiel Schwarz (Sustainism) and an interactive discussion on future skills in higher education with minister of Education, Culture and Science Jet Bussemaker, EU policy makers and students. In the introduction week students also visited the Innovation Expo and explored their research area for the first time during a city expedition.

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The start of FabCity also marked the beginning of the off-campus student programme (11 April – 24 June). In this research programme (international) students coming from a wide range of disciplines, from both universities and art academies, participated. Among the participants were students from the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, AMS Institute, HKU University of the Arts, Saxion and InHolland.


Š ANKE TEUNISSEN

For the following ten weeks the hundreds of students worked together in multidisciplinary teams to research transformational issues in eleven study areas across Amsterdam, such as Oosterdokseiland and Buiksloterham. Research topics included circularity, community building, mobility and area development. During the research some of the groups worked closely with a case owner, such as de Ceuvel, BPD, Buiksloterham Circular, BeeCare or the Amsterdam Arena Innovation Center. The teams investigated urban concerns and issues that are not unique to the city of Amsterdam but are happening in cities all over Europe. Together they developed creative and sustainable solutions to tackle these problems. Students also worked on-site in the study areas, doing fieldwork and talking to stakeholders. In the Learning Lab at FabCity, they met with peers to exchange knowledge and showcased their results.


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Š ANKE TEUNISSEN

During the Halfway Festival (19 May), the sea containers of the Learning were transformed into eleven dioramas, in which the groups presented their midterm results with mood boards, posters, videos and photos. In the final week of FabCity, the students presented their outcomes to peers, teachers, stakeholders and other FabCity visitors. One group of AMS Institute students had the honour to also explain their research and recommendations on the food cycle of the Amsterdam Arena to minister for Foreign Trade and International Cooperation Lillian Ploumen, while she visited FabCity.


© NICOLE SANTÉ


JUNE

URBI ET ORBI ON STAGE

‘I love Europe cause there is more freedom’ ‘Europe creates a link. And we are very open’ ‘Europe is an awesome country; I’ve been living here for a long time now’ ‘The people in Europe are nice and helpful’

AUDIO-VISUAL COLLECTIVE

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For a weekend people could ride a mechanical rodeo bull at the Dam square, defending their thoughts on the European Union. A few quotes:

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URBI ET ORBI: ZEUS OP DE DAM ≥ 18 — 19 JUNE ≥ DAM SQUARE


ANNETTE KOUWENHOVEN FABCITY FOOTBALL TOURNAMENT ≥ 18 JUNE ≥ FABCITY ‘We Are Here FC promotes the culture of human rights and responsible citizenship towards refugees, undocumented, homeless people. For 'the future of everyday living' we co-organise encounters – tournaments - in public urban spaces, where people from different backgrounds can meet, get active, eat, talk. Together with our fans, (social) organisations and citizens we advocate a sustainable, empowering approach to the ‘havenots’ in growing urban areas.’

STRATEGIC DESIGNER & CO-FOUNDER WE ARE HERE FC


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© WE ARE HERE FC

JUNE


© PHOTO BY ANKE TEUNISSEN


JUNE

WUNDERBAUM, DE KOMST VAN XIA ON STAGE

THEATRE COLLECTIVE

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‘Freedom is being able to do everything as long as it doesn’t hurt someone else. Everything. To accomplish this freedom we trust in Xia. Xia is the expression of the common will. All people have the right to contribute to her creation. She should be the same to everyone. (..) Because all citizens are equal in Xia’s eyes, they will have equal access to all dignities, places and public offices, according to their abilities and with no other distinction than that of their virtues and talents. Xia, the glow of the sunrise.’

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HOLLAND FESTIVAL — DE KOMST VAN XIA ≥ 22 — 25 JUNE ≥ FABCITY


BART DEUSS & NITA LIEM ON STAGE DON’T HIT MAMA — BIG TOWN ≥ 11 & 12 JUNE ≥ FABCITY LEARNING LAB ‘With dancers and the audience we constructed a temporary city in FAB city, in that white tent, built with containers. In our “Big Town”, as the show is called, everybody is welcome. Performing together with the audience, in a nontheatrical, open environment in which everyone is more naked and vulnerable. We experienced this performance in FAB City as a special and intense closure of our tour of “Big Town” in our own city Amsterdam. Alive en re-created everyday.’

ARTISTIC LEADERS DON’T HIT MAMA


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© PHOTO BY JEAN VAN LINGEN

JUNE


© PHOTO BY ANKE TEUNISSEN


JUNE

MARIEKE DERMUL ON STAGE

SINGERSONGWRITER,ACTRESS & EUROPEAN CITIZEN

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‘Ik ben een Belg en ik ben verward, I am a Belgian and I am confused, je suis belge et je suis confuse, ich ein Belgier und ich bin verwirrt, soy un Belgica y soy confusa. By the European Citizen Popsong I want to invite people for a positive reflection on the world and an intuitive conversation. Contributing to this song creates space for debate.’

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OVER HET IJ FESTIVAL — EUROPEAN CITIZEN POPSONG ≥ JUNE ≥ CONTAINER PROGRAMME OVER HET IJ FESTIVAL


LEE FELDMAN FABCITY BICYCLE MAYOR ELECTION 2016 ≥ 11 APRIL — 26 JUNE ≥ PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER ‘The bicycle has to play a huge role in the future. Cycling is possible in every city. I won’t let any city off the hook. If you’re in Cape Town, and it’s too hilly, use an e-bike. If I look at subsequent generations, there’s more and more emphasis on wellness and fitness, this is almost an obsession with staying fit. The bike really provides that mechanism to stay fit. They start realising that they don’t really need to go to the gym anymore, that they have free time to do other stuff. (..) We’ll turn back the clock on climate change quite a bit, because if you can make that kind of transformation, you can actually really radically decrease carbon emissions.’

FOUNDER CYCLESPACE


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© ANKE TEUNISSEN

JUNE


© CASPER KOSTER


JUNE

THE ROAD OF BROKEN HEARTS ON STAGE

LIKEMINDS

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‘Our youngsters explored seven European cities to look for resemblances and differences in dealing with lost love. In an ever changing world we learned that broken hearts can bring people together.’

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THE ROAD OF BROKEN HEARTS – LIKEMINDS ≥ 24 — 26 JUNE ≥ THE WALL


THE ODYSSEY ON STAGE ITS FESTIVAL ≥ 29 — 30 JUNE ≥ HET STENEN HOOFD / DE TOLHUISTUIN ‘With The Odyssey the ITs Festival emphasises its international orientation. Directors and students from Maastricht, Warsaw, Brussels, Munich and Riga give a performance which is both raw and physical, and poetic. The scene in which Odysseus’ passport is being taken away because he’s a strangers, is very touching. Now, he is a nobody.’ (NRC, 1 July)

PLATFORM FOR EUROPEAN THEATRE ACADEMIES


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© NEELTJE KNAAP

JUNE


© FARAH RAHMAN / CREATIVE COURT


JUNE

RABIAÂ BENLAHBIB ON STAGE

DIRECTOR CREATIVE COURT & CURATOR ‘AND NOW I AM HERE’

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‘Interesting subcultures and sub networks are developing in Europe, arising from local needs, inter human connections, sustainability thinking and facilitated by the possibilities of the internet. The future of everyday living is about further making different kinds of connections. This involves notions we have, for a long time, considered to be soft, but are in fact completely normal, like hospitality, gratitude, granting and sharing, but also responsibility.’

