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SUMMER 2016 // ISSUE 78

OYSTER WORLD RALLY

NEW BOAT REPORTS

OYSTER REGATTAS

OYSTER OWNERS

The wonderful adventure around the globe starts in January 2017

Test sail review of the new Oyster 745, and see the Oyster 675 in build

Fun, friendship, family and social racing at our Palma and Antigua regattas

Inspiring real-life stories of our owners’ adventures


// CONTENTS

// NEWS 03 04 06

Foreword Oyster News New Arrivals

// EVENTS 09 10 12 36 38 58 68 119

2016-2017 Events Programme Superyacht Events 2016 Owners’ Dinner 2015 Atlantic Rally For Cruisers Oyster World Rally 2017-2019: The Big Blue Adventure Oyster Regatta Palma 2015 Oyster Regatta Antigua 2016 Our Regatta Partners

// FEATURES 25 28 34 49 51 55 57 78

Sojana, A Modern Icon Owner Story: Spirit Owner Story: Magrathea Owner Story: Rainbow Spirit Owner Story: Quester Owner Story: Pegasus Focus On Palma Owner Story: Sea Mist

// FLEET 14 17 21 23 86

In Build: The Oyster 675 New Yacht Review: Oyster 745 In Build: The Oyster 885 In Build: The Oyster 118 Fleet Review

// BROKERAGE 105

Brokerage Listings

// CHARTER 82

Charter Listings

// CONTACT 120

Contact Us


FRONT COVER Photo: Yacht Shots EDITOR Kate Porteous, Marketing & Communications Manager CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Louay Habib Mike Jones Mike Owen Sue Pelling FROM THE EDITOR We know from our readers that the articles they most enjoy reading in the Oyster magazine are the contributions from Oyster owners. If you have a story to tell or information about cruising in your Oyster please let us know. Photographs are always welcome. E: marketing@oysteryachts.com The Oyster magazine is published by Oyster Marine Limited. The publication is for promotional purposes only, privately circulated, and cannot form part of any contract or offer. Views, details and information herein are therefore not necessarily endorsed by the publisher who will not be held responsible for the consequences of any error or omission. Pictures and illustrations are liable to show non-standard equipment. Oyster magazine is published by Interstate Creative Partners on behalf of Oyster Marine Limited. INTERSTATE CREATIVE PARTNERS Jayne Connell: Founder & Director of Branding Caroline Jenkins: Associate Director Christina Beani and the Design Team


// WELCOME

issue 78 KEEP YOUR IDEAS COMING PLEASE! Welcome to our 78th Oyster magazine in our 43rd year of building yachts. I do hope you are inspired by reading it - we are regularly inspired by the ideas you bring to us! It continues to be a real privilege to build lovely yachts for lovely clients who creatively bring us a wide range of personal and sometimes amusing ‘extras’ that they would like to see built in to their Oyster. One that caught my attention was the owner who confessed that his 100 litre stainless rum tank with deck filler in his Oyster 54 was ‘perhaps a little large’ (sic) - so in the 625 we are now building for him, could we reduce it to 70 litres please! The feature on the Oyster 885 in this magazine is a more serious example – eight different yachts: two for circumnavigating, two for racing, three with raised deck profiles and one with 25% of the interior volume dedicated to an enlarged Owners’ Suite! We have been similarly flexible across the range and our mantra of ‘choice not compromise’ is supported with a real passion to try to say ‘yes of course’ when new ideas are suggested. Once away on the oceans, Oyster owners continue to amaze us with their breadth of ideas for adventures. The feature on Cheryl and John Ellsworth, living aboard their Oyster 56 for 11 years highlights how it is possible to pack up the house and set sail. Others plan more structured experiences - a couple of years ago, two Oyster 72s surprised each other when they met unexpectedly in high latitudes in Hudson Bay – one arriving from the Atlantic

David at the helm of the first Oyster 745.

and one having just completed the North West Passage. This yacht then went on to excite the Australian press as he took part in their famous ‘tough Sydney Hobart race’ as a minor

As part of our commitment to high levels of customer service, we’re

detour on his way to Ross Island at ‘Latitude 77’.

delighted that the decision to set up an Oyster Service Centre in Palma has proved so popular. The take up of guardienage services, small refits

For those wishing to be in warmer climates it is eye-opening to see how accessible the

and general maintenance work has been demanding to respond to and

major oceans have become. Over 300 Oyster yachts have completed the transatlantic

we now have 19 members in our Palma team. One Superyacht Captain

ARC and over 70 Oyster yachts have circumnavigated – the longest taking eight years

based in Palma, who bought a low priced Oyster 435 recently said, as

– they are clearly enjoying life aboard their Oyster. And with 34 entered for the second

we helped him restore it with a very significant refit, that he wouldn’t

Oyster World Rally starting in January 2017, over 100 yachts will have circumnavigated

have entertained the project without the Oyster Palma team being close

by the end of this adventure. What were vague dreams for only the hardy and adventurous

on hand. Again, it’s all part of the theme of my introduction – we’re

few have now become serious reality for even some quite inexperienced sailors.

here for you and whatever ideas you may have. It’s a pleasure to try to respond to them; new build, adventures, restorations or simply looking

It’s a real pleasure to play our part in turning ideas in to long lasting memories and stories

after your yachts.

for the grandchildren. More and more we realise that we may be boat builders but our main task is to help you fulfil your dreams!

My thanks as ever, go to the ~400 staff at Oyster who maintain this positive attitude across the Company.

The exciting launch of the first two Oyster 745s in early summer will be followed by the first Oyster 675 being exhibited at the Southampton Boat Show in September. These two new models are simply stunning and their owners have made some fantastic choices in specifications, interior layouts and styling. With one of the 745s having an extended aft deck and vertical transom and the other staying with a more conventional retroussé stern, our day on the Solent with press and helicopters captured some great images and quotes – my favourite being from the well known journalist Matthew Sheahan completing his review of the 745 with the words, “A new bar has been set.” Praise indeed.

David Tydeman, CEO Oyster Group

Oyster issue 78 / 3


OYSTER NEWS SCARLET OYSTER SUCCESS 2015-16 has been a successful year of regattas for Oyster Lightwave 48, Scarlet Oyster, with multiple wins in the Caribbean in 2015 and a superb season. 2016 got off to a great start with RORC Caribbean 600 2016 where they finished first in IRC 2, first in CSA 2 – a fourth Class win in C600 – a record in itself! Skipper and owner, Ross Applebey’s most memorable recent regatta was the Antigua Sailing Week 2015, where Scarlet Oyster finally won her Class having been runner-up on three occasions by one point each time. They won with a clean sweep of eight bullets, taking the overall racing Classes trophy, as well as first British Boat, first Charter Boat and the Royal Southern YC Challenge trophy! Ross said “It was pretty special as one year later, we collected all the same trophies again! Roll on 2017 for the 50 th Antigua Sailing Week!” Photo by Paul Wyeth, Antigua Sailing Week

Read more about her ARC 2015 success on page 36 and follow their blog at www.scarletoyster.com.

