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Independent Student Newspaper for the University of Texas at San Antonio

08.24.2010 Vol. 44 Issue 1

The

Paisano

Celebrating Thirty Years of Independent News with a Brand New Design Weekly Beak

‘Think Green Fund’ approved

G.I. Jobs names UTSA a militaryfriendly school

UTSA launches Campus Alerts UTSA has launched the new Campus Alerts website. The site was developed to keep students, faculty, staff and the general public informed on the status of the university during emergency situations. Managed by the UTSA Office of Business Continuity and Emergency Management and the Office of Communications, the site is a single source for information on UTSA closures prompted by inclement weather, health and other emergencies, and construction and maintenance work. The goal of the one-stop site is to help reduce confusion by eliminating duplicate messages on various UTSA websites. Linked from the UTSA home page, the website will offer a unified official voice for UTSA with information from campus organizations, departments and outside partners. Particularly important during emergencies, the site can be updated quickly and easily with clear, concise details.

AP Photo

The University of Texas at San Antonio recently was named by G.I. Jobs Magazine a militaryfriendly school for 2011. The honor ranks UTSA in the top 15 percent of all colleges, universities and trade schools nationwide and features more than 1,000 schools doing the most to embrace America’s veterans as students. More than 7,000 schools in the United States were considered for the list. Schools are chosen after years of research and compiling survey results. UTSA had 1,342 veterans enrolled during the spring 2010 semester and 1,283 in the fall of 2009. As a military-friendly school, UTSA will be included with a G.I. Jobs basic listing in the “2011 Guide to Military Friendly Schools,” which will be published in September 2010, as well as a basic listing online at MilitaryFriendlySchools.com. The list makes it easy for students to find the military discounts, services and programs offered by each school. “UTSA obviously is interested in recruiting military students,” said Joe DeCristoforo, UTSA assistant vice president and university registrar. “We’re thrilled to be honored by G.I. Jobs, but the true honor is that veterans are choosing UTSA for their education.”

Christopher Connell paisanoarts@sbcglobal.net

Editoral Photo: The proposed construction of a mosque near ground zero has sparked debate, even at the Paisano. See Mosques & Men, Page 6.

See GREEN, Page 5

Nine faculty members honored for teaching Christopher Connell

paisanoarts@sbcglobal.net Seventy-two faculty members from various University of Texas institutions were recognized Aug. 11 by the Board of Regents for outstanding teaching and will share $2 million in awards. Nine of those faculty members are from UTSA. “On behalf of myself, Provost John Frederick and the entire UTSA community, I want to extend my hearty congratulations to these nine faculty members,” UTSA President Ricardo Romo said. “We are so pleased to see their accomplishments in the classroom are being recognized and celebrated, and we thank them for the dedication they show to our students every day.” Kolleen Guy, associate professor of history, said that she was nominated for the Regents award last year and did not win. “This year I felt very confident.  Nonetheless, I was giving

a lecture in the Netherlands and kept getting e-mails from people congratulating me, but I was up for a couple of different awards so didn’t know what they were congratulating me for. It took another week before I got any official letter,” Guy said. Guy’s expertise focuses on food products that go global. “In class, I talk about the development of cultures of food abundance such as in the US) and pockets of dearth (places where we see periodic famine).  These things are connected with environment and, as our global environment changes, so, too, do food regimes.  I also teach about the culture of food--how food gets linked to our identities,” Guy said. Thomas Cannon, senior Marketing lecturer, said that he has a simple teaching philosophy: “Employers don’t care about theory. They want employees who know how to get things done,” Cannon said.

UTSA winners of 2010 UT System Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Awards: (top row from left) Diane Abdo, Sazzad Bin-Shafique and Thomas Cannon; (middle row) Kolleen Guy, Maria Kaylor and Alycia Maurer; and (bottom row) Mary McNaughton-Cassill, John Morris and Richard Utecht. Photos: Courtesy of UTSA Today.

Stem cell researcher generates neurons Christopher Connell

paisanoarts@sbcglobal.net Assistant Professor Doug E. Frantz of the College of Sciences’ Department of Chemistry has received the Max and Minnie Tomerlin Voelcker Fund’s 2010 “Young Investigator Award.” The award will distribute $450,000 over the next three years. Frantz is the first UTSA researcher to receive the award.