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AND NOW I AM HERE ≥ 14 — 20 JUNE ≥ COMPAGNIETHEATER


MIRANDA LAKERVELD ON STAGE WORLD OPERA LAB — MANJUN & LEYLA ≥ 4 JUNE ≥ MERCATORPLEIN ‘I often imagine how people living in Amsterdamwest would sing and dance on the streets instead of merely talking and walking. In his performance I tried to bring this fantasy to life: all these beautiful personal languages, rooted in so many different cultures, reflecting on each other. Sometimes there is friction, but mostly these languages seamlessly merge and strengthen each other. The madman Majnun is a beautiful symbol for bridging social and cultural differences. In sufi-scriptures his love is understood as a divine force bringing down walls. Following Majnun's footsteps, we want to be part of a city where we will not rest until differences between people will not lead to incomprehension and conflict but to inspiration and renewal.’

FOUNDER WORLD OPERA LAB


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© FOUAD LAKBIR

JUNE


PARTICIPANTS Hans Aarsman / Els Aarts ≥ Circular pavillion / Nikolai Aasen ≥ Oslo and Akershus University / Amal Abbass-Saal ≥ Inspiratie-Inc / Madelon Abbes ≥ TU Delft / Elisa Achterberg ≥ Sustainable Finance Lab / Charlien Adriaenssens ≥ New Europeans / Sietse Agema ≥ AEB / Pallas Agterberg ≥ Alliander / Araf Ahmadali ≥ City of Amsterdam / Aylin Akgul ≥ HvA / Tijl Akkermans ≥ We Are Data / Kenan Aksular ≥ BMW / Heleen Alberdingk Thijm ≥ Kunsten '92 / Petra Albu ≥ ELIA / Dominique Almeida ≥ Flo.co / Frank Alsema ≥ Buiksloterham / Nawras Altaky / Paulina Alvarez ≥ TU Delft / Rob Andeweg ≥ HvA / Vera Andeweg ≥ Over het IJ festival / Nathalie Angenent ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Nabil Aniss ≥ Brussel Short Film Festival / Núria Arbonés Aran ≥ HvA / Hans Ariens ≥ OneWorld / Wasim Arslan / Ingrid Asvik ≥ Over het IJ festival / Pieternella Aten ≥ TU Delft / Annie Attademo ≥ University of Naples / Stefan Auberg ≥ New Europeans / Abdelhabi Baaddi / Nienke Baars ≥ City of Amsterdam / David Bade ≥ Instituto Buena Bista / Tim Baden ≥ HvA / Fatema Baheranwala / Bas Bakker ≥ HvA / Stephanie Bakker ≥ Future Cities / Sebo Bakker ≥ ZID Theater / Reinder Bakker ≥ Overtreders W / Mara Balestrini ≥ Ideas for Change / Ruud Balkenende ≥ TU Delft / Peggy Bannenberg ≥ Makerversity / Noa Bar-Ephraim ≥ HvA / Benjamin Barber ≥ The Global Parliament of Mayors Project / Ger Baron ≥ City of Amsterdam / Bente Bast ≥ TU Delft / Bilguun Batsuch ≥ HvA / Willem Baumfalk HvA / Michel Bauwens ≥ Commons Strategies Group / Lietje Bauwens ≥ Europe by People / Sander Bax ≥ Tilburg University / Nicolaas Beets ≥ Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations / Jasminka Beganovic ≥ ITs Festival / Jorick Beijer ≥ AMS Institute / Olfa Ben Ali ≥ New Amsterdam Academy / Eran Ben-Michael ≥ George & Eran / Rabia Benlahbib ≥ Creative Court / Annemiek Bentem ≥ AMS Institute / Justin Bentvelsen ≥ HKU / Martin Berendse ≥ OBA / Ivo Berg ≥ Finch Buildings / Tom Bergevoet ≥ Tom Bergevoet Architecture / Niko Bergsma ≥ Sustainer Homes / Anna Berkhof ≥ New Europeans / Mattia Bernini ≥ Precious Plastic / Luca Bertolini ≥ UvA / Gina Beuk ≥ Likeminds / Florian Beukeboom ≥ Flo.co / Joost Beunderman ≥ Civic Systems Lab / Jurgen Bey ≥ Sandberg Institute / Boris Bezemer ≥ Over het IJ festival / Matteo Bifulco ≥ Over het IJ festival / Svetlana Bijelic / Heleen Blaauw ≥ HvA / Eefje Blankenvoort ≥ Propaganda by the People / Suzy Blok ≥ Dansmakers Amsterdam / Gemma Blok ≥ UvA / Anneke Blokker / Jos Blom ≥ Alliander / Thomas Blom ≥ We Are Data / Norbert Bode ≥ Holland Festival / Vincent Bogers ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Cas Bokken ≥ HvA / Quirijn Bolle ≥ Marqt / Severine Bommel ≥ Wageningen University / Yuri Bongers ≥ Vloeistof / Nienke Bongers ≥ Nul Zes / Tom Bonte ≥ Beursschouwburg / Cas Bool ≥ Framer Framed / Beitske Boonstra ≥ TNO / Teresa Borasino / Mark Borst ≥ Europe by People / Yvonne Bos ≥ De Vries Producties / Natalie Bos ≥ Europe by People / Arwin Bos ≥ Potato Farmer / Nicolai Bosko ≥ Over het IJ festival / Thomas Bouvy ≥ Urbi et Orbi / Esther Bouw ≥ InHolland / Tjeron Boxem ≥ Rainproof / April Brachner / Raul Brandao Defilicibus Gomes ≥ HvA / Lena Brandhorst ≥ Wageningen University / Yvonne Brandwijk ≥ Future Cities / Andreea Breazu ≥ New Europeans / Floor Bregman ≥ HvA / Brian Bregman ≥ Wikkelhouse / Rob Bremer ≥ Alliander / Mara Breunesse ≥ Mara Architectuur bna / Tom Brinkkemper ≥ Europe by People / Marco Brömmelstroet ≥ UvA / Jasper Brommet ≥ StoneCycling / Hans Brouwer ≥ MassiveMusic / Peter Jan Brouwer ≥ Stichting Biomeiler / Rutger Buch ≥ Cirkelstad / Rick Buchter ≥ Wikkelhouse / Donica Buisman ≥ State of Flux / Daria Bukvic ≥ Nobody Home / Harriet Bulkeley ≥ Durham University / Klaartje Bult ≥ DutchCulture / Faten Bushehri / Jet Bussemaker ≥ Ministry of Education, Culture and Science / Orlando Cabanas ≥ Politecnico di Milano / Mellouki Cadat ≥ Movisie / Lynn Calmthout ≥ TU Delft / Nelson Carrilho / Yara Cavalcanti ≥ HKU / Francesco Cavaliere / Gordan Cengic ≥ GO! Antwerp / Daniel Charny ≥ From Now On / Marielle Chartier ≥ Wageningen University / Annie Chou ≥ Anmec / Nina Chrispijn ≥ HvA / Maarten Claassen ≥ Waternet / Charlie Clemoes ≥ New Europeans / Max Cohen de Lara ≥ XML / Hanna Copini / Liz Corbin ≥ Institute of Making / Antwan Cornelissen / Silvana Corro Quintana ≥ TU Delft / Twan Cortenraede ≥ TU Delft / Marjolein Cremer ≥ European Cultural Foundation / Paul Currion ≥ A Resilient Serbia / Ines Da Costa ≥ Royal Academy of Visual Arts / Remco Daalder ≥ City of Amsterdam / Winnie Daamen ≥ TU Delft / Faiza Dadi ≥ Amsterdamse School / Rob Dam ≥ HKU / Ronen Dan ≥ The Motown Movement / Dinah Danish / Hans Daudeij ≥ Coöperatiede Waardenburcht Haaften U.A / Ursula Davies ≥ Makerversity / Bengin Dawod ≥ City of Amsterdam / Ana Méndez de Andés / Florian de Backere / Fiona de Bell ≥ Gascoland / Willemijn de Boer ≥ ANNA vastgoed en Cultuur / Herbert de Bruijne ≥ Breed Bestuurlijk Overleg / Menno de Bruin ≥ Royal Academy of Visual Arts / Wim de Buren ≥ De Buren / Ann-Katrien de Clippele ≥ Festival van Vlaanderen Brussel / Dirk de Clippeleir ≥ AB Brussels


