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San Diego NOVEMBER 2012 / PACIFICSANDIEGO.COM

SAN DIEGO’S WHERE, WHEN AND WOW!

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yellowtail sashimi with ponzu and jalapeño at katsuya by starck

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WE’VE BEEN WORKING HARD ON OUR

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SPECIAL THANKS TO CHEF SARA POLCZYNSKI, CHEF PETER OCHOA, SOUS CHEF NIKKI, AND BLIND TIGER COCKTAIL CO.


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Editor’s Note This Howard Alber selfportrait, titled “Ideas,” has a blinking light bulb built into a box frame and a power cord that plugs into an A/C outlet. Howard gave it to me when I was a kid living in Philadelphia, and it made me smile. As an adult, I’ve looked at it and felt nostalgic. Today, it makes me think about my future. I doubt the artist predicted his work would make such an impact. My grandfather, Howard Alber, was born in Philadelphia in 1911, back when horses pulled barges up the Schuylkill River. Howard Taft was president at the time, Salvador Dali was 7, and Marilyn Monroe wouldn’t be born for another 15 years. Point is, that was a long time ago. Also a long time ago, during the 1950s, Grandpop, a graphic and fine artist, designed the “P” for the Philadelphia Phillies. The team used his script letter on hats and jerseys when the Whiz Kids (Phillies’ nickname at the time) were in their heyday. I always thought that was pretty cool. Grandpop was Grandmom’s third husband (first one – my real one – died before I was born; second one was a boob, or so I’m told). They married in 1975 at my parents’ house. I was the ring-bearer. One of my earliest memories of Howard was sitting around a coffee table at the wedding. (My brother and I, ages 4 and 6 at the time, thought it was fun to call him “How-weird.”) I was fumbling with a Triscuit, trying and failing to spread cheese on it without its crumbling in my hand. Howard took the cracker from me, ate it, and then began spreading cheese onto a new cracker. I watched in awe as the deft hands of an artist at work smoothed so much cheesy goodness in every direction. Not a crumb fell on the table. How did he do it? With a smile, he handed me his masterpiece – a generous peak in the center, symmetrical on all sides. A perfect pyramid. I took a bite. Bliss. For years, I lacked the manual dexterity to build myself an hors d’oeuvre of that caliber, so Grandpop often obliged. “Make me a pile. Make me a pile,”

I said. Mom said he used too much cheese. Grandpop made them bigger when she wasn’t looking. Eating a little too much was always one of Howard’s signature moves. He probably never weighed more than 180 pounds, but he was never taller than 5’ 5”, either. Cute and cuddly as a bear, with an appetite to match. At age 95, Grandpop was still eating and drinking like there was no tomorrow. “In my case, there might not be,” he said, slurping shrimp with lobster sauce at the Chinese restaurant near his house. “Don’t tell Mother I ate this much salt.” Not telling her about the Reese’s Pieces he hid in the glove compartment was another rule. By this time, “Mother” referred to his fourth wife, the lovely Carolyn. My grandmother had checked out years before. Eventually, Carolyn died, too. Howard had outlived his fourth wife, and the loss devastated him. Carolyn, he told me, was his true love. By the time he moved into a retirement community at age 81, he had long observed his daily ritual of drinking five fingers of scotch and an ice cube before lunch. “One drink a day,” he said. Two or three of those drinks equals a bottle. For decades, Grandpop never missed a meal or his late-morning drink. But on October 17, he never woke up. I cried when I heard he died. It’s hard not to cry while writing this. But Grandpop didn’t want tears. He didn’t even want a memorial service. Instead, he wanted someone to display his favorite paintings in one big room, where everyone who loved him could come together around his art, sharing stories about his life and creating lasting friendships over copious amounts of food and drink. The party is this month in Philadelphia, so I dedicate this dining issue of PacificSD to Grandpop. Please join me in raising a drink and a cracker with cheese to Howard Alber. If you’d met him, you’d have wanted to hug him. And he’d have wanted you to eat well. E D I T O R - I N - C H I E F, David Perloff Howard Alber June 13, 1911 – October 17, 2012 Old as hell, young at heart and gone too soon. Love you, Man. See you on the other side.

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6 years in publication

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…and we’re just getting started. A

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vol.6

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issue 11

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NOVEMBER 2012

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF David Perloff

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Kenny Boyer MANAGING EDITOR Patricia B. Dwyer ASSOCIATE EDITOR Allie Daugherty EDITOR-AT-LARGE Ron Donoho CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Brandon Hernández, Wendy Lemlin, Brandon Matzek, Dan McLellan, David Moye, David Nelson, Tim Pyles, Frank Sabatini Jr. COVER PHOTO Brevin Blach CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Brevin Blach, Jeff “Turbo” Corrigan, Rob Hammer, Wendy Lemlin, Brandon Matzek, Kristina Yamamoto

PUBLISHERS David Perloff Simone Perloff

PROMOTIONS + CLIENT SERVICES DIRECTOR Alyson C Baker (alyson@pacificsandiego.com)

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“We continue to get a fantastic response to our ads in PacificSD – such a strong response, in fact, that we’ve just booked our sixth annual campaign. I’m excited to be advertising with you through 2012, as I feel that PacificSD truly reflects San Diego.” —Matthew Spencer, Owner, Analog, Firehouse, Vin de Syrah T welve

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DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Dana Schroedl (dana@pacificsandiego.com)

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INTERNS Catlin Dorset Ashten Goodenough Kelly Shryock Reach America’s Finest readers via print, web, social media and events. Read, click, connect...BOOM! 619.296.6300, pacificsandiego.com facebook.com/pacificsd, Twitter @pacificsd


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Contents 11.12 pacifics A N d I E G O . com

Features 44 Chain of Gourmand

Savor a progressive feast linking 10 San Diego chefs and their favorite dishes

54 Bordering on Obsession

The desire for delicious cuisine is luring foodies to Baja

60 The Yeast You Can Do

A how-to (and where, too) of San Diego Beer Week

64 The LATEST DISH

PHOTOS BY BREVIN BL ACH ON THE COVER: YELLOWTAIL SAHIMI WITH PONZU AND jalapeño AT KATSUYA (STORY PAGE 104). THIS PAGE: Braised beef cheeks WITH SMOKED TOMATO JAM at Urban Solace (story page page 50). S I X teen

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San Diego’s ultimate menu (special advertising section)


Contents 11.12 pacifics A N d I E G O . com

“the paTHos of things” by tim cantor (STORY page 32).

Departments C U R R E N T S FIRST THINGS 21 Coming To Terms Jerry Sanders’ days at City Hall are numbered, and he’s okay with that COOLTURE 24 Poise in the HOOD North Park stands tall among the hippest U.S. neighborhoods 24 Straight From the Hip A local filmmaker’s candid assessment

26 It’s About Thyme Chef Brian Malarkey spices things up with a new cookbook

38 What A Kick Sockers seek fourth straight championship season

OLD’S COOL 28 The Right Stuff Breaking bread and thinking inside the box

STYLE 40 Movember Paying more than lip service to a worthy cause

ART 30 Just Four Shows November museum and gallery exhibitions

42 Put a Lid On It Hot hats for her and him

SPORTS 34 A Shot Across the Bow College hoops make a splash on the waterfront

TASTE 79 Seasoned Eatings Spice up the holidays at San Diego’s oldest restaurants

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84 Market Watch Yes, we cans! 86 Sign of the Dimes A children’s charity’s signature gourmet feast returns 88 For The Birds A recipe for leftover turkey chili 92

LICENSE TO CHILL How and where to drink like a secret agent

GROOVE 95 Concert Calendar See who’s rockin’ America’s Finest 2 0 1 2

100

air Play FM morning show team has fun for a living

102 All-Star Castro A barman achieves near-celebrity status BLIND DATE 104 What’s Cooking A recipe for romance CALENDAR 110 eleven. twelve November events THINK 114 Free Bird And this bird you cannot change


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SEE WHAT’S PULSING THROUGH S.D. MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES pAgE 46

coming to terms

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POISE IN THE HOOD / a shot across the bow

Currents

STRAIGHT FROM THE HIP / what a kick /

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IT’S ABOUT THYME mo-mentum /

/ the right stuff PUT A LID ON IT

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just four shows

MAYOR JERRY SANDERS sips and quips UP AT KENSINGTON GRILL.

Coming to Terms

Jerry Sanders’ days at City Hall are numbered, and he’s okay with that By Ron Donoho / Photos by Rob Hammer Likeable San Diego mayor Jerry Sanders spent 20 years as a cop, but during the bulk of his professional career he has seemingly been putting out fires. Sanders retired as chief of the SDPD in 1999 to head up the troubled San Diego chapter of the United Way. In 2002, when the local Red Cross chapter got in fiscal hot water, he took over as chairman of the board. Three years later, San Diego’s mayor resigned mid-term, and voters picked Sanders to put things back on track. Stick a fork in this guy’s political career. He’s counting the days until his term expires; talks to us candidly about city politics; and muses about his favorite restaurants and craft breweries, alt-rock bands and a not-soon-enough vacation to Italy. (Continued on page 22) T went y – O N E

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(Continued from page 21) clue as to what he is going to do. You lost 96 pounds while you were mayor. Have the pounds stayed off? Yes. I keep saying I’m trying to lose more. Once you decide you’re where you want to be, then you start gaining it back. So for me, I have to continue to keep trying to lose it. What is your favorite local restaurant and meal? We’re seeing a resurgence of neighborhood restaurants like Brooklyn Girl [in Mission Hills]. In Kensington, we go to Bleu Bohème and the Kensington Grill. I like the hamburger at the Ken Grill, and the beef stew at Bleu Bohème…I also like The Prado. What’s your favorite local brewery and beer? I like them all. But I like Stone Brewing Company’s smoked porter a lot. I like all of Ballast Point’s beers. Green Flash is really good. I like to go to all the small breweries and try new beers. We know you like Pink Floyd; do you have other favorite bands? I listen to the same CDs I have in my truck, or I put together playlists on my iPod. And I have Bose speakers I hook up to my computer at home and play music in my backyard. I like alt-rock – Angels & Airwaves, Okkervil River. I like The Shins’ new CD. I mix that up with Yes and Pink Floyd and Rush. It drives my wife nuts. What does she listen to? She likes rap. And hip-hop. She listens to Eminem and some of those, and it makes me crazy… My own new favorite, though, is LMFAO. They are just a hoot. Have you seen that “Wiggle” video? Are you Gangnam Style? My wife just played that for me the other day. She said we have to learn how to do that Gangnam dance. And I said, “Oh, yeah, right.” What advice do you have for the next mayor? Don’t take yourself too seriously. And hire good staff.

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MAYOR SANDERS, PITCURED HERE AT KENSINGTON GRILL, USED TO TAKE A BITE OUT OF CRIME AS SAN DIEGO’s police chief.

A Walk in the Park

Mayor Jerry Sanders was included in a music video called “Jackin’ It in San Diego” on an episode of South Park that spoofed the nude, ranting, masturbatory meltdown of the co-founder of San Diego-based charity Invisible Children. (Look for it on YouTube.) “When it came out, I didn’t know about it,” says Sanders, who now has a framed screenshot of his animated depiction sitting on a shelf in his office. “I went into Starbucks, and the kid at the counter says, ‘You’re a star now. You were on South Park.’ I came down to the office, and somebody showed it to me. It was hilarious. My daughter said, ‘Dad you need to get out of politics right now. You’re never going to top today.’” (See if he tops it on page 114.)

comedy central

How will you spend your last day in office? It’s December 3. The new mayor will be inaugurated at 10 a.m. I will declare the rest of the day a vacation day and probably have a beer before 5 p.m. Will you put your stuff in a cardboard box? No. You’re going on vacation in Italy with your wife [Rana Sampson]. When and for how long? We’ll go for three months starting in January. We’ll go wherever we feel like. We’ll start in Rome and go down to Sicily. We don’t have anything booked. We don’t know how long we’ll want to stay in any place. Any job offers yet? I am going to go back to work. Nothing in politics – I learned my lesson. Politics is enjoyable to some people, not to others. What was your most difficult decision to make as mayor? A six-percent compensation cut for city employees was something I really deliberated about…The gay marriage issue was a tough one. [Sanders’ daughter is gay, and, in 2010, he tearfully and publicly reversed his stance on a state gaymarriage ban.] What prompted your “bullshit” comment at a press conference when talking about mayoral candidate Carl DeMaio? Well, I’ve been known for my language for quite some time. I did say, “Fu#k you, [Steve] Francis,” at a debate. I’m a cop. I’m not ashamed of my language. I try not to use it in public, and I think I’m pretty even-tempered about 99 percent of the time. Every once in a while I cut loose. Why did you then endorse DeMaio for mayor? I actually think he would be the best mayor, between him and that other guy [Bob Filner]. Carl is on the same page I am for fiscal reform and pension reform. I just think the other guy doesn’t have a

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currents

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FORBES RECENTLY named san diego’s NORTH PARK the no. 13 MOST HIPSTERFRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD in the u.s. below: DOMINIC BOGART PLAYS the leading role in the film “I AM NOT A HIPSTER.”

TOM H ARDY

poise

B r e t Pa w l a k

in the hood North Park stands tall among the nation’s hippest neighborhoods By Allie Daugherty

The last thing a hipster wants is to be labeled as such, but Forbes has done just that. In its September issue, the magazine ranked the Top 20 of America’s Best Hipster Neighborhoods, placing San Diego’s North Park at No. 13. “This recognition as a hip neighborhood means that this community appreciates the finer things that life has to offer,” says Angela Landsberg, executive director of North Park Main Street, the neighborhood’s business improvement district. To establish its rankings, Forbes enlisted the help of social media site Nextdoor.com, which assessed 250 U.S. neighborhoods according to criteria including:

STRAIGHT FROM THE HIP A local filmmaker’s candid assessment By Allie Daugherty

Walkability Number of coffee shops per capita Assortment of local food trucks Number and frequency of farmers markets Number of locally owned bars and restaurants Percentage of residents who work in artistic occupations

A film shot and produced in San Diego by San Diegans premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, which surprised its producer, Ron Najor. “I always thought of ‘I Am Not A Hipster’ as a movie that most people will see on the Internet,” says Najor, “but watching the movie at Sundance with huge crowds, and hearing them laugh and cry, really made me remember how great it was to watch a movie with a group of people.” Directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, “I Am Not A Hipster” tells the story of a young singer/songwriter as he wanders through San Diego’s music and art scene, trying to figure out his life after the passing of his mother. “The mission of the film was to try and make a good movie with our friends that we would want to see,” says Najor. “We wanted to make something that spoke to us, and hoped others would like it, too. It was not to bring awareness to the hipster culture.”

“Culturally diverse North Park is home to Craftsman cottages, cafes and diners, coffee shops, several microbreweries, boutiques and the North Park Farmers Market,” the article states. “The North Park Theater and the Ray Street Arts District are also bastions of creativity in the area.” Landsberg isn’t surprised the area received recognition. “North Park has attracted businesses, residents and visitors who are just plain friendly,” she says. “The fact that they are hipster-friendly is just a bonus.” T went y – F O U R

Check out “I Am Not A Hipster,” November 8 at UCSD’s Price Center theater (universitycenters.ucsd.edu). iamnotahipster.com /

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SAN DIEGO’S FINEST DUI DEFENSE

currents

YOU KNOW THE CHEF, YOU KNOW THE CUISINE, BUT YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOUR BLOOD ALCOHOL CONTENT

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it’s about thyme

Chef Brian Malarkey spices things up with a cookbook By Catlin Dorset With five San Diego restaurants under his belt (so far), it was only a matter of time before Bravo “Top Chef ” Brian Malarkey penned a how-to for diners wanting to know how to recreate his signature dishes. “We want you to come and have some drinks with us, have some great food, share some laughs – and that’s exactly what the cookbook is there to convey,” Malarkey says. Come Early, Stay Late provides aspiring chefs insight into how to cook up the “Asian Cowboy” flavors served at Malarkey’s Burlap restaurant in Del Mar, and the surf ‘n’ turf offerings popular at his new Herringbone restaurant in La Jolla. To sweeten the pie, the book, which hits stores late-November, also includes anecdotal accounts of Malarkey’s experience in the restaurant industry, not to mention dessert decadence from executive pastry chef Rachel King.

YOU CHOSE THE FINEST WINE, NOW CHOOSE THE FINEST ATTORNEY

Former prosecutor. Trained in blood and breath testing machines. Field Sobriety Test Instructor. SAN DIEGO HAS MORE DUI’S AN PER CAPITA TH TY CI R HE OT Y AN IN THE U.S.A.

If you’re above the legal limit, let Pete Mesich limit the damage.

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Brian Malarkey is executive chef and partner of five Enlightened Hospitality Group restaurants: Burlap in Del Mar, Gabardine in Point Loma, Gingham in La Mesa, Herringbone in La Jolla and Searsucker in the Gaslamp. (A Searsucker in Scottsdale, Ariz., is coming soon.) T went y – six

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Ch a n t e l l e P h o t o g r a ph y

A Bunch of Malarkey


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clockwise (from left): sohpie cubbison and her eponymous stuffing; this cubbisons’ store specialized in the melba toast that would become the base for cubbison’s famous stuffing; cubbison was the first to sell stuffing in a box.

Western Research Kitchens

TheRightStuff Breaking bread and thinking inside the box By David Moye Thanksgiving originated in Plymouth Rock, Mass., but one of the holiday’s popular dishes – store-bought stuffing – actually has its roots in San Diego thanks to a pioneering home economist by the name of Sophie Cubbison. Born in 1890, Sophie Huchting was raised on a San Marcos lima bean farm run by her German-born dad, a baker, and her mother, a Californian of Mexican descent. Beginning at age 16, she put

herself through college with money she earned by cooking, raising enough dough to attend Cal Poly San Luis Obisbo, where she was one of the few women in the country attending college. She majored in home economics and, in 1916, married salesman Harry Cubbison. The two ran a successful bakery specializing in Melba toast (a dry brown bread popular during the 1930s), which her father had taught her to make. “She was a pioneer who was really ahead of her time,” says Leo Pearlstein, who worked with Cubbison for 32 years until her death in 1982. “She was a health nut from way back and was using soy flour back in the 1920s.” But things didn’t start cooking for Mrs. Cubbison until 1948, when she created the eponymous brand of stuffing, which was the first ever to be sold in a box. She made it as a way to use the broken bits of Melba toast that couldn’t be sold. It was a revolutionary idea.