Frantz, along with Drs. Jay Schneider and Jenny Hsieh of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, will synthesize drug-like molecules that target stem cells and could help treat heart disease and brain cancer. The drug-like molecules are referred to as isoxazoles and pyrazoles. Frantz’ research shows promise. Using synthesized isoxazoles, Frantz’ team was able to induce both cardiogenesis and

neurogenesis in various stem cell lines (both embryonic and adult stem cells). Cardiogenesis is the development of the heart in the embryo, and neurogenesis is the process by which neurons are generated in the brain. “We are also studying pyrazoles since they are structurally similar to isoxazoles, but may have improved drug-like characteristics,” Frantz said. “We have generated some preliminary data on using our

small molecules to go after cancer stem cells as well as a potential new treatment paradigm for brain cancer,” Frantz said. Many people have the misconception that stem cells are blank cells that have the ability to become any other type of cell. Actually, Asst. Professor Doug E. Frantz See STEM CELL, Page 5

Source: UTSA Today

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Football Update

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The Think Green Fund, a $5 increase in fees, to support green initatives at UTSA, passed earlier this month. When the fund was up for proposal by only 980 of the over 29,000 UTSA students voted. The proposal was supported by Young Democrats, Green Society, ReEnergize San Antonio and Students for John Sharp. The proposal was strongly opposed by UTSA Republicans and Young Americans for Liberty at UTSA. During the proposal process, three

Road to Success Paisano-Online com

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Scott Pilgrim

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News

The Paisano

August 24 2010

STD affects over 4 million in U.S.

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Christopher Connell

paisanonews@sbcglobal.net Dr. Ashlesh Murthy, research assistant professor in the department of biology and a member of the South Texas Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases received a two-year, $144,500 RO3 grant from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Disease within the National Institutes of Health. Murthy’s research will focus on the immune cells in the body that can cause complications in the upper genital tract after the body has become infected with Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydia is one of the leading Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) and affects approximately 4 million people every year within the US. The infection causes severe disease in the reproductive organs of women, and to a lesser extent men. Murthy said that Chlamydia is an intracellular parasite that has co-evolved with humans for thousands of years. “Given the advances in modern medicine, we still understand very little about the pathogenic

mechanisms of this organism, and despite several decades of research efforts, a precentive vaccine has not been attained,” Murthy said. The damage caused by the infection usually occurs in the reproductive tract and surrounding organs. As the body’s immune response kills the infected cells, many innocent bystander cells may also be killed. After the infection is cleared by the immune system, the body enters a state of repartive healing. “Since repeated infections with Chlamydia are common, such damage and repair processes occur repeatedly, resulting in scar tissue. Some serious consequences of the disease include pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy and infertility,” Murthy said. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 40 percent of untreated women go on to develop PID. Among PID cases, it is estimated that up to 20 percent develop infertility. “While the initial infection, when recognized, can be treated effectively with antibiotics, the

AP Photo

Defense against Chlamydia as harmful as disease

Dr. Murthy’s research may be used to combat other Sexually Transmitted Disease’s like trichomonas vaginalls (pictured above).

majority of infected people show no symptoms and, therefore, do not seek medical treatment,” Murthy said. Murthy has worked with his mentor, Dr. Bernard Arulanan-

Check us out:

dam, on other projects related to Chlamydia. In April 2009, they teamed up with Dr. Guangming Zhong, professor of microbiology and immunology from the Health Science Center to become the

university’s first revenue producing license to develop a vaccine against the disease. The license is a sponsored research agreement with Merck & Co. Inc.

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The Paisano The Paisano

August 26, 2008 August 24 2010

Textbook Shuffle

News

5 P5

GREEN: STEM CELL: Fund increases fees $5 semester

Drug like molecules could cure cancer

Joesph Tidline/The Paisano

From Page 1

Students shop at the Main Campus bookstore, which now offers book rentals.