PARTICIPANTS THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING 351

/ Pieter de Gooijer ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Mira de Graaf ≥ The Beach / Rutger de Graaf-van Dinther ≥ Blue 21 / Cees de Graaff ≥ DutchCulture / Robert de Groot ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Sandra de Haan-Morlog ≥ Rotterzwam / Nick de Haas ≥ Sustainer Homes / Annekee de Jager ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Nel de Jager ≥ Zeeheldenkwartier Den Haag / Pjotr de Jong ≥ Europe by People / Thomas de Jong ≥ InHolland / Huib de Jong ≥ HvA / Jos de Krieger ≥ Superuse Studios / Marije Baart de la Faille-Deutekom ≥ HvA / Michiel de Lange ≥ University of Utrecht / Lucas de Man ≥ Stichting Nieuwe Helden / Tine de Moor ≥ OGK / Jente de Motte ≥ Over het IJ festival / Winfred de Nijs ≥ Bouwbedrijf De Nijs / Robin de Puy / Annabella de Reus ≥ InHolland / Nicolas de Ribou ≥ Popposition / Arnoud de Romph ≥ Sempergreen / Joep de Roo ≥ Linkeroever / Janneke de Rooij ≥ Propaganda by the People / Tess de Rooij / Jeroen de Swart ≥ AEB / Frans de Vries ≥ Europe by People / Jim de Vries ≥ Europe by People / Roëll de Vries ≥ InHolland / Daphne de Vries ≥ InHolland / Christopher de Vries ≥ Rademacher de Vries Architecture / Maud de Vries ≥ CycleSpace / Tessa de Vries ≥ New Europeans / Martijn de Waal ≥ HvA / Gertjan de Werk ≥ D-Exto / Sebastiaan de Wilde ≥ NS / Marcus Deblaere ≥ AB Brussels / Joachim Declerck ≥ Architecture Workroom Brussels / Bas Dekker ≥ EI aan het IJ / Fien Dekker ≥ Rainaway / Luuk Deleau ≥ Summerdance / Monica den Boer ≥ VU Amsterdam / Tanja den Broeder ≥ Ons Eten / Marieke den Heijer ≥ De Vries Producties / Sjoerd Derine ≥ Over het IJ festival / Marieke Dermul ≥ Over het IJ festival / Marguerite des Gayets ≥ CAP ou pas cap?/ Brechtine Detmar ≥ HvA / Bart Deuss ≥ Don't Hit Mama/ Lonneke Deutekom ≥ HvA / Laurent Dewilde ≥ Impact vzw / Tomas Diez ≥ FabLab Barcelona / Emilie Dijkema ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Ellen Dijkshoorn ≥ City of Amsterdam / Edo Dijksterhuis / Aranka Dijkstra ≥ D-Exto / Cornelia Dinca ≥ CycleSpace / Cyril Dion / Doezan Doepel ≥ Cirkelstad / Ruth Doesburg ≥ InHolland / Cees Donkers ≥ Brabant Academy / Marco Donnarumma / Kees Dorst ≥ TU Eindhoven / Ingeborg Douque ≥ Wageningen University / Jaap Draaisma ≥ Stichting Urban Resort / Walter Dresscher ≥ De Natuurlijke Stad / Remy Driehuizen ≥ InHolland / Bas Driessen ≥ Fabric / Nieso Dubbelboer ≥ Agora Europa / Paul Dujardin ≥ Bozar / Sietske Duller ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Albert Dun Dun ≥ Agro / Els Duran ≥ Creative Court / Siana Durfort ≥ HvA / Dora Ðurkesac ≥ ELIA / Jan Willem Duyvendak ≥ UvA / Jeroen Eekelen ≥ Wageningen University / Sipco Eggink ≥ Sunfloat / Eelco Eikenaar ≥ Provincie Groningen / Wael El Allouche ≥ New Europeans / Simone Eleveld / Diane Elshout ≥ Moving Arts Project / Lot Elshuis ≥ Europe by People / Marja Elsinga ≥ TU Delft / Marielle Engberink ≥ HvA / Maaike Engels ≥ Urbi et Orbi / Antonija Eremut ≥ City of Solin / Thomas Ermacora ≥ Machines Room / Afra Ernst ≥ Over het IJ festival / Bas Ernst ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Mitchell Esajas ≥ New Urban Collective / Adriana Esmeijer ≥ Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds / Abdelilah Essemmaa ≥ DAR Amsterdam / Maarten Essenburg ≥ Europe by People / Pettra Eszter-Beveren ≥ HvA / Gerrit Faber ≥ The European Cyclists' Federation / Marileen Fabers / Amandine Faugere ≥ Popposition / Joris Feis ≥ Zumtobel / Sjoerd Feitsma ≥ City of Leeuwarden / Lee Feldman ≥ CycleSpace / Thijs Felperlaan ≥ Zoutmus / Quentin Feral ≥ CAP ou pas Cap? / Ruben Ferweda ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / Yvonne Feuerhahn ≥ IVAM / Evi Filippou ≥ Xenita.16 / Ragini Fit ≥ HvA / Andreas Fleischmann ≥ Meervaart / Steven Fleming ≥ CycleSpace / Enrica Flores d'Arcais ≥ European Cultural Foundation / Moritz Föllmer ≥ UvA / Dante Föllmi ≥ Tiny Tim / Hans Peter Föllmi ≥ Tiny Tim / Jarrod Francisco ≥ Likeminds / Egbert Fransen ≥ Europe by People / Steven Franssen ≥ HvA / Ilke Froyen ≥ Passa Porta / Christiaan Fruneaux ≥ Monik / Jos Gadet ≥ City of Amsterdam / Marcos Garcia ≥ Medialab / Edwin Gardner ≥ Monik / Pierfrancesco Gava ≥ Royal Academy of Visual Arts / Eric Geboers ≥ Salt City Expo / Ann Geeraerts ≥ Bozar / Willeke Geertsema ≥ HKU / Arno Geesink ≥ Kraft Architecten / Gaston Gelissen ≥ Rijkswaterstaat / Wietse Gelmers ≥ urbanSCR_PT & Golfstromen / David Geneste ≥ HvA / Janneke Gerards ≥ University of Utrecht / Paul Gerretsen ≥ Vereniging Deltametropool / Richard Gerritsen ≥ The Beach / Roos Gerritsma ≥ InHolland / Neil Gerschenfeld ≥ Bits & Atoms / Ine Gevers ≥ Hacking Habitat / Farzad Ghaus ≥ Stad & Co / Khasayar Ghiabi ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Pascal Gielen ≥ RUG / Monique Gieskes ≥ Vlisco Group / Josine Gilissen ≥ WUNDERBAUM / Eva Gladek ≥ Metabolic / Philip Gladek ≥ Spectral Utillities / Jelte Glas ≥ Porta Palace / Paul Glazier / Wanda Glebbeek / Kamila Glodowska / Federico Gobbo ≥ Esperanto Project / Kelvin Godee ≥ HKU / Daniel Goedbloed ≥ Rainproof / Wouter Goedheer ≥ Stichting Nieuwe Helden / Daan Goedkoop ≥ MX3D / Daniel Golob ≥ Universität für angewandte Kunst Wien, Vienna / Michiel Goossensen ≥ Wageningen University / Tabo Goudswaard ≥ Art of Impact / Sara Gradstein ≥ City of Amsterdam / Elisam Grasso ≥ New Europeans / Zoe Gray ≥ Wiels / John Grin ≥ UvA / Jasper Groen ≥ Groenlinks / Peter Groenendaal ≥ Placemaker Plus / Annabelle Groenendijk ≥ Tiny House Movement / Syb Groeneveld ≥ Mediafonds / Martine Groenewegen ≥ De Klik Biomassa DHZ / Gerrit Jan Groothedde / Vicente Guallart ≥ FabLab Barcelona / Valérie Guichon ≥ Labfab / Felix Guttmann ≥ Amsterdam Light Festival / Guy Gypens ≥ Kaaitheater / Roos Haasjes ≥ Van De Jong / Femke Haccoû ≥ City of Amsterdam / Ulf Hackauf ≥ TU Delft / Kim Hagenaar ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Hajar Haghani ≥ ArtEZ / Maarten Hajer ≥ IABR / Laura Hakvoort ≥ City of Amsterdam / Marjan Hammersma ≥ Ministry of Education, Culture and Science / Camilla Hanney ≥ IADT Dul Laoghaire, Dublin / Suzanne Hansen ≥ HvA / Peter Hardewijn ≥ YOU-R-O-TEENS / Martin Haring ≥


