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SUMMER 2016

HARVEST TIME OZARKS FOOD HARVEST – THE FOOD BANK

NEWSLETTER FROM THE O’REILLY CENTER FOR HUNGER RELIEF

FEEDING PROGRAMS GIVE KIDS HOPE

One in four children in the Ozarks are at risk of going hungry Thousands of children living right here in the Ozarks have a secret – they are hungry. Some of these kids are hungry every day, and some might experience it only on the weekend of the school year or when they aren’t in summer programs. But for the one in four kids facing this struggle, it is a painful reality. Meeting 9-year-old Presley, you wouldn’t know some nights she goes to bed hungry. She has a sweet smile and bubbly demeanor. Presley is just like any other child. She wants to do well in school and have fun at recess, but when she feels

the pain of hunger in her stomach, it’s hard to be a kid. “Being hungry makes me feel sad because I can't eat enough. So I can't really get A's on my school work,” the Springfield elementary student shared. “We don't have enough money to buy cereal and stuff to have for breakfast. It is hard to think about not having enough food at home.” But there is hope. Ozarks Food Harvest provides kids like Presley more than 70,000 meals and snacks through summer feeding programs, and 432,200 meals during the school year through the After-School and Weekend Backpack programs. In addition, The Food Bank educates families with food insecure children on pantries in their cities. The Ozarks community understands that kids who don’t have enough to eat suffer. And that’s why thousands of donors and volunteers give of their time and treasure year after year to make sure these kids have a chance for a bright future. Children who don’t have enough to eat suffer physically and emotionally. They are not only missing the nutrients needed to grow, but young children don’t understand why friends at school always seem to have food, but when they go home sometimes mom or dad doesn’t have anything for dinner. “Malnutrition and undernutrition seem to be far-away issues … but this simply isn’t true. Many children right here in the Ozarks also suffer from undernutrition or food insecurity,” said Alyse Fields, dietician with CoxHealth. “This

means they do not have adequate nourishing food to support their needs of growth and development.” Fields said that children who are undernourished experience metabolic changes that cause them to have excessive weight gain. These children also have higher levels of cortisol which is linked to depression and cognitive defects.

“It's hard to think about not having enough food at home.” -Presley, 9-years-old “Similar studies reveal undernourished children suffer from lower reading and mathematics scores,” she said. “Though these consequences occurring in our own backyard can seem overwhelming, something can be done. Programs such as the Backpack Program through Ozarks Food Harvest not only provides nourishing food but also food consistency to protect against obesity, as well as brain food – a chance for these children to be successful in school and in their futures.” Presley shared that when she grows up, she wants to be a veterinarian. Not having enough to eat now can have dire consequences on her ability to be her best self when she grows up. But thankfully, each week during the school year, she takes home a bag filled with six nutritious meals and during the summer, she attends programs that serve meals and snacks. “The best part of the food bags is the cereal,” Presley shared. “The food bag helps me because I want to get A's on everything … when I get the Hope Note in the food bag it makes me feel happy.” There are thousands of children like Presley living in our community. It takes everyone coming together doing what they can to make sure no child goes hungry.

ozarksfoodharvest.org


FIGHT HUNGER. SPARK CHANGE. GIVES 571K MEALS Walmart’s nationwide Fight Hunger. Spark Change. initiative provided over $17 million to Feeding America food banks across the country. Ozarks Food Harvest was awarded $114,368 to fight hunger right here in the Ozarks. From late March through April, Walmart called on the public to take action in the fight against hunger by encouraging public participation in the Fight Hunger. Spark Change. online campaign, as well as purchase specialty marked products and give monetary donations at the register. The collective donations will allow Ozarks Food Harvest to provide 571,840 meals to children, families and seniors who access food assistance from The Food Bank’s network of 200 member pantries and programs. “In partnership with the Feeding America network, this campaign will significantly boost our collective ability to raise awareness about the issue of hunger, allowing us to secure more local funds and, ultimately provide food to more people in need in the Ozarks,” said Denise Gibson, director of development and communication at Ozarks Food Harvest. “We’re grateful that our supporters and generous Walmart customers joined us to take action in the fight against hunger by participating in the campaign.” “This campaign is a great example of our long-standing commitment to hunger relief and dedication to ensuring every family has access to affordable, nutritious and sustainably grown food,” said Kathleen McLaughlin, president of the Walmart Foundation and chief sustainability officer for Walmart.