Business Auxiliary Services reminds students whose courses are held at the Downtown Campus must purchase their books at the DT Campus bookstore as these classes often require different books than those courses taught on the 1604 campus. L&M, the Roadrunner Bookstore, the University Bookstore and shopping online are also viable options.

students appealed the vote, citing examples of Student Government Association (SGA) improperly lobbying students to vote for the fund. Members of SGA reviewed and dismissed the appeals. A student lead Bi-law committee will determine the distibution of funds. Students interested on being on the committee should contact Pardeis Heidari at pardeis. heidarisga@gmail.com. The Paisano was unable to contact the three students who appealed the fund.

U.S. World News awards Trinity No. 1; UTSA No. 62 Christopher Connell

paisanoarts@sbcglobal.net For the nineteeth consecutive year, Trinity University has received a No. 1 spot in U.S. News & World Report's “America's Best Colleges” guide. Trinity has been awarded the No. 1 spot for institutions that offer a range of undergraduate degrees as well as select master's programs in the Western half of the United States (including Hawaii and Alaska). Trinity was also awarded the No.1 ranking in “Great Schools, Great Prices.” category. Trinity is also ranked in the top 25 Best Engineering Programs (where a doctorate is not offered). Trinity came in at 21. Because UTSA offers three doctor of philosophy degrees in Engineering, it falls under a different U.S. News category, Best Engineering Programs (where a

doctorate is the highest degree). The category also contained UT Austin at 11, Rice University at 19, Southern Methodist University at 98. UTSA ranked tied for last with 13 other colleges at 156. In San Antonio, Trinity was followed by St. Mary's University at 19, Texas State University at San Marcos at 40 (125), University of the Incarnate Word at 59, and Our Lady of the Lake University and the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) tied for 62. Rice University was ranked the top national university in the state at 17, followed by the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) at 45 (UT Austin was also awarded the No. 7 spot for Best Undergraduate Business Programs), Southern Methodist University at 56 and Texas A&M University at 63.

From Page 1

there are several different types of stems cells. “Pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into nearly all cell types. However, multipotent stem cells can only differentiate into closely related cell types based on their lineage,” Frantz said. The team is investigating exactly how the molecules induce stem cells to differentiate into various cell types. “If we can figure out the biological mechanisms that control stem cell differentiation using our small molecules, it would be a huge breakthrough in stem cell biology,” Frantz said. Isoxazoles is already in use in other medicine, such as Valdecoxib, which was taken off the market for the potential to increase heart attack and stroke. Frantz said that we are a long way from studying our small molecules in humans and trying to predict potential side-effects would be premature. “There is no scientific basis to guess at potential side-effects by simply comparing the structures of two drugs, it is much more complicated than that,” Frantz said. Before testing the medicinal qualites of the small molecules on humans, Frantz said that it is best if they understand stem cell biology. “Our goal is not really to develop our current molecules into

drugs per se, but to use them as molecular probes to shed light on the current black box of stem cell biology. If we can eventually develop our molecules into threapies for regenerative medicine, that would just be icing on the cake,” Frantz said. Frantz explains that their research could assist in other areas as well. “The potential to extend this to a number of neurogodegenerative disease including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s is high on our list,” Frantz said. He also explained that the work in cardiogenesis could have huge implications for treating patients with heart disease or those who have suffered from a heart attack. UTSA President Ricardo Romo credits the growth of UTSA into a premier research university to partners like the Voelchker Fund. “By supporting research in its own backyard, the Voelchker Fund is providing a great opportunity to San Antonio medical researchers and particularly UTSA,” Romo said. In 2009, the Voelchker Fund awarded its “Yound Investigator Award” to researchers making significant research contributions that advance clinical treatments in the areas of heart disease, cancer, arthritis, muscular dystrophy and maculative degeneration of the retina.

k c a B h s a C g n i k Chec L L A n o k c a 10¢B s e s a h c r u P Debit Card

UTSA Branch 14410 IH-10W (Next to Costco)

Join online – rbfcu.org

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Opinion

Photo Poll

What do you like most about UTSA?

Brittney Bell Freshman/Biology “I like the resources UTSA has such as tutoring.”