T went y – E I G H T

Before Mrs. Cubbison started selling her pre-made stuffing, it was a dish that was timeconsuming for consumers to prepare, as it requires drying bread before cutting it. At first, Cubbison sold the product to be used in recipes including stuffed eggplant and breaded pork chops, but when a group of turkey farmers got wind of her stuffing, they began working with her to promote both her product and their Thanksgiving birds. “She was charming and hardworking,” Pearlstein says. “When I first met her, she was crumbling the bread herself. She called it ‘kibbling,’ but I suggested she call it ‘crumbling,’ because at the time, dog food was called ‘kibble,’ and I didn’t want people to make that connection.” Mrs. Cubbison’s Stuffing hasn’t become a national brand like Stove Top Stuffing, which appeared in the 1970s (“It’s too expensive for that,” Pearlstein says), but it is

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the most popular brand in the 11 western states where it’s sold. Harry Cubbison died in 1953. Mrs. Cubbison retired in 1955 to travel and to work on her East County San Diego home in Highland Park. “She wanted to do that all her life,” Pearlstein says. “She wanted to see Europe and South America. She told me, ‘People all over the world make the same things but call it something different.’ And she would send my wife and I recipes on postcards. “However, no matter how much she traveled, she would always be home for Thanksgiving and she would go through the stores to see if they were stocked with the stuffing.” As for the lima bean farm where she got her start? “She held on to it until the 1960s when she sold it,” Pearlstein says. “She said she got more money from that than whatever she made from stuffing.”


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“beautiful monster” by tim cantor

y in the lboa galler a From a museums in B ming to p upco m r u la s fo a G re are onfirm Park, henings that c lsing ope is pu o. t a be t the ar gh San Dieg throu

Just Four Shows

11/3-1/30: Tim Cantor The Art of Tim Cantor, Gaslamp timcantor.com

November museum and gallery exhibitions By Patricia B. Dwyer

San Diego artist Tim Cantor adopts painting methods used by artists in the 1500s to create dark and magical imagery. Using pigments imported from Europe, he spends as much as two years applying up to 30 layers of paint onto wood paneling to produce powerful, moody scenes. “I’m really attracted to dramatic imagery,” says Cantor, “but there’s always two sides to it. Half the public sways toward the darker side, and half the public sees T H I R T Y

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the lighter and the goodness in the painting. That’s exactly what I’m after.” Cantor says the upcoming exhibition of his work, which will be on display at his gallery in the Gaslamp, is his “most powerful collection so far.” The November 3 opening coincides with the release of his second book, Tim Cantor, Paintings and Writings, which comprises never-before-seen works, sketches and poetry that trace his maturation as an artist. (Continued on page 32) N O V E M B E R

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(Continued from page 30) 11/10-12/29: Kelsey Brookes “Serotonin; Happiness and Spiritual States” Quint Gallery, La Jolla quintgallery.com Six years ago, Kelsey Brookes quit his job at a Mira Mesa biotech company to make art. Take that, American Dream. Hints of the North Park artist’s scientific background come through in “Serotonin; Happiness and Spiritual States,” a collection of his paintings that depict the molecular structures of hallucinogenic drugs and the neurotransmitter serotonin. “It just happened a little more naturally than actively mining a psychedelic experience and trying to represent that on a canvas,” Brookes says. “It comes from a different place. I haven’t quite figured out exactly what’s going on, but you can tap into it without having to do all those drugs.” Brookes uses phosphorescent paint, radiating lines and meticulous detailing to portray the molecules, conveying the palpable hallucinogenic substances as well as the experience and culture associated with ingesting them. “Just expect a lot of color, a lot of really, really intense details and a little bit of fun,” he says.

“The Painting lesson” by charles reiffel

11/10-2/10: Charles Reiffel “An American PostImpressionist” San Diego Museum of Art sdmart.org

“SERATONIN SPLIT” BY KELSEY BROOKES

“cho-looke, the yosemite fall” by albert bierstadt

11/10-2/10: “Behold, America!” Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, mcasd.org San Diego Museum of Art, sdmart.org Timken Museum of Art, timkenmuseum.org Three of San Diego’s largest art museums are pooling their resources to create an exhibition that will span all of their locations and display more than 250 years of American art. Highlighting pieces from their permanent collections, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the San Diego Museum of Art (SDMA) and the Timken Museum of Art will display 175 paintings, sculptures, photographs, prints, pastels, watercolors, installations and more. “It’s a great way to connect with American identity, culture and history,” says Amy Galpin, associate curator for art of the Americas at SDMA. “In many ways, it’s a visual history of the United States.” Because the exhibition will be split into three sections – forms, figures and frontiers, with each museum showcasing one section – viewers will be able to compare similar pieces created centuries apart and get a sense of the progression of artistic expression in the U.S. T H I R T Y – two

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Charles Reiffel’s paintings may appear tame to today’s viewers, but in the 1920s to 1940s, they were considered radical. Reiffel was a post-impressionist, meaning he didn’t depict life exactly as-is, but rather used vibrant colors, abstraction of forms and loose brushwork to create vivid and expressive scenes. Critics of his day either praised him as an “American Van Gogh” or shunned his work and considered him “too modern.” “Reiffel’s landscapes, whether modest sketches or monumental murals, appear to vibrate and pulse with life,” says Ariel Plotek, assistant curator at the San Diego Museum of Art (SDMA). “An energy and vitality is communicated by means of both color and composition.” More than 90 of the artist’s watercolors, paintings and sketches from SDMA’s permanent collection will be on display along with loans from The San Diego History Center, private collectors and public institutions across the country. 2 0 1 2


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SDSU Senior guard and returning starter chase tapley drives toward the hoop.

sdsu athletics

A Shot Across the Bow College hoops make a splash on the waterfront By Ron Donoho

Playing a basketball game on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier docked in San Diego Bay has been done before. This year, though, the matchup will be epic, as new NCAA championship contender San Diego State University takes on perennial powerhouse Syracuse University in a November 9 season opener. “This is really going to be a big deal,” says San Diego Hall of Champions/Sports Commission vice president Angela Lachica. Last year, North Carolina battled Michigan State in the Carrier Classic, a game played aboard the active U.S.S. Carl Vinson. President Obama attended, and security was a bee-otch. This year, in what is being billed as the “Battle on the Midway,” the Aztecs are playing the Orangemen aboard the U.S.S. Midway, a decommissioned carrier that is currently serving as a downtown floating museum. (Continued on page 36)

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FOOTBALL SEASON

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S PO R T S

(Continued from page 34) senior guard CHRIS Tapley (right) and junior guard xavier thames ATTEND A PRESS CONFERENCE aboard the uss midway.

WATCH ALL YOUR FAVORITE GAMES @

christian deleon

The silver-throated Dick Enberg (who announces everything from Padres games to Wimbledon), Steve Kerr and Erin Andrews are scheduled to host the game, which will be televised nationally on Fox TV (5 p.m.). This hoop-de-do is a ticket people will be scrambling to get their hands on, as organizers can build seating for only 4,000-5,000 fans on the carrier deck. Compare that capacity to SDSU’s on-campus Viejas Arena, which holds 12,414 for a basketball game. Rick Schloss, a spokesperson for locally based Syndicus Entertainment, which is partnering with the San Diego Sports Commission on this Veteran’s Day weekend event, notes that if the outdoor game gets rained out, the contingency location is the Valley View Casino Center. The facility formerly known as the Sports Arena holds 14,500 for hoops. So if you want a ticket and you aren’t an SDSU or Syracuse booster or part of the military (they get first dibs), start praying for rain.

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How the teams stack up

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San Diego Sockers / aaron jaffe

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November Games

11/3: vs. Sacramento Surge 11/10: vs. Real Pheonix 11/17: at Arizona Storm 11/24: vs. Toros de Mexico

what a kick

Sockers seek fourth straight championship season By Dan McLellan San Diego is Title Town thanks to the San Diego Sockers. Our indoor soccer team went a perfect 24-0 last season en route to winning its third straight Professional Arena Soccer League (PASL) and U.S. Open Cup championships. “Once you get a taste of a championship, it’s championships that drive the players,” says star forward and three-time PASL MVP Kraig Chiles. “It never gets old winning a championship.” Vying for their fourth straight championship in the 2012-13 season, the Sockers are on the verge of making history – they’re entering the season on a 37-game win streak, the second longest winning streak in U.S. professional sports history. That mark is just three games short of the Sioux Falls Storm (40 in a row, 2005-08) of the now-defunct United Indoor Football League. “We have to get to that 40 mark,” says head coach Phil Salvagio. “We have a lot of pressure on us. And with every game we win, there is more pressure.” Reaching that goal will be facilitated by the return of ageless wonder Paul Wright, who rejoins the Sockers this season. Wright has won six championships with the Sockers over three decades, which ties Michael Jordan’s accomplishment with the Bulls. He would have won a seventh last season had he not signed with the Anaheim Bolts to help launch their franchise. “I’m very excited about Paul Wright coming back home to the Sockers organization,” says general manager John Kentera. “We always left the door open for Paul to come back. My family enjoyed watching him play as a 19-year-old and T H I R T Y – E I G H T

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Sockers captain aaron susi (left), led his team to its third straight championship last season.

we will continue to enjoy watching him play at a very high level as a 43-year-old.” Wright is excited to join the team in a new capacity. “My role is to be a helper,” he says. “It’s funny to say at my old age that I can provide fresh legs, but my legs feel great, and I know I can help out. I grew up at the Sports Arena and know it like the back of my hand.” The Sockers were revived during the 2009-10 season, and for the last three seasons have played in the Del Mar Arena where they went a perfect 35-0. This season, the team will play in the Valley View Casino Center, formerly known as the San Diego Sports Arena and the Sockers’ home for nine championships. Our hometown heroes will also be infused with new talent. Notable signings include SDSU alumni forward Raymundo Reza and defender Matt Couch. “We are bringing aboard two quality young players in Raymundo and Matt,” says Kentera. “Both of these young men have the talent to play this game at a very high level, and both are outstanding individuals as well. They were great Aztecs, and now we expect them to be great Sockers.” Despite once again having an elite roster, Kentera is under no illusions that the Sockers’ path to another championship will be easy. “The PASL has expanded dramatically, and this should be the most challenging year yet for the Sockers,” he says. “This will be the greatest year yet to come. Bring out the family for indoor [soccer] excitement.” sdsockers.com

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Mo Better

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Mo-mentum Paying more than lip service to a worthy cause By Ron Donoho

Think of moustaches as hairy ribbons. They’re not pink like the symbol for the fight against breast cancer, but last year during November, nearly one million of these flavor-savers worldwide hovered over men’s lips to bring awareness to a disease that affects one out of every six guys. Movember is an international charity movement that bullies back against prostate cancer. On November 1, many manly men will shave their faces and begin to grow a fresh moustache, or “Mo,” for the month. Ladies can participate by becoming “Mo Sistas,” and help start fundraising teams or recruit dudes to get hirsute for 30 days. It’s been six years since the Australian-born

movement moved into the United States. Talk about Mo-mentum. Worldwide, $126 million has been raised. Last year, 145,000 Americans rounded up $15 million. Movember COO Jason Hincks says brand awareness doubled in the U.S. from 2010 to 2011. Who goes Mo? “The bulk of our audience is 18 to 35 years old, old enough to grow a Mo with their first ball of fire,” says Hincks, with Aussie flair. He adds that the longer the Movember campaign exists in a country/market, the older the demographic becomes. This year’s campaign theme is “Movember and Sons,” which is meant to encourage sons to talk about health issues like prostate cancer with their dads.

oneMotime At the end of the month, Movember participants are invited to attend regional Grand Partés, where mustachioed men dress up in costumes that befit their mos (think Tom Selleck, Ron Burgundy, etc.). The San Diego Parté will be held November 30 at Block No. 16 Union & Spirits (8 p.m. – 1 a.m.), in East Village. us.movember.com. movember

2012 GRAND PARTé EMCEE (and pacificsd editor-atlarge) RON ‘BURGUNDY’ DONOHO SHOWS HIS HAIR UP THERE AT MOVEMBER’S 2011 SIGNATURE FUNDRAISER.

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Growing a moustache doesn’t require looking like or a slouch or a sleazy 1970s porn star. For those eyeing Movember participation, Urban Shave Barbershop owner David Obdrzalek offers these tips for how best to grow and show a mo. Choosing a Style. “I look at how each guy’s hair grows naturally,” says Obdrzalek. “Is your hair fine, or do you have ‘holidays’ [gaps]? Guys with thin lips should definitely consider a moustache – it fills up your face and brings balance.” Upkeep. Electronic beard trimmers are the way to go, says Obdrzalek. He recommends (and happens to sell) the Panasonic Moustache & Beard Trimmer. It’s cordless, you can take it in the shower and it retails for about $25. Cleanliness. A moustache can make your upper lip dry and ruddy. Don’t forget to wash it daily. Our expert says you can shampoo and condition it, and/ or go the extra (s)mile by using a lava pumice soft scrub. The Big Don’t. The numberone mistake made by rookie mo-growers is slathering on too much shaving cream and using a multi-blade shaver. Hey, FuzzFace, you can’t cut what you can’t see! Instead, Obdrzalek says use a single-blade system and a clear, pre-shave solution like John Allan’s Slick Water. Urban Shave Barbershop 3774 Park Blvd, Hillcrest 619.297.4283 theurbanshave.com

“Guys with thin lips should definitely consider a moustache – it fills up your face and brings balance.”


Photography: Tom Stoddart © MMVI Copyrights and Likeness of La Dolce Vita © International Media Films


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Put a Lid on It

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Wear it with: black to dress it up or blue jeans to dress it down GAIN Fedora, $52

Wear it with: your little black dress SCALA Collezione, $42

Models: Ashten Goodenough, Nick Macomber Assistant: Cassie Ekbatani

Wear it with: a colorful fall sweater Jaxon Cap, $18.95 Wear it with: a brown dress, red tights and boots Stout Diamond Crown Fedora, $65

Getting a-head of fashion this fall By Ashten Goodenough / Photos by Jeff “Turbo” Corrigan

The Village Hat Shop opened in Seaport Village in 1980. Today, the store continues to be a big hit with throngs of browsing tourists and cruise shippers, while a Hillcrest location has become one of the city’s chief destinations for locals and visitors looking for a huge selection of styles and varieties. “You can turn a really dull, everyday outfit into something really fun with a really cool hat,” says manager Anthony Nuñez. “Or, if you’re just having a bad hair day, you can cover it up with a really cool hat, and no one will ever know.” The Village Hat Shop 853 W. Harbor Dr., Seaport Village, 619.233.7236 3821 4th Ave., Hillcrest, 619.683.5533 villagehatshop.com F ort y – T W O

Wear it with: a black or brown outfit to make the teal stand out Grizzelle Fedora, $60

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Wear it with: a basic top that accentuates the hot pink Laduree, $80

Wear it with: any outfit, because of its versatility in style and color Fort Point, $45

Wear it with: with blue jeans, a sweater and a scarf Miriam, $98

Wear it with: a black leather jacket, a fun skirt and tights Cape Wrath, $65

Wear it with: any style or color of plaid Lake Tahoe, $75

Craftsman Cassel Goorin sold his first hat from the back of a horse cart in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1895. More than 100 years later, hats still run in the family, as Goorin’s great grandson now oversees Goorin Bros., which operates nine hat stores in California, 15 more throughout the U.S. and two in Canada. “We want to get hats back into fashion and have everybody wearing them – a hat for every head, basically,” says Nicholas Jones, shopkeeper at the Goorin Bros. store in the Gaslamp. “It’s that extra little bit of fashion you can add onto every outfit to make things look a little bit more toned up…or toned down, if you want.” Goorin Bros. 631 5th Ave., Gaslamp 619.450.6303, goorin.com F ort y – T H R E E

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Chain of

Gourmand

Savor a progressive feast linking 10 San Diego chefs and their favorite dishes

By Frank Sabatini, Jr. / Photos by Brevin Blach

Back by popular demand (by many of the city’s top chefs), PacificSD proudly presents the second annual Chain of Gourmand, wherein a chef cites his or her favorite dish, and then the maker of that dish cites his fave. The only limitation: chefs must pick dishes from San Diego restaurants other than the ones at which they run the show. This year’s chain begins with chef Antonio Friscia, who dug his culinary roots while training in Italy and currently helms the kitchens of Stingaree, Campine Catering and Gaijin Noodle + Sake House in the Gaslamp. Friscia’s favorite dish of late – the hamachi

crudo at Herringbone – holds a tender spot in his heart, as he shared it this summer with his wife, Stacy, days before a burn accident left her in critical condition. “We’re planning on going back for more when she recovers,” he says. (PacificSD is thrilled to report that Stacy is on the mend. We can’t wait to see her back on the scene, enjoying her favorite dish with our dearest Antonio.) Friscia serves crudo (raw fish) at Gaijin, but he is particularly fond of the Old World Italian elements chef Amanda Baumgarten puts into her version at Herringbone: lardo, olive oil and spicy caper relish.

Antonio Friscia’s favorite dish

“Hamachi and pork fat – if they could elope to Vegas tomorrow, they totally would.”

Hamachi crudo at Herringbone Created by executive chef Amanda Baumgarten Lardo, a type of Italian charcuterie, delivers a bacon-y, fatty dimension to raw fish that is balanced by citrus. “Hamachi and pork fat – if they could elope to Vegas tomorrow, they totally would,” says Baumgarten, who introduced the top-selling cold appetizer when Herringbone opened in June.

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Herringbone 7837 Herschel Ave., La Jolla 858.459.0221, herringboneeats.com


Amanda Baumgarten’s favorite dish Truffle egg toast at Davanti Enoteca Created by chef/owner Scott Harris “It’s a show-stealer,” Baumgarten says. “I had it while sitting at the bar and reading The New Yorker during a quiet night alone that I rarely get. It’s amazing, but so rich that I couldn’t finish it.” Chicago transplant Scott Harris of Davanti Enoteca removes the crusts and hollows out the centers of Pullman white bread before layering it with Fontina cheese and fresh asparagus. He then inserts a warm egg yolk in the middle that is destined to ooze. The loaded bread receives a butter brushing before a light toasting in the oven. “It’s such a simple dish, but people go nuts for it,” Harris says.

Davanti Enoteca 1655 India St., Little Italy 619.237.9606, davantisandiego.com

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Scott Harris’ favorite dish Black cod saikyo yaki at Nobu By executive sous chef Andy Huynh “The skin is cooked perfectly, and the sauce has a little bit of sweetness,” Harris says. “I first had it at Nobu in New York for Valentine’s Day and loved it. Now, I get the entrée every time at Nobu San Diego, because it’s made exactly the same way.” Chef Andy Huynh has mastered cooking this top-selling dish, authored by famed chef Nobu Matsuhisa. The cod is first marinated in denmiso (miso, sake, sugar and sweet Japanese cooking wine), then broiled to a poetic crisp on the outside and served simply with pickled ginger. Expect melt-in-your mouth texture and sturdy flavors.