OYSTER YACHTS WROXHAM WINS APPRENTICE EMPLOYER OF THE YEAR On Thursday 17th March 2016, Technical Engineering Manager, Colin Vicarey, attended an awards ceremony at City College Norwich to receive the award of Apprentice Employer of the Year on behalf of Oyster Yachts Wroxham. The award was in recognition of the team’s efforts to ensure that our apprentices receive first-class, structured workplace training and supervision alongside their classroom-based instruction and tuition. The specialist tutors and assessors were highly complimentary about the quality and attitude of our young apprentices and the level of support they receive from the Electrical and Engineering departments.

MAEGAN WINS INTERIOR DESIGN AWARD

Congratulations to the Wroxham technical departments, our supervisors,

Oyster 825-03 received an award for interior design at the International Yacht

teams and apprentices, for this well-deserved recognition of their effort

and Aviation Awards ceremony held at the Hotel Cipriani, Venice on Friday

and commitment.

20th May 2016. There to accept the award, Oyster CEO, David Tydeman said, “I am delighted to accept this award for Oyster 825, Maegan, on behalf of the company. Over 7000 unique votes were received for these awards and we are honoured to have won. The interior design for Oyster 825, Maegan, exemplifies the superb service offered by Oyster Yachts where we work closely with the owners to deliver exactly what they want. Maegan's owner, Marja de Pundert, worked together with Marcus Wright, Oyster Senior Interior Designer on Maegan’s interior design, which was then brought to life by the expert team of craftsmen at Oyster. A true team effort so well done to all involved. Our thanks to Design et al magazine for hosting the event.”

4 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


IN MEMORY OF BILL DOCKSER WORDS BY MOLLY MARSTON

It is with great sadness that we say goodbye to Bill Dockser who passed away in March 2016. He was an ardent sailor, and this was an honour and a highlight in his life. Bill owned two Oysters over his sailing career, firstly an Oyster 70 and more recently an Oyster 82. Both were called Ravenous signifying his enthusiasm for living life to its fullest. The iconic lobster spinnaker with a stars and stripes tail was for his love of lobster and patriotism. Bill was a key inspiration and supporter of our Oyster regattas, most recently joining us at our BVI Regatta 2015. He also enjoyed sailing with his family and sharing the experience with his 17 grandchildren. He will be fondly remembered and missed by all.

OYSTER YACHTS SPONSOR ANTIGUA FOOTBALL CLUB Antigua has welcomed Oyster to its shores for decades. As a small way of saying “Thank You”, 2016 saw the start of Oyster sponsoring the Swetes Football Team. Pictured here, following their promotion to the Island’s premier league, they certainly are great supporters of Oyster too!

IN MEMORY OF ED DUBOIS WORDS BY DAVID TYDEMAN

There have been many tributes to Ed since he sadly left us earlier this year. He changed the sailing industry with his talent for exciting owners to build more and more fantastic yachts, pushing boundaries,

RONA SAILING PROJECT

engineering and styling to new frontiers. It’s highly appropriate that his last project, still under build at Royal Huisman, is called 'The Beast', I know she will be a fitting legacy for a creative and charismatic talent.

Based on the river Hamble, Rona II, an Oyster 68,

Ed also changed Oyster with his designs for the Oyster 100 and 125, taking us in to new territory with three of

has taken more than 7200 young people sailing,

these beautiful yachts – Sarafin, Penelope and Twilight – on the water turning heads wherever they go. He was

completed 24 International and three Transatlantic Tall

great company, a friend and someone who we will all miss. Our thoughts go to his wife Honor and their

Ships campaigns and has run more than 350,000nm

children and we wish her and Peter the best of success in keeping Dubois Naval Architects going forward.

in her career to date. The charity relies on a 400-strong afterguard of volunteers and runs sail training voyages primarily for young people of various abilities from diverse and often very deprived backgrounds. Rona II will embark on her fourth Transatlantic campaign in April 2017 and the decision has been taken to replace her masts. Visit www.ronasailingproject.org.uk to assist us in supporting this very worthy charity; their track record in helping youngsters gain control of their lives through sailing is impressive.

NEW GENERAL MANAGER AT OYSTER YACHTS WROXHAM Ben Collett joins Oyster in September as General Manager of our Norfolk shipyard. Ben brings a strong mix of experience, most recently developing the prototype and setting up production for the exciting Aston Martin carbon lightweight 37ft powerboat. A yacht builder at heart, he was MD of Formula Masts – a key supplier to Oyster – and before then had ten years running Discovery Yachts, a close competitor for Oyster in the sub-60ft sector. We thank Suzy Lynch for her work as the Interim Manager and are delighted she will remain available in a consultancy role.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 5


NEW ARRIVALS

RECENTLY LAUNCHED OYSTERS SUKAMA OYSTER OYSTER 475 625

TO: SUE AND MALCOLM BLACKWELL & SON ANTHONY

The first Oyster 475, Sukama left Ipswich on 6th July 2015 heading straight to Malta to complete formalities and then onto Palma. Sue and Malcolm kept Sukama in Sicily over the winter. They are currently exploring the Med, and may cross the Atlantic at the end of 2016.

ALTAIR OYSTER 475

TO: LIISA AND KEN BACCO

475-02, Altair was handed over to Liisa and Ken Bacco in Newport, Rhode Island. Whilst being mainly based in Newport, Altair will now spend the summer cruising Maine and the north east coast of the US. Long-term plans include participating in the Oyster World Rally in 2017.

ASKARI OYSTER 625 475 OYSTER

TO: CAROLYN AND ANDREW BELLAMY

Andrew was, until recently, CEO of Austal, builders of warships, fast ferries and stealth boats. Andrew and Carolyn’s attention to detail has been to a very high level. The result is a stunning 475. Andrew and Carolyn have sold up and will be circumnavigating for the next 5-10 years. Current plan is Ipswich for 7-10 days, South Coast and Channel Islands for 3-4 weeks, then France, Spain, Portugal, Madeira and the Canaries. An Atlantic crossing to the Caribbean is planned for the end of the year.

OYSTER 545

ALDOURIE

TO: JEAN VANHOEBOST

Jean was actively involved in the project from the start and eagerly awaited the chance to take the helm of his new Oyster 545.  Aldourie attended our Oyster Private View at St. Katharine Docks, before Jean sailed her down to the Med for the summer (via a short spell in Holland). After that, Jean intends to participate in his first ARC and a season in the Caribbean.

6 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


TO: PATRICK ALLAWAY

545-08 was successfully shipped and handed over to her owner, Patrick Allaway, in Australia. Patrick wasn’t able to make handover in Ipswich so Duncan from Oyster Commissioning flew out to see her safely off the ship and give Patrick and his crew a thorough handover in home waters. Pegasus is set to join the rest of the 34-strong fleet in the Oyster World Rally starting in January 2017.