The Paisano

August 24 2010

Editorial Of mosques and men, presidents and protestors

The Paisano

The Arizona immigration conflict should have held the media’s attention for most of the summer but a small group Muslims diverted the attention when they decided they needed new place to worship in New York City. On Aug. 3, a New York commission opened the path for a mosque to be built two blocks from “Ground zero” where the World Trade Center was destroyed by two airplanes. The American public according to Fox News has weighed on the issue as “legal but inappropriate.” They try to paint the American perspective as one of freedom with moral codes and boundaries. That is religious freedom only when necessary. Now they claim that if any other religion had asked to build a sanctuary there it would have been fine. People who are not Muslims should not restrict the freedom of other religions. New York is a very large city with loads of real estate left to raid (especially in this budget crisis) but the fact is that U.S. law allows for .

Interim News Editor:

One might say that there many laws in the states that are legal but not necessarily moral. One could argue the death penalty and abortion and gay marriage in some states fit into the same category. Some argued a public option for health care wasn’t technically legal ealier this decade, but many people believe it’s America’s responsibility to ensure that those less fortunate have insurance. After 9/11 there were reports of racial slurs being dropped and people getting beat up or fired from their jobs because oAmericans were fearful. It doesn’t surprise me now that there is still latent animosity towards those of the Islamic faith. When President Obama tried to weigh in on the issue he suffered significant backlash. However, even some among the Jewish community within New York who spoke out in favor of the new mosque. If a mosque isn’t allowed to be built anywhere in America who’s to stop prejudicial decisions on Atheists, Scientologists and other non-

Editor-in-Chief:

traditonal groups from assembling. The president shouldn’t have to feel threatened for defending for people who believe in this faith that they have practiced for just the last thousand plus years. The worst part is that some Americans started questioning President Obama’s religion again after he said the mosque was justified. He was even classified as a Muslim. Freedom comes with a cost: it must be afforded to everyone in every situation. Allowing freedom only for some leaves the U.S. open for justified criticism from other countries. This applies to the mosque as well. When other religions such as Christianity or Judaism feel thratened they look to the law to protect them. But when the law protects others they become outraged. In America, though, the law must apply equally to all to be just and effective.

Editorial Photo

Chris Garcia-Lozano

Joseph Tidline

Christopher Connell

Features Editor: Arianne Evans

Arts Editor: Ruben Mercado

Sports Editor: Vanessa Elizarraras

Photo Editor: Burk Frey

Graphics Editor: Robert Calcagno

Web Editor: Robyn Lorkovic

Ads Manager: Kevyn Kirven

Staff: Kevin Won, Jonathan Nomamiukor, Annalise Perry, Megan Lovelady, Krysteen Villarreal, Evan Anders, Misha Yurchenko, Judd Messer, Itza Carbajal, Jose Vasquez, Steven Ordaz, Chelsea Harbin, Bradley Banks, Ariel Alvarez, Graham Cull

Contributing Writers:

Michael Gardiner, Andrew McClung, Christopher Thomas, Veronica Salinas, Marium Ayyad, Patrick Shupp, Brianna Johnson, Angela Orosco

Advisor:

Need to pay tuition? Try again next week

Diane Abdo

Advisory Board: Steven Kellman, Mansour El Kikhia, Jack Himelblau, Sandy Norman, Matt Stern

Freshman/ Criminal Justice “Everything on campus is easiliy accessible.”

The Paisano is published by the Paisano Educational Trust, a nonprofit, tax exempt, educational organization. The Paisano is operated by members of the Student Newspaper Association, a registered student organization. The Paisano is NOT sponsored, financed or endorsed by UTSA. New issues are published every Tuesday during the fall and spring semesters, excluding holidays and exam periods. All revenues are generated through advertising and donations. Advertising inquiries and donations should be directed towards:

Jeff Mitchell

© The Paisano

Freshman/ Electrical Engineering

14545 Roadrunner Way San Antonio, TX 78249

“I love getting involved in the free activities on campus.”

Phone: (210)690-9301 Fax: (210)690-3423

Joseph Tidline/ The Paisano

E-mail: paisanoeditor@sbcglobal. net

Lillian Garza Freshman/ Liberal Arts “Getting involved in the community and branching out into something new.”

Megan Beedy Freshman/ Public Policy “I am really excited about football starting next year.”

Willyam BJ Wintston Sophomore/ Public Relations “It’s very diverse and the campus is still growing.”

Students may have trouble getting thier tuition paid off this week. Long lines for both Fiscal Services and Financial Aid kept students waiting till nearly closing time Aug. 23 as they tried to pay off their debts to UTSA.