WALMART CUSTOMERS WERE PROMPTED AT THE REGISTER TO GIVE TO HUNGER RELIEF DURING THIS YEAR'S FIGHT HUNGER. SPARK CHANGE.

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ARVEST REPRESENTATIVES, L-R, ERIN WARD, PENNY LACY, SHANE COWGER AND SARAH SIGLE PRESENT OFH'S BART BROWN A CHECK FROM THIS YEAR'S 1 MILLION MEALS CAMPAIGN.

1 MILLION MEALS DRIVE EXCEEDS YEAR'S GOAL 1.7 million meals collected bank-wide during sixth year For the sixth year, Arvest Bank held its annual 1 Million Meals campaign to raise food and funds for local people who struggle with hunger. This year’s campaign at the Springfield and Nixa branches collected $3,125 and 1,662 pounds of food for Ozarks Food Harvest. The bank branch in Monett donated $447 to support its town’s Weekend Backpack Program. Traditionally held in the fall and winter, the campaign was moved to the spring this year to provide a donation just in time for summer, when many children struggle with hunger even more without the guarantee of school breakfasts and lunches. “Thanks to the outstanding efforts of our associates, customers and members of our community, we’re excited to provide many meals to our neighbors in need,” said Brad Crain, president and chief executive officer of Arvest Bank in Springfield. “We hope 1 Million Meals has increased hunger awareness in southern Missouri, and will continue to fight hunger in our community long after this year’s initiative has ended. I am proud of – and humbled by – our success with this year’s

LOCAL FOOD DONATIONS FROM SPRINGFIELD AND NIXA BRANCHES ARE DELIVERED TO OFH.

campaign. We all look forward to continuing to give back to our community.” Across all of the Arvest Bank branches in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma, over 1.7 million meals were provided to directly benefit 66 organizations. “Arvest’s donation and continued support of our work is making a tremendous impact on ending hunger in our community," said Bart Brown, president and CEO of Ozarks Food Harvest. "We want to extend a special thanks to all the Arvest associates who promoted the drive, and all the people who bank with Arvest who gave so generously."

Transforming Hunger into Hope™ for more than 30 years


STAND UP FOR FOOD ACCESS Greetings from the O’Reilly Center for Hunger Relief! Our elected state and federal representatives are making decisions every day that affect our way of life and well-being. As supporters of Ozarks Food Harvest, I believe it is our responsibility to stand up against proposed changes that would make it harder for our neighbors to get the food assistance they desperately need. Access to food should be a right of all Americans. In the midst of these challenging months, as you read about in the cover article, a new initiative titled “A Better Way” was presented by the House Task Force on Poverty, Opportunity and Upward Mobility outlining their plan to tackle the widespread issue of poverty and hunger, among other pressing topics. Solving hunger for our region and the nation is critical if we want to create better and healthier communities. My friends at Ozarks Food Harvest are thankful the report is starting a national conversation about the

MAKING SNAP REQUIREMENTS TOO RESTRICTIVE HURTS KIDS LIKE 12-YEAR-OLD JAZMYNE.

issue of poverty, but some of the proposal would make it harder for those who are hungry to get help putting food on the table. We like that the federal plan to address hunger affirms that people should be provided opportunity to make a better life. This includes improving much-needed access to Summer Food and After-School Food programs for food insecure children. But the report also outlines instituting harmful increased work and training requirements for recipients of SNAP, or food stamps. The changes to SNAP requirements would make it harder for people to get back on their feet. Adequate jobs aren’t easy to come by, and Bart shared that increasing requirements for SNAP recipients without guaranteeing access to income assistance, training and support in finding employment ultimately does more harm than good. We don't object to work requirements for physically able recipients of SNAP, but this proposal would make it too difficult for many recipients to obtain basic food supplies. I agree that the focus should be on strengthening employment and training programs and ensuring that child care and transportation, among other supports, are available for people able to work. And the reality is that for some living in the Ozarks, even full-time jobs don’t provide enough to pay for the essentials. Amidst the debate and rhetoric addressing the heartbreaking issue of hunger, I hope our representatives remember that people’s well-being and hope for a better future hangs in the balance. None of us should forget that behind each statistic is a person who needs a little extra help putting food on the table.