TO: SUE AND DAVE HALES

575-32, Capella of London was handed over to Sue and Dave Hales following the Southampton Boat Show in 2015. The handover sail took place on a fresh day in the Solent immediately after the show, with lunch being taken at anchor in Osborne Bay. Capella of London is Dave’s first Oyster and will be used primarily for cruising in the Med but Dave and his crew are quite keen on racing and we’re sure she will soon be prowling on

OYSTER 575

CAPELLA OF LONDON

OYSTER 545

PEGASUS

an Oyster regatta start line. 

IMAGINE OF WROXHAM

Oyster 575-34, Imagine of Wroxham was handed over to Shirley and Allan Cook at the Oyster Private View at St. Katharine Docks, London, in April 2016. Their first Oyster, Solway Mist of Kippford, Oyster 46-08 enjoyed the Oyster Jubilee Regatta in 2010 in Porto Cervo, Sardinia and they enjoyed cruising with her in the Mediterranean and Croatia. We look forward to seeing the Cook family and their new

OYSTER 575

TO: SHIRLEY AND ALLAN COOK

Oyster 575 on the Oyster regatta circuit.

TO: SUE AND HARVEY DEATH

Sue and Harvey previously owned Oyster 56 Sarabi which they sailed extensively in the Caribbean. Safiya was built with the Oyster World Rally in mind and is sensibly engineered and suitably equipped to allow them to circumnavigate in comfort and style. With her toffeecoloured hull and custom Maffioli ropes, Safiya was very well received at both our Private View and the London On-Water Show at St. Katharine Docks. Light winds on handover just allowed for the hoisting of the bold orange cruising chute with the stunning lioness logo. 

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 7

OYSTER 575

SAFIYA


IRISH BLESSING OYSTER 625

TO: VANESSA AND JOHN McTIGUE

Irish Blessing handed over to Vanessa and John McTigue and their son, Cullen, in June 2016 in Newport, Rhode Island. 625-16 is a shoal draft, twin rudder configuration which allows John to visit one of his favourite anchorages in Anegada. John previously owned 56-60 Blue Dreams in which he attended many Caribbean regattas. Irish Blessing will remain in Newport for the summer and will be at the Newport and Annapolis boat shows leaving the USA in late October to her base in Nanny Cay, BVIs. 

OYSTER 745

SATORI Satori is the first Oyster 745 built and she made her début at the Oyster Private View at St. Katharine Docks in April 2016. Satori handed over in June 2016. She will cruise the Baltic this summer, head to the Oyster Regatta in Palma in October and then will depart for the Caribbean to join the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019.

OYSTER 745

GRAYCIOUS Handed over in June 2016, Graycious is the second Oyster 745 to hit the water. She will be available to view at the Cannes Yachting Festival, 6th-11th September 2016 and at Strictly Sail Miami, 16th-20th February 2017. She will be based in the USA.

ALBATROS OYSTER 825

TO: MANFRED KERSTAN AND SABINE HOFFMAN

Manfred has been sailing for 50 years and completed over 20 ARC crossings on his previous boats. Albatros came 6th in their Class in last year’s ARC. They spent the winter cruising in the Caribbean and Venezuela before returning to the Med for summer 2016.

OYSTER 885

FIREBIRD Oyster 885-07 handed over in April 2016. Firebird is the owners’ second Oyster yacht. Their first Oyster was the award-winning 625, Lady Mariposa – a regular performer at Oyster regattas. Firebird participated in Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta 2016 in Sardinia and Superyacht Cup Palma, followed by a summer season cruising the Med on charter. Their future plans involve ski-sailing in Norway. Read more about Firebird in the Oyster 885 article on page 21.

8 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


2016-2017 EVENTS PROGRAMME JULY 2016

JANUARY 2017

MAY 2017 CONTINUED

// ROYAL SOUTHERN OYSTER WEEK 4TH - 8TH JULY 2016

// LONDON BOAT SHOW 6TH - 15TH JANUARY 2017

// OYSTER OWNERS’ DINNER, LONDON DATE TBC

// S  YDNEY INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW 28TH JULY - 1ST AUGUST 2016

// O  YSTER WORLD RALLY DEPARTS FROM ANTIGUA 15TH JANUARY 2017

// OYSTER BROKERAGE SPRING SHOW 12TH - 14TH MAY 2017 (TBC)

// 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF OYSTER USA 29TH JULY 2016

// B  OOT DÜSSELDORF 21ST - 29TH JANUARY 2017

// LORO PIANA SUPERYACHT REGATTA, SARDINIA 6TH - 10TH JUNE 2017

SEPTEMBER 2016 // CANNES YACHTING FESTIVAL 6TH - 11TH SEPTEMBER 2016

FEBRUARY 2017 // T  HE SUPERYACHT CHALLENGE, ANTIGUA 2ND - 5TH FEBRUARY 2017

JUNE 2017

TWO DRAMATIC EVENTS FOR YOU TO PLAN AHEAD FOR At the end of March 2018 we will have an Oyster

// NEWPORT INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW 15TH - 18TH SEPTEMBER 2016

Regatta in Auckland, celebrating the start of

// STRICTLY SAIL MIAMI 16TH - 20TH FEBRUARY 2017

MARCH 2017 // SOUTHAMPTON BOAT SHOW 16TH - 25TH SEPTEMBER 2016

OCTOBER 2016 // OYSTER PALMA REGATTA 4TH - 8TH OCTOBER 2016

// U  NITED STATES SAILBOAT SHOW, ANNAPOLIS 6TH - 10TH OCTOBER 2016

Part 3 of the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019 – every Oyster owner is welcome, with or without their yacht! In summer 2020 we will be creating a cruise

// L  ORO PIANA CARIBBEAN SUPERYACHT REGATTA 10TH - 13TH MARCH 2017

APRIL 2017 // OYSTER BVI REGATTA 10TH - 15TH APRIL 2017 (TBC)

in company and an Oyster Regatta within the 300-year-old celebration in Cork of the oldest yacht club in the world – the Royal Cork Yacht Club.

For more information on any of the above events, please contact +44 23 8083 1010 or email info@oysteryachts.com

// PALMA SUPERYACHT SHOW 28TH APRIL - 2ND MAY 2017

MAY 2017 // HAMBURG INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW 29TH OCTOBER - 6TH NOVEMBER 2016

// O  YSTER PRIVATE VIEW, ST. KATHARINE DOCKS, LONDON DATES TBC

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 9


SUPERYACHT EVENTS Ever since wealthy individuals started building large sailing yachts, challenges have been laid down for them to race against each other.