HvA / Bram Heijkers ≥ Platform31 / Jochem Heijmans / Erik Heijmans ≥ AMS Institute / Jan Heijns ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Nicky Hekster ≥ IBM Nederland / Tycho Hellinga ≥ De Ceuvel / Zef Hemel ≥ UvA & Amsterdam Economic Board / Mitzy Hemme / Bas Hemmen ≥ AEB / Marielle Hendriks ≥ Boekmanstichting / Carry Hendriks ≥ WUNDERBAUM / Pepik Henneman ≥ Hack of a City / Linda Hentzepeter ≥ HvA / Albert Herder ≥ Studioninedots / Coen Hilberdink ≥ KNAW / Malu Hilverink ≥ ABN Amro / Domenique Himmelsbach de Vries ≥ New Europeans / Terence Hinrichs ≥ ArtEZ / Lotte Hinten ≥ Europe by People / Julie Hjort ≥ Danish Design Centre / Dennis Kristoffer Hoel ≥ Oslo and Akershus University / Natasza Hoffman ≥ DG Environment EU / Simone Hogendijk ≥ Over het IJ festival / Mikkel Christian Knudsen ≥ Holst Underbroen / Betina Holt Haraldsen ≥ City of Oslo / Niels Hoogendoorn ≥ Europe by People / Renee Hoogendoorn ≥ Europe by People / Serge Hoogendoorn ≥ AMS / Annius Hoornstra ≥ City of Amsterdam / Rob Hopkins ≥ Transition network and transition town Totnes / Michaela Hordijk ≥ UvA / Tom Horijon ≥ Wageningen University / Britta Hosman ≥ VPRO / Siebe Houtsma ≥ Wageningen University / Tessel Hovenkamp ≥ InHolland / Sonja Huijgens ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Han Huiskamp ≥ Greenbattery / Jaffie Hülsenbeck / Michiel Hulshof ≥ Tertium / Nat Hunter ≥ Machines Room / Ilse Huttinga / Myrte Sara Huyts ≥ Creative Court / Christian Iaione ≥ Laboratory for the Governance of Commons / Bram Ieven ≥ Leiden University / Felipe Ignacio Noriega ≥ Over het IJ festival / Sander Ijsseldijk ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / Bernadette Iseli ≥ Europe by People / Liesbeth Jansen ≥ Bureau Marineterrein / Anne Janssen ≥ Passa Porta / Elise Janssen ≥ HvA / Ine Janssen ≥ City of Maastricht / Anja Janssen ≥ Creative Court / Kristel Jeuring ≥ Locality / Andre Joassin ≥ Cinematek / Jan Jonckheere ≥ Chinasquare / Renee Jones Bos ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Jan Jongert ≥ Superuse Studios / Chris Jonker ≥ BAM Bouw & Techniek / Jeroen Jonkers ≥ Geef om de Jan / Eef Eveline Jonkhoff ≥ City of Amsterdam / Maartje Joosten ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Peter Joosten ≥ Project Leven / Manon Jutte ≥ Alliander / Hans Kalliwoda ≥ World in a Shell / Steven Kamperman ≥ trio / Marleen Kamperman ≥ New Amsterdam Academy / Marte Kappert ≥ 7Zebra's / Sophia Karimi ≥ Goethe Institute / Hans Karsenberg ≥ Stipo / Maite Karssenberg ≥ SPUI25 / Lia Karsten ≥ UvA / Marianne Karstens ≥ Ons Eten / David Kasse ≥ Vereniging Vlas en Hennep / Marie Keeling / Marco Keijzer / Frank Keizer / Rogier Kentie ≥ InHolland / Dennis Kerkhoven ≥ Coöperatie de Waardenburcht Haaften U.A / Annemieke Keurentjes ≥ Holland Festival / Niall Keville ≥ IADT Dul Laoghaire, Dublin / Dalia Khalife ≥ Over het IJ festival / Reem Khedr ≥ City Castles Invisible Shadows / Bridget Kievits ≥ AHK / Freja Kir ≥ New Europeans / Baban Kirkuki / Rudy Klaassen / Friso Klapwijk ≥ Dakdokters / Jola Klarenbeek ≥ Frascati Theater / Rogier Klomp ≥ Propaganda by the People / Robert Kloosterman ≥ UvA / Arthur Kneepkens ≥ Theaterstraat / Ziggy Knel ≥ Likeminds / Oscar Kneppers ≥ Accelerator Rockstart / Jurrian Knijtijzer ≥ Finch Buildings / Jan Jaap Knol ≥ Fonds voor Cultuurparticipatie / Erika Koehler ≥ Ministry of Economic Affairs / Carolien Koehorst ≥ Kantoorkaravaan / Theodoor Koelewijn ≥ Europe by People / Sanjay Koendjbiharie ≥ HvA / Dyveke Kok ≥ Hemp Collective / Kiki Kolman ≥ Radboud University Nijmegen / Bert Kommerij ≥ Meet the Locals / Vincent Kompier ≥ The Flexible City / Natascha Kooiman ≥ Sustainable Food Rebel / Barbara Koole ≥ Wasted / Daniëlle Koolhaas ≥ InHolland / Casper Koomen ≥ IOT / Malu Koppel ≥ Academie van de Stad / Romeny Koreman ≥ Willem de Kooning / Kristian Koreman ≥ ZUS architecten / Joost Körver ≥ Studioninedots / Laurie Kos / Tjerk Kostelijk ≥ VicarVision / Paul Koster ≥ VU Amsterdam / Piet Koster ≥ City of Amsterdam / Diana Krabbendam ≥ The Beach / Roland Krager ≥ Urban Cycling Institute / Frank Kresin ≥ Waag Society / Marloes Krijnen ≥ Foam / Kevin Krizek ≥ Radboud University / Linda Kromhout ≥ HvA / Emilie Kröner ≥ Kwartiermaker Lola Luid! / Alma Krug ≥ Heijmans One / Albert Jan Kruiter ≥ Instituut voor Publieke Waarden / Tristan Kruithof ≥ Supervliegsupermouche Festival / Katia Krupennikova ≥ Framer Framed / Wytze Kuijper ≥ City Embassy Apeldoorn / Zofia Kuligowska ≥ ELIA / Juliane Kurschner ≥ City of Amsterdam / Cesar Kuyper ≥ City of Amsterdam / Nico Kuyvenhoven / Ilse Kwaaitaai ≥ Wasted / Gert Kwekkeboom ≥ The Cloud / Naomy Laan ≥ HvA / Godrey Lado / Esther Lagendijk ≥ Over het IJ festival / Karin Laglas ≥ Ymere / Miranda Lakerveld ≥ World Opera Lab / Freek Lamers ≥ HvA / Remko Landtman / Janno Lanjouw ≥ Food Film Festival / René Lansink ≥ HKU / Nicolas Lassabe ≥ FabLab Toulouse / Mélanie Laurant / Sophie Lauwers ≥ Bozar / Patricia Lavado ≥ Ceviche y Maas / Francesca Lazzeri ≥ Over het IJ festival / Gys le Roux / Sabine Lebesque ≥ City of Amsterdam / Els Leclercq ≥ Studio Aitken Urbanism / Heidi Leenaarts ≥ United Economy / Arnoud Leerling ≥ FoodValley / Rik Leermans ≥ Wageningen University / Olga Leijten ≥ City of Amsterdam / Annet Lekkerkerker ≥ Holland Festival / Sandra Lenzholzer ≥ Wageningen University / Marion Leukefeld ≥ UvA / Monique Leyenaar ≥ Radboud University / Tian Li ≥ Wageningen University / David Li ≥ Hacked Matter / Wampie Libon ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Nita Liem ≥ Don't Hit Mama / Floris Lieshout ≥ Art of Impact / Esmee Lim Weijand ≥ Design Academy Eindhoven / Jiabiao Lin ≥ TU Delft / Pieter Litjens ≥ City of Amsterdam / Ruiying Liu ≥ TU Delft / Anastasiia Liubchenko ≥ Influence 2016 / Beertje Lohman ≥ HKU / Jessica Loudon ≥ HvA / Jos Louwman ≥ MacBike / Pim Luitjes ≥ Over het IJ festival / Maurice Maarssen / Madeilene Maaskant ≥ Academie van Bouwkunst / Lieven Machiels ≥ KU Leuven / David Madden ≥ London School of