UPCOMING EVENTS HUNGERTHON ON 105.9 KGBX – SEPT. 9–12

Join Kevin & Liz on iHeartMedia's 105.9 FM during Hunger Action Month as they work to end childhood hunger in the Ozarks. You can help by sponsoring a Weekend Backpack Program child for just $25 per month — or for a semester at $12.50 per month. Listen to the radio-thon live to make your pledge, Friday, Sept. 9 through Monday, Sept. 12. Or call (417) 865-3411 in advance to learn about other ways to show your support of the 18th annual event.

CHARLIE O'REILLY, O'REILLY CENTER

CHARLIE'S CORNER Twelve-year-old Jazmyne shared, “Our dad gets $30 every payday at his job, but the $30 only covers the bills for the house. [Ozarks Food Harvest] helps my family so we can have food on the table to eat.” As a supporter of Ozarks Food Harvest, please join me in contacting your representatives from Congress today through the Feeding America advocacy hotline, 888-398-8702 or contact them through their websites and ask them to make hunger relief a priority: Sen. Claire McCaskill, mccaskill. senate.gov; Sen. Roy Blunt, blunt.senate.gov; and Rep. Billy Long, long.house.gov. Private charities working side-by-side with social programs are essential to ensure our neighbors have something to eat. Your continued support of the hungerrelief work at Ozarks Food Harvest helps local families in need, and is greatly appreciated by Food Bank staff and the people they serve. Visit ozarksfoodharvest.org or give Bart a call today to learn more about how you can stand up for food access in our community.

417 RESTAURANT MONTH During the month of August, diners who participate in 417 Magazine's Restaurant Month will have the opportunity to make a donation to OFH's Weekend Backpack Program after their meal. Learn how you can participate at ozarksfoodharvest.org

GO ORANGE DAY – SEPT. 8 Orange is the color of hunger awareness, and National Go Orange Day is Sept. 8. Sport orange to raise awareness during Hunger Action Month this September. Watch for more ideas on OFH's 30 Ways in 30 Days Join The Food Bank at Panera Bread on calendar at ozarksfoodharvest.org. National & Elm during the First Friday Art Walk, Nov. 7. When you make a monetary donation to OFH, you receive soup and a baguette Ozarks Food Harvest Panera Bread from Panera—plus an and "empty bowl” created areapartnering for Empty event by local artist. The "emptyBowls, bowls"an serve as a offering aofmeal of soup and a on reminder the thousands of bread, empty and bowls bowl created by a local artist, in exchange for dinner tables across SWMO. cash donations. Come join us this fall!

EMPTY BOWLS– SEPT. 23

distribution

Give time, food or funds at ozarksfoodharvest.org

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OFH EARNS PERFECT SCORE

BART BROWN, PRESIDENT/CEO

When it comes to hunger relief, I’m proud to say that Ozarks Food Harvest is one of the most effective nonprofits in the nation. Seeing firsthand how hard the staff and volunteers work to provide food for our struggling neighbors is incredible. And so many of you generously give of your treasure to ensure no one goes hungry. While I’ve always known of the great work being done here at Ozarks Food Harvest, the leading evaluator of nonprofits nationwide helped make that abundantly clear this June. Ozarks Food Harvest was one of only 49 nonprofits among the more than 8,000 evaluated across the country to earn a 100 percent rating from Charity Navigator. We were the only charity in Missouri to receive this honor. Earning a perfect 100 percent score from

Charity Navigator is a testament to the trust we have in this community. This rating gives you, our valued donors, greater confidence that every $1 you give to The Food Bank is making a tangible impact on the life of someone who is hungry. For the past four years, Ozarks Food Harvest had received the top four-star rating from Charity Navigator. When the evaluator updated its rating system earlier this year to provide donors better information on how charities perform over time, Ozarks Food Harvest was one of a few select nonprofits to earn the never before awarded 100 percent perfect score. Charity Navigator’s improvements include measuring nonprofits’ program, administration and fundraising costs over the three most recent fiscal years, rather than just from the most recent fiscal year. It also added calculating nonprofits’ liabilities to assets ratio as a measure of financial health. This analysis was added to Charity Navigator’s existing measurements that evaluate nonprofits’ transparency and financial accountability. At Ozarks Food Harvest, this score is based on years of strategic planning and research that has allowed us to most effectively use your gifts to make the biggest difference in the Ozarks, where as you know, hunger affects one in four people. Over the past three years, Ozarks Food Harvest has increased the number of meals distributed per person in need by 27 percent