PHOTOS BY CARLO BARONCINI & CARLO BORLENGHI

Sometimes these challenges developed into amazing events – the

The Oyster 100s Sarafin and Penelope, Oyster 885s Lush, Guardian

America’s Cup for example. An outcome of the Great Exhibition

Angel and Firebird and Oyster 825 Maegan have all done well over

in 1851, the first race between the New York Yacht Club and the

the past couple of years. Oyster 82s Pandemonium and Zig Zag have

Royal Yacht Squadron for the 100 Guinea Cup. This highlighted

recently taken part in their first events.

our desire to win with the famous line, “Your Majesty, there is no second place.” – when Queen Victoria enquired who was following

The Superyacht Racing Association tracks all these events, and

the beautiful winning schooner America across the finish line.

membership of the SRA is encouraged by all and helped along through discounted entry fees to regattas.

Rules of engagement of one form or another followed and The Racing Rules of Sailing have been progressively refined over the years,

The SRA lobbied the Offshore Racing Council successfully and

as competitive opportunities increase through the evolution

its new ORC Superyacht handicap rule has produced fair racing

of technology.

between a diverse fleet, ranging from restored wooden classics, new aluminium 150+ footers, lightweight carbon one-offs or series

These large yachts have always been very spectacular when they

built yachts from Swan, Southern Wind, Perini and Oyster. These

are doing 12-15 knots upwind or 25 knots plus off wind. Some of the

events are now an opportunity for Oyster owners to both take part

fleet displace more than 300 tonnes and stopping distances can be

in and feel there is a serious chance of being on the podium.

huge. Superyacht racing events are not for the faint-hearted but approached with respect, and with the right team on board, these

A recent SRA report summarises the opportunity well;

events can increase your knowledge of your yacht and leave you

“Around 150 yachts over 80ft take part in around eight regattas

with amazing memories and incredible photographs.

per year mainly in the Mediterranean and the Caribbean, with per iodic events in more faraway locations such as Auckland,

Many of these events are aimed exclusively at yachts over 100ft,

NZ. Of this about a quarter of the fleet are between 80-100ft and

although there are now several events each year open to yachts over

interestingly, about half the fleet change each year and a third

80ft. Counting our current fleet and order book at time of going

of the fleet only do one regatta each year. Thus those entering

to print, there are 38 Oyster yachts over 80ft and several of these

are constantly changing, new friendships are to be made and

owners now have these Superyacht events in sight – either racing

the opportunity to see and race against a wide diversity of yachts

or just joining in the social side.

is amazing.”

10 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


“Just coming to watch is worth it”, said Oyster owner of 54-19 Nikitoo II, from the St. Barths Bucket Regatta, Caribbean, March 2016. Against this backdrop we hope to see more of the 38 larger Oyster yachts enjoying these events in the future. Congratulations to: John McMonigall on his Oyster 82 Zig Zag – 2nd in the Superyacht Challenge Antigua, January 2016. Oyster shareholders Klaas Meertens and Wim de Pundert on their Oyster 825 Maegan – 1st in Class and 2nd overall in the Palma Superyacht Cup, June 2015 and 2nd in Class in the Loro Piana Caribbean Superyacht Regatta, March 2016… both enjoying some incredibly close results against a broad spectrum of spectacular yachts. Oyster 825 Maegan and Oyster 885 Firebird raced in the Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta in Sardinia in June 2016. Oyster 885 Firebird will take part in the Superyacht Cup, Palma in the same month. We hope to see all at the Oyster Regatta in Palma 4th-8th October 2016. Next year, Oyster 885s Guardian Angel and Clare with Oyster 82s Zig Zag, Dama de Noche and Bare Necessities hope to bring the total to seven yachts at each of the main events in 2017.

To read more about the latest Oyster 885s’, Firebird and Guardian Angel, plans on the Superyacht Regatta circuit go to page 21.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 11


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2016 OWNERS’ DINNER 2466

ROYAL THAMES YACHT CLUB, LONDON

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The 2016 Oyster Owners’ Dinner took place on Friday 15th April to coincide with the annual Oyster exclusive boat show at St. Katharine Docks, London. The ‘Private View’ provided a stunning début for the first Oyster 745 and the opportunity to hold private naming ceremonies for two new Oyster 575s. A beautiful example of the Oyster 545 completed the impressive line-up. 4087 3199

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The oldest royal yacht club in the United Kingdom and the oldest

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continuously operating yacht club in the world was the stunning venue for our 2016 Oyster Owners’ Dinner. The Royal Thames Yacht Club was established in 1775 and overlooks Hyde Park in Knightsbridge, London. The Club has had many distinguished Flag Officers and traditionally the Commodore

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has been a member of the royal family. Earl Mountbatten was Commodore for 20 years and today the Club’s Commodore is HRH

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Prince Andrew, the Duke of York. Unusually among leading yacht clubs, the senior elected member and Chairman of the Club is the Vice Commodore. We were delighted and honoured that Bernard Kinchin, Vice Commodore, could join us for our annual event. This year over 100 people from all over the world joined us for the

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exclusive evening of fine food and wonderful company in the heart of London.

3360 the champagne reception, the guests sat down to supper Following

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where the tables were decorated with the Royal Thames Yacht Club’s finest trophies.

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Oyster CEO, David Tydeman commented, “It’s superb to see so many people join us for our event; hosting this dinner is an important date in our calendar. We have a wonderful diversity

PHOTO BY MIKE JONES, WATERLINE MEDIA

of owners here, with the owner of the latest 885 on the water, a couple who will soon be setting off on the Oyster World Rally 3870

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2017-2019 on their brand new 575, and some wonderful new friends who have joined us for the first time following their purchase of their Oyster Brokerage yachts. The grand reunion table of Oyster World Rally 2013-2014 participants is the table ever ybody wanted to be

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on. With birthdays also being celebrated, we hope that everyone

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had a great night to remember.”

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Wouter Verbraak, guest speaker for the Oyster Owners’ Dinner is a professional yachtsman, skipper and navigator. As a degree-trained meteorologist and accomplished sailor combined with a very competitive 2688 attitude and team player approach, Wouter

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has a unique profile in the yachting world. His wealth of experience in both inshore and offshore racing captivated the room as he entertained Oyster owners with tales of life as a professional sailor on the Volvo Ocean Race, America’s Cup and many others.

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2930 He is well-respected in the navigation community, but when Team Vestas Wind ran into the Cargados Carajos Shoals during the second leg of the Volvo Ocean Race, he was their navigator. He eloquently talked us through 2492the inside track on what really happened and highlighted the serious gaps that exist between electronic and paper

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charts – humbly bringing us all to fits of laughter when he recounted his son saying to him, “How could you miss the island Daddy – it’s even on my IKEA world map?” Thanking Wouter after his speech, David Tydeman commented, “Wouter is doing

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a ver y important job now by working with all the electronic navigation equipment suppliers to help prevent this experience from happening to one of us. In essence he

759 him.” is helping to make the water safer and for this we thank 15

The Oyster owners at the dinner were each given a signed copy of Wouter’s book, ‘Beyond the Break’ with Wouter commenting, “It was a pleasure to be invited to speak

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at such a prestigious event. The Oyster team made me very welcome and it was a treat

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to feel part of this unique Oyster family. The dinner was delicious and I look forward

291meeting up again – perhaps some where on the regatta circuit.” to

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‘Beyond the Break’ by Wouter Verbraak is available on www.amazon.com

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IN BUILD: THE OYSTER 675 With just a few months to its August completion date, the Oyster 675 has started to emerge from its cocoon at the Wroxham yard, and has created the sort of reaction to indicate she’ll become a favourite within the luxury, mid-sized, sporty sector.