PARTICIPANTS THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING 353

Economics / Ola Mafaalani ≥ NNT / Stan Majoor ≥ HvA / Kimberly Major ≥ Stichting Nieuwe Helden / Ivar Manuel ≥ City of Amsterdam / Ymer Marinus ≥ The Living Void / Mariana Martinez Balvanera ≥ UvA / Ward Massa ≥ StoneCycling / Khadija Massaoudi / Fred Mathot ≥ Alliander / Marissa Matias ≥ Democracy in Europe / Chris McCampbell ≥ D-Exto / Javina Medina ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / Max Meegens ≥ HvA / Joachim Meerkerk ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Marie Meeuis ≥ HvA / Sabine Meier ≥ University of Siegen / Geleijn Meijer ≥ HvA / Danielle Meijer ≥ InHolland / Detlef Meijer ≥ Alliander / Marianne Meijers ≥ HvA / Maxi Meissner ≥ Wasted / Sebastian Mejia ≥ Pontificia Universidad / Javeriana Colombia / Morgan Mekertichian ≥ Creative Court / Danai Melita Melita ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / Bernardo Menezes / Azevedo Soter ≥ HvA / Massimo Menichinelli ≥ FabLab Barcelona / Clayde Menso ≥ Amsterdams Fonds voor de Kunst / Piet Menu ≥ Zuidelijk Toneel / Tracy Metz / Claudia Metz ≥ AEB / Jeffrey Meulman ≥ Theater Festival / Francesca Miazzo ≥ Wasted / Dennis Mica ≥ 2GetThere / Mark Minkjan ≥ New Europeans / Mark Minkman ≥ Paradiso / Marjan Minnesma ≥ Urgenda / Otto Moison ≥ HvA / Esther Molenwijk ≥ Hemp Collective / Hans Mommaas ≥ Centraal Planbureau voor de leefomgeving / Rosa Montero / Ingrid Mooy ≥ HKU / Peshmerge Morad / Nima Morkoç ≥ TU Delft / Hilda Moucharrafieh ≥ Over het IJ festival / Brahim Moujalis ≥ Likeminds / Alphonse Muambi / David Mulder ≥ XML / Koen Mulder ≥ Het Zinderend Oppervlak / Maarten Mulder ≥ Ministry of Education, Culture and Science / Jaap Mulders / Charly Mulholland ≥ HvA / Michiel Munneke ≥ Art of Impact / Lenno Munnikes ≥ HvA / Gerben Nap ≥ Social Trade Circuit Nederland / Mirjam Nebbeling ≥ Frontaal / Lukas Nerl ≥ UvA / Caspar Nieuwenhuis ≥ Likeminds / Michael Nieweg ≥ HvA / Arthur Nijhuis ≥ Rechtstreex / Christian Nold ≥ UGL / Philippien Noordam ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Frank Noorland ≥ Bellevue / Brigitte O'Regan ≥ TU Delft / Natasja Oerlemans ≥ WNF / Dietmar Offenhuber ≥ Northeastern University / Kasja Ollongren ≥ City of Amsterdam / Annemiek Onstek / Sarah Famke Oortgijsen ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Chris Oosterom ≥ Imagine Film Festival / Thomas Oostlander / Floortje Opbroek ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Valentina Orazzini ≥ Democracy in Europe / Edwin Oskam ≥ AMEC Board / Arvid Ostendorf / Pauline Otten ≥ Over het IJ festival / Henk Ovink ≥ Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment / Nevin Ozutok ≥ City of Amsterdam / Marjanne Paardekooper ≥ HKU / Alberto Pagliarino ≥ Caravan Next / Tatjana Pajovic ≥ POD Teatar / Laura Pana ≥ Migrationlab / Leon Paquay ≥ Cruqiusgebied / Emma Pareschi ≥ FabLab Amsterdam / Devika Parti ≥ New Europeans / Paolo Patelli ≥ New Europeans / Daniela Patti ≥ Eutropian BmbH / Ines Peborde ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Alexander Pechtold ≥ D66 / Willem Pedroli ≥ Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations / Gert-Joost Peek ≥ University of Rotterdam / Richard Pelgrim ≥ Play the City / Nellekke Penninx ≥ City of Amsterdam / Michel Perquy / Karin Peters ≥ AMS Institute / Niels Peterson ≥ HvA / Kelsy Pieneman ≥ HvA / Theunis Piersma ≥ University of Groningen / Josien Pieterse ≥ Netwerk Democratie / Marc Pil ≥ Over het IJ festival / Fenne Pinkster ≥ UvA / Kristof Polfliet ≥ Brussel Film Festival / Hettie Politiek ≥ City of Amsterdam / Alexandre Pólvora ≥ Joint Research Center / Levente Polyak / Ksenia Polyanina ≥ TU Delft / Pierangelo Pompa ≥ Altamira Studio Teater / Pedro Campos Ponce ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Irene Poortinga ≥ Rainproof / Henriette Post ≥ Fonds Podiumkunsten / Dennie Post ≥ HvA / Astrid Postma-Smeets ≥ Voedingscentrum / Rienk Postuma ≥ Woonstichting De Key / Jasper Pott ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / James Powell ≥ HvA / Henriette Prast ≥ Tilburg University / Aalt Prins ≥ HvA / Gerry Proctor ≥ Liverpool Air Project / Adrian Proos ≥ Nationale Politie / Ali Rabarison ≥ City of Amsterdam / Farah Rahman ≥ Creative Court / Anne-Marie Rakhorst ≥ Duurzaamheid.nl / Renny Ramakers ≥ Droog / Christian Rapp ≥ TU Eindhoven / Anne-Mariken Raukema ≥ Tuinpark Amstelglorie / Eduard Ravenhorst ≥ De Coöperatieve Samenleving / Ben Rawlence / Joshua Record ≥ HvA / Marco Redeman ≥ De Coöperatieve Samenleving / Arnold Reijndorp ≥ UvA / Otto Reinstra ≥ Waternet / Linda Rekelhof ≥ Willem de Kooning / Mieke Renders ≥ De Brakke Grond / Cynthia Rensman ≥ TU Delft / Thijs Reuten ≥ City of Amsterdam / Barbara Revelli ≥ ELIA / Käti Robb / Janny Rodermond ≥ Stimuleringsfonds Creatieve Industrie / Tijs Roelofs ≥ City of Amsterdam / Yvonne Rogers ≥ UCLA / Remon Rooij ≥ AMS Institute / Daan Roovers / Eva Ros ≥ TU Delft / Robert Rosier ≥ TPEX / Jan Rothuizen / Geert Rovers ≥ Saxion Hogeschool / Marja Ruigrok ≥ Ruigrok / NetPanel / Kim Ruijs / Jan Jaap Ruijssenaars ≥ Universe Architecture / Radna Rumping ≥ New Europeans / Zahra Runderkamp ≥ SPUI25 / Jeske Rutgers ≥ Klean / Lukas Rydzek ≥ Wageningen University / Ismael Saidi ≥ Jihad / Chris Salter ≥ Hexagram / Ivo Salters / Nicole Santé ≥ Europe by People / Martijn Sargentini ≥ Investment in Bicycle / Liza Saris ≥ New Europeans / Martijn Savenije ≥ Wageningen University / Federico Savini ≥ UvA / Han-Maurits Schaapveld ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Charlot Schans ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Maud Schijven ≥ De Ceuvel / Heinz Schiller / Oep Schilling ≥ Wikkelhouse / Luud Schimmelpenninck ≥ Witkar / Carolien Schippers ≥ Huisvesting COA / Sebastian Schoenmaker ≥ InHolland / Roel Schoenmakers ≥ Gascoland / Prem Scholte Albers ≥ Europe by People / Jordi Scholten ≥ ABN Amro / Frank Scholten ≥ Stichting Biomeiler / Mayke Schoorl ≥ InHolland / Fred Schoorl ≥ BNA / Casper Schouten de Nijs / Socrates Schouten / Kim Schuiten ≥ Netwerk Democratie / Claartje Schulp ≥ Europe by People /