The Bird Seed by Megan Lovelady

Send letters to: paisanoeditor@sbcglobal.net

Letters must be less than 400 words and include the writer’s name, classification or title and telephone number. The Paisano reserves the right to edit all submissions.


Features

The Paisano

August 24 2010

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Road to success

‘Your Journey Begins’ Students and faculty provide helpful tips for freshmen to succeed

Dezranique Stansberry Junior, biology major “Freshmen need the will power to make it. They need to understand that education is important and that goes along with time managment. They need to make good use of their UTSA planners.”

Students Stephanie Nguyen Sophomore, business major “Freshmen need to educate themselves on the resources availiable on campus. We have tutors and supplemental Intruction to help with any academic issues; they need not be afraid to ask questions.”

Alanna D’ Antonio Sophomore, business major “My advice for the freshmren to succed is to be open-minded, and brave these new adjustments. The transition from high school to college is a huge, so be open to try and meet new people and don’t just stick to your comfort zone.”

Did you know... In the years 2009-2010, the Department of Criminal Justice was awarded over half a million dollars in federal grants and contracts. Funding agencies include: Department of Defense, National Institute of justice, Bureau of Justice Adminstration and the National Science Foundation.

Nanami Ito Junior, marketing major “Study, study, study. You can go out and party but if you can do that, you can find time to study. Freshman should study during their free time between classes. Every little bit of studying makes a difference. “

In 2010, UTSA had 9 faculty named as Regents’ Outstanding faculty–more than any other university in the UT system

Faculty

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The College of Engineering has experienced a 101% increase in undergraduate enrollment over the past seven years..

Linda Shepherd Professor, Programming (IS) “Freshmen need to learn how to study without distractions. You can’t be text messaging, playing on the computer and going back and forth between reading because when you do ,you distrub your train of throught; you don’t have continuity when you do that. You lose the gist of the concepts and theories that you’re reading. A focused effort is extremely important.”

The college of Liberal and Fine Arts is the fastest-growing liberal arts college in the state with a 43% increase in majors over the past five years; and is a major provider of arts and humanities programming in South Texas, with an audience of over 70,000 guest annually.

Curtis Odle Assistant Director of Residents Life, University Oaks “Freshmen need to get involved and get to know their professors. They need to be engaged with their college experience and not just be a spectator.”

Ryan Mcpherson Foundations/Theory Professor “It’s good to be involved because research suggests that it actually helps your grades. However, if you take on more than you can handle, it can hurt your grades. Bottom line: don’t over commit yourself.”

David Kandel Residential life corrdinator, University Oaks “Freshmen need to come in with a positve attiitude and forget about what they did in high school and focus on the fact that this is what ‘s going to set up the rest of their lives.”

Tweet this: Arianne Evans paisanoarts@sbcglobal.net

It is often said, “Take as long as you can in college because when you get out into the real world, you’ll wish you would’ve stayed longer.” Funny, college for me is about as real as it can get managing my own budget, keeping up with all of the organizations I’m in and focusing on my course work. All the while trying to pay off the loans, I have yet to

tell my parents about, if the “real world” is worse than this, I may as well quit while I’m ahead. I grew up in a family centered on structure and rules. Once I got to college, I felt as if I was granted a ‘get out of jail free card’ by Rich Uncle Penny bags himself (the monopoly guy). When I left for college my parents told me, “Your only job is to go to school and make A’s.” They expected so much from me, but didn’t weigh in the factors of the

Get over the freshmen experience “real world.” My first night moving into my apartment I had my first sip of alcohol. It was all I had imagined, and then I threw up. I grew up fast freshman year. I was partying threefour days of the week and doing the minimal amount of course work. My roommates were complaining because I was never at home, but what they didn’t seem to realize was that I had spent my entire life at home. At that time, college

was the place I went to be myself and escape from the totalitarianism government I call a home. In high school my curfew was 9:00 p.m. When I went to my senior prom, I had to be back at midnight! The transition from high school to college doesn’t have to be difficult. The expectations here are clearly different than in high school. Professors’ move at a quicker pace and require more note taking and class

Paisano-Online com

attendance. The ideology is simple, you’re paying all of this money for an education, why not make the most of it? Yeah–I know what you’re thinking, your schedule is spaced out and light so that means that you have all of the free time in the world. WRONG. Freshman year proved to a productive lesson in time management and organizational skills. It’s all fun in games until you realize just how much fun you’ve been having.