WORDS BY SUE PELLING // PHOTOS BY RYAN LOVEJOY

Based on the success of the 625, which in turn had lifted performance from the Oyster 66 with cleaner hull lines, the 675 continues to uphold Oyster’s heritage of innovation and design excellence, using the finest materials and outstanding workmanship. Humphreys Yacht Design team has once again fulfilled Oyster’s brief to create a yacht that fits exactly in the intended slot of the market – for the executive connoisseur who requires plenty of style, and space for entertaining, yet who doesn’t want to compromise on sailing performance. Her sleek, low aspect profile, and the company’s signature wraparound window design gives the 675 the unmistakable Oyster stamp. She’s spacious and reliable, yet, with the option of carbon fibre mast and rigging, and fully-battened mainsail, powerful and dynamic enough to offer comfortable speeds and that all-important ‘licence to thrill’. For those who require a crew, there is the option to turn the fourth cabin/workshop, strategically positioned off the main saloon, into a functional crew cabin. Now in the final fit-out stage, 675-01 is progressing well and her owner, who is looking forward to her official handover in Palma March 2017, has been working closely with the design team to create his ultimate, sociable family/ entertaining yacht. Commenting on the appeal of the 675, the owner of the first yacht in production said the decision couldn’t have been easier: “Fo r me the 675 f itted my requirements exactly. I wanted a quality, statement, high perfor mance yacht that I could rely on, with enough space for my young family and friends to enjoy in comfort. “Although she is only an extra five feet over the 625, which is the model I first considered, the extra volume has given us a lot more inter ior to ‘play’ with. Given her size, I was also keen to have the option of a crew cabin incor porated off the main saloon, which cleverly separates it from the owner/guest areas.

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Computer generated images

“Also, as someone from a racing background, I was keen to have a yacht that performed well, so that I could spice things up when required for fast passages and a spot of racing in Oyster regattas. Given her powerful hull and r ig design, I believe the 675 will deliver on all counts.” When stepping aboard the 675 the proportional difference between her and the 625 – the more recent design on which she was based – is quite noticeable and gives the impression of a far larger yacht. The overall increase in volume has allowed the designers to utilise the space and create a sumptuous living and entertaining platform.

I WAS KEEN TO HAVE A YACHT THAT PER FOR MED WELL, SO THAT I COULD SPICE THINGS UP WHEN R EQUIR ED FOR FAST PASSAGES

Like the slightly larger 745, the 675’s foam-core, glass fibre hull is constructed using Oyster’s engineered laminate layup, consisting of high-tech, fibre-reinforced materials for increased strength and reduced weight. As is standard with all the beamier Oyster designs, the 675 has twin rudders and carbon fibre wheels, and a standard semi-bulb deep keel. There is also the option of a swinging centreboard. In an effort to keep things simple, for short-handed sailing in particular, it is possible to opt for powered main and headsail furling for push-button control. >>

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The emphasis on this particular boat’s interior layout was to position the VIP guest cabin forward and ensure it matched the space and lavish style of the Master Cabin aft. Both are self-contained en-suites for maximum privacy, and offer plenty of space to relax in comfort. The optional Oyster ‘Seascape’ vertical windows in the slightly beamier Owners’ Cabin aft, allows maximum natural light to flood in and offer spectacular panoramic views. Guests in the third spacious double cabin, also positioned forward, have use of the day head and shower room across the corridor. The open plan main saloon has been carefully thought out for optimum entertaining purposes. Taking in the full 5.65m beam of the yacht, the owner has chosen to position the spacious galley to port, with plenty of luxurious seating around the oak table centrepiece. The sophisticated limed oak wood interior finish, combined with the cream toned furnishings and panoramic ‘Seascape’ windows, gives an exceptionally light and bright feel. The recessed ceiling lighting and low-level lighting offer just enough ambiance to the entertainment area when the sun goes down. The crew cabin has been sensibly positioned on the through corridor, just aft of the nav station on the starboard side, to give separation from the guest quarters and to allow independent access to the saloon, galley and the engine room. On deck the standard layout has been crafted and configured to exclusive specifications to meet the owners' requirements. Carbon fibre finish in strategic areas including on the main stairs, antenna pole, nav panels, and the carbon-effect mast cover below, adds to the modernity. With entertainment in mind, and adding to the already huge expanse of pushpit and cockpit seating, the owner has opted for an uninterrupted, cushioned sunbathing area just forward of the mast. There is no doubt this flawlessly crafted new addition to the Oyster range will appeal to those looking for a spacious, eye-catching, pedigree yacht that is likely to make an impression on the Oyster regatta circuit. David Tydeman, Oyster CEO commented: “In conceiving the Oyster 675 and her larger sister the 745, we set out to design and build two yachts that could be handled by the more exper ienced owner without crew or with just one crew and who still wanted to be hands on. Finding the balance for other owners who needed more space and bunks for two or even three crew, we are very excited that these two designs have worked out well. Extending the signature deck saloon windows a little on these two yachts has given them that slightly edgier styling and what became nicknamed the ‘coupés’ in the range – these are great yachts and I think they are our most exciting designs to date.”

See the Oyster 675 at the Southampton Boat Show, 16th-25th September 2016. For further information, please call +44 23 8083 1010, email info@oysteryachts.com or visit www.oysteryachts.com

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NEW YACHT REVIEW OYSTER 745

Facts, figures and statistics are all very well, but when it comes to understanding what the new Oyster 745 is all about there are easier ways of getting to grips with this new model. One is to simply look at her deck.