across the 28 counties served in the Ozarks. Today, The Food Bank provides 14 million meals every year. Five counties – Greene, Newton, Ozark, Texas and Vernon – saw at least a 50 percent increase in meals distributed since 2013. And Lawrence, Shannon and Wright counties saw an over 100 percent rise in meal distribution. I hope that you know that each dollar or pound of food you give to Ozarks Food Harvest is being used in the most effective and efficient way to help local children, families and seniors put food on the table. Hunger in our community is an urgent and growing need, but our commitment to solve this heartbreaking issue is stronger than ever. Thanks to your compassion, we’re reaching more people and distributing more meals than ever before. Would you consider making a donation today to help us grow our direct service and pantry programs? Ninety-six cents of every dollar you give goes straight to helping those who need our help. We need and value your long-term commitment to stand beside us in the fight against hunger.

SUPPORTERS RAISE AWARENESS

DENISE GIBSON, DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

FROM

DENISE'S DESK 4

Thirty-eight-year-old Amy often worries if she’ll have enough food to feed her kids. “As a single parent it's a struggle to provide to my four children,” she shared. “Sometimes it's more difficult to provide for my kids during the summer months. I just work more to make up for the difference, but that's hard on my family, too.” One in six adults and one in four children in southwest Missouri face the heartbreaking reality of hunger. Families like Amy’s are all too common in the Ozarks. Working hard to make ends meet, but at the end of the day coming up too short to provide even the most basic necessities. But those facing hunger have hope because you care and give of your time and treasure. This September is the annual Hunger Action Month — a chance for Ozarks Food Harvest and hunger-relief organizations across the country to shed light on food insecurity and the ways the community can help.

AMY'S FAMILY BENEFITS FROM YOUR GENEROSITY.

As a supporter of The Food Bank, you know how hunger affects the Ozarks, but there are still many who don’t know how widespread the issue is, or aren’t sure how they can make a difference. This September I encourage you to participate in events like Go Orange Day, Hungerthon and Empty Bowls. You can learn more at ozarksfoodharvest.org. Please also take the opportunity to tell someone about the work we do. When we work together, we can Transform Hunger into Hope.

Transforming Hunger into Hope™ for more than 30 years


OFH BOARD OF DIRECTORS Tamara deWild O’Reilly Auto Parts–President Dr. Meera Scarrow Mercy Hospital-Springfield–President Elect TommyWohlgemuth SGC™ Foodservice–Treasurer Tim Bellanti Associated Wholesale Grocers, Inc.–Secretary Mike Pinkston Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Inc.–Past President Dr. John Buckner Ferrell Duncan Clinic Brad Crain Arvest Bank of Springfield Jim Guthrie Prime Inc. Gary Naab General Mills, Retired Jill Reynolds Commerce Trust Company Kenny Ross Morelock–Ross Builders Krystal Russell Spectrum Accounting and Payroll Vault Todd Sherman Kraft Heinz JamesWilson NewStream Enterprises, a subsidiary of SRC Holdings

OFH STAFF Bart Brown, President/CEO ADMINISTRATION Cindy Snow, Director of Administration Cindy Boggs, Office Manager Terry Keller, Administrative Services Coordinator MelanieToler, Receptionist

SPECIAL THANKS TO THESE FRIENDS OF THE FOOD BANK MUSGRAVE FOUNDATION GRANTS $10,000 TO BACKPACK PROGRAM Ozarks Food Harvest received a $10,000 grant from the Musgrave Foundation to benefit the Weekend Backpack Program! The gift will provide 1,250 food bags to children in need over the weekend. Since 2006, this generous organization has donated over $415,000 to hunger-relief in the Ozarks.

OHAF DONATES $10,000 FOR KIDS Thanks to a recent donation of $10,000 from the Ozarks Health Advocacy Foundation, 7,500 meals will be provided through the Weekend Backpack Program to children attending Springfield Public Schools during the coming school year. OHAF is dedicated to improving quality of life in the Ozarks by addressing children’s critical physical, mental and dental health needs.