Nobu 207 Fifth Ave., Gaslamp (at Hard Rock Hotel San Diego) 619.814.4124, noburestaurants.com

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“The skin is cooked perfectly, and the sauce has a little bit of sweetness.”


Andy Huynh’s favorite dish Caprese salad at Sora By chef Noriyoshi Teruya “It’s different, because the tomatoes are in Grand Marnier – not too overpowering, but really nice,” Huynh says. “The salad also comes with burrata cheese instead of regular mozzarella, making it much better than other caprese salads.” Japanese herbs, creamy burrata cheese and tomatoes marinated in Grand Marnier comprise the caprese salad at Sora, a downtown newcomer that flaunts attention-grabbing Asian-Italian cuisine masterminded by chef Noriyoshi Teruya. The orange-flavored liqueur injects an elegant sweetness to the tomatoes, while a puck of young curds (the burrata) nurtures the tongue with the right measure of cream.

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“It’s different, because the tomatoes are in Grand Marnier – not too overpowering, but really nice.” Sora 655 W. Broadway, Downtown 619.564.7100, sorasandiego.com


Noriyoshi Teruya’s favorite dish Escargot risotto at Farm House Café By chef/owner Olivier Bioteau

“I love the flavor of the parsley butter and Parmesan cheese that goes into the recipe.”

“I used to live in Europe, and this is a very traditional dish,” Teruya says. “I love the flavor of the parsley butter and Parmesan cheese that goes into the recipe.” Vegetable broth meets Arborio rice in this silky risotto dish chef Olivier Bioteau of Farm House enhances with escargot. The rice is finished off with parsley butter and beurre blanc, giving the tender snails their rightful French flair amid a Roman injection of garlic and Parmesan. “A lot of people serve escargot with just garlic butter and bread. That is too ’80s,” says Bioteau.

Farm House Café 2121 Adams Ave., University Heights 619.269.9662, farmhousecafesd.com

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Olivier Bioteau’s favorite dish Pork sandwich at Carnitas’ Snack Shack By chef/owner Hanis Cavin

“There is a lot of pork with some sort of spicy sauce, all in one bun – perfect for a late-night dinner after I leave my kitchen.” F ort y – N I N E

Carnitas’ Snack Shack 2632 University Ave., North Park 619.294.7675, carnitassnackshack.com

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“It’s absolutely delicious,” Bioteau says. “There is a lot of pork with some sort of spicy sauce, all in one bun – perfect for a latenight dinner after I leave my kitchen.” Known otherwise as “The Triple Threat,” this Carnitas’ Snack Shack favorite is a circus of swine, offering pulled pork, bacon and schnitzel on a Kaiser bun. The pork is pulled from a shoulder cut after it’s braised for nearly seven hours with tomatoes and sweet onions. Chef/ owner Hanis Cavin, who garnishes the sandwich with house-made pepperoncini relish and aioli, says it’s “a little crazy, but with great flavors that are realistic.”


Hanis Cavin’s favorite dish Braised beef cheeks at Urban Solace By chef/owner Matt Gordon “The cheeks were gorgeous and rich without being mushy,” Cavin says. “They had perfect texture and went very well with the smoked tomato jam. You knew you were eating a quality beef product.” Grass-fed cattle serve as the source for these coveted cheeks, which chef Matt Gordon of Urban Solace rubs in a spice mixture before braising in red wine, celery and garlic. Gordon serves the dish with mustard jus and smoked tomato jam, which has been bringing devout carnivores back for more for the past four years.

Urban Solace 3823 30th St., North Park 619.295.6464, urbansolace.net

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Matt Gordon’s favorite dish Whole wheat pancakes with tart cherry syrup at Café Chloe By chef Katie Grebow “As a pancake connoisseur, I order these a lot,” Gordon says. “Their texture is really light, with an earthy flavor. And the sweet-tart cherry compote works very well.” Sticking to Café Chloe’s Parisian slant, chef Katie Grebow adds crème fraîche to the batter, a moisturizing trick she learned from her mother. The addition of wheat bran cranks up the healthy component in the pancakes, while a spot of brandy imparts a boozy undertone to the tart, cherry syrup. Protein is provided by a few tubby slices of apple-smoked bacon, which sit like ribbons atop this sweet gift for the palate.

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“Their texture is really light, with an earthy flavor. And the sweettart cherry compote works very well.” Café Chloe 721 9th Ave., East Village 619.232.3242, cafechloe.com


Katie Grebow’s favorite dish Soy chorizo pizza at Blind Lady Ale House by chef Todd Renner “The soy chorizo is made in-house, which is so cool,” Grebow says. “It has a moderate heat level and goes on top with chili peppers. They make it as a delicious pizza without turning it into a taco.” The soy chorizo at Blind Lady Ale House boasts 16 spices, including coriander, cumin and smoked paprika. Chef Todd Renner drapes the kicky faux meat over the pizza with poblano peppers from local farms, along with bright tomato sauce and Fontina cheese. The latter can be replaced with a vegan option. Either way, the pie washes down swimmingly with “the Lady’s” everchanging beer selection.

Blind Lady Ale House 3416 Adams Ave., North Park 619.255.2491, blindladyalehouse.com

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Todd Renner’s favorite dish Charred octopus salad at Isola Pizza Bar By chef/owner Massimo Tenino

“It’s a recipe inspired by my family when I grew up in Italy.”

“The kitchen nailed it perfectly with tender octopus and fresh ingredients that were very visible,” Renner says. “It’s a shareable salad that also has potatoes and celery in it, a classic Italian pairing.” Isolo’s chef/owner, Massimo Tenino, reveals that he first braises the octopus in wine, lemon juice and bay leaf before charring it inside his 900-degree wood-burning oven. “The process brings out the sweetness of the octopus,” he says. “It’s a recipe inspired by my family when I grew up in Italy.”

Isola Pizza Bar 1526 India St., Little Italy 619.255.4230, isolapizzabar.com

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B ordering on

Obsession at

the desire for delicious cuisine is luring foodies to baja S t o r y

the sleek campus of the Culinary Art School in Tijuana, alumnus Diego Hernandez, executive chef/partner at Corazon de Tierra in Baja’s Valle de Guadalupe wine region,

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demonstrates a stunning salad of deep green and burgundy amaranth leaves, heirloom tomatoes, Russian kale sprouts, purple borage flowers, golden butternut squash puree and pale ears of baby corn –including the surprisingly sweet silks – all grown in his restaurant’s gardens. The 25 ooh-ing and aah-ing class participants aren’t newbie culinary students, however, but a group of well established U.S.

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chefs and restaurant owners who had come from as far away as Hawaii and Boston to spend several days in the company of celebrity chefs Rick Bayless and Ricardo Muñoz, enthusiastically touring and tasting the border region from Tijuana to Ensenada. Suddenly, foodies have been making a run for the border in droves. Indulging in übernow Baja Med and locavore

Alejandro Alarcon

“ I c o o k f o r m e , an d h o p e f u l l y c u s to m e r s w i l l l i k e i t, to o.”

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cuisines, they follow in the footsteps of TV celebs like Bayless, Anthony Bourdain (“No Reservations,” Travel Channel) and Andrew Zimmern (“Bizarre Foods,” Travel Channel). Plating a dish of his famous marinated duck tacos in the open kitchen at La Querencia, chef Miguel Angel Guerrero says of the cuisine he first named, “Baja Med is what this


OPPOSITE CLOCKWISE (from left): chef hernandez of corazon de tierra in the valle de guadalupe; hernandez’s amaranth corn silk salad; corazon de tierra offers sweeping views of the valley; the restaurant’s naem roughly translates to “heart of the earth.” this page clockwise (from left): chef miguel angel guerrero of la querencia in action; the scene at tijuana’s el taller; chef guerrero’s five clam ceviche; guerrero and his wife judith medrano at their pizzeria eltaller.

region is all about. It melds together the street food from Tijuana; the seafood that fills the market stalls in Ensenada; Asian influences from Mexicali; and the Mediterranean-type ingredients, such as olive oils, wines, cheeses, meats and produce from the Guadalupe Valley and local farms.” An avid hunter, fisherman and diver, Guerrero gave his 11-year-old restaurant the atmosphere of a hunting lodge with animal trophies on every wall. “I cook for me, and hopefully my customers will like it, too,” he says, as he presents a ceviche that conjures up a day on a Baja beach, with five types of clams surrounded by a citrusy squid-ink sauce and garnished with cucumber, fried leeks, avocado and roasted garlic. Several blocks away, Guerrero’s wife, Judith

Medrano, greets customers at the couple’s trendy pizzeria, El Taller. The two met while they were in law school, and it was she who encouraged Guerrero to become a chef instead of a lawyer. In an olive grove in the Valle de Guadalupe, Guerrero opened his latest restaurant, Almazara, a year ago. These aren’t $2 taco joints, but prices are far more accessible than those charged by restaurants of comparable quality north of the border. The food is sophisticated, inventive and driven by locally sourced ingredients. At Diego Hernandez’s Corazon de Tierra, located in an idyllic setting reminiscent of Napa or Tuscany, floorto-ceiling windows open onto seven acres of organic gardens, where the cooks are often spotted picking the next course’s herbs and produce.

There is no standard menu. Instead, Chef Hernandez, nominated in 2011 and 2012 as Travel + Leisure’s Best Rising Star, serves a $55 seven-course tasting menu based on which ingredients are at their absolute best that day. “We grow all our own produce – from the ground, not greenhouses,” Hernandez says. “Growing in open fields, they have to fight for their lives, taking in the most nutrients from the soil, producing maximum flavor.” If there is a poster child for the Baja chef as a rock star, it probably is Javier Plascencia, whose sophisticated Misión 19 has been garnering mega-buzz from New York to Mexico City since its opening in January 2011. Even Anthony Bourdain put aside his usual snarkiness and named it the No. 1

“ W e g r o w a l l o u r o wn p r o d u c e – f r o m t h e g r ou n d, not g r e e n h o u s e s .” F I F T Y – F I V E

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restaurant in Baja. Plascencia downplays the whole rock star thing. “I love it, but I don’t see myself like that,” he says. “I grew up in the restaurant business and I started in the kitchen 30 years ago, as a kid, at the bottom. I trained at Mesa College and then traveled, gaining inspiration. I put in my time, I grew and now I am doing what I love.” What Plascencia loves is creating masterpieces like dry aged duck breast, its crispy skin topped with guava slices and intoxicated by a glaze of mescal and piloncillo, an earthy, caramel-like unrefined sugar. A tuna parfait appetizer is a celebration of the raw diced fish layered with a cloud of avocado meringue, Persian cucumber, tangy housemade yogurt, umami-rich (savory) soy gel and chicharron (fried pork


“ I wan t e d t o p r e s e n t t h e c i t y w i t h s o m e t h i n g p e r s o na l an d s p e c i a l an d g i v e t h e p e o p l e a r e a s o n t o c o m e o u t an d d i n e . ” rinds) pieces on top for texture contrast. His dishes play with straightforward ingredients and just enough molecular gastronomy magic to surprise, tantalize and intrigue. The restaurant encapsulates Plascencia’s belief in the positive future for Tijuana. “I opened Misión 19 when the reputation of Tijuana was at its worst,” he says. “I wanted to present the city with something personal and special and give the people a reason to come out and dine.” He and his family own about a dozen restaurants, but Misión 19 and the more casual seafood

showcaser, Cebicheria Erizo, are his creations. In August, Plascencia opened Finca Altozano, a seasonal al fresco restaurant set in the bucolic midst of the vineyards of Valle de Guadalupe. Last chance to catch it until next May will be Thanksgiving Day, with a sixcourse dinner featuring locally raised heritage turkeys. It’s not just Baja Med that’s knocking TJ’s dining socks off. In the trendy, somewhat Bohemian neighborhood of La Cacho, a South African chef and his Tijuana-raised wife have turned a 70-yearold house into the city’s only

French restaurant, L’Escargot Bistrot. Ryan Steyn and Susan Monsalve met while she was studying oenology in South Africa, where he had already been a chef for 10 years. When he followed her back to Mexico, he was amazed by what he found. “I fell in love with Baja,” Steyn says. “I couldn’t believe the variety of local ingredients available right here – the seafood, like bluefin tuna, octopus and sea urchin; the olive oils; organic produce; the meats – they are all so fantastic.” L’Escargot Bistrot rocks authentic French dishes as

well as what Steyn dubs “Baja cooking with French tendencies.” A beet terrine shines ruby-like, its fresh sweetness contrasting delectably with the bite of sharp goat cheese truffles and sprinkling of French sea salt. Tender tentacles of crispy grilled octopus crown a deep black squid-ink risotto with huge depth of flavor. Crusty bread, fresh from the wood-fired oven outside, enfolds a filling of mushrooms and asiago cheese, awaiting a slathering of pesto made from the basil growing in the intimate restaurant’s courtyard garden. About 25 miles east, the

Koran Ríos Koran Ríos

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opposite, clockwise (from top left): Javier plascencia’s duck breast With guaava mezcalpiloncilllo; plascencia plating his creations at misión 19; the sleek setting of tj’s misión 19. this page, clockwise (from top right): 70-year-oLd house-turnedfrench-restaurant, l’escargot bisrot; tijuana’s only french restaurant; south african Chef ryan steyn; steyn’s octopus and risotto negro.

GETTING THERE U.S. citizens must have a U.S. passport; a passport card; a trusted traveler card such as NEXUS, SENTRI or FAST; or an enhanced driver’s license to reeneter the U.S. from Mexico. Non-U.S. citizens must have compliant documentation as well. If you plan to drive in Mexico, stop in San Ysidro (or Tecate, CA) to buy car insurance for Mexico. U.S. insurance isn’t valid in Mexico – if you’re in an accident and don’t have insurance, you will be held responsible (and may be jailed), no matter who is at fault. Tijuana: If you don’t have a SENTRI or Ready Lane pass, the easiest thing to do is to park at one of the lots in San Ysidro (about $5) or take the trolley, walk across the border, and then take a taxi to the restaurant (about $5). When returning to the U.S., the pedestrian line is usually fairly short after 9 p.m., so linger over dinner and have the restaurant call you a taxi when you are ready to leave. Tecate: Follow CA 94 east from San Diego through Jamul (about 40 miles), then take CA 188 (about 2.8 mi) to Tecate, the country’s easiest border crossing. This is a beautiful drive, but curvy and very dark at night. Crossing back into the U.S., Tecate is a much easier and shorter crossing compared to Tijuana (except sometimes on Sunday afternoons and evenings). The border crossing at Tecate closes at 11 p.m.

3 toward Tecate and the Ruta del Vino (wine route). Option 2 (scenic route): Almost identical to the Tecate border crossing, follow CA 94 east from San Diego through Jamul (about 40 miles), then take CA 188 (about 2.8 miles) to Tecate. This is where things change from the Tecate crossing. Once across the border, follow Calle Lazaro Cardenas for several blocks and look for the signs for Mexico Carretera 3 and the Ruta Del Vino. Follow Route 3 south for about 40 miles to the Valle de Guadalupe. Ensenada: After crossing the border at San Ysidro, stay in the second lane from the right. Follow the signs that say “Rosarito Beach, Ensenada Scenic Route.” This road will take you along the Mexico/U.S. border. As you come to the top of the hill, move into the right lane. At the bottom of that hill, take the fork to the right. It is marked with arrows Rosarito/Ensenada/Ensenada Cuota. (Cuota indicates the toll road). There are three tollbooths in total (a little over $2 each). After the last toll booth, it’s about six miles to Ensenada proper. About one mile before you get there, you’ll come to a fork in the road; stay to the right, and this will take you into the front end of town. At the first signal, you will be on Boulevard Costero. The drive is about 1 1/2 hours once you cross the border. Take a Tour Don’t want to drive and have a group who wants to wine and dine through Baja? Five Star Tours and Charter Bus Company has regularly scheduled wine tasting and culinary tours from San Diego to Tijuana and the Valle de Guadalupe, and will custom-design tours for groups. Check bajatours.org or sdsuntours.com.

Valle de Guadalupe: There are two main routes to the Valle De Guadalupe from San Diego. Option 1: Cross the border at San Ysidro, take the toll road (“cuota”) along the coast towards Ensenada (see directions below for Ensenada) and, just before Ensenada, take Route

“ Baja cooking with Fre nch t e n d e n c i e s .” F I F T Y – S E V E N

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“ T e c a t e i s Baja ’ s b e s t k e p t s e c r e t . A s t h e h e a r t o f t h e T i j u ana / En s e na d a / M e x i c a l i t r i an g l e , a l l r o a d s l e a d h e r e , an d i t i s e x c i t in g f o r m e to in cor por ate the i n g r e d i e n t s an d i nf l u e n c e s f r o m t h e s e a r e a s i n t o m y p e r s o na l s t y l e . ” quiet town of Tecate might seem to be the least likely place to find an elegant restaurant serving shrimp with hibiscus flower mole, chile-crusted ribeye with Kahlua and espresso sauce, or duck confit in tamarind sauce. However, hidden away on a hilltop commanding a scenic view south towards mountains and the Guadalupe Valley sits beautiful Asao Restaurante, whose executive chef, Roberto Alcocer, serves up contemporary Mexican cuisine,

combining local ingredients and classic Mexican flavors with international influences and avant-garde techniques. Alcocer, who trained in Bordeaux, France, and Belgium, assumed the helm at the four-year-old restaurant in July. “Tecate is Baja’s best kept secret,” he says. “As the heart of the Tijuana/Ensenada/ Mexicali triangle, all roads lead here, and it is exciting for me to incorporate the ingredients and influences from these areas into my personal style.”