WORDS BY MATTHEW SHEAHAN // PHOTOS BY MIKE JONES (INTERIOR) & JOE MCCARTHY (SAILING)

Aside from the familiar, trademark wraparound deck saloon windows, her flush foredeck is the first indication of a more modern style that characterises the new Oyster generation. Another example is the short bowsprit which carries twin anchors and provides easily accessible tack fittings for a gennaker and code zero. And when it comes to the quality of fit-out, the immaculate, clear lacquered Hall Spars carbon mast and the impressive array of high spec Spinlock rope clutches clustered around the mast wall on neatly engineered carbon plinths say it all. Then there are the halyard locks for the staysail and code zero, modern race engineered details that have been applied for this bluewater configuration. Details that mark a bold step forward in the quest to create the next generation of bluewater cruisers. It’s not just fancy fittings and high spec deck gear that set her apart. Her guest cockpit offers another clue to the new approach. Twenty percent larger than her predecessor’s cockpit, there are no ropes, clutches or clutter of any kind in this deep and secure cockpit. >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 17


Unlike similar configurations that can be exited simply by stepping over the coamings, it feels both awkward and wrong on the 745 to do so. The more natural and preferred way is to use the centreline passageway between the twin carbon wheels where grab handles on the large pedestal/instrument plinths provide perfect hand holds. This leads you to the working area of the 745 where a pair of powered Lewmar 88STs provide the muscle for the jib sheets while a pair of manual 68STs are the secondary winches. All four winches sit just behind the helmsman’s steering positions making it easy to both communicate with sailing crew and operate the sheets when sailing shorthanded. It is not until you look forward, especially when you are underway, that the penny drops fully. Viewed as a whole, the complete deck layout is not only clean and clutter free, but also offers superb visibility. It is perhaps only then that you realise that the very feature that characterises an Oyster, its distinctive deck saloon structure, is lying low. At least that’s how it appears from the cockpit. Yet from off the boat the 745 has lost none of its DNA. This effect is no accident. The style and proportions of the new look superstructure is another area in which the Oyster design team and the Humphreys Yacht Design office have worked hard. And the results are impressive. Indeed, so clear are the decks forwards, it is as if the control lines and associated deck gear have been led under the deck to save you from tripping or stubbing your toes. Yet no such masking tricks have been used. Instead, the designers have utilised a more traditional, practical approach to sail handling where reef lines and halyards are gathered around the mast. But unlike classic designs where multiple winches are scattered on deck like mushrooms around a tree, the Oyster 745 has just two powered Lewmar 68STs and a collection of perfectly positioned clutches. Another clever detail is the pair of flush fitting rope tail lockers built into the deck alongside the mast - simple, effective, clean and tidy. Meanwhile, her jib sheets are led back to behind the twin steering pedestals. One of the benefits of a blade jib is that flogging sheets are kept well away from the cockpit, but the 745’s configuration goes one step further with the sheets led neatly along the lower outside edge of the deck superstructure. Keeping them low and running them through several stainless steel fairleads ensures that they remain out of harm’s way no matter what the conditions. If this was where the innovation stopped there would be plenty to recommend her, but the reality is that the new style goes way beyond an ingenious new deck layout. In fact, the catalyst for this new design came from a different set of considerations. On the face of it, upgrading from say a 50 or 60 footer should provide plenty more volume below decks to install additional creature comforts along with more sophisticated handling systems that make light work of the extra power that a bigger boat can generate. But a bigger boat along with more complex engineering can in turn require a skipper/engineer and/or crew.

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One or two extra crew can then mean extra cabins which quickly swallow up some or all of the additional volume that had been gained. Moving up another notch in size may be a solution for some, but it’s easy to end up with a much bigger boat than you had originally intended with the added limitations that come with size. Going bigger doesn’t always work for all. Interestingly, towards the top end of the range the balancing act between length and number of cabins can become harder rather than easier. Take the Oyster 100. Her length means that she has to comply with the Marine and Coastguard Agency Large Yacht Code (LYC) which, among other details, sets out minimum dimensions for some of the accommodation. The net result is that this professionally run 100 footer has two cabins for crew and just three for guests. Owners of say a 56 or 575 who have no crew to cater for and will be used to having four cabins for themselves and their guests, may raise an eyebrow or two at the thought of a boat that is nearly twice the length but has less guest accommodation. Which is where the concept for the new generation of Oysters started and has led to the development of the 745. Drawn to the limit of the LYC, the designers of the 885 were able to make full use of the cavernous hull without restrictions while also looking carefully at how they could boost performance. This fuller form with its subtly refined distribution of buoyancy helped to achieve a more powerful, yet easily managed hull. The next stage was to refine and validate the design with a towing tank programme at the Wolfson Unit in Southampton. It was this work that both validated the performance predictions, but also highlighted a significant gain in another area, the rudders. “We have designed a good deal of boats with twin rudders over the years, but mostly with boats that are restricted by draft or have lifting keels,” said Rob Humphreys of Humphreys Yacht Design. “But one of the interesting results to emerge from the tank testing was the reduction in drag from the rudders when sailing upwind. Because the leeward rudder is off the centreline it is out of the turbulent flow from the keel. Here it is operating in a much cleaner flow and therefore requires significantly less rudder angle when sailing upwind and this reduces drag.” >>

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The concept was repeated aboard the 825 and now appears on the 745. In practice, under sail, she is certainly easy on the helm. Upwind in 10-15 knots of breeze she has a balanced feel, one of the key characteristics of a twin rudder configuration. Downwind, with her large asymmetric gennaker set, she sets into an equally purposeful stride with a direct feel and plenty of grip through the helm, even when pushed hard. If this configuration does have a flipside it is the 745’s ability to keep pressing on with the same full sail plan as the breeze builds with good control and no hint of the rudder stalling out. Yet even so, this is also a benefit, especially in squally, changeable conditions where her surefooted feel will carry you through the worst of the weather and out to the other side with ease. The bottom line is that her performance under sail is as big a step up as her deck layout. But still there’s more. Below decks she can cater for a wide range of different layouts. But there are several key features that make her stand out here too. In particular, the clever balancing act that has been struck in the main saloon where the full width of the hull has been exploited without making the deck saloon feel like the glazed dome of a cathedral. Instead, the saloon cabin sole is at just the right height to allow good, near all round visibility when standing and moving around. When seated the vertical, rectangular orientated ‘Seascape’ windows that have become part of the signature of the new breed come into play. Beneath the saloon floor lies the engine room where appliances and critical items are well spaced and are easy to get to for servicing. Aside from the light, visibility and space afforded by the new look deck saloon, the next detail to stand out is the dual companionway forward either side of the mast. To starboard lies another guest cabin, while to port the longitudinal galley also provides a passageway forward to the crew accommodation. This clever detail was taken directly from the 825 and has proved to work well, allowing crew and guests to move back and forth without having to pass through each other’s areas. A further innovative detail in this area is the sliding panel and door on the galley side that allows the galley/crew accommodation to be closed off completely from the guest accommodation. Particularly useful when chartering the boat. Abaft the saloon lies the guest double with en-suite to port with a cabin on starboard that can be arranged for a variety of purposes from pilot berth cabin and utility room to an office, workshop or children’s play room. Furthest aft is the owner’s cabin, a spacious and comfortable layout that can easily be configured from comfortable to cavernous depending on how owners wish to use their own space. But for all the details above and below decks, perhaps the cleverest aspect of the 745 is how easily she can switch roles between being a professionally run charter yacht and a private yacht for an owner and friends. In the past this would have been considered a clever compromise. Today it is simply one of the latest generation of bluewater cruisers. A new bar has been set.