Iris Schutten ≥ Willem de Kooning / Andrea Schuurman ≥ City of Amsterdam / Henne Schuwer ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Michiel Schwarz ≥ Sustainist Lexicon / Brigitta Seegers / Jaap Seidell ≥ VU Amsterdam / Haroon Sheikh ≥ Dasym Investment Strategies / Robert Shepherd ≥ Makerversity / Rhythima Shinde ≥ TU Delft / Rebecca Shoesmith ≥ MENA / Li-Shi Shu / Lisanne Sieburgh ≥ HvA / Erinke Siegersma ≥ Wageningen University / Floris Siekman ≥ Hemp Collective / Slawomir Sierakowski ≥ Democracy in Europe / Christelle Silva ≥ InHolland / Annemieke Slager ≥ Foam / Jeroen Slot ≥ City of Amsterdam / Wouter Sluis ≥ Fontys / Fieke Sluys ≥ InHolland / Ben Smart ≥ ELIA / Maaike Smelter / Melle Smets ≥ Sandberg Institute / Willem Smink ≥ JongeHonden / Lynn Smit ≥ HKU / Ilse Smits ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Adrián Sneeuw ≥ Makerversity / Talitha Snel ≥ Europe by People / Maaike Snelder ≥ TNO / Rowin Snijder ≥ le Compostier / Katusha Sol ≥ Placemakers & De Buurtcamping / Elise Sothys ≥ Royal Academy of Visual Arts / Machiel Spaan ≥ Academie van Bouwkunst / Karolina Spaic ≥ ZID theater / Zinzi Speear ≥ Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations / Floor Speet ≥ Waternet / Anat Spiegel / Thomas Spijkerboer ≥ VU Amsterdam / Jana Splunter ≥ InHolland / Huibert Spoorenburg / Eef Spronck ≥ MVO Nederland / Roos Stallinga ≥ CycleSpace / Dennis Stam ≥ Fonds Podiumkunsten / Stijn Stam ≥ TU Delft / Stavros Stavrides ≥ School of Architecture Athene / Renilde Steeghs ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Koen Steger ≥ Over het IJ festival / Gerard Steijn ≥ The Mobile Factory / Lizzy Steller ≥ HKU / Hannah Stewart ≥ Royal College of Art / Marleen Stikker ≥ Waag Society / Wieger Stoel ≥ City of Amsterdam / Bart Stoffels ≥ Except / Poike Stomps ≥ Poike / Shanti Straub ≥ Likeminds / Tim Straver ≥ Deze Straver / Jelske Streefkerk ≥ TU Delft / Xander Stro ≥ De Buren / Maria Stuut / Anna Suikerbuyk ≥ Over het IJ festival / Henny Sukesi / Thijl Sunier ≥ VU Amsterdam / Justyna Swat ≥ POC21 / Hester Swaving ≥ We Are Data / Rutger Sypkens ≥ BAM Bouw & Techniek / Farid Tabarki ≥ Studio Zeitgeist / Warhin Tahir ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / Maria Tarantino / Borjan Tchakaloff / Marco Te Brommelstroet ≥ UvA / Janos Tedeschi ≥ Over het IJ festival / Carlijn Teeven ≥ Creative Court / Rick Tegelaar ≥ Atelier Rick Tegelaar / Marnix ten Holder ≥ JongeHonden / Ellen ten Voorde ≥ City of Amsterdam / Denzel Tensen ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / Jorinde Tenten ≥ Europe by People / Janine Terlouw ≥ Royal Academy of Visual Arts / Waas Thissen ≥ Tiny Tim / Hans Georg Thönges ≥ Goethe Instituut / Steve Threlfall ≥ We Make Place CIC / Iris Tick ≥ HvA / Hester Tiggeloven ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Hans Tijl ≥ Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment / Jean Tillie ≥ HvA / Mark Timmer ≥ Frascati Theater / Jelte Timmer ≥ Rathenau Instituut / Anousjka Timmermans ≥ HvA / Anneke Timmermans ≥ Heijmans One / Dick Timmermans ≥ Heijmans One / Benjamin Tincq ≥ Ouishare & POC21 / Chantal Tjin ≥ Meet the Locals / George Elias Tobal ≥ George & Eran / Tom Tobia ≥ Makerversity / James Tooze / Ivan Tosics ≥ URBACT / Baukje Trenning / Thijs Tromp ≥ Prins Bernhard Cultuurfonds / Joris Tubergen ≥ Klean / Jasper Tuinema / Sophia Urlich / Kimberley van Aarst ≥ HvA / Babette van Aggelen ≥ HvA / Yu-Lan van Alphen ≥ Stichting DOEN / Tommie van Alphen ≥ InHolland / Peter van Assche ≥ Bureau SLA / Tyso van Batenbrug ≥ HvA / Annemiek van Bentem ≥ AMS Institute / Jacqueline van Benthem ≥ Het Compagnietheater / Sarah van Binsbergen ≥ Valiz / Bas van Bentum ≥ Vandejong / Hermineke van Bockxmeer ≥ Ministry of Education, Culture and Science / Pieter van Boheemen ≥ Waag Society / Lars van Borssum ≥ Kantoorkaravaan / Maarten van Boven ≥ Muziekgebouw aan het IJ / Arnold van Bruggen ≥ Propaganda by the People / Iris van Burgsteden ≥ InHolland / Tamar van Caspel / Els van Dam ≥ HvA / Tom van de Beek ≥ Kantoorkaravaan / Christel van de Craats ≥ Europe by People / Ellis van de Giessen ≥ De Vries Producties / Thijs van de Grift ≥ Corporate Accounts Eneco / Reny van de Kamp ≥ Atheneum / Gijs van de Velden ≥ MX3D / Irene van de Voort ≥ Voeding Leeft / Paula van de Waterlaat ≥ Queen of One Night / Rogier van de Weijer ≥ AEB / Simone van den Akker ≥ Pakhuis de Zwijger / Lotte van den Berg / Matthias van den Berg ≥ Amstel Hoveniers / Ilse van den Breemer ≥ Eneco / Anouk van den Brink ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / Teun van den Ende ≥ Platvorm VOER / Maryem van den Heuvel ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Natasja van der Berg ≥ Tertium / Joey van der Bie ≥ HvA / Youp van der Graaf ≥ HvA / Wouter van der Heijde ≥ City of Amsterdam / Jurjen van der Heijden ≥ AT Osborne / Iris van der Helm ≥ City of Amsterdam / Quirine van der Hoeven ≥ Ministry of Education, Culture and Science / Robbert van der Horst ≥ Saxion University of Applied Sciences / Derk van der Kamp ≥ Ludwig Ensemble / Vincent van der Klei ≥ Studioninedots / Eric van der Kooij ≥ City of Amsterdam / Eberhard van der Laan ≥ City of Amsterdam / Kees van der Lugt ≥ Waternet / Martijn van der Mark ≥ Stimuleringsfonds Creatieve Industrie / Conny van der Molen ≥ Leoparte / Mark van der Net ≥ Dutch Masters / Jurgen van der Ploeg ≥ Tiny Tim / Sophie van der Pol ≥ Over het IJ festival / Sebas van der Sangen ≥ City of Amsterdam / Jan Willem van der Schans ≥ Wageningen University / Rick van der Steen ≥ Over het IJ festival / Jessica van der Tol ≥ Europe by People / Pauline van der Valk ≥ Finch Buildings / Menno van der Veen ≥ Tertium / Jesse van der Velde / Hilco van der Wal ≥ APPM / Abe van der Woude ≥ Tiny Tim / Bob van der Zande ≥ City of Amsterdam / Nol van Dijk ≥ Gagatrading / Nel van Dijk ≥ AHK / Gerben van Dijk ≥ Bouwstenen voor Sociaal / Hester van Dijk ≥ Overtreders W / Simon van Dommelen ≥ Stichting Noorderpark Trust / Karlijn van Dongen ≥ City of Amsterdam / Jos van Doorn ≥ Leger