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Sports

The Paisano

August 24 2010

Sports Calendar

Sunday August 29

1p.m. Women’s Soccer vs. Houston Baptist

Wednesday September 1

File Photo

6:30 p.m. Volleyball vs. Baylor Men’s Cross Country Trinity Opener

Head Football Coach Larry Coker is committed to helping the Roadrunners be good athletes and good students.

Roadrunners gearing up for 2011 Stephen Whitaker

paisanosports@sbcglobal.net A clock in the office of Head Football Coach Larry Coker counts down the time remaining before UTSA’s first football game next fall. The big story for the summer was the agreement with Northside ISD in July for use of Dub Farris Stadium as UTSA’s practice facility. “We don’t have a stadium on campus or a practice facility, so we have had to go to Dub Farris, and we have had to work around the high schools,” Coker said. “We are in the process of raising money and building facilities.” On the same day UTSA reached an agreement with Northside for the stadium, Bob Wills of the PM group presented UTSA football with a check for $50,000 to fund scholarships for UTSA football. That check will provide for future players at UTSA. The coaches have

done everything to prepare players for fall. “We sent our players workout schedules to give them a plan to go by to get conditioned. Our coaching staff had a lot of busy work this summer such as putting out the playbooks. It was a lot of grunt work.” In the fall semester UTSA football will be busy recruiting players for national signing day in February and holding practices. “The other thing we will be doing is going about figuring out how we want to practice,” Coker said. “We have a lot of younger players and there are not any upperclassmen for us to say ‘follow his direction’ so we have to teach a culture.” This goes past the gridiron and into the classroom. With no games this season, Coker has a lot of time to help the young Roadrunners. “We want the players to live that culture. Make sure they do the right

thing--going to tutoring, academic coaching,” Coker said. “That’s a huge thing for us to be able to have that luxury to focus on academics.” In a year the Roadrunners will have to worry about somebody on Saturday but at least in 2011 it won’t be Texas or A&M. “Our schedule is completed: it has no D1 teams, some 1AA teams, division 2. We play Cal Davis; we play Georgia State, a start up program out of Atlanta with Bill Cray leading that one,” Coker said. “We are playing McMurry State, Eastern Oklahoma, my alma mater, and also playing two of the best teams out of the Southland--McNeese State and Stephen F. Austin. So we are playing really good teams from the outset, and it’s going to be tough.” A tough schedule in 2011 and a busy fall in 2010 is what UTSA football has to look forward to.

Friday September 10

11a.m. UTSA Classic Volleyball vs. Texas Pan-American 7 p.m. UTSA Classic Volleyball vs. UTEP

Saturday September 11

5 p.m. UTSA Classic Volleyball vs. Davidson

Sunday September 12

1:30 p.m. Volleyball vs. North Texas

Friday September 17

6 p.m. Men’s Cross Country Ricardo Romo/ Six Flags Fiesta Texas Classic 7 p.m. Soccer vs. Texas Southern

Sunday September 19

1 p.m. Soccer vs. Houston

Thursday September 23 6:30 p.m. Volleyball vs. UT Arlington

Friday September 24 7p.m. Soccer vs. TCU

Saturday September 25

3 p.m. Volleyball vs. Texas State

Friday October 1

7p.m. Soccer vs. Texas State

Paisano-Online com

Hat Trick Hello, and welcome back Vanessa Elizarraras paisanosports@sbcglobal.net

It’s a new semester and that means a new semester of sports. As usual the sports section will be covering UTSA sports such as volleyball, soccer, men’s and women’s basketball and football. Since, we want to bring to you the most thorough coverege that we possibly can, we will require your assistance. If you have questions about a certain team, or there’s something that you see that should be addressed in this section send it in. Also I will be introducing a new section in which we feature an athlete that played a great game or has been bestowed a certain honor. The column name might not make sense to some but it’s really quite simple. In soccer and in hockey when a player scores 3 goals it’s called a hat trick. So what I will be doing is disscusing a certain sports topic in three points and that’s why this column will be called the hatrick. For now I just wanted to let you all know what you can expect from the sports section.