See the Oyster 745 at Cannes Yachting Festival, 6th–11th September 2016. For further information, please contact +44 23 8083 1010, email info@oysteryachts.com or visit www.oysteryachts.com

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IN BUILD: THE OYSTER 885 Commissioned to sail the Oyster World Rally, the first Oyster 885, Lush, circled the globe straight ‘out of the box’, sailing 30,000 miles without an issue. The reputation was set. Now three years on the eighth is in build, and the latest launch, Firebird, on handover immediately set course for this summer’s Mediterranean Superyacht regatta scene, with adventure ski-sailing in Norway to follow. Completed according to different intents and focus, each 885 is individual, commissioned and planned precisely to very specific preference across a fascinating mix of sailing.

WORDS BY MIKE OWEN

‘Choice not compromise’ is the line. You get what you want with so much more opportunity than offered by others in the world of series-built yachts this size. The options of two different deck superstructures and three saloon configurations begin to illustrate the scale and breadth in that choice. Then consider that the entire interior arrangement can be customised and reconfigured for anything up to six cabins, six heads: four for owner and guests up to ten, and two for a crew of four. And add in how these are physically laid and scaled into the plan according to emphasis, be it for optimal owner personal space and privacy or more equal arrangements for friends and family charter, for which the Oyster 885 is well set being commercially coded under MCA. Reflecting the defining principle of today’s Superyachts, in all there’s a clear separation of crew and galley quarters from guest space. Externally, the Raised Saloon on 885s Guardian Angel, Firebird, and Project TM3, still in build, stands 300mm/12in taller than the Deck Saloon which topped the first three built, Lush, Karibu, Clare and then the fifth, Bacchus. With that raised profile the aesthetic remains, outwardly the line still every inch an Oyster, the glazing panel size just enhanced to match the underlying purpose to elevate eyeline and outlook from within, achieving this by raising and also building the floor at a single level. >>

PHOTO BY MIKE JONES

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PHOTO BY NICO MARTÍNEZ

Computer generated images Between times, though, in one option for the lower deck superstructure, the saloon is not just levelled but enlarged to extend its span full-beam by actually lowering the floor this time to create good height for seating stretching under the side decks. Intriguingly, the as yet unnamed and in build, Project TM3, has opted for the benefit of both the Raised Saloon deck structure and this Lower Saloon floor. The wide open, spatial sense is extraordinary. Almost 2.5m/8ft headroom and, when heeled, panoramic views through both the deck house and wide hull windows from a single vantage point. This was an owner with vision! He knew what he wanted and suffered no compromise. The same applies to general arrangement. Convention at this boat size is to maximise planned cabin numbers. With a near 90-footer like the 885, that’s three suites aft: a master in the stern and a twin or double to either side of the corridor, with then a fourth cabin forward of the saloon

forward, claiming a little extra of the accommodation floor, yet the three cabin plan is

opposite an enclosed galley, through which the crew have their two cabins,

retained. The loss is just a little space in the master heads, and now a shared heads and

one double, one bunked. The balance and space throughout is excellent.

shower for the two aft guest cabins. The forward section shows more change though, with big utility and locker area for this race-keen owner’s many code sails that fly from

But what if you want more for yourself? Simple, request it. Any

a custom-integrated carbon bowsprit. A very personal choice influenced by a race

complexity is ours not yours, yet by planning for extensive change

programme including the RORC 600, Malta Sea Race and other IRC events, so not

from day one, the shell and core of the 885 was design engineered to

just Superyacht regattas.

best enable such customisation. Project TM3 is a good example with the owner requiring a larger suite aft, incorporating a linked private

Firebird, which launched into racing this summer with the Loro Piana event in Porto

sitting room in what otherwise might have been a guest cabin. The

Cervo and then Palma Superyacht Cup, has the Raised Saloon, too, but with a more

forward guest cabin was then given a bigger heads and shower, making

conventional aft end, and forward the fourth guest cabin converts out of a very

it more equal with the remaining aft guest suite. The final part of this

comfortable, well served owner’s private office. That hints at extended stays aboard

story is that with the lower saloon floor, there is a reduction in engine

and, with exploration and winter ski-sailing in northern waters in the heart of the brief,

room height necessitating a longer machinery space, hence the saloon

there’s full climate control to cope equally well be the boat in tropical sun or polar chill.

is actually longer as well as wider, which means reconfiguring galley access and work areas.

The versatility and capability of the 885 is clear, and second off the line Karibu is set to enjoy that next year extending her dual role as family cruiser and finely tuned regatta

With another different treatment forward, the third built 885, Clare,

racer to become world girdler, as she’s now set to join the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019.

has a second saloon space or, with sliding panel and door, a snug that quickly converts to fourth guest cabin.

The range of sailing and owner profile simply covers the world. Leaders of industry, sportsmen, British, Irish, Russian, German and serial Oyster owners, as well as others

The fourth built 885, Guardian Angel with Raised Saloon, has a dinghy

new to the marque, discovering the benefits of customising a series-design which brings

garage in the transom for which the aft bulkhead needed moving

proven engineering for reliability and quantifiable savings. It’s quite a story to tell.

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IN BUILD: THE OYSTER 118 This summer sees the passing of a major milestone in the building of the new, 36m Oyster 118. With moulding completed at Oyster’s ancillary construction facility in Lee on Solent, the 118 is now returning to Oyster HQ in Southampton’s Saxon Wharf for fitting out. With a massive 700m3 volume below the sheerline, this biggest of current new builds will take until winter 2017 to complete, ready for sea trials through the spring of 2018.

WORDS BY MIKE OWEN

Observers will know, though, unusually she’s already been to sea. For a craft this size, the only way in and out of the mould shop in the former Royal Naval Air Station HMS Daedalus is by sea. With military precision, first in went the moulds transported by barge with a beach landing, then craning and low-loading into the hall for the hull to be hand laminated inside its long sectional female mould before being sprung and in reverse order shipped, with deck moulding also, back to Southampton. So after eight months in the mould shop, it’s now time for the machinery, utilities and furnishings to take centre stage. And what a stage, as Oyster CEO David Tydeman explains, “We have such space to work with, and with the way we designed the str ucture with Humphreys Yacht Design much more scope than might be expected. In the aft end there is enormous volume which we can use in three, four and even five guest cabin arrangements, with yet another guest cabin option forward. For a sense of scale, just the social areas on the main deck are bigger than the entire interior of an Oyster 72. The main deck’s guest cockpit and split level saloon alone measure more than 13m/43ft long.” Then consider the option of second saloon cum snug/cinema room forward on the lower deck, and on the foredeck a tender pit that converts to seated picnic arrangement. The picture then builds of a cleverly conceived, modern performance ocean cruising yacht, constructed to DNV classification and MCA LY3, and coded for high latitude sailing. A truly go anywhere yacht customisable for up to 12 guests served by a crew of six plus nanny or tutor if heading off for that long family cruise. >>