PARTICIPANTS THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

des Heils / Rob van Dorland ≥ KNMI / Joke van Eden ≥ HvA / Aik van Eemeren ≥ City of Amsterdam / Jan van Erp ≥ University of Twente / Arthur van Es ≥ Volvo Cars Nederland / Herwil van Gelder ≥ City of de Marne / Lonneke van Genugten ≥ OneWorld / Toine van Goethem ≥ City of Amsterdam / Stefan van Haaster / Ineke van Hamersveld ≥ Boekmanstichting / Belle van Heerikhuizen ≥ Over het IJ festival / Mieke van Heesewijk / Ton van Helvert ≥ Kadaster / Arno van Herwijnen ≥ Meet the Locals / Julie van Heteren ≥ City of Amsterdam / Manon van Hoeckel ≥ In Limbo Embassy / Geert van Itallie ≥ Melkweg / Rob van Kampen ≥ BAM Bouw & Techniek / Ira van Keulen ≥ Rathenau Institute / Joey van Koningsbruggen ≥ Joylent / Sonny van Kranenburg ≥ HvA / Johan van Leeuwaarden ≥ TU Eindhoven / Frank van Lieshout / Hans van Lint ≥ TU Delft / Koert van Mensvoort ≥ TU Eindhoven / Stanja van Mierlo ≥ Blijburg / Marieke van Nood ≥ AEB / Elsje van Ommen ≥ City of Amsterdam / Niels van Oort ≥ Goudappel Coffeng / Koen van Oostende ≥ Hemp Collective / Ton van Oostwaard ≥ The Green Junk / Pieter van Os ≥ Reserved Concepts / Dirk van Peijpe ≥ De Urbanisten / Loek van Poppel ≥ AEB / Han van Poucke ≥ Holland Festival / David van Reybouck / Paulien van Rijckevorsel ≥ Fontys / Sosha van Rijnberk ≥ Radboud University Nijmegen / Bas van Rijnsoever / Bas van Rossum ≥ ZO!City / Maarten van Rousselt ≥ Flagey / Jacco van Sandijk ≥ De Vries Producties / Lisa van Schagen ≥ Dakdokters / Marjo van Schaik ≥ Europe by People / Anselm van Sintfiet ≥ Stimuleringsfonds Creatieve Industrie / Jurriaan van Stigt ≥ LEVS / André van Stigt ≥ Buro van Stigt / Malou van Stuijvenberg ≥ Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Arjan van Timmeren ≥ AMS Institute / Philip van Traa ≥ Grown Down Town / Maarten van Tuijl ≥ Temp.architecture / Arjan van Vliet ≥ RDW / Gert van Vugt ≥ Sustainer Homes / Bert van Vuuren ≥ Natural Plastics / Eva van Vuuren ≥ Europe by People / Anne van Wageningen ≥ UvA / Ronald van Warmerdam ≥ City of Amsterdam / Eddy van Wessel / Friso van Wiersum ≥ European Cultural Foundation / Sweder van Wijnbergen ≥ HEAS BV / Norbert van Workum ≥ Regenwater / Arie van Ziel ≥ Studio Content / Tomas Vanheste ≥ de Correspondent / Yanis Varoufakis ≥ Democracy in Europe / Jochem Veemboer ≥ Europe by People / Tjeerd Veenhoven ≥ New Amsterdam Academy / Marissa Veer ≥ TU Delft / Julie Vegter ≥ Europe by People / Giselle Vegter ≥ Creative Court / Evelien Vehof ≥ Creative Court / Viktor Vejvoda ≥ ELIA / Harrie Vekemans ≥ MADE / Henjola Veldhoven ≥ HvA / Thom Veldman ≥ InHolland / Maria Vera ≥ Over het IJ festival / Maud Verheij ≥ TU Delft / Tom Verhoek ≥ Wageningen University / Dries Verhoeven / Qurijn Verhoog ≥ City of Amsterdam / Bas Verkerk ≥ City of Delft / Tim Verlaan ≥ UvA / Jouke Verlinden ≥ TU Delft / Floortje Vermeer ≥ CycleSpace / Sarah Vermoolen / Niek Verschoor ≥ Willem de Kooning / Marianne Versteegh ≥ Kunsten '92 / Lia Versteegh ≥ UvA / Mick Verweij ≥ InHolland / Dionne Verwey / Paul Veugen ≥ Usabilla / Ellen Veul ≥ City of Amsterdam / Christian Villum ≥ Danish Design Centre / Jacques Vink ≥ Willem de Kooning / Femke Vink ≥ Willem de Kooning / Barbara Visser ≥ Society Of Arts / Jan Eric Visser / Barbara Visser / Lisa Vlug ≥ Europe by People / Andrea Voets ≥ Xenita.16 / Heleen Volman ≥ DansBrabant / Dick Vonk ≥ Zumtobel / Jacques Vork ≥ InHolland / Caroline Vrauwdeunt ≥ Map Your City / Tessa Vroege ≥ InHolland / Laura Vroom ≥ Over het IJ festival / Bob Waaijer ≥ VU Amsterdam / Kristie Wagemaker ≥ HvA / Jessie Wagenaar ≥ BPD / Roger Waldinger ≥ UCLA / Katherine Watson ≥ European Cultural Foundation / Colm Weakliam ≥ IADT Dul Laoghaire, Dublin / Wieteke Weenink ≥ AEB / Tu Weiming / Fenneke Wekker / Anke Wetzel ≥ Eckwerk / Kathleen Weyts ≥ Bozar / Nira Wickramasinghe-Samarasinghe ≥ University of Leiden / Norbert Wiechmann / Friso Wijnen ≥ CPEU2016 / Eddy Wijnker ≥ Greensand / Tony Wijntuin ≥ WYNE Strategy & Innovation / Julia Wilasco Vieira ≥ HvA / Henk Wildschut / Femie Willems ≥ Fonds voor Cultuurparticipatie / Jaleesa Williams ≥ De Vries Producties / Catherina Wilson ≥ Leiden University / Wim Witteveen ≥ Kadaster / Sinaya Wolfert / Erik Wong ≥ Wongema / Mel Woods ≥ DJGAD Visuel research Center / Raimond Wouda / Nienke Wulder ≥ Don't Hit Mama / Theologos Xenakis ≥ Wageningen University / Bahar Yilmaz ≥ Likeminds / Zafer Yurdakul ≥ Podium Mozaiek / Marta Zakowska ≥ Magazyn Miasta / Max Zanartu ≥ i Plaza / Ron Zandvliet ≥ City of Amsterdam / Pieter Zeeman ≥ Fonds Podiumkunsten / Senne Zeinstra / Amalia Zepou ≥ Vice Mayor for Civil Society, Athens / Edward Zevenbergen ≥ BPD / Floor Ziegler ≥ Noorderparkkamer / Bjorn Zielman ≥ ArtEZ / Jan Zoet ≥ AHK /