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Alcocer’s first month’s tenure saw Asao placing first in a prestigious region-wide restaurant-and-winery-pairing competition held in Ensenada. His winning dish, lamb in rosemary and prune sauce, will be featured in season as part of a weekly changing eight-course tasting menu. Asao’s little sister, the more casual Bistro Med, opened this past summer in a portion of the same beautifully landscaped and richly appointed structure to serve pastas, pizzas and other

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Italy/Baja fusion delicacies. The list of divine dining worth crossing the border for goes on. In the Valle de Guadalupe, chef Jair Tellez started a wine/ food obsession 13 years ago at his Laja, which continues to be a standout destination. At Adobe Guadalupe Winery, guests of the onsite B&B (and diners with advance reservations) can enjoy a four-course wine pairing dinner prepared by Chefs Martha Manriquez and Marcela Ruiz Chong. In Ensenada, Chef Diego Hernandez’s wife, Krista Velasco, opened her own kitchen last April at Cerveceria Wendlandt, one of the newest in a growing crop of trendy craft breweries. Everything there is made fresh in-house and locally sourced; Velasco doesn’t believe in freezers or processed foods. Last month, the second annual Baja Culinary festival (with four days of dinners and events throughout the region), as well as the multidiscipline Tijuana Innovadora exposition’s two days of culinary events and U.S./ Baja Battle of the Chefs, drew record numbers of visitors from Southern California to eat, drink and make merry. A year ago, few people were venturing into Mexico, but these days, the two Californias are coming together at the dinner table. Baja is back, and it tastes delicious.


opposite, clockwise (from top left): asao restaurante’s duck confit with tamarind sauce; roberto alcocer of asao restaurante at work; bistrO med serves up italy/baja fusion. this page, clockwise (from bottom right): the scenic setting of asao restaurante and bistro med in tecate; fresh ingredients at valle de guadalupe’s corazon de tierra; tijuana pizzeria el taller; l’escargot bistrot’s wood-fired oven; outside tijuana’s misión 19.

*All phone numbers shown are for calls placed from the U.S. Calls placed from Baja require dialing only the last ten digits of each number. Tijuana Restaurants Misión 19 Misión San Javier 10643, 2nd Floor, VIA Corporativo Building, Zona Urbana Rio 011.52.664.634.2493 mision19.com Reservations recommended. Cebicheria Erizo Ave. Sonora 3808 - 11 Recta Chapultepec 011.52.664.686.1564 La Querencia Av. Escuadrón 201 No. 3110, between Blvd. Sánchez Taboada and Blvd. Salinas 011.52.664.972.9935 laquerenciatj.com El Taller Av. Rio Yaqui #2969-B 011.52.664.686.3383 eltallerbajamed.com L’Escargot Bistrot Gobernador Ibarra 2730 at the corner of Jalisco 011.52.664.84.9999 bistrotescargot.com

Valle De Guadalupe Restaurants Note: these restaurants are all at varying distances off the main road, Route 3, (aka Carretera Tecate Ensenada). The closest kilometer marker is given, at which point there are signs pointing the way. Corazon De Tierra Rancho San Marcos Toros Pintos, San Antonio de las Minas. 011.52.646.156.8030 corazondetierra.com Shares a property with La Villa Del Valle Hotel and Vena Cava Winery in the El Porvenir Ejido, off a dirt road between kilometer markers KM-87 & KM-88 on Route 3. For the best directions, go to lavilladelvalle.com. Reservations recommended. Almazara KM-85, Route 3, Carretera Tecate Ensenada, Rancho Olivares 011.52.1.664.648.1267 Finca Altozano KM-83, Route 3 Carretera Ensenada-Tecate 011.52.664.166.6839 Seasonal. May not be open every day in November. Last day scheduled will be Thanksgiving Day. Reservations recommended.

Laja KM-83, Rte 3 Carretera Ensenada-Tecate 011.52.646.155.2556 lajamexico.com Reservations recommended. Adobe Guadalupe Winery, B&B and dining room in town of Guadalupe (aka Fransisco Zarco) off Route 3. Explicit directions on website. 011.52.646.155.2094 adobeguadalupe.com Reservations required to be let through the gate. Tecate Restaurants Asao Restaurante and Bistro Med Part of the Santuario Diegueno property including a conference center and brand new hotel, 214 Esteban Cantu, Tecate 011.52.665.654.4777 santuariodiegueno.com Provides pickup from the Tecate border crossing if diners prefer to park on the U.S. side and walk across (contact in advance). Ensenada Restaurant Cerveceria Wendlandt Blvd. Costero #248, 22870 Ensenada 011.52.646.178.2938, wendlandt.com.mx

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w-totoo) A hoe , h reiego w d (an San D k of r Wee Bee By Brandon Hernández

nearly every weekend, beer dinners

j e f f “ TUR B O ” c o r r i g a n

With festivals

The Yeast

on an almost nightly basis

and incredible local brews available at thousands of bars and restaurants countywide,

every week feels like beer week in San Diego.

But here in the nation’s craft beer capital, nothing quite compares to the fermentable free-for-all

that is San Diego Beer Week—

a 10-day span packed with more than 500 beer-centric events. Everything from pint nights to homebrewing seminars to grandiose fests with unlimited pours of hundreds of specialty brews will be on tap from

November 2 to 11.

So, cheers to beers from here. Have a great 10-day week!

You Can Do

The Harlot, The Widow, The Dandy – they’re not Welcome fictional characters, but the names of a superb cast of beers crafted by two men playing a big to the role in the future of San Diego beer. Friends and business partners Neighbeerhood Travis Smith and Doug Constantiner

Building a closer-knit community through craft beer

photos by jeff “TURBO” corrigan

are combining their collective experience and enthusiasm to craft quality ales in celebration of beer’s propensity for bringing people together. It’s what they and their rookie operation, Societe Brewing Company, are all about.

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My Word Terminology to help beer

Animal Subtraction

novices sound like they know what they’re talking about

Expanding the vegan side of sudsy cuisine Beer goes great with bratwurst, pizza, burgers, chicken wings and hunks of roast beast. Such pub grub and beer festival staples have carnivores’ appetites covered. Ditto for the more innovative fare served up at specialty beer dinners around San Diego, which often include adventurous takes on pork belly, short ribs, beef cheeks, charcuterie and the like. But what can vegans eat while drinking beer? Until recently that query had gone largely unanswered, but a pair of San Diegans, Kory Stetina and Derek Humbard, think they have the solution – LOVELIKEBEER. In just over a year, this dynamic duo has made tremendous headway, expanding the number of inventive, beer-friendly food options available to local vegans via pop-up dining events throughout the city. For each event, they’ve collaborated with the host venue’s chef, providing their knowledge of vegan ingredients to help develop ideal beer pairings for the dishes served. Those one- and two-nighters (held at sudsy spots like Blind Lady Ale House in Normal Heights, Hamilton’s Tavern in South Park and Tiger! Tiger! Tavern in North Park; plus farm-to-table restaurants including Sea Rocket Bistro in North Park and Local Habit in Hillcrest) have drawn hundreds of beer-thirsty diners – vegan and non-vegan alike – making a case for eateries to provide options for beer-loving vegans that go beyond grilled eggplant, steamed vegetables and mushroom everything. Despite their rapidly growing following, Stetina and Humbard remain a bit clandestine – and even they aren’t sure where they’ll be popping up next. Keep up at lovelikebeer.com and subscribe to their email list. Prefer something you can count on any day of the week? Check out LOVELIKEBEER’s Menu Series. A kimchee barbecue seitan dish they worked up with the kitchen team at Sea Rocket Bistro and pair with Green Flash’s Hop Head Red is on Sea Rocket’s regular menu. And just like with the pop-up events, a portion of proceeds from sales of that entrée benefits local charities.

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Ingredients: Beer is made from four core ingredients – malted grains, hops, water and yeast. Other ingredients may be added to provide additional flavoring, but these ever-present components are the foundation of every beer on the planet. Ales and Lagers: The type of yeast used is the differentiator and what lends trademark flavors to ales and lagers. Ales are produced using top-fermenting yeast. Lagers are produced with bottom-fermenting yeast and are fermented over a longer period of time at colder temperatures. Session Beer: “Session” refers to a lengthy period of time spent drinking several beers. “Session beers” are lower-alcohol brews that can be enjoyed, pint after pint, without having to cut the session short due to heavy inebriation. Imperial / High Gravity Beer: Both of these terms mean the same thing – high alcohol content. Imperial stouts and IPAs are stronger and, typically, more boldly flavored versions of their everyday base beers. Attenuation: Attenuation refers to how efficiently the sugars in beer are converted into alcohol during fermentation. Exceptional beers are well attenuated, meaning little sugar is left in the finished product, making the beer well balanced and light on the palate versus sweet and cloying. Acronyms: Geek out with the geeks by dropping BJCP (Beer Judge Certification Program). Beers are judged by BJCP criteria at the GABF (Great American Beer Festival), the largest annual beer competition and tasting event in the country, and the WBC (World Beer Cup), the biennial largest brewing competition on Earth. Beer Styles, Origins and Basics German: Pilsner (light hoppy lager), Hefeweizen (light wheat lager), Märzen (medium-bodied lager), Bock (light lager), Dopplebock (medium-to-dark strong lager)

ABOVE: (from top) lovelikebeer founders kory stetina (left) and derek humbard; farmers market etouffee with huitlacoche (corn smut) by chef nick brune from the “les bon temps” pop-up event.

1. inspect malt before miling. Mill malt. add crushed malt to mash tun with hot water. let mash rest. run liquid from mash off of grains into kettle. boil liquid. SOCIETE inspect hops on vines growing oustide. COMP pelletize hops. AN

The company opened in June, and its dual lines of Belgian-inspired ales and IPAs, which explore botanic-inspired nuances (read: more than just bitter bombs) are already garnering fans who congregate at its Kearny Mesa tasting room… just as Smith and Constantiner planned. With tons of space, a designated breweryabutting parking spot for a rotating array of food trucks and a set-up where patrons can carry their beer outside when ordering from those gastromobiles, Societe is well suited for making

British: ESB (light-to-medium-bodied ale), Pale Ale (light-to-medium-bodied bitter ale), India Pale Ale (lightto-medium-bodied abundantly bitter ale), Brown (mediumbodied dark ale), Stout (dark ale) Belgian: Wit (light wheat ale), Saison (light effervescent ale), Dubbel (medium-bodied ale), Trippel (light strong ale), Quadruppel (dark strong ale)

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PLANNING A HEAD

Route, Route, Route for the Home Team

With 500-plus events taking place during San Diego Beer Week, it’s crucial to pick and choose. Here are day-by-day best bets for a full-bodied experience. For more information on each, or the week as a whole, check out the official Beer Week website: sdbw.org.

A trio of beer-touring options for your imbibing pleasure

Vista

Nearly every San Diego community has its own brewery, but some areas are more saturated than others. We’ve divided the county into three brewery-heavy beertouring tracks, so you can conquer them in the most efficient manner possible.

Mother Earth Brewing Co. 206 Main Street 760.726.2273, motherearthbrewco.com Few municipalities are as supportive of craft brewers as this North County berg. Start by sampling the wide-ranging creations of former nano-brewery Mother Earth Brew Co. at its expansive new tap house in the heart of the redeveloped Historic Old Town area.

Iron Fist Brewing 1305 Hot Spring Way #101 760.216.6500, ironfistbrewing.com Scoot over to the usually packed hotspot, Iron Fist Brewing, for largely Belgian offerings and barrel-aged goodness.

Port Brewing Company / Lost Abbey 155 Mata Way #104, San Marcos 800.918.6816, portbrewing.com, lostabbey.com Alternate pucker-inducing sours, west coast IPAs and Belgian ales at this world-renowned beer tour destination, serving beers from Port Brewing and The Lost Abbey.

Aztec Brewing 2330 La Mirada Drive #300 760.598.7720, aztecbrewery.com Brews flavored with Mexican chilies and spices await at nearby Aztec Brewing.

Indian Joe Brewing 2379 La Mirada Drive indianjoebrewing.com New neighbor Indian Joe Brewing infuses ingredients utilized by owner and brewer Max Moran’s Luiseño Indian ancestors.

Miramar

AleSmith Brewing Company 9368 Cabot Dr. 858.549.9888, alesmith.com Take Miramar Road to 2009’s best small brewing company in the U.S., AleSmith.

Hess Brewing 7955 Silverton Ave. #1201 619.887.6453, hessbrewing.com Get a glimpse of what these now vaunted operations looked like in their earlier days with a stop at artisanal nano, Hess.

Ballast Point 10051 Old Grove Rd. 858.695.2739, ballastpoint.com Hard to believe, but the most stocked beer track in San Diego begins in…Scripps Ranch? Kick things off at the recently expanded tasting room of 2010-11 best Rough Draft Brewing small brewing company in the 8830 Rehco Rd. D world, Ballast Point. 858.453.7238, roughdraftbrewing.com Take a short trip to one of the most comfortable tasting rooms in San Diego at Rough Draft Brewing.

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Northeast Stumblefoot Brewing 1784 La Costa Meadows Dr #103, San Marcos stumblefoot.com Begin with a chipotle stout at Stumblefoot Brewing in south San Marcos’ University Commons area. Rip Current Brewing 1325 Grand Av #100, San Marcos 760.481.3141, ripcurrentbrewing.com Next, head for the 78 and one the county’s newest and most anticipated breweries, Rip Current, for beers brewed by Paul Sangster, 2011’s best homebrewer in America.

Latitude 33 1430 Vantage Court # 104 760.913.7333, lat33brew.com Down the road is Latitude 33, a promising newcomer making beers high in flavor but low in alcohol, so they can be enjoyed in greater quantity.

OFFBEAT Brewing Company 1223 Pacific Oaks Place #101, Escondido 760.294.4045, offbeatbrewing.com Head to Escondido for a pre-Stone session ale or two from newcomer OFFBEAT Brewing.

Green Flash Brewery 6550 Mira Mesa Blvd. 858.622.0085, greenflashbrewery.com Next up is Mira Mesa’s rapidly expanding house that hops built, Green Flash Brewing.

New English Brewing 11545 Sorrento Valley Rd. #305 619.857.8023, newenglishbrewing.com Sip proper pints of traditional British ales at New English Brewing in Sorrento Valley.

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Stone Brewing Company 1999 Citracado Parkway, Escondido 760.471.4999, stonebrew.com With a brewery sporting its own farm-to-table restaurant and one of the best stocked bars in the county, Escondido’s Stone Brewing Company seems like a great place to start, but plan to end up there instead.

Karl Strauss 9675 Scranton Rd. 858.587.2739, karlstrauss.com Still thirsty, or just need a place to detox? Get one last brew and edible sustenance on the majestic outdoor patio at Karl Strauss’ Sorrento Mesa breweryrestaurant.

Friday, November 2 Book Signing at Mission Brewery: Last year, Chefs Press brought nearly every brewer in San Diego together for the signing of its first book, San Diego’s Top Brewers. A number of them will be back for this event, this time joined by chefs and culinarians who contributed to Chefs Press’ new San Diego- and beer-centric cookbook, Brew Food. Saturday, November 3 San Diego Brewers Guild Festival: Expected to draw 4,000, this festival, stocked exclusively with beers from all of San Diego’s brewing companies, will be the biggest party this 10-day span has to offer. Get in there and drink up our sudsy subculture. Sunday, November 4 Green Flash Brewing Brunch and AleSmith Cheese Night at Urge Gastropub: Come early and get midday food paired with Green Flash beer. Show up a bit later and discover cheeses from AleSmith’s work-inprogress offshoot fromage biz, or hold down a barstool and do both. Monday, November 5 10th Anniversary Beer Release Party at Green Flash Brewing Company: Check out a Flanders-style sour red ale brewed to celebrate a decade of Green Flash beer at the company’s brewery, located, not coincidentally, at the corner of Mira Mesa Boulevard and Flanders Drive. Tuesday, November 6 Night of a Million Zillion Speedways at O’Brien’s Pub: AleSmith owner and brewmaster Peter Zien is bringing on multiple versions of Speedway Stout, a beer considered by most to be the world’s best imperial stout (most rate it 99 or 100). ‘Nuff said.

new friends over brews as good as, if not better than, those from San Diego’s most established brewing companies. The key to that straight-out-of-thegate quality is Smith and Constantiner’s hearty brewing chops, earned at some of the country’s most renowned brewing companies – Russian River Brewing Company in Santa Rosa, California, and The Bruery in Orange County. Both companies specialize in creating beers that go beyond everyday pale ales, ambers and

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Wednesday, November 7 Hamilton’s 4th Annual Frisbee Golf Tournament at Morley Field: Frisbee golf is so popular among brewers it could qualify as the industry’s unofficial sport. Fling, nosh and drink with some of San Diego’s finest at this spirited athletic competition. Thursday, November 8 Brewmaster’s Dinner at Local Habit: Meet Hess Brewing owner and brewmaster Michael Hess over five courses of Southern-tinged fare designed to pair perfectly with Hess’ ales and lagers at this Hillcrest haven for farm-to-tablers. Friday, November 9 First Anniversary Party at Monkey Paw Pub & Brewery: Toast the first 365 days of this instantly successful East Village brewpub’s promising life with several of their many diverse beers. Saturday, November 10 Second Saturday at Hamilton’s Tavern: Hamilton’s Tavern’s Second Saturday events are always epic, jam-packed affairs. Inject Beer Week fever and beers from NorCal visitor, Marin Brewing Company, and it’s bound to be even, um, epic-er? Sunday, November 11 Beer Garden at The Lodge at Torrey Pines: Each year, toques from Chef’s Celebration, a non-profit supporting the education of young kitchen professionals, gather to push beerand-food pairing into the stratosphere at this AAA five-diamond resort. Eleven local chefs, 22 local beers, a Pacific Ocean overlook…it’s the perfect way to close out ten extraordinary days of beery fun.

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

beer-vana

San Diego has become the beer capital of the U.S. It’s hard to believe that, in 1989, there were zero operating brewhouses in San Diego County. No one could have guessed then that, two decades later, America’s Finest would be known as nirvana for craft beer lovers. But, thanks to the establishment of local companies including Stone Brewing, Ballast Point, AleSmith and Karl Strauss – which blazed a trail with passion and full-flavored ales and lagers – that’s exactly what happened. Today, San Diego is home to almost 60 operating brewhouses. Two local operations are ranked among the country’s largest craft brewing companies (Stone at No. 11, Karl Strauss at No. 44). Even more notable, two San Diego businesses have been named the best small brewing company in the country (AleSmith – 2008, Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey – 2007); three have been named the best small brewing company in the world (Ballast Point – 2010/11, Port Brewing/The Lost Abbey – 2008, Oggi’s – 2004/5); and local chain Pizza Port has won the best U.S. brewpub designations for three consecutive years. This success has inspired businesspeople and homebrewers to get in on the action, adding their own flavors to the local beer scene. Currently, there are nearly 30 upcoming brewhouses in the planning stages, most of which are slated to open before the end of 2013. This growth not only provides a wealth of quaffable options for beer drinkers, but also generates jobs for citizens. According to the San Diego Brewers Guild, the local brewing industry accounts for approximately 7,000 jobs throughout the county. On top of that, it’s an industry that provides a great deal of stability – craft beer’s most successful industry growth has occurred in the midst of some of the worst economic conditions in our nation’s history. No matter what, people want beer. But why has beer been such a huge hit in San Diego specifically? Most brewers cite the same key ingredient – weather. San Diego’s ever-sunny climate is perfect for year-round beer craving and consumption, and it’s also a draw for those skilled in the fermentation arts. One of the best things about brewing is the fact that it can be done almost anywhere. So, if a brewer has their pick of where to brew, why not pick a place as pleasant and ale-accommodating as San Diego? Take that, St. Louis!