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Sports

The Paisano

August 24 2010

Sports Calendar

Sunday August 29

1p.m. Women’s Soccer vs. Houston Baptist

Wednesday September 1

File Photo

6:30 p.m. Volleyball vs. Baylor Men’s Cross Country Trinity Opener

Head Football Coach Larry Coker is committed to helping the Roadrunners be good athletes and good students.

Roadrunners gearing up for 2011 Stephen Whitaker

paisanosports@sbcglobal.net A clock in the office of Head Football Coach Larry Coker counts down the time remaining before UTSA’s first football game next fall. The big story for the summer was the agreement with Northside ISD in July for use of Dub Farris Stadium as UTSA’s practice facility. “We don’t have a stadium on campus or a practice facility, so we have had to go to Dub Farris, and we have had to work around the high schools,” Coker said. “We are in the process of raising money and building facilities.” On the same day UTSA reached an agreement with Northside for the stadium, Bob Wills of the PM group presented UTSA football with a check for $50,000 to fund scholarships for UTSA football. That check will provide for future players at UTSA. The coaches have

done everything to prepare players for fall. “We sent our players workout schedules to give them a plan to go by to get conditioned. Our coaching staff had a lot of busy work this summer such as putting out the playbooks. It was a lot of grunt work.” In the fall semester UTSA football will be busy recruiting players for national signing day in February and holding practices. “The other thing we will be doing is going about figuring out how we want to practice,” Coker said. “We have a lot of younger players and there are not any upperclassmen for us to say ‘follow his direction’ so we have to teach a culture.” This goes past the gridiron and into the classroom. With no games this season, Coker has a lot of time to help the young Roadrunners. “We want the players to live that culture. Make sure they do the right

thing--going to tutoring, academic coaching,” Coker said. “That’s a huge thing for us to be able to have that luxury to focus on academics.” In a year the Roadrunners will have to worry about somebody on Saturday but at least in 2011 it won’t be Texas or A&M. “Our schedule is completed: it has no D1 teams, some 1AA teams, division 2. We play Cal Davis; we play Georgia State, a start up program out of Atlanta with Bill Cray leading that one,” Coker said. “We are playing McMurry State, Eastern Oklahoma, my alma mater, and also playing two of the best teams out of the Southland--McNeese State and Stephen F. Austin. So we are playing really good teams from the outset, and it’s going to be tough.” A tough schedule in 2011 and a busy fall in 2010 is what UTSA football has to look forward to.

Friday September 10

11a.m. UTSA Classic Volleyball vs. Texas Pan-American 7 p.m. UTSA Classic Volleyball vs. UTEP

Saturday September 11

5 p.m. UTSA Classic Volleyball vs. Davidson

Sunday September 12

1:30 p.m. Volleyball vs. North Texas

Friday September 17

6 p.m. Men’s Cross Country Ricardo Romo/ Six Flags Fiesta Texas Classic 7 p.m. Soccer vs. Texas Southern

Sunday September 19

1 p.m. Soccer vs. Houston

Thursday September 23 6:30 p.m. Volleyball vs. UT Arlington

Friday September 24 7p.m. Soccer vs. TCU

Saturday September 25

3 p.m. Volleyball vs. Texas State

Friday October 1

7p.m. Soccer vs. Texas State

Paisano-Online com

Hat Trick Hello, and welcome back Vanessa Elizarraras paisanosports@sbcglobal.net

It’s a new semester and that means a new semester of sports. As usual the sports section will be covering UTSA sports such as volleyball, soccer, men’s and women’s basketball and football. Since, we want to bring to you the most thorough coverege that we possibly can, we will require your assistance. If you have questions about a certain team, or there’s something that you see that should be addressed in this section send it in. Also I will be introducing a new section in which we feature an athlete that played a great game or has been bestowed a certain honor. The column name might not make sense to some but it’s really quite simple. In soccer and in hockey when a player scores 3 goals it’s called a hat trick. So what I will be doing is disscusing a certain sports topic in three points and that’s why this column will be called the hatrick. For now I just wanted to let you all know what you can expect from the sports section.


The Paisano Vol. 44 Issue 1  

The Paisano newspaper as published 8/24/2010

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