355

AND MANY OTHERS...


PARTNERS


357

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

PARTNERS


COLOPHON EUROPE BY PEOPLE

ON STAGE

CULTURAL INTENDANTS Egbert Fransen Marjo van Schaik Frans de Vries

BOARD OF INSPIRATION Lucas de Man David Mulder Dionne Verwey Daria Bukvic Jarrod Francisco

ASSISTANT TO THE INTENDANTS Talitha Snel OFFICE, PAKHUIS DE ZWIJGER Hester Tiggeloven Phronaise Jacobs Jeroen Keijzer COMMUNICATION & MARKETING Natalie Bos Maarten Essenburg FINANCES Petra Poll Wenda Verbeek EDITORS Nicole Santé Niels Hoogendoorn Jorinde Tenten Vincent Bogers Robin de Kruijff TECHNICAL PRODUCER Prem Scholte Albers CAMPAIGN DESIGN Vandejong

PROGRAMME MAKERS Julie Vegter Jessica van der Tol THE WALL / NEW EUROPEANS CURATOR Pjotr de Jong ART DIRECTOR Roos Haasjes ARTISTIC TEAM Radna Rumping Mark Minkjan PRODUCER Eva van Vuuren DESIGN WALL La Bolleur BRUSSELS PROGRAMME MAKERS Klaartje Bult


EDITOR Nicole Santé

EDUCATION + VOLUNTEERS Lisa Vlug

DESIGN Vandejong, Roos Haasjes Bas van Bentum

PROGRAMME MAKERS Jan Heijns

PRINT Veenman+, Hans Hogeland

359

STUDENT PROGRAMME Christel van de Craats Bernadette Iseli

MAY

Dymphie Braun Joachim Meerkerk Coen Hermans FABCITY Khashayar Ghiabi Folkert Lodewijks MEMBERS STRATEGIC TASK FORCE Charley Fiedeldij Dop Rob Andeweg Charlot Schans Renee Hoogendoorn Jitske van der Kooi Jorick Beijer Simea Knip Floortje Opbroek BOARD OF INSPIRATION Quirine Winkler Albert Herder Peter Both Bruno Doedens Mara Verdaasdonk Machiel Spaan Marjolein Cremer Sjors de Haan Josien Pieterse Vincent van der Klei Wendy Springer Wouter Hermanns Arie van Ziel LOCATION MANAGERS Wouter Valkenier Jim Horst Frank Kresin Jochem Veenboer Gijs de Waal Tom Brinkkemper Alex Clay Chander van der Zande INTERNS Claartje Schulp PRODUCER Lot Elshuis Leonoor Coppoolse BOOK PROJECT COORDINATORS Mark Borst COORDINATION Theodoor Koelewijn Kim Hagenaar

THE FUTURE OF EVERYDAY LIVING

Lietje Bauwens Sonya Huygens


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Rene Jones Bos, Robert de Groot, Han Maurits Schaapveld, Ilse Smits, Renilde Steeghs ≥ Ministery of Foreign Affairs; Pieter de Gooijer, Henne Schuwer, Maryem van den Heuvel, Sonja Huijgens ≥ Embassy of The Netherlands Brussels; Maarten Mulder ≥ Ministry of Education, Culture and Science; Nicolas Beets ≥ Ministery of Internal Affairs; Kajsa Ollongren, Abdeluheb Choho, Nienke Baars, Elsje van Ommen, Ger Baron, Nevin Ozütok, Ali Rabarison, Wouter van der Heijden, Ron Zandvliet, Evelyne Jonkhoff, Sebas van der Sangen, Wieger Stoel, Olga Leijten, Araf Ahmadali and Femke Haccou ≥ City of Amsterdam; Arjan van Timmeren ≥ AMS; Huib de Jong and Willem Baumfalk ≥ Hogeschool van Amsterdam; Norbert Bode; Alexander Rinnooy Kan; Tabo Goudswaard ≥ Art of Impact; Niesco Dubbelboer ≥ Agora Europa; Tomas Diez ≥ Fab Lab Barcelona / FabCities Network. FOR MORE INFORMATION EUROPE BY PEOPLE Pakhuis de Zwijger Piet Heinkade 181k 1019 HC Amsterdam The Netherlands 0031 20 6246380 europebypeople@dezwijger.nl © 2016 EUROPE BY PEOPLE / STICHTING PLAN C We’ve done our best to correctly state all authors and rightful claimants of the images in this book.

Profile for Pakhuis de Zwijger

Europe by People  

EU 2016 Arts & Design Programme --> The Future of Everyday Living

Europe by People  

EU 2016 Arts & Design Programme --> The Future of Everyday Living

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