9. measure pelletized hops. add hops to boil. after cooling, send to fermenter. add yeast to fermenter. take notes during entire process. allow beer to ferment. refridgerate and enjoy. allow sour beers to age in barrels.

porters, instead leaning heavily into the realm of barrel-aged stouts and sour beers. Societe’s first oak-infused offering is a robust, chocolaty imperial stout dubbed The Butcher. But the best is yet to come. Smith and Constantier have a storage space filled with vino-stained barrels from Napa’s Stag’s Leap Winery, from which a third line of sour ales will emerge in roughly a year-and-a-half. San Diego Beer Week 2014 is sounding tastier already.

TIME TO DRINK !

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HI There A Hawaiian beer returns to San Diego

Fans of Kona Brewery’s Pipeline Porter can say “Aloha” to the Hawaiian beer once again as it makes its way to the mainland for the seventh year. Available until December, the seasonal brew makes a name for itself with the inclusion of its 100% Kona coffee, which is grown on the Big Island. But don’t let the inclusion of this ingredient keep you up at night.

“The beer has a negligible amount of caffeine,” says brewing operations manager Anthony Bledsoe, who oversees the team who makes the beers at Kona. “The coffee is added for flavor to round out the robustness of the beer. The smooth nature of Kona coffee really complements the profile of our porter.” The drink should be paired with coldweather foods such as stews and roasts. It’s also meant to be a session beer at 5.4% ABV (alcohol by volume), meaning “you can have more than one and not feel the alcohol’s effects too strongly,” Bledsoe says. The brewer also says Pipeline’s complex blend of roasty flavors and aromas mean a different appeal to different drinkers. “There’s a wide range of reviews and notes that people detect,” he says. “We have heard hints of cola, raisin and caramel – among others like chocolate and nuttiness – are detected.” —Allie Daugherty


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the latest dish SAN DIEGO’S ULTIMATE DINING GUIDE

WIN $750 IN GIFT CARDS

$50 FROM EVERY RESTaurant IN THIS DINING GUIDE PLAY AT FACEBOOK.COM/PACIFICSD


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barleymash

It’s no secret…the chef spiked the menu A Verant Group Establishment, barleymash is the Gaslamp’s fun, high-energy restaurant and bar that celebrates American culture through progressive bar fare based on two barroom staples, beer and bourbon. Chef Kevin Templeton created the menu himself, designed the kitchen and utilizes his classic, upscale style of cooking to create fun, non-pretentious dishes. At barleymash, the name refers to the typical grain mixture used in the brewing and distillation process of both beer and bourbon. From StoutBraised Short Ribs to Car Bomb Cake, the notion of pairing ideas is omnipresent in both the menu and the aesthetic at barleymash. The dining room includes three large communal tables, which foster a sense of gathering where deliciously innovative food, conversation and drink can be shared amongst friends and neighbors. At barleymash, you’ll find that every dish is creatively crafted to include a key ingredient to the bar scene: booze. VIBE: Laidback, upscale, complements the Gaslamp scene with a warm, modernist design and feel. SPECIALTY: Booze-infused menu items. VARIETY: Burgers to barley pies. AVERAGE $: $15 per entrée.

LEFT: Nurturing a passion for cooking since the age of 17, Chef Kevin Templeton brings passion for sustainability and local purveyors to barleymash. RIGHT: Set amidst reclaimed wood from the original foundation, barleymash supports San Diego’s brewing community with 30 local beers on tap. barleymash / 600 5th Ave. / Gaslamp 619.255.7373 / facebook.com/barleymash / barleymash.com


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Katsuya by Starck A feast for the senses

Downtown’s newest urban hotspot combines masterful Asian cuisine developed by chef Katsuya Uechi with posh, contemporary environs dreamt up by design icon Philippe Starck. An über-fresh array of sea fare – including delicacies like toro, sea urchin and yellowfin collar – is done justice in some of the city’s finest sushi, sashimi and warm preparations, including skewers grilled over a traditional Japanese robata grill. Katsuya also boasts specialty cocktails featuring unique ingredients meant to stimulate the senses, including the soothing Watermelon Cucumber Mojito and the adventurous Burning Mandarin made with mandarin vodka, seranno chili, lemon, orange and cranberry juice. Enjoy either over dinner or in Katsuya’s chic bar, which features a Daily Double Social Hour where all specialty cocktails and a selection of signature dishes are available for $7 from 4 to 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. to close.

VIBE: Cutting-edge and captivating; stimulating, yet comfortably laidback urban oasis. SPECIALTY: The miso-marinated black cod and crispy rice with spicy tuna are legendary. VARIETY: Artfully plated sushi and non-sushi dishes, as well as a vast array of robata-grilled specialties. AVERAGE $: Starters, $17; robata, $4; sushi and sashimi, $7; rolls, $12.

FROM LEFT: Spicy albacore sashimi with crispy onion; chef Adam Cho presents the signature Katsuya Roll, complete with salmon, tuna, yellowtail, scallop and avocado; Katsuya’s famous crispy rice with spicy tuna. Katsuya by Starck / 600 F St. / Gaslamp Reservations: 619.814.2000 / facebook.com/KatsuyaBySBE / sbe.com/katsuya/san-diego


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WACHENA

Contemporary Dining at Sycuan Casino Only all-natural meats and produce make the menu at Wachena, the popular steakhouse at Sycuan Casino. Homegrown Chef Andrew Modrzejewski, who understands classic and contemporary cuisines equally well, serves exciting fare built solidly on “nothing but the best.” His policy means that patrons feast on all-natural steaks from strictly free-range cattle, and Wachena’s chicken and lamb meet the same standards. Daily catches swim in from local waters. “Comfort food with a twist” is sensational when devised by Chef Andrew, who bakes Kobe meatloaf in muffin pans “so it has a really cool look,” and adds elegant sauce chasseur. Equally exciting and unique: Carne asada ravioli, a Mexican-Italian sensation with a spicy-suave, roasted chilescreamed corn sauce. Simple comfort – and delicious! For a WOW of a lamb-rack, this all-natural Wachena entrée is seared, roasted to perfection and paired with chef Andrew’s brilliant organic huckleberry demiglace sauce. Dinner starts with homemade soup and salad, and includes two plush sides. VIBE: High-spirited gamblers and other lively guests create an exciting mood. SPECIALTY: New York steak paired with a North Atlantic lobster tail. VARIETY: Impressive steaks, seafood and lamb racks are served alongside tantalizing comfort food. AVERAGE $: $24.95 for steak and lobster.

LEFT: Chef Andrew shows off a pair of Wachena favorites. RIGHT: From savory steaks to succulent seafood, everything is created fresh to order. WACHENA RESTAURANT AT SYCUAN CASINO / 5469 Casino Way / El Cajon 619.445.6002 / facebook.com/sycuancasino / sycuan.com


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Ciro’s Pizza & Beerhouse EAST COAST PIZZA WITH A WEST COAST VIBE

Celebrate San Diego Beer Week (Nov. 2 – 11) at Ciro’s Pizzeria & Beerhouse, the most diverse craft beer scene in Pacific Beach. Derek DiNublia and Kenny Casciato oversee this sudsy domain of 80 craft beers, which includes 22 rotating taps and adds up to PB’s largest selection. “We feature local, regional and global craft beers, but focus on the unbelievable wealth of craft beers available to us in San Diego County,” says DiNublia. “And we take pride in our pizza,” Casciato says. “Our pie is hand-tossed, thin-crust East Coaststyle.” Enjoy a slice or a whole pizza at one of Ciro’s high-top tables, or chill at home with delivery until 2:30 a.m. on weekends. Check out the Wednesday Night Locals’ special (8 p.m. - close), featuring a free slice with purchase of any local draft beer. “Our everyday specials make it easy for anyone to enjoy Ciro’s,” Casciato says.

VIBE: Relaxed and friendly, with great people-watching on the sidewalk patio. SPECIALTY: Tremendous selection of craft beers and sensationally savory, creative pizzas. VARIETY (FOOD): Authentic, hand-tossed, thin-crusted East Coast-style pizzas. VARIETY (BEERS): The largest collection of craft beers in Pacific Beach, featuring “hoppy” IPAs. AVERAGE $: Specialty pizzas, $19.99.

ABOVE: Ciro’s Buffalo Chicken Pizza is a local favorite. It’s topped with chicken breast, house-made buffalo sauce, bleu cheese crumbles and West Coast ketchup-ranch dressing.

Ciro’s Pizza & Beerhouse / 967 Garnet Ave. / Pacific Beach 858.483.4624 / facebook.com/cirospb / cirossd.com


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gaijin noodle +Sake house You Can Slurp Your Noodles...We Won’t Tell

Fire it up at Gaijin Noodle + Sake House. Downtown’s first and only yakitori specialist serves a hip, lively vibe and an amazingly creative menu. At the yakitori bar, watch the chef carefully grill Gaijincreated delights like jumbo asparagus wrapped in deluxe Nueske bacon over smoldering binchotan, log-shaped Japanese coals that transform skewers of choice morsels into succulent miniature banquets. Everybody seems to love the bao bao, succulent steamed buns jammed with fillings you only find here: pork carnitas garnished with tangy sunomono salad, peanuts and red rock sugar. The karaage chicken bao features spicy cabbage slaw and cilantro. When the gong chimes on the hour, guests hoist chef-hosted sake shots and shout,“kanpai!”

VIBE: Welcoming, friendly and focused on community dining. SPECIALTY: Creative Japanese cuisine made with the finest local and sustainable ingredients. VARIETY: Delicious Japanese-style tapas, bao bao stuffed buns, yakitori skewers and slurpable noodles. AVERAGE $: Yakitori, $6; noodle bowls, $10.

CLOCKWISE (from above): The Seven Samurai is a favorite among Gaijin regulars and includes a variety of sizzling skewers chosen daily by the chef; Gajin’s signature bao bao fills succulent steamed buns with carnitas pork, tamarind-braised jalapeño and a sprinkling of red rock sugar and peanuts; the interior of Gaijin was inspired by the gritty streets of Tokyo’s red light district, incorporating a massive street art-style mural.

Gaijin Noodle + Sake House / 627 4th Ave. / Gaslamp Reservations: 619.238.0567 / facebook.com/gaijinsd / gaijinsd.com


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glass door taste the world, from our view

Glass Door’s new executive chef, Thomas Depew, has 19 years of kitchen experience. He assisted in the creation of the Fort Wayne, IN, chapter of the Slow Foods movement; learned the art of Wagyu beef from the Tanaka family of Japan; and cooked at the James Beard House in 2010. The new canvas of Depew’s hard-earned creativity is Glass Door, a restaurant that offers the casual sophistication the city is known for and features a seafood-based menu that draws influence from every major culinary capital in the world. Depew’s new menu is complemented by craft cocktails and local microbrews. Come sit at one of our family-style tables to enjoy a spectacular meal, enhanced by an exquisite panoramic view of the San Diego Marina.

Glass Door’s signature sea fare: seared, locally caught grouper over beluga lentils and smothered with etouffee topped by fennel-parsley salad. VIBE: Casual/modern sophistication, panoramic bay views. SPECIALTY: Seafood, craft cocktails, unique local beers. VARIETY: Artful small plates and global cuisine made with locally sourced produce and seafood. AVERAGE $: $18 per entrée.

LEFT: A glimpse of the exquisite panoramic view of the

San Diego Marina seen from Glass Door. RIGHT: Glass Door’s executive chef, Thomas Depew. Glass Door / 1835 Columbia St., 4th floor of the Porto Vista Hotel / Little Italy Reservations: 619.564.3755 / facebook.com/glassdoorsd / glassdoorsd.com


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ROPPONGI

award-winning asian-fusion cuisine San Diego’s pioneer in Asian-fusion cuisine is a stylish solution for diners who are undecided between Hong Kong duck and prime rib eye with Hollandaise sauce. The AsianEuro menu, authored by acclaimed chef Stephen Window, spotlights everything from boldly constructed sushi rolls and glistening sashimi to honey-basil short ribs and beautifully marbled steaks. Mongolian tiger shrimp over pineapple fried rice and crispyskinned Jidori chicken are among the popular mainstays. An expanded tapas list spotlights curry-spiked quinoa cakes made with coconut milk, and braised lamb saté in honey-mustard glaze and mint vinaigrette. A global wine list captures coveted German Rieslings and California labels. Cooler weather signals increased mingling around a dazzling fire pit encircled by marble on the front patio. Inside, the bar lounge was recently remodeled with crescent booths, complementing the gold and bronze hues that flow throughout multiple dining sections.

VIBE: Elegant and softly lit, with Far East décor. SPECIALTY: Globally inspired tapas and entrees, creative sushi and specialty cocktails. VARIETY: Euro-Asian fusion. AVERAGE $: Tapas, $13; dinner entrées, $22.

ROPPONGI / 875 Prospect St. / La Jolla Reservations: 858.551.5252 / facebook.com/roppongiusa / roppongiusa.com

Roppongi is owned by the Ladeki Restaurant Group. It maintains a year-round calendar of special events that includes a wine-pairing dinner by Michael David Winery on November 13, and a New Year’s Eve bash with food and live music.

Zanzibar

California comfort food at its finest Zanzibar is proud to serve only the highest-quality food and beverages. Located in downtown’s East Village, this restaurant, full-service bar and gourmet market offers breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as catering for corporate and private events. A second Zanzibar location, now open at The Loft at UCSD (located in the Price Center), offers breakfast, lunch and a performance lounge complete with a bar and eclectic entertainment lineup. For delicious food and perfect café ambiance, Zanzibar hits the spot…actually, make that two spots: Downtown and La Jolla. VIBE: Casual, vibrant neighborhood bistro. SPECIALTY: Lemon chicken piccata, grilled fish tacos. VARIETY: Mediterraneaninfluenced California comfort food. AVERAGE $: $16 per entrée.

Zanzibar’s full bar and high-quality menu make for a relaxing atmosphere welcoming to patrons of all ages.

ZANZIBAR / 707 G St. / Gaslamp / Reservations: 619.230.0125 9500 Gilman Dr. (The Loft at UCSD) / La Jolla / Reservations: 858.678.0922 Catering Office: 619.699.9141 / 858.866.6523 facebook.com/zanzibarcafepb / zanzibarcafe.com


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Flavor Del Mar Simple food, more flavor

Feast on sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean along with straightforward Mediterraneanand Asian-tinged gourmet cuisine showcasing the freshest of ingredients at this sleek, ultra-mod overlook in the heart of downtown Del Mar. Chef Brian Redzikowski pays homage to the finest produce and artisanal edibles, changing his menu on a daily basis to match the best markets have to offer. Innovative, hand-crafted cocktails are also built on seasonal gems. Prefer a glass of vino? A wide array of Old and New World varietals and blends are available from next-door rustic French country wine enclave, Sip. No matter your libation of choice, Flavor’s adept staff, many of whom are certified sommeliers, will know the perfect dishes to pair with each wine for optimal enjoyment. Step into Flavor, where big-time flavor is guaranteed.

ABOVE: Alaskan black cod with miso glaze, Japanese greens, rancho gordo beans and baby heirloom peppers. RIGHT: Santa Monica farmers market plate – asparagus, tomato confit, spring onion, baby root vegetables, chantarelle mushrooms, pumpkin gnocchi and garlic puree.

VIBE: Light, airy environs with chic, modern touches and stunning ocean views. SPECIALTY: We let the best ingredients shine on their own merits. VARIETY: Warm and cold sea fare with Mediterranean and Asian flare. AVERAGE $: Starters, $12; mains; $32. Flavor Del Mar / 1555 Camino Del Mar, #322 / Del Mar Reservations: 858.755.3663 / facebook.com/flavordelmar / flavordelmar.com

atoll at catamaran resort hotel & spa DINING WITH A VIEW

The Atoll restaurant, located within the picturesque Catamaran Resort Hotel & Spa on Mission Bay, is a local’s favorite for California Coastal Cuisine and serene waterfront views. Surround yourself with spectacular sunsets, white sandy beaches and the sights and sounds of nature while sampling a menu of the freshest seasonal ingredients prepared by chef Steven Riemer. Riemer’s traditional and inventive dishes include his braised local scallops atop spicy rice noodles paired with an avocado, citrus and mint salad; and the tempura-crusted Pacific cod with crushed Weiser farms purple potatoes, egg and caper relish. Ideal for breakfast, lunch, dinner and special occasions, Atoll offers a forever-tranquil bay-front dining experience. Come make your great escape today. ABOVE: Executive chef Steven Riemer unveils his cooking skills, creating an unforgettable menu. RIGHT: Enjoy views of Mission Bay while dining on the Atoll patio.

VIBE: Polynesian oasis. SPECIALTY: Freshest seasonal and local ingredients in the market. VARIETY: California Coastal cuisine. AVERAGE $: $24.95 per entrée.

Atoll at Catamaran Resort Hotel & Spa 3999 Mission Blvd. / Mission Bay Reservations: 858.539.8635 facebook.com/atollrestaurant / catamaranresort.com


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Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas The Ultimate Cinema Experience, only at Cinépolis

From hand-crafted salads to tantalizing desserts, Cinépolis has arguably one of the best menus in town. This luxury cinema offers not only the ultimate comfort and exclusivity – with reserved Italian leather reclining seats – but also a full bar with signature drinks and a world-class gourmet menu, which you can enjoy from the comfort of your seat while watching a movie. The bar selections vary from ice-cold margaritas to frosted champagne bottles. And verything is made to order, from authentic hand-crafted salads to fine Angus certified steaks, not to mention the tantalizing desserts. Some of the signature, must-try items include the burrata and prosciutto Panini; the couscous tropical shrimp skewer; and the Ultimate Burger, made with 1/2 lb. of Pat LaFrieda Chopped short rib and marbled blue cheese; all of which have been created by renowned worldclass chef Matt Beskin. Treat yourself to the Ultimate Cinema Experience, only at Cinépolis. Certified Angus steak meals accompanied by high-end wines are only a small taste of what Cinépolis has to offer. Add reserved premium leather recliners and in-theater dining, and you get the Ultimate Cinema Experience. VIBE: Romantic, elegant, luxurious; amazing bar. SPECIALTY: Enjoy at-your-seat full bar and gourmet menu items while watching a movie. VARIETY: Steak and seafood specialties, handmade sushi and premium appetizers. AVERAGE $: (average) $15.50 per entrée.