MEMBER SERVICES Mary Zumwalt, Director of Programs & Member Services Jordan Browning, Comm. Partnerships & Advocacy Coord. Casey Gunn, Retail Compliance Specialist Kimberly Hansen, SNAP Coordinator Abbey Hedges, Backpack Program Coordinator Terra Lamb, Agency Outreach Coordinator Elise Peck, Member Services Assistant JaneTerry, Creative Information Specialist ErinThomason, Nutrition Programs Coordinator OPERATIONS ADMINSTRATION Scott Boggs, Director of Operations Teresa Dixon, Warehouse Supervisor Mike Doubledee, Inventory Manager Steven Henry, Operations Administration Mike Hesebeck, Transportation Supervisor Eddie Hicks, Operations Administration Steve Roberts, Transportation Supervisor Due to growth and limited space in the newsletter, all warehouse and transportation associates on the Operations team are now listed online at ozarksfoodharvest.org.

GIVE OZARKS RAISES $21,000 FOR AREA FOOD INSECURE KIDS Ozarks Food Harvest exceeded its goal for the second annual Give Ozarks! Over the course of 24 hours, area businesses and community supporters donated $21,163 for the Weekend Backpack Program. These gifts came from 187 donors, 66 of whom gave to The Food Bank for the first time. Thanks to Community Foundation of the Ozarks, Commerce Bank, DairiConcepts, Vance Chiropractic and Bohannon Auto Services for their donations and support of the event.

JOHN DEERE GIVES TO OFH

DEVELOPMENT & COMMUNICATION Denise Gibson, Director of Development & Communication Jenna Brown, Development&Comm.ResourcesAsst.Coord. Cassie Hanson, Development & Grants Manager Tessa Hull, Communication Assistant Coordinator Lisa Matus, Development Assistant Jennifer Sickinger, Senior Coordinator ChristineTemple, Communication Coordinator COMMUNITY RESOURCES Gordon Day, Director of Community Resources Dan Bohannon, Retail Store Donation Coordinator Jeremy Clark, Volunteer Coach Christy Claybaker, Community Engagement Coordinator Brenda Hesebeck, Volunteer Coach Rob Medlen, Full Circle Gardens Assistant Jeremy Moore, Volunteer Coach JoleneThompson, Volunteer Engagement Manager BrianWilson, Volunteer Center Supervisor CorbinYoung, Volunteer Coach

COMMUNITY MEMBERS AND BUSINESSES DONATED OVER $21,000 FOR GIVE OZARKS 2016.

Thanks to the John Deere Foundation for its donation of $5,000 to Ozarks Food Harvest’s Weekend Backpack Program. This donation will provide 625 bags of food to kids.

U.S. BANK EMPLOYEES WORK AT A MOBILE PANTRY IN HARTVILLE, WHICH SERVED 115 FAMILIES.

US BANK GIFTS $4,000

HEUER FUNDS MOBILE PANTRIES The Heuer Foundation generously gifted $3,000 to fund another three Mobile Food Pantries in the West Plains community.

U.S. Bank donated $4,000 to fund mobile food pantries in Hartville and Salem. These rural cities located in Wright and Dent counties experience high rates of food insecurity, 17 percent and 16.4 percent respectively. OFH uses these mobile pantries to reach people in rural areas, distributing 13,000 pounds, on average, at each pantry.

SCHREIBER FOODS GIVES TO FOOD BANK PROGRAMS Mt. Vernon-based Schreiber Foods, Inc. made a $5,000 donation to The Food Bank. The Weekend Backpack Program will receive $1,000 of the donation, $3,000 will go toward funding The Food Bank’s general feeding efforts and St. Susanne’s Catholic Church, a member food pantry in Lawrence County, will receive $1,000.

FIELD STUDENTS MADE ARTWORK TO SELL AT A SCHOOL-WIDE MARKET AS A FUNDRAISER FOR OFH.

FIRST GRADERS SUPPORT OFH First graders at Field Elementary School sold artwork and held a food drive, collecting a total of $843 and 119 pounds of food, to provide 4,314 meals to people in need!

Give time, food or funds at ozarksfoodharvest.org

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VOLUNTEER & FOOD DRIVE PROGRAMS

SUMMER 2016 SCOUTING FOR FOOD PROVIDES 27,000 MEALS

DATEMA HOUSE RESIDENTS, L-R, MAISEN, TAYLOR AND DALTON SORT NONPERISHABLE FOOD AT OZARKS FOOD HARVEST DURING THEIR JUNE VOLUNTEER SESSION.