LEFT: Press the “call waiter” button to have handcrafted sushi and sinful desserts served at your seat. RIGHT: Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas feature elegant lobbies, lounge areas and a giant TV wall over the bar. Cinépolis Luxury Cinemas / Book your seats at cinepolisUSA.com facebook.com/cinepolisUSA / Locations in La Costa, Carlsbad and Del Mar


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slater’s 50/50 BURGERS BY DESIGN

What’s the coolest scoop in town? Slater’s 50/50 newest burger creation, the A La Mode. Says founder Scott Slater, “The cool thing is that, at Slater’s, you create your own experience. You can design a custom burger, which many guests do. One asked for the Peanut Butter & Jelly burger, which already has bacon on it, to be topped with a scoop of vanilla. I love it, ice cream on a burger. I had to try it. It was delicious! Slater’s is fun, casual, kooky; there are TVs everywhere. There are so many different facets to Slater’s. You can go for beer with your friends or you can take your family. I’m a San Diego State alumnus, and I want to give San Diego the best.”

VIBE: Invitingly casual and fun boths indoors and on the breezy patio with a beer garden. SPECIALTY: The famous half-bacon, half-beef Slater’s 50/50 Burger. VARIETY: Choose from our list of specialty burgers or design your own. AVERAGE $: $9.95 per burger.

LEFT: Peanut Butter and Jellousy, a Slater’s award-winning favorite made with ground beef topped with thick-cut bacon, creamy peanut butter and strawberry jelly; served on a honey-wheat bun (also available a la mode). ABOVE: Slater’s famous Bacon Brownie – warm Ghirardelli chocolate and chopped-bacon brownie, served a la mode.

slater’s 50/50 / 2750 Dewey Rd., Bldg. 193 / Liberty Station 619.398.2600 / facebook.com/Slaters5050SanDiegoLibertyStation / sandiego.slaters5050.com


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the INSLIDER

Gourmet sliders on the go. Get your slide on!

ABOVE: The sweet potato tater tots are served with kicky chipotle aioli. BELOW (left): In keeping with the seasons, look for a new bone-warming slider in December, which features panko-crusted Jidori chicken stuffed with mozzarella and ricotta cheeses, herbs and tomato sauce. BELOW (right): The InSlider was launched earlier this year.

New Jersey native Stacey Werner and her son, Evan Hess, have elevated sliders to a whole new level for hundreds of public and private events. From their popular The InSlider food trucks, they spread love in the form of sliders made with Kobe beef, marinated Jidori chicken and pulled Kurobuta pork, all crowned with fresh organics and scratch-made sauces. Vegetarians are nurtured with a balsamic-marinated portobello slider garnished with mushroom aioli. Artisan brioche buns seal the deal for these mini gourmet sandwiches, which can be ordered with truffle hand-cut fries or sweet potato tater tots. Werner brings high-quality meals to the streets with a staff that includes culinary students and graduates. The InSlider appears throughout the week at various locations listed on the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web site, theinslidersd.com. It also caters weddings, birthday bashes, fundraisers and other occasions, always with a baker onboard. Private parties can request tailor-made dishes in addition to savories from the regular menu.

VIBE: Animated, cheerful and outgoing. SPECIALTY: Gourmet sliders made with beef, poultry, pork or portobello mushrooms. VARIETY: American, with European and Southwest twists. AVERAGE $: $11 for three sliders plus fries.

the inslider Check website for times and locations facebook.com/theinslidersd 619.206.5022 / theinslidersd.com


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Crossroads at house of blues Where food, music and art intersect

Crossroads at House of Blues is a lively restaurant and bar located on Fifth Ave. in the Gaslamp, inside the worldfamous House of Blues. It features a tantalizing new menu created by celebrity chef and Food Network star Aarón Sanchez. Enjoy signature dishes such as shrimp and grits (pictured at right), lobster mac n’ cheese, applewood baconwrapped meatloaf, short rib meatball sliders and fire-grilled flatbreads. Plus, try some new twists on House of Blues favorites like jambalaya, slowsmoked pulled pork, signature burgers, salads and steaks. It’s food that’s bold and classic, yet contemporary. Open nightly for dinner, Crossroads at House of Blues is truly the place where food, music and art intersect. Pan-seared jumbo shrimp, simmered in chipotle garlic cream sauce and served over a crispy-fried grit cake and sweet tear-drop tomatoes. VIBE: Energetic, lively, vibrant bar scene; hot spot that’s casual and fun. SPECIALTY: Menu incorporates flavors from all over the world. VARIETY: American classics and internationalinspired dishes like chili-braised short ribs. AVERAGE $: $17.99 per entrée. LEFT: Chili-braised short ribs brushed with pasilla glaze, served with andouille corn pudding and fresh vegetables. RIGHT: Aarón Sanchez, known to millions for his popular Food Network shows, has re-imagined the Crossroads at House of Blues menu. HOUSE OF BLUES / 1055 Fifth Ave. / Gaslamp Reservations: 619.299.BLUE (2583) / facebook.com/hobsandiego / hob.com/sandiego


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Shino Sushi + Kappo the intimacy of ultra-fresh sushi

Shino Sushi + Kappo is the go-to spot for remarkably fresh sushi that connoisseurs compare to meals they’ve experienced in top-rated establishments throughout Tokyo. Chef Robert Nakamura brings to the restaurant 11 years of training from San Diego’s famed Sushi Ota, where he gained expertise for tracking down the highest-grade seafood on the market. An intimate atmosphere sets the stage for a concise selection of rolls, sushi and sashimi. Japanese sardines and mackerel pike are among the prized species appearing in artful, traditional constructs. Entrées include miso-marinated black cod, teriyaki and mixed tempura sporting featherweight texture. Nakamura’s masterpieces are served on handcrafted, brightly colored Shino plates from Japan. Shino’s crisp interior features a 10-seat sushi bar that puts you in eyeshot of the chefs, plus a smaller bar suited for eating and drinking over romantic interludes.

VIBE: Intimate, embracing and romantic. SPECIALTY: Traditional rolls and ultrafresh sushi and sashimi. VARIETY: Japanese. AVERAGE $: $13 to $40 per entrée.

ABOVE: Crispy rice with spicy tuna and avocado. RIGHT: For the carb-conscious, chef Robert Nakamura’s protein roll ranks as a top seller. Instead of rice, Nakamura uses cucumber and soy paper to capture an oceanic treasure chest of snow crab, tuna, albacore and salmon. SHINO SUSHI + KAPPO / 838 W. Ash St. / San Diego Reservations: 619.255.2527


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SEASONED EATINGS

MARKET WATCH

SIGN OF THE DIMES

FOR THE BIRDS

TasTe license to chill

GRANT GRILL’S MOCK TURTLE SOUP, MADE WITH BEEF TONGUE AND BRAISED SHORT RIBS, receives A shot of SHERRY.

Seasoned Eatings

Spice up the holidays at San Diego’s oldest restaurants By Frank Sabatini, Jr. / Photos by Brevin Blach

They are museums to their time, those iconic restaurants where salads are still properly accompanied by chilled forks, and filet mignon is served with deserving respect by tuxedoed waiters. If you’re looking for a taste of yesteryear, replete with relic décor and anti-trendy attitudes, we’ve unearthed several kitchens that have been feeding San Diegans memorable meals since before man walked on the moon. (Continued on page 80)

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ABOVE: THE MARINE ROOM REPLACEd ITS WINDOWS WITH THICKER GLASS AFTER LARGE WAVES CRASHED INTO THE LA JOLLA SHORES RESTAURANT IN 1942 AND 1982. RIGHT: HOB KNOB HILL’S RECIPES FOR GERMAN CHOCOLATE (LEFT) AND LEMON-PECAN PIE HAVE REMAINED UNCHANGED SINCE THE RESTAURANT OPENED IN 1946.

“The patronage remains largely the same, and several recipes have been vigilantly preserved, including those for lemon-pecan pie and German chocolate cake.” (continued from page 79) Waterfront Bar & Grill Established 1933 2044 Kettner Blvd., Little Italy 619.232.9656 waterfrontbarandgrill.com Credited with obtaining the first liquor license in San Diego after Prohibition ended, this nowfamous burger bar was co-founded by Chaffee Grant, grandson of President Ulysses S. Grant. Boozed fishermen dominated the scene back when sandwiches sold for five cents apiece…after a kitchen was added. “Some of our customers get pumped up when they see the worn pictures on our walls showing their grandpas drinking here during the fishermen days,” says Chad Nichols, whose greatgrandfather purchased the joint in the late-1960s after it had changed hands a few times. Nichols runs the establishment with his grandmother and cousin, slinging

wells and drafts and signature cheeseburgers dripping with grilled onions. As for that mysterious urn lurking behind the bar, it contains the ashes of a longtime customer who requested a Waterfront interment after coming in daily to glug wine on the patio. The Marine Room Established 1941 2000 Spindrift Dr., La Jolla Shores 858.459.7222 marineroom.com If traveling back in time to the early days of The Marine Room, you would need only $1.35 for lobster Newburg and 35 cents for a martini. Just avoid landing in 1942 or 1982, the years when stormy waters crashed through the windows and rendered this beachside landmark inoperable for several months. A photographic

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display of the damage appears inside the restaurant. The windows have since been replaced by thicker glass, allowing patrons to safely witness the drama of high tides lapping against the building while supping on such vestiges as tableside Caesar salad and cobblestone ice cream pie. With the arrival of French chef Bernard Guillas 18 years ago, the menu has come to include his prized lobster bisque, spiked with sherry and peach schnapps, along with other haute cuisine that is priced and plated more elaborately than when customers used to arrive in Cadillac Fleetwoods. Hob Nob Hill Established 1944 2271 First Ave., Bankers Hill 619.239.8176 hobnobhill.com Founder Harold Hoersch still

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comes in every Tuesday for short ribs, one of the blue-plate specials he began offering when the restaurant operated as Juniper Café 68 years ago. In 1946, he renamed it Hob Nob Hill, attracting a mix of neighborhood folk and downtown business types on the hunt for beef stew, liver with onions and desserts made from scratch. The patronage remains largely the same, and several recipes have been vigilantly preserved, including those for lemon-pecan pie and German chocolate cake. Hoersch sold Hob Nob Hill in 1993 to current owners Jeff and Tania Kacha, who recently remodeled the interior but kept the original 14-stool lunch counter. Better yet, they upheld the Victorian-like traditions of providing chilled forks with salads and heated spoons with soup.


“Some of our customers get pumped up when they see the worn pictures on our walls showing their grandpas drinking here during the fishermen days.”

CLOCKWISE (FROM LEFT): SIGNATURE BURGER at THE 80-YEAR-OLD WATERFRONT; WATERFRONT OBTAINED SAN DIEGO’S FIRST POST-PROHIBITION LIQUOR LICENSE; GRANT GRILL DIDN’T ALLOW UNACCOMPANIED WOMEN INTO THE RESTAURANT during lunctime UNTIL 1971.

Filippi’s Pizza Grotto Established 1950 1747 India St., 619.232.5094 realcheesepizza.com Fishermen gravitated to the heavy aroma of aged cheeses and salted cod when Filippi’s Pizza Grotto began as a neighborhood deli more than 60 years ago. They’d fuel up on salami and bread before setting out on their tuna boats, oftentimes leaving behind their spent Chianti bottles that owners Vincent and Madeleine DePhilippis hooked to the ceiling in their honor. Today, a thick canopy of bottles dangles overhead in the adjoining dining room (formerly the Roma Inn Bar), which the family expanded into during Beatle Mania after running a smaller version of the restaurant behind the store. “My grandparents wanted to feed everyone well with affordable

food,” says Danny Moceri, referring to the oversized Angus meatballs and more-is-better pasta portions that remain the norm. With the exception of a vegetarian pizza added over time, the kitchen has resisted contemporary food trends, yet the Filippi’s brand lives on in nearly a dozen other locations within the county. Grant Grill Established 1951 326 Broadway, Downtown 619.744.2077 grantgrill.com Male chauvinism at the Grant Grill was kept alive until 1971, prior to which women weren’t allowed inside during lunchtime. If they came for dinner, a “male escort” was required. A clique of women challenged the rule in 1969, when they encroached for a defiant lunch of mock turtle soup, provoking

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shock waves among the staff. The threat of legal action a few years later resulted in liberation. As a reminder of their victory, the original plaque spelling out the discriminatory policy hangs at the threshold, located inside the chandeliered lobby of the U.S. Grant Hotel. Power lunches and the famous mock turtle soup persist, although these days the soup is made with beef tongue and braised short ribs rather than green sea turtles – and it no longer sells for 30 cents a serving. Red Fox Room Established circa-1958 2223 El Cajon Blvd., Hillcrest 619.297.1313 redfoxsd.com “Everyone’s dead now, so we don’t know the exact year it became a restaurant,” says manager Jim Demos of this dimly lit steakhouse

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that his father purchased nearly a decade after it was converted from a drug store. The restaurant’s haunting fireplace mantle and Tudor paneling with carved figures date back to the 1600s from an English inn. (Before ending up at Red Fox, the historic pieces graced the oceanfront California home of actress Marion Davies.) A haunt for celebrities who bunked at the adjoining Lafayette Hotel & Suites (built in 1946), the restaurant sports a red ceiling and Naugahyde booths that set the stage for steak, lobster and Athenian salad, not to mention a scarlet haze that colors the vision upon exiting. Little has changed, notes Demos, revealing that “we still write [customer] checks without using a computer system.” (Continued on page 82)


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“Everyone’s dead now, so we don’t know the exact year it became a restaurant.”

above: naugahyde booths, dim lighting and red paint set the nostalgic scene at hillcrest’s red fox room. left: red fox room’s athenian salad.

(continued from page 81) Brigantine Seafood Restaurant Established 1969 2725 Shelter Island Dr., Shelter Island 619.224.2871 brigantineseafood.com Mike and Barbara Morton launched Brigantine Seafood Restaurant at the Shelter Island address that now houses Miguel’s Cocina, which they also own. In 1984, they moved the seafood house down the street to its current location, taking with them the bulky, handpainted wooden menus that were once handed to guests. As the business expanded, they began dispersing to their other dining rooms a swollen collection of nautical artifacts donated by fishermen. Recently, much of the

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memorabilia ended up in the company’s warehouse. “It was history versus our design company when we remodeled in 2009,” says Mike Morton, Jr., president of Brigantine Family Restaurants. Sharing menu space with steaks, crab, lobster and the fish tacos the Mortons helped popularize, fresh swordfish rules the day, selling in 1969 for $3.50. Sentimental customers can still opt for tartar sauce with the flamed fish, while younger customers gravitate to the avocado-lime butter. The Godfather Established 1974 7878 Clairemont Mesa Blvd., Kearny Mesa 858.560.1747 godfatherrestaurant.com With waiters dressed in

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tuxedos, The Godfather restaurant (which opened two years after the first “The Godfather” movie hit the big screen in 1972), delivers an unexpected touch of panache to Kearny Mesa. Formality extends to a burgeoning wine list and razzle-dazzle meals by chef Isidoro Balistreri, who opened the restaurant with his wife, Maria, after emigrating from Sicily. The 14-ounce filet mignon is a mainstay. It’s stuffed with prosciutto, mozzarella and mushrooms, then draped in marinara and Barolo wine sauce. “There’s a core style that we rarely change,” says Anthony Balistreri of his father’s cooking. Veal and pasta dishes abound, along with antique chandeliers and Mob-scene photos.


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Market

watch Yes, we cans! By David Nelson Photo by Jeff “Turbo” Corrigan

In a 2011 auction held at Christie’s New York, a photograph of a 99-cent store fetched more than $4.3 million. A picture may be worth a thousand words, but who knew those words could be worth more than four thousand bucks each? Inspired to recreate photographer Andrea Gursky’s multimillion-dollar “Rhein II,” we headed to the aisles of Balboa International Market in Clairemont. The photo may not bring unlimited wealth, but the selection here sure is rich. This is where Lady Macbeth would buy all the spices of Arabia, but while the market does have a distinctly Middle Eastern-Iranian feel, it’s essentially an Ali Baba’s cave of fine foods from around the globe. Exploring it should delight any foodie, as will lunch at the terrace cafe. Shopper-friendly prices include $10.99 for 10 pounds of aged basmati rice grown in the Himalayas. Dozens of other varieties from various countries present unique flavor profiles – affordable ones, too. Green, black, cracked, spiced and oil-cured olives in cans and jars hail from Turkey, Greece, France, Bulgaria, Israel and Jordan. Other specialties include Imam Bayeldi (a famous Turkish eggplant dish), elephant beans in oil, pomegranate molasses and an educational encyclopedia of vinegars. The butcher counter bans meats not in keeping with Islamic food laws, but the deli bursts with unexpected finds like Bobak’s smoked hunter’s bacon from Chicago and Hungarian-style paprika salami. Indian canned goods include deadly looking hot Bengal chutney; the produce department impresses with unusual fresh herbs (savory for $.69 a bunch); and the bakery turns out hot, fragrant breads. Friendly staffers make returning a pleasure. Balboa International Market 5907 Balboa Ave., Clairemont 858.277.3600, balboamarket.com

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The photo may not bring wealth, but the selection is rich. Balboa International Market in Clairemont offers a wide variety of global delicacies.

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OPENING DAY AT NEW YEAR’S EVE DEL MAR RACETRACK

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PHOTOS FROM THE 2011 MARCH OF DIMES SIGNATURE CHEFS GALA AT THE SAN DIEGO MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Sign of the Dimes

A children’s charity’s signature gourmet feast returns By Allie Daugherty F. Scott Fitzgerald’s infamous party-boy character The Great Gatsby had a lot of reasons to celebrate: wealth, beautiful women and the excitement of the Roaring Twenties. If he were alive today, Gatsby would surely attend “A Night at the Speakeasy,” a November 8 March of Dimes fundraising event at El Cortez, where guests will revel in the era’s glamour while helping raise funds and awareness to prevent premature births, birth defects and infant mortality. What can be expected from the event that will pair many of San Diego’s top chefs and mixologists for an all-night tasting session? “Prohibition-style, all-around glamour,” says co-chair Yolanda S. Walther-Meade. “Speakeasy strolling under chandeliers strung from tents, oyster bar and vodka tastings, sipping and sampling from the most creative culinary artists and masters of mouth-watering cocktails in San Diego and beyond.” More than just a fun time, the event (hosted by emcees Ruben Galvan of CW6 and comedian Lead Chefs: Monique Marvez) supports the Bernard Guillas of the Marine Room  charity who’s founding goal was Andrew Spurgin of Bespoke event styling and menu design to eradicate polio, the vaccine Signature Chefs: Alex Carballo of Stone World Bistro for which was created by Jonas Hanis Cavin of Carnitas Snack Shack Salk. And the cause hits close to Tommy Gomes of Catalina Offshore Products home: each year, roughly 1,500 Matt Gordon of Urban Solace and Solace and the Moonlight Lounge of the 48,000 babies born in Ilan Hall of The Gorbals San Diego County have a birth Katherine Humphus of BO-beau Kitchen + Lounge defect, and about 200 won’t Rachel King of Searsucker David Meade of Nobu reach their first birthday. Dawn Parks of The Wild Thyme Company “The March of Dimes is Javier Plascencia of Misión 19 a pioneer in funding genetics Kaitlin Ramos of St. Germain’s Bistro research and therapies, with funds Mixologists: raised going to local research at Michael Esposito of Snake Oil Cocktail Co. Jeff Josenhans of Grant Grill facilities like the Salk Institute, Shane McKnight of Best Beverages Scripps Institute and U.C. San Guillermo Sauza of Tequila Fortaleza Diego,” says Walther-Meade. Chris Simmons Smoke & Mirrors Cocktail Company Purchase tickets, learn more Ian Ward of Pick & Rocks Cocktails about the event and/or make a Aaron Zieske of PrepKitchen Co-chairs: donation at marchofdimes.com/ Yolanda S. Walther-Meade and Michele Arthur ca/sdchefs. eight y – S I X

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B R E A K FA S T

LUNCH

DINNER

ALL NIGHT

Night or Day

THE RESTAURANT THAT NEVER SLEEPS OPEN 2 HOU4R S

The Brian’s 24 Pancake Monster—five delicious buttermilk hot cakes, a halfpound each of ham and country-fried steak, four giant bacon strips and three fried eggs, all piled onto a pound of home fries. This $25 entrée is FREE for anyone who devours it in under an hour.

“OUR FOCUS HAS ALWAYS BEEN ON BIG COMFORT FOOD. THIS DISH TAKES IT TO THE EXTREME.” —BRIAN EPSTEIN, OWNER 828 SIXTH AVENUE | GASLAMP QUARTER | 619.702.8410 | BRIANS24.COM

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Tender Thanksgiving turkey leftovers make for a hearty and delicious chili when combined with the proper fresh ingredients.

For the

BIRDS A recipe for leftover-turkey chili Story and photos by Brandon Matzek

Thanksgiving, the Super Bowl of the culinary world, has become my favorite holiday. The thought of serving a six-course dinner to a party of 18-to-22 may seem daunting, but I thrive on the challenge and love providing an elevated experience to my friends and family. My favorite part? Side dishes. Each year, I prepare a wide assortment of gourmet sides that overshadow the holiday’s traditional star attraction, the turkey. With sides like caramelized shallot and Brussels sprout gratin, and stuffed Savoy cabbage with rosemary brown butter (both recipes available on kitchenkonfidence.com), it’s easy to see why I leave just a tiny spot on my plate for the humble bird. After the final dish has been cleaned and my guests have left for the evening, I’m left with a few bites of side dishes and one big pile of carved turkey. It’s not that the turkey tastes bad (last year, I rubbed truffle butter under the skin), it’s just that I’ve always enjoyed side dishes more. And I think my guests do as well. Post “game day” two years ago, I made this turkey chili in an attempt to use up the tender, shredded turkey sitting in my fridge. Seasoned with a flavorful blend of chili powder, red pepper flake, cumin, oregano and black pepper, this dish is bold and comforting. It’s also quite satisfying on a texture level. Stewed tomatoes, shredded turkey and kidney beans provide a hearty heft with each spoonful. With just a little advanced prep, this recipe can come together fairly easily. The difference between good soup and great soup usually comes down to two ingredients: stock and salt. Use a high quality chicken stock here (homemade is best). Also, be sure to season well with kosher or sea salt (avoid table salt). Keep tasting and seasoning until flavors in the soup are big and bold. Turkey may not be my favorite on Thanksgiving, but thanks to this soup, I now look forward to the day after the big day each year. (Continued on page 90)

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Plan Your Holiday Party at

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san diego’s:

best

THAI*

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(continued from page 88)

Turkey Chili

Ingredients 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 medium brown onion, chopped (about 2 cups) 1 green bell pepper, chopped (about 1 cup) 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 3 tbsp. chili powder* 1 tbsp. ground cumin 1 tbsp. red pepper flakes 70 oz. canned stewed tomatoes with juices (that’s 2 big cans and 1 smaller can) 2 15-oz. cans kidney beans, drained and rinsed 2 tbsp. tomato paste 3/4 cup chicken stock ABOVE: Chopped green peppers and 1 tsp. dried oregano red onion to carmelize with the 1 tbsp. kosher salt, plus more to taste spices. BELOW: Chili powder, garlic, 1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper cumin and red pepper flakes give new life to second-day turkey. 4 cups shredded, cooked turkey meat 1 tsp. sugar, plus more to taste Toppings: shredded cheese, chopped red onion, sour cream

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Cook aromatics and spices. Warm extra virgin olive oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium high heat. Once the oil starts shimmering, add the chopped onion and green bell pepper. Cook until soft and slightly caramelized, stirring occasionally (about 5 minutes). Add garlic, chili powder, cumin and red pepper flakes, stirring to combine. Cook the spices for a few minutes, stirring often.

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Simmer and season. To the pot, add stewed tomatoes with juices, kidney beans, tomato paste, chicken stock, oregano, kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper and shredded turkey meat. Bring the mixture to a simmer then reduce heat to low. Simmer, uncovered, for an hour. Stir in sugar then season to taste with additional sugar and kosher salt. Serve. To serve, spoon chili into soup bowls and top with shredded cheese, chopped red onion and sour cream.

Restaurant & Wine Bar DOWNTOWN: 619.595.0115 906 Market St., East Village

UPTOWN: 619.299.8272 3761 6th Ave., Hillcrest

*I used a blend of various chili powders: 1 tablespoon of mild chili powder, 1 tablespoon of extremely spicy chili powder and 1 tablespoon of ground ancho chili. The resulting flavor and spice level were perfect (for me). Feel free to make adjustments based on your own taste.

See website for menus and photos

lotusthaisd.com

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Introducing 

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Visit our sister restaurant Acqua al 2 in the Gaslamp.

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DRINK

License to Chill How and where to drink like a secret agent By Ron Donoho

“Skyfall,” the 23rd James Bond flick to hit the silver screen, represents the 50th anniversary of the spy film franchise and the third time Daniel Craig has taken on the role of Agent 007. It may be time to celebrate with a cold cocktail – “shaken, not stirred.” Ian Fleming wrote those historic words in his first Bond novel, Casino Royal, in 1953. More than half a century and six leading men later, Craig repeats Fleming’s

original recipe for the “Vesper” martini in “Casino Royale,” the movie (2006): “…three measures of Gordon’s [gin], one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it over ice, and add a thin slice of lemon peel.” Later in the movie, after Craig’s Bond has bet and lost millions of dollars, a bartender asks if he’d like his martini

Daniel Craig stars as James Bond in Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures / Columbia Pictures / EON Productions’ action adventure SKYFALL. Skyfall© 2012 Danjaq, LLC, United Artists Corporation, Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All rights reserved.

shaken or stirred. A pissed-off Bond replies: “Do I look like I give a damn?”  Like your drink a particular way? Whether or not you drive an Aston Martin, pack heat (preferably a Walther PPK) or are an international man or woman of mystery, here (opposite page) are double-oh-seven sky-high places in San Diego where ordering a martini can bring out your inner Bond before “Skyfall” hits theaters November 9.

Role Call

A look at 50 years of on-screen Bondage 1. “Dr. No,” 1962, Sean Connery 2. “From Russia With Love,” 1963, Sean Connery 3. “Goldfinger,” 1964, Sean Connery 4. “Thunderball,” 1965, Sean Connery 5. “You Only Live Twice,” 1967, Sean Connery 6. “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service,” 1969, George Lazenby 7. “Diamonds Are Forever,” 1971, Sean Connery 8. “Live and Let Die,” 1973, Roger Moore 9. “The Man with the Golden Gun,” 1974, Roger Moore 10. “The Spy Who Loved Me,” 1977, Roger Moore 11. “Moonraker,” 1979, Roger Moore 12. “For Your Eyes Only,” 1981, Roger Moore 13. “Octopussy,” 1983, Roger Moore 14. “A View to a Kill,” 1985, Roger Moore 15. “The Living Daylights,” 1987, Timothy Dalton 16. “License to Kill,” 1989, Timothy Dalton 17. “GoldenEye,” 1995, Pierce Brosnan 18. “Tomorrow Never Dies,” 1997, Pierce Brosnan 19. “The World Is Not Enough,” 1999, Pierce Brosnan 20. “Die Another Day,” 2002, Pierce Brosnan 21. “Casino Royale,” 2006, Daniel Craig 22. “Quantum of Solace,” 2008, Daniel Craig 23. “Skyfall,” 2012, Daniel Craig

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www.lik.com 

Peter Lik’s Endless Summer Beach House

Altitude Sky Bar Down a Skyy vodka martini 22 stories atop the San Diego Marriott Gaslamp Quarter. Imagine zip-lining into nearly Petco Park to foil villains dressed as Los Angeles Dodgers fans. 660 K St., Gaslamp 619.446.6086, altitudeskylounge.com Bertrand at Mr. A’s Watch planes land at nearby Lindbergh Field (one is carrying your top secret contact) as you take healthy swigs from an extra dry Bombay Sapphire martini. 2550 5th Ave. #12, Park West 619.239.1377, bertrandatmisteras.com Cusp Gaze out from the 11th floor of Hotel La Jolla and imagine Halle Berry exiting the Pacific, while you try not to spill a Plymouth gin martini with orange bitters. 7955 La Jolla Shores Dr., La Jolla 858.551.3620, cusprestaurant.com

MISSION BEACH, SAN DIEGO CALIFORNIA Rooftop Pool & Spa Resort! Lounge 30 feet above the white sands of the Pacific Ocean on your private sun-kissed rooftop deck at 708 San Jose Place. It is equipped with a pool and spa. Enjoy 360-degree views of the Sandy Beaches, the Pacific Ocean, and Mission Bay from La Jolla to Sea World, Point Loma and the Coronado Islands. This one-of-a-kind 3-bedroom masterpiece includes the fine art and design of world famous master of photography Peter Lik. The home boasts modern elegance, yet it’s warm and inviting. Retracting glass walls open to create the ultimate indoor/outdoor experience. No expense was spared in construction, from the poured-in-place concrete walls, floors, countertops and cabinetry to the brass rocky mountain hardware fixtures and a solid brass kitchen sink. You will also find a Wolf cooktop and Sub-Zero refrigerato refrigerator. It has incredible lighting including LEDS and directional pin beams. Collect a Peter Lik original, for this beach house is truly one of a kind!

Ivy Rooftop Lounge by the fire pit atop the Andaz Hotel and stay cool while ladies in low-cut dresses check you out as they sip “Cougar” martinis (Grey Goose Pear). 600 F St., Downtown 619.814.2055, ivyentertainmentsandiego.com/ivyrooftop Martini’s Above Fourth Go way undercover in Hillcrest and opt for an “Above Fourth” martini (Hangar One Mandarin, Pama Liqueur). 3940 Fourth Ave., Hillcrest 619.400.4500, martinsabovefourth.com SummerSalt Rooftop Bar They serve a Vesper on the outdoor deck of downtown’s Hotel Palomar. Get in character (“Bond…James Bond”) with Beefeater gin, Smirnoff vodka and Lillet Blanc. 1047 5th Ave., Downtown 619.515.3000, hotelpalomar-sandiego.com

$2,750,000

Top of the Hyatt Share a wink and a romantic view of San Diego Bay with a dry Chopin martini for him, and a Black martini (Absolut Vanilla, Kahlua, espresso, whipped cream and a chocolate stick) for her. 1 Market Pl., Downtown 619.232.1234, manchestergrand.hyatt.com

RON FLETCHER 858.472.2700 Cell RonFletcher.com CA DRE #01268956 ALL INFORMATION DEEMED RELIABLE BUT NOT GUARANTEED. ESSD229FLET

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POUR MAN a MIXOLOGIST’S S.D. HOMECOMING page 98

eats everything

CONCERT calendar

air play

GrooVe all-star castro

11/30 @ Voyeur, voyeursd.com This multi-genre house music boundary-pusher from Bristol, U.K. (real name: “Daniel Pearce”), is a big-time DJ/producer on the other side of The Pond and is coming to make the American masses move with only a handul of U.S. shows scheduled.

(Continued on page 96)

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concerts (Continued from page 95) 11/2: Rome @ Belly Up Tavern, bellyup.com This guy just fronted Sublime at Cricket Wireless (it was billed as “Sublime with Rome”). 11/3: DJ Ikon @ FLUXX, fluxxsd.com Two-time recipient of the Bar and Nightclub DJ of the Year. 11/3: Waka Flocka Flame @ 4th & B, 4thandbevents.com American rapper promoting his new album “Tripple F Life: Friends, Fans and Family.”

11/11: Darude @ Hard Rock Hotel San Diego, hrhsdtickets.com Finnish trance legend whose bouncy song “Sandstorm” is played during timeouts of college sports games everywhere.

11/2: rome

11/10: japandroids

11/7: brANDI CARLILE

(Continued on page 98)

ninet y – six

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frank ockenfels

11/6: Delta Spirit @ House of Blues, hob.com San Diego/Long Beach indie rock band that recently won Song of the Year for “California” at the San Diego Music Awards.   11/7: Brandi Carlile @ House of Blues, hob.com Alt-country and folk songstress.   11/7: Musiq Soulchild @ 4th & B, 4thandbevents.com Funk, soul, R&B, blues, jazz and a dash of alternative.  

11/16: Neon Hitch

fueled by ramen

11/4: Elite Force @ Hard Rock Hotel San Diego, hrhsdtickets.com U.K. DJ who mixes popular songs with dubstep flair, and whose first college band was formed with Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke.          11/4: Other Lives @ Casbah, casbahmusic.com Indie rock band that recently opened for Radiohead during the first leg of its 2012 North American tour.   11/5: The All-American Rejects @ House of Blues, hob.com Pop alternative rock band from Stillwater, Oklahoma.

11/8: Foghat @ Sycuan Live & Up Close, sycuan.com Legendary British boogie and blues rock band that was at the top of their game in 1976.   11/8: Misfits @ House of Blues, hob.com Horror punk band that inspires legions of new young punkers year after year.   11/8: The Monkees @ Escondido Center for the Arts, artcenter.org Three of the original four, minus Davey Jones. R.I.P., Mr. Jones.   11/9: Skid Row and Warrant @ Sycuan Live & Up Close, sycuan.com Big hair, heavy metal and aging guitarists – the ’80s rock on!   11/10: …And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead @ Casbah, casbahmusic.com These Austin, Texas, boys rock like an inferno of epic proportions.    11/10: Japandroids @ Porter’s Pub, porterspub.com Two-piece noise/pop rock outfit from Canada that has the ferocity of a full band.


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Angel Ceballos

concerts

(Continued from page 96) 11/11: Minus The Bear @ House of Blues, hob.com Progressive indie alternative pop rock band from Seattle.   11/14: Walk the Moon @ House of Blues, hob.com American pop alternative rockers who paint their faces for live shows and bring enough paint for audience participation.   11/14: Wiz Khalifa @ Rimac Arena, ticketmaster.com “Black And Yellow” rapper who loves his cannabis (and spends up to $10,000 a month on it).   11/15: Paul Oakenfold @ FLUXX, fluxxsd.com Greatest House DJ in the world!   11/16: Neon Hitch @ Hard Rock Hotel San Diego, hrhsdtickets.com See the British singer-songwriter made famous for crooning the chorus of Gym Class Heroes’ “Ass Back Home.”

11/20: Toots & The Maytals @ Belly Up Tavern, bellyup.com Reggae legends. Yes, there’s a smoking patio.   11/21: Rush @ Valley View Casino Center, valleyviewcasinocenter.com With 24 gold and 14 platinum records, these Canadian prog rockers still got it.   11/21: Quintino @ FLUXX, fluxxsd.com Dance music maestro who has worked along Afrojack and Tiesto.   11/23: Unwritten Law @ House of Blues, hob.com Poway pop punk rock heroes!   11/30: War @ Sycuan Live & Up Close, sycuan.com Low rider band from the ’70s.

11/15: paul oakenfeld 11/11: minus the bear

11/16: The Mother Hips @ Belly Up Tavern, bellyup.com Indie rock hippie band.   11/17: DJ Cobra @ FLUXX, fluxxsd.com Hip-hop and dance DJ who has performed with recording artists including Lady Gaga, Ludacris and P. Diddy.

11/20: toots & the maytals

11/17: El Ten Eleven @ The Irenic, frontgatetickets.com L.A.-based with S.D. ties, this two-piece plays experimental instrumental rock.

11/14: walk the moon

11/20: The Faint @ House of Blues, hob.com Dance punkers playing their seminal album “Danse Macabre” in its entirety. ninet y – E I G H T

/

D a v i d Opp e n h e i m e r

RCA M u s i c G r o u p

11/17: All My Friends Music Festival @ Casa De La Cultura (Tijuana), amfmf.com Independent music festival in Tijuana, featuring bands from both sides of the border.   11/17: Proxy @ Voyeur,  voyeursd.com Russian DJ on the electro side, like The Prodigy or Justice.

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AIR PLAY

FM morning show team has fun for a living By Allie Daugherty / Photos by Jeff “Turbo” Corrigan The star of The AJ Show – AJ Machado – loves his job. “I take the job of having fun seriously,” he says, “and I’m not just being cute when I say that.” The rest of the morning show’s crew, producer Hula Ramos, assistant producer Tonya Castillon and entertainment reporter Dorothy Tran, nod in agreement. “Getting up in the morning can suck,” Machado says. “It’s a time when you could be beating

yourself up, and if we can change that into maybe having a laugh or being engaged, that’s an awesome way to make a living. I really try to put on a show every day that will do the job people ask of it.” Machado began his San Diego radio career at Channel 933, where he stayed for nearly a decade before moving to Star 94.1 for a three-year stint that ended in July. Since September, he’s been the morning show host

Fare Play

Where the team eats after the show AJ – Roy’s, in La Jolla “They have great food, it’s a nice dining experience and it’s where I ate the night I told my now wife that I love her.” Hula – Barona Buffet “Coming from a Pilipino family, we’re all about saving money and eating buffets, and that’s one of the best places to do it.” Dorothy – Pearl, in Rancho Bernardo “It’s a really good Chinese restaurant, they have really good dim sum on the weekends. They’re really nice and friendly there.” Tonya – La Bella’s, in Chula Vista “I grew up in Chula Vista, so that’s the place you’d go after Pop Warner games, after your high school football game or just to get a slice of pizza.”