GIVING BACK MAKES BIG IMPACT ON BOYS' FACILITY When 14-year-old Maisen arrived at Datema House, an alternative school and group home for teenage boys part of the Missouri Division of Youth Services, he was not excited at first about participating in community service. “I thought it was going to be terrible,” he shared. “But when we got to Ozarks Food Harvest, it was really fun when I got to find out what we were actually doing – helping feed people.” Maisen is one of approximately 30 teenage boys who have volunteered at Ozarks Food Harvest during their stay at Datema House. Since February 2015, these boys and their leaders have given over 316 hours of service. In elementary school, Maisen was a recipient of the Weekend Backpack Program. He views his volunteer time as a way to give back and grow personally. “I looked at it as a way of building my character. I have empathy for others when I’m doing community service.” For 15-year-old Taylor, volunteering gave him confidence he didn’t have before.

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“I used to have really low self-esteem before I came to Datema House,” he said. “Being able to help others, it makes me see that I’m capable of doing things and it makes me feel proud of myself and the efforts that I put in. It helps me boost my self-esteem quite a bit.” Several of the boys in the program shared similar stories. “When I first came in here ... I didn’t think well of myself,” said 17-year-old Kentrell. “Now I can actually say that I helped people and didn’t take.” Fifteen-year-old Dalton shared, “Doing community service shows me how my actions affect others in a positive way, rather than a negative ... to hear of all you are doing to help out people, it’s really fun. It feels good.” Many of the boys said they would like to volunteer after graduating from the program at Datema House. Taylor said, “It’s really cool that we get this opportunity to do this, because it’s really made a difference in my life.”

Boy Scouts across the Ozarks went doorto-door this spring to gather nonperishable food for Ozarks Food Harvest during the 27th annual Scouting for Food. Together they collected a record 29,745 pounds of food and $442.43 to provide nearly 27,000 meals. Grocery sacks filled with nonperishable food were picked up in area neighborhoods and the Scouts held one-day drives at area Walmart stores. “We are very pleased with our success at the Ozark Trails Council, Boy Scouts of America. This year our campaign ran a little longer than usual with Scout units doing food drives almost up until the first week in May,” said Nathan Rackers, Osage Hills District executive for the Ozark Trails Council. “In addition, more units participated in the Scouting for Food drive this year.” Ozarks Food Harvest will provide the donations to its network of 200 pantries and programs across 28 counties in southwest Missouri. Through this project, local Scouts have provided nearly 160,000 meals over the last 11 years. “Our local Boy Scouts are such an important partner as we fight to solve hunger for the Ozarks,” said Christy Claybaker, community engagement coordinator at Ozarks Food Harvest. “Their energy and excitement for this drive is a great motivator for the community to get involved.”

BOY SCOUTS COLLECT FOOD AT WALMART.

Hunger Hope™Visit for more than 30 years Do you want your school, Transforming church or business to into volunteer? ozarksfoodharvest.org/volunteer to sign-up!


STAMP OUT HUNGER SETS RECORD

A LETTER CARRIER PICKS UP FOOD DONATIONS DURING THIS YEAR'S RECORD BREAKING DRIVE.

A record 80 million pounds of food was collected in support of food banks nationwide during this year's Stamp Out Hunger. Hosted annually by the National Association of Letter Carriers, Stamp Out Hunger is the largest single-day food drive. “These results are gratifying, because they mean that even more people will be helped,” NALC president Fredric Rolando said. “As letter carriers, we are honored to be able to assist people in need. On a daily basis we see the struggles in the communities we serve, and we believe it's important to do all we can to help."

Ozarks Food Harvest’s agencies received a total of 255,027 pounds of food from Stamp Out Hunger to help fight hunger in the Ozarks. This total beats the 2015 total by more than 36,000 pounds. Local Hunger Heroes left bags of food near their mailboxes on May 14 to help feed children, families and seniors in the Ozarks. Letter carriers collected the donations and delivered them to Food Bank pantries: Crosslines, The Salvation Army and Victory Mission, as well as Grand Oaks Mission. The items will be distributed to those facing hunger in southwest Missouri.