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for the new station Energy 103.7. “I’m excited to be here, because this is a full-service, built-for-San-Diego, live-andlocal radio station,” says Machado. “All our DJs are live, we’re super involved in the community, and it’s the kind of radio I got into radio to do.” He says his show has stayed the same despite the relocation. “It’s real life,” says Ramos. “If you’re driving in your car you can relate to one member of the show. We each individually represent somebody out there.” “Radio kind of precursed reality TV,” adds Machado. “Good morning personalities were sharing their lives on the radio long before ‘Survivor’ came along. Reality TV isn’t as real as radio. We’re not heavily edited and coached. Reality TV is kind of fake. Radio is still actually real.” The AJ Show is also real in the way it gives back via its annual toy drive, AJ’s Kids Crane, in which Machado lives in a crane until enough toys have been collected for H U N D R E D

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Rady Children’s Hospital. Last year more than 100,000 toys were donated. “Without the San Diego community, I’m just a maniac in a crane,” he says. “It was amazing to me, when we had our window of time when we were between radio stations, the [second] biggest question I got by far was, ‘Wherever you land, are you going to do the crane?’ The listeners, they’re a part of it now.” The team, whose new home at CBS Radio is down the street from Rady’s in Kearny Mesa, will host the 11th annual AJ’s Kids Crane early this month. “What I like most is the specialness of what we do,” Machado says. “If someone comes up to the guy who plays Sheldon on ‘The Big Bang Theory’ and says, ‘I feel like I know you,’ they’re saying they feel like they know Sheldon. But when they come up to us and say they feel like they know us, they feel like they know us because we’re not playing characters on the air. That’s the highest compliment you can pay me.”


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TRENDIEST CLOSET


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ALL-

CASTRO

A barman returns to San Diego with near-celebrity status By Brandon Hernández / Photo by Kristina Yamamoto

At first blush, Erick Castro seems like a transplant, some big-name soda-gun-for-hire brought in to lend cocktails and clout to a spirited new cocktail haven hitting America’s Finest. It’s true, time spent rocking out topshelf pre-Prohibition cocktails at renowned San Francisco speakeasy Bourbon & Branch has earned the inventive mixologist nationwide notoriety, but he’s more than a mixology mercenary. Castro has San Diego roots from his days spent studying at SDSU and nights spent tending bar around town. “The difference in the bartending scene from when I left San Diego in 2004 to now is night and day,” says Castro. “Lemon Drops were getting popular, and the most complicated drink I was making back then was a margarita.” When visiting San Diego over the past eight years, Castro has been impressed by the astounding expansion of the local craft cocktail contingent. Analyzing that growth, he credits spirit world innovators, tipple-focused venues and…brewers? “I think San Diego’s progression into a more creative cocktail scene came very naturally, because there is such an incredible beer culture here,” he says. “People already have these great palates due to the fact they were able to experience amazing craft beers in their own backyard.” Fittingly, it’s a collaboration with Consortium Holdings – the San Diego company responsible for alcohol-fueled hotspots Neighborhood, Noble Experiment and Craft &

Commerce, operations that led with craft beer before taking craft cocktails to the next level in a big way – that inspired Castro’s southern migration. Now, the group is opening a pair of neighboring venues, Polite Provisions and Soda & Swine, at the intersection of 30th Street and Adams Avenue in North Park. Castro will reign over the former, a modern take on the

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old-time, soda fountain-adorned neighborhood drugstore that will feature 46 taps, most of which will dispense spirits and cocktails, beer-tails, craft spirits and sodas. “I love the idea of reviving the golden era of the pharmacy, focusing on Old World values and craftsman culture,” Castro says. “It opens up a whole new realm of cocktails and beverages like the oldfashioned soda pops and fizzes that

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we’ll make in-house; milkshakes and malts, both non-alcoholic and spiked; as well as cocktail elements such as house-made tonics and bitters as a nod to those ingredients’ medicinal uses. It opens the floodgates for creativity.” He hasn’t been back in town long, but this mixologist is already poised to shake things up (or make a stir, if you prefer). Cheers to another Aztec homecoming!


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INFO & T


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WHAT’S COOKING A recipe for romance

By David Perloff Photos by Brevin Blach Amanda grew up in Los Angeles and is now the executive chef at Herringbone, Brian Malarkey’s new restaurant in La Jolla. Matt, a San Diego native, is the chef/ owner at Table 926 in North Pacific Beach. These two chefs live two blocks from each other in Little Italy, but they never met before about half an hour ago, when an Epic Limo picked them up for tonight’s blind date. Before they arrive in Old Town for tequila tasting, let’s review the pre-date interviews.

PacificSD: What do you do for fun? MATT: I like wine and beer tasting, try to travel or at least dream of traveling, going to Padres games, cooking on the grill, trying new restaurants and practicing to join a pro bocce ball team. AMANDA: For fun. Let’s see...I practice piano. I’m a little short on hobbies, sorry. What are you best at? MATT: I am a chef, so I guess I’m best at cooking great meals for people. AMANDA: I’m really good at Scrabble. What are you looking for in a date? MATT: Witty, open-minded and unpretentious, like me. I like someone who can be comfortable being themselves around me. Self-confidence is very sexy, and nice curves definitely do not hurt.

MATT: If I knew what I was looking for in a date, perhaps I would have found it by now. But, generally speaking, they should like cool bands, take less time to get ready than me and be smart.

What’s your favorite thing to eat? MATT: Duck confit or carne asada burrito. AMANDA: I love shitty Chinese food.

What’s the sexiest thing about you? MATT: My height – or my thick, distinguished, slightly salt-andpeppery hair. AMANDA: I dunno, shucks.

What’s your favorite drink? MATT: A cold beer, or a nice wine that doesn’t come out of a box. AMANDA: I drink Blantons [single-barrel burbon], neat.

What’s your surefire trick for making a date with romance? MATT: Oysters, wine and chocolate – and trying really hard to not get smashed. AMANDA: I’m not good with romance, so I leave that up to the men.

What food are you most like and how? MATT: I’m like good sushi: I’m simple and good for you. AMANDA: I’m not like food; that’s probably why I cook it. Otherwise, I’m sure I’d have a conflict of interest or something.

After about an hour of tequila tasting and appetizers at the nationally recognized El Agave, Amanda and Matt jump back into their Epic Limo for the ride downtown to Katsuya, the chic sushi and robata (Japanese barbecue) restaurant at Andaz San Diego.

What traits could your date exhibit that would be complete deal-breakers? MATT: Being conceited and snobby. No one wins with that

THANK YOU! Epic Limo 858.270.LIMO (4566), epiclimo.com (Continued on page 106)

What do you like least about yourself? MATT: My initial shyness and my long work hours. AMANDA: I guess I wish I could be less awkward sometimes. What is your biggest fear? MATT: It’s a tie between failure and being eaten by a shark. AMANDA: My biggest fear is spiders. And I’m not too keen on failure, either. O N E

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kind of attitude. AMANDA: If my date were a republican, it’d be a deal breaker.


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(Continued from page 104)

Taster’s Choice

One tequila, two tequilas, three tequilas more As the chefs/daters talk over cocktails at Katsuya, chef Adam Cho emerges from the kitchen to give them a private lesson in sushi-rolling. After they’ve had a chance to rock a few rolls and enjoy sushi and other dishes created by the master himself, the couple is split for mid-date debriefings.

PacificSD: How’s it going so far? MATT: It’s fun; it’s good times. Great to meet a chef, so we have a lot in common. I’ve been to her restaurant before and respect her. AMANDA: It’s going well. He’s very nice, and polite, and wellgroomed and a nice young man from a nice family.

outstanding, and the margaritas were very good. AMANDA: We had a really delicious five-year-aged tequila anejo [El Agave’s own brand]. It almost tasted like bourbon, really sweet. I also tried the corn fungus for the first time, which I can’t pronounce. It was really good.

Is this the type of person you’d normally date? MATT: Yeah, I think so. She’s girl-next-door solid brunette, nice cheekbones, good package. And she’s definitely got the personality for it, definitely fun to hang out with. AMANDA: I don’t normally date, so I don’t really have an answer for that. I don’t normally talk to boys. I don’t normally get out much. I’m kind of a nerdy girl.

What’s the most attractive thing your date has done so far? MATT: She’s very flirty with her bodily functions [editor’s note: he probably means “body language”]. She smiles a lot and has good eye contact, which I think is cute. AMANDA: He carries himself in a very masculine and assured sort of manner, which is attractive.

How was El Agave? MATT: The corn fungus was really interesting and nice. It’s been about 15 years since I’d been there. The tequila was

What’s the least attractive thing your date has done so far? MATT: She seems to be unbalanced sometimes. Not mentally – sometimes she almost falls over. I don’t know if that’s the alcohol or the amount of time O N E

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we both worked today. AMANDA: He makes kind of awkward jokes. What would your parents say about your date? MATT: They would be very happy to know that I can meet someone here and get along with them. AMANDA: Daddy would be very proud, because he’s a doctor’s son and good-looking and respectable and clean and well-nourished. Rate your date on a scale of one to 10 for looks. MATT: Eight, 8.5. AMANDA: Ten. Rate your date on a scale of one to 10 for personality. MATT: Nine, 9.5 AMANDA: Ten. Do you want to kiss your date now? MATT: I don’t think so, now. But we live two blocks away from /

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each other, so who knows what could happen? AMANDA: Maybe. He hasn’t really had the opportunity to do anything overly chivalrous, which is normally something that I find important. Does your date want to kiss you? MATT: I don’t know yet. Still working on it. I think so. Who knows? Coin flip. AMANDA: I think he probably wants to kiss me. If you had to leave now with $100 cash or make out with your date at the table, which would you choose? MATT: Definitely go back inside. AMANDA: Do I get the $100 in singles? THANK YOU! El Agave 2304 San Diego Ave., Old Town 619.220.0692, elagave.com (Continued on page 108)


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(Continued from page 106)

on a roll

The daters get their hands into it at Katsuya After their entrées arrive, the daters are finally left alone to enjoy the rest of their evening in peace. We call the next day to see what we missed. How was Katsuya? MATT: The food was great. I’m not sure either of us will be applying for the sushi chef position at Katsuya anytime soon, but it was fun nonetheless. AMANDA: Katsuya has a very cool vibe. All of the staff was super friendly, especially the chef. They brought us a bunch of sushi mise en place [ingredients on the table], and then he came out and taught us how to roll sushi – mine was terrible. What did you eat? MATT: Chef Cho styled us out with assorted sushi and some of his favorite dishes. Highlights for sure were the striped bass and the Kobe rib eye. Tried monkish liver for the first time. AMANDA: We ate spicy tuna, crispy rice, Kobe rib eye, monkfish liver, blue fin tuna. We didn’t order; they just hooked us up, cheffy style. What happened after the magazine crew left?

MATT: We sent the limo driver home and decided to stay downtown and head out. We headed to barleymash for some beers and shots, a chef ’s favorite combination. AMANDA: We went to barleymash for some whiskey and beer. We both live downtown, so we cut the limo loose after dinner and shared a cab back to little Italy.

AMANDA: We drank Coors Light out of champagne glasses in the limo.

When did you get home? MATT: 12:30-ish. AMANDA: I got home at about 12:30.

What’s one thing your date really should know before his/ her next date? MATT: She should make sure she doesn’t have parsley stuck to her teeth. AMANDA: Matt is a perfect gentleman and a very good date. He didn’t do anything stupid like talk about his ex. He made a couple of corny jokes, but those were charming. I don’t think I have any pointers for him.

Was there a kiss or romantic exchange? MATT: Sure, I gave her a kiss goodnight. AMANDA: A lady never discusses such things. What’s the funniest thing that happened during the date? MATT: Not sure about just one funny thing, but we shared a lot of good laughs. O N E

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Will there be a second date? MATT: We both work insane hours and have little free time, but we live and work close to each other. I’d say there would be a good chance we’d hang out again. AMANDA: It all depends on if he asks, right?

What food does your date remind you of and how? MATT: I’d say Amanda reminds /

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me of one of her dishes she serves at her restaurant: she’s eclectic, good to look at and maybe a little spicy, too. AMANDA: Matt is a person; he isn’t edible – outside of a downed-Cessna-in-the-Andes, life-or-death situation. And even then, I’d need to do some serious soul-searching. Despite the risk of having too many cooks, this date had all the right ingredients. Matt says Amanda is “good to look at and maybe a little spicy, too.” She says he’s attractive but inedible, but she did ask if she could “get the $100 in singles,” so maybe there’s a spicier second serving in their future. If these two chefs do reconnect, we hope the night will end with some friendly spooning, if not another utensil…like a good fork. Bon appetit! THANK YOU! Katsuya (at Andaz San Diego) 600 F St., Gaslamp 619.814.2000, sbe.com/katsuya


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Calendar NOVEMBER 2012

pacifics A N d I E G O . com

11/1-2: Dia de los Muertos

Location: Old Town Admission: Free Info: sddayofthedead.org It’s a dead man’s party with more than 50 Day of the Dead altars to tour. The living will show off their art, cooking and more. SAN DIEGO ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL

11/3-4: Escondido Renaissance Faire

SD A s i a n F i l m F o u n d a t i o n

Location: Felicita County Park, Escondido Admission: $17 per day; $27 for two days Info: goldcoastfestivals.com In case Halloween wasn’t enough makebelieve for one season, ye can throw on that Hobbit costume one more time for a weekend of turkey legs and jousting. Remember Dungeons & Dragons? These guys do. 11/4: Susan G. Komen 5K Race for the Cure

11/1-9: San Diego Asian Film Festival

Location: Theaters and locations throughout the county Admission: $11.50 per film Info: sdaff.org Watch more than 150 movies from 20 countries in this celebration of Asian and Asian American cinema and culture. Chargers home games

11/1: vs. Kansas City Chiefs 11/25: vs. Baltimore Ravens

11/13-25: CAVALIA

Location: Balboa Park Admission: $40-$55 Info: komensandiego.org Bras won’t be the only thing supporting boobs at this scenic 5K, as thousands converge to walk and run for breast cancer awareness. The after-race expo features educational and vendor booths and live entertainment. 11/4: Carlsbad Village Faire

Location: Grand Ave., Carlsbad Admission: Free Info: carlsbad.org Check out what’s touted as the largest one-day street fair in the nation, hosting more than 900 vendor booths, an international food court and a beer garden.

11/12: San Diego County Veterans Day Parade

Location: Pacific Hwy., Downtown Admission: Free Info: sdvetparade.org Help honor those who’ve served the nation during this Veterans Day parade, commemorating the 65th anniversary of man’s first breaking the sound barrier. 11/13-25: Cirque du Soleil: “Cavalia”

Location: Petco Park, Downtown Admission: $39.50-$154.50 Info: cavalia.net Who could say “neigh” to this acrobatic show at Petco, featuring equestrian and performing arts, multimedia and special effects? 11/4: SUSAN G. KOMEN 5K RACE FOR THE CURE

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Calendar NOVEMBER 2012

11/15: RA’S 15TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY

pacifics A N d I E G O . com

11/12: Grub Sprawl

Location: Restaurants in East Village Admission: $5 per dish Info: grubsprawl.com Enjoy generous small plates for just $5 during this tasty walking tour of East Village restaurants including Lotus Thai, East Village Tavern + Bowl, Bub’s at the Ballpark and more. 11/14-18: Cirque du Soleil: “Dralion”

11/14-18: San Diego Bay Wine and Food Festival

Location: Various venues, followed by a largescale event at Embarcadero Marina Park North Admission: $45-$200 Info: sandiegowineclassic.com A five-day series of culinary events, ranging from food truck parties to top chef cooking demonstrations, culminates in a waterfront grand tasting celebration that brings together 200 wineries, breweries and spirits; 70 San Diego chefs and restaurants; and nearly 5,000 food fans wanting to taste it all.

Location: 474 Broadway, Gaslamp Admission: Free Info: rasushi.com Achieve sushi nirvana during RA’s 15th Anniversary in the Gaslamp, where ’90s-themed “Teen Spirit” drinks are $5, patrons’ checks are discounted 15 percent, and RA will donate 15 percent of proceeds to Mama’s Kitchen. 11/16-12/31: Valitar

Location: Del Mar Fairgrounds Admission: $65-$225 Info: valitar.net Saddle up for the 225,000 square-foot Valitar Kingdom, a multi-tent equestrian experience showcasing the strength and grace of horse and man. 11/22: Father Joe’s Thanksgiving Day 5K Run/Walk

Location: Museum of Man, Balboa Park Admission: $35-$42 Info: my.neighbor.org Turkey-trot over to Balboa to help Father Joe’s Villages raise funds to continue providing safety, nutrition, health and education to thousands of San Diegans in need.

RA SUS H I

Location: Valley View Casino Center Admission: $35-$160 Info: cirquedusoleil.com An acrobatic extravaganza will have legions of performers bending over backward to convey the fusion of humans with nature and ancient Chinese disciplines with those of the West.

11/15: RA Sushi’s 15th Anniversary Party

11/14-18: san diego bay wine and food festival

11/12: the east village grub sprawl includes a stop at the awardwinning lotus thai

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THINK

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And this bird you cannot change By David Perloff (bird inciter) Photo by Rob Hammer Southern rock legend Lynyrd Skynyrd – the long-hairs responsible for the 1973 rock mega-hit “Free Bird” – released its 13th studio album, “Last of a Dyin’ Breed,” in August. PacificSD’s hope for America’s Finest: that the straight-shootin’, soon-to-leave-office Jerry Sanders (pictured here with one bird free) isn’t the last of his kind, and that the next mayor of San Diego can fill at least one of his shoes. Hats off, Mr. Sanders. You’re as free as a bird now…or at least you will be December 3. Hope you don’t catch too much flack for this photo at the office in the meantime.

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“Free Bird” If I leave here tomorrow, Would you still remember me? For I must be traveling on, now, ’Cause there’s too many places I’ve got to see. But, if I stayed here with you, girl, Things just couldn’t be the same. ’Cause I’m as free as a bird now, And this bird you cannot change.

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Pacific San Diego Magazine, November 2012 issue