GROUPS 20+ HOURS

INDIVIDUALS 25+ HOURS

3M Campbell UMC Circle #7 Chase Bank Cultured Pearls of Springfield DairiConcepts Datema House Developmental Center of the Ozarks Doniphan Key Club Drury Student Ambassadors Drury University Ebenezer UMC Enactus Faith For Life - Campbell UMC First Marion Worship Arts Hamlin Baptist Church Hillcrest Interact Club Humana I Pour Life Jack Henry CISPO Jessen Care Group Junior League of Springfield King's Way UMC Macy's MSU Delta Zeta Sorority MSU Dietetic Interns MSU Habitat For Humanity Republic High National Honor Society North Point Church Ozark National Honor Society PD Packers Parkview High School National Honor Society Robberson Community School Springfield Catholic HS Sustainable Gardening Serve With Liberty Program Springfield Skeptics Springfield Wholigans Springfield Public School Students TOMS Initiative Wesley UMC March 1-May 31, 2016

Ruby Allen Marisa Andrews Jim Blackwell Margaret Blackwell Delys Bodenhausen Max Bodenhausen Charley Bowen Trudy Bowen Brigett Breckner Gene Campbell Karla Carroll Gale Clithero John Cooper Travis Copas Eddie Currier Linda Currier Eileen Deal Adam Debacker Patsy Devine Kris Dreesen Carson Eggers Arlene Eichler Lana Farmer Eltjen Flikkema Jerri Flikkema Elaine Garton John Gentry Alexander Goodman Kara Gulotta Bob Hanson Wil Hardiman Kirk Hawkins Patti Hudgins Julia Jenkins Harvey Kaylor Freeman Kleier Don Landon

FOOD DRIVES 75+ POUNDS Stamp Out Hunger — 255,027 lbs. Scouting for Food — 29,745 MSU Fraternity and Sorority Life — 2,957 The Venues — 1,520 Greenleaf Properties — 1,170 Red Tree Church — 959 Fort Leonard Wood Commissary — 827 Grant Avenue Freewill Baptist Church — 694 Farm Bureau Insurance — 674 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — 330 Council of Churches, Fish Drive — 301 Walmart Supercenter (E. Independence) — 298 Walk-In Donations — 279 Patton Alley Pub — 277 MSU Meyer Library — 269 Woods Supermarket (Buffalo) — 265 Curves (Springfield) — 231 Delta Sigma Phi — 207 CoxHealth CCU/MICU — 205 Aldersgate UMC, Fish Drive — 204 Database Systems — 168 Family Video — 162 All Saints Angelican Church, Fish Drive — 143 MSU Sociology Department — 126 Field Elementary School — 119 St. Canera Catholic Church, Fish Drive — 118 Strafford UMC — 114 Asbury UMC, Fish Drive — 80 Springfield-Greene Co. Office of Emergency Mgmt. — 75 March 21-June 14, 2016

George Lawrence Justin Linebaugh Randy Mall Ann Marsh Susanne Martin Dave McGee Natalie Moore Melvie Mosier Linh Neal Charlene Nelson John Parrish Jerry Patton Beth Robertson Rhonda Roseborough Nikki Roseborough Deborah Rumpf Tom Ryan Judith Sharp Chloe Shauck Bill Sines Harley Snyder Carolyn Steensland Kassidy Swindle Jennifer Terry Courtney Timmer Jacob Waggoner Kambry Wagner Lona Wait Tarah Wallis Melanie Webb Josh Wells Chuck Williams Von Williams Matt Wilson Larry Woolf Jerry Yoakum March 1-May 31, 2016

LOCAL GARDENS PRODUCE 9,100 POUNDS OF PRODUCE

Ozarks Food Harvest’s Full Circle Gardens Program has provided thousands of pounds of locally harvested produce to families in need so far this season! In its third year, The Food Bank’s garden at Ozarks Natural Foods

has already produced nearly 600 pounds of food planted, maintained and gleaned by volunteers. And thanks to generous farms like Fassnight Creek Farm, Victory Garden and Urban Roots Farm, more than 8,500 pounds

of excess produce was gleaned by volunteers before it went to waste. More volunteers are needed to keep up with the demand in these gardens. Sign-up today at ozarksfoodharvest.org/volunteer.

food or funds Transform Hunger intoGive Hopetime, by collecting food at or ozarksfoodharvest.org volunteering to help your neighbors in need.

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O’Reilly Center for Hunger Relief 2810 N. Cedarbrook Ave. | P.O. Box 5746 Springfield, MO 65801-5746 (417) 865-3411 ozarksfoodharvest.org

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Transforming Hunger into Hope™

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Transforming Hunger into Hope™ for more than 30 years

Summer 2016 | Harvest Time  
Summer 2016 | Harvest Time