Computer generated images

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 23


And for the commissioning owner of this first Oyster 118 it was this family wish, keeping teenage children and their friends involved, that drove the instruction for five cabins aft and a cinema room forward that with sliding panels converts to a bunked sixth cabin. So counting in the three crew cabins, one double, two bunked and all to MLC standards, this is an eight/nine cabin yacht with, pleasingly, each aft cabin still bigger than its equivalent on the 885, and even equal to the guest cabins of the Oyster 100. An alternative layout focuses on more personal space, particularly for the owner with a very large, 90m3 forward-extending Master Suite, incorporating a private drawing room and library. This plan also then allows for a VIP guest suite with island bed and enhanced featuring and enlarged shower room. Access from the lower to main deck varies according to cabin arrangement. For the 118-01, the stairwell emerges on the saloon centreline, while in the three and four aft cabin versions, the stairs are offset to one side adding to the sense of space again and allowing more options in saloon plan. For this first 118, the forward area of the two-step, split level saloon features a chaise longue under the sloping, opening forward screens, with occasional tables and additional deep armchair seating. Another option would have been for a free standing dining arrangement, but the owner chose to forego this having decided to take meals always on deck in the protection of the sleek, rigid bimini around a fine table set for ten to 12. Serving or working the deck, crew access directly from galley to foredeck precludes the need to pass through guest areas, so reducing intrusion and maintaining better privacy for all onboard, that’s guests and crew. Sailing systems on this first launch include four captive winches for the single-headed, Hall carbon and North 3Di rig’s main halyard, mainsheet and headsail sheets, and the code sails fly from a powerfully engineered prodder in-built with the anchoring system. There’s a removable inner forestay also. Electronics include a full Furuno system and the bespoke Skyships ship’s management system that monitors virtually all engineering functions aboard. The engine room is almost standing height and, as always with Oyster, excellently laid out with quick access to strainers, electrics and routine service points across engines, generators, chillers, watermaker and more, and has a good bench working area. Aft the lazarette houses compressor and toys and the transom hydraulically lowers to provide a landing platform for bathers and tender. And if you fancy all this but wish she was bigger again, then you can opt for a squared stern that balances well with the plumb bow and adds another full metre to deck length. There’s even a flybridge version under discussion. As David Tydeman says, “We’ve had a great canvas to play with and have a wide variety of options for owners wanting a very high specification yacht with the benefits of series building. It’s a serious business but it has been fun and we’re ver y much looking for ward to these next stages in delivering our new flagship.”

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SOJANA, A MODERN ICON

The Southampton Yacht Services (SYS) team at the Oyster Custom & Refit

of the ship’s systems. Cosmetically, this came in the form of new

yard haven’t had a moment’s respite as no sooner had the mighty classic

teak decks, expertly laid by the shipwrights at SYS, an area in which

Fife S/Y Cambria launched, the British-built S/Y Sojana moved in to the shed.

they boast considerable experience, along with a new topside paint

In fact work had already begun on the 115ft Farr-designed ketch, following

job, retaining the regal dark blue finish that Sojana is known for.

her arrival in Southampton in May 2015; when works began immediately with

Internally, the living spaces received a minor face lift, with works

preparations for the paint work and the removal of the teak decks.

being done to her existing dark mahogany joinery followed by a complete re-varnish in a satin finish. The interior reflects an age of traditional yachting, but the owner also took the opportunity

WORDS & PHOTOS BY MIKE JONES

to update the interior upholstery, resulting in a revitalised fresh look for the interior, whilst still retaining the same timeless quality feel it has always enjoyed. In addition, particular attention was paid

The objective of the exercise was to reinvigorate that ‘new yacht’ finish

to updates in the galley and captain’s quarters which saw the most work

to a vessel that has seen some seriously extensive cruising and racing

done, a testament to the original design and layout as most areas

since her initial launch in 2003, combined with upgrading a number

remained unchanged. >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 25


WORTHY OF NOTE IS THE INCREASED LINE-SPEED TO THE HALYARD WINCHES, WHICH CAN NOW SPOOL UP TO AN IMPRESSIVE 220M PER MINUTE. In many ways though, these cosmetic updates are the just the tip of the iceberg for the engineering work carried out, now neatly concealed once again behind the yacht’s bulkheads panelling and sole boards. Project Manager, Matthew Townsend draws on a team of vastly skilled individuals, as a project of this size requires attention to detail and precise execution. The fundamentally well-designed ship’s systems saw upgrades, with inevitable advances in technology in the last 13 years since her build, the electrics and hydraulics both received extensive attention. Worthy of note is the increased line-speed to the halyard winches, which can now spool up to an impressive 220m per minute, a welcome performance upgrade that will no doubt be maximised as Sojana races in the Mediterranean Superyacht regattas this season. A less glamorous, but essential element of the refit was work to the black water system, again proving the diversity of skills available at SYS.  The owner enjoyed a party onboard to celebrate the launch and his birthday, where the refit was admired by over 50 guests in the sunshine. Following completion of her commissioning and sea trials with SYS, Sojana plans to join the Superyacht fleet in the Med to compete in Palma at the Superyacht Cup, which will see her race against Oyster’s very own Firebird (Oyster 885 RS). Preparations are now underway for the yard to receive the hull and deck of Oyster’s new flagship 118, which will be fitted out by the team of craftsmen at the Southampton facility for an expected launch towards the end of 2017. Oyster 118-01 will be the 358th yacht from the world leading partnership between Oyster and Humphreys Yacht Design, and will reflect the extensive Superyacht experience within Oyster’s Southampton base.

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SYS ROLL CALL 2016

1982

BOAT NAME Sojana Cambria Penelope Sarafin Liara Tigre d’Or Yali Leopard 3 Windsor Belle Hetairos Sea Lion Alinda V Caneli & Waterlily Luxury Tenders Bystander Velsheda Wings (repairs) Merrymaid Hyperion Free Spirit Celera Seastream Mari-Cha III Ilona of Kylesku Savannah Alexa Refanut Pamina Namaqua Intuition Zanna United Spirit Atalante Signe Thendara Seven Seas Craftsman’s Art Rocio Blue Fascination Paz Lady Ecosse Belle Aventure Golden Horizon Sabina D Diablesse Ticonderoga Gemervesence Harmony Bay Nahema Brave Challenger Jagare Provenance Altair Calabuig Matchless Secret Sin Star of the Sea Swagman Cariad

LOA 115ft (35.1m) 114ft (34.7m) 100ft (30.5m) 100ft (30.5m) 98ft (29.9m) 98ft (29.9m) 95ft (30m) 98ft (30m) 68ft (20.7m) 140ft (42.8m) 68ft (21m) 94ft (28.6m) 142ft (43.4m) 43ft (13m) 138ft (42m) 130ft (39.6m) 70ft (21.4m) 98.3ft (30m) 156ft (47.7m) 80ft (24.4m) 66ft (20.1m) 65ft (19.8m) 147ft (45m) 92ft (28m) 90ft (27.4m) 100ft (30.5m) 62ft (18.9m) 112ft (34.1m) 60ft (18.3m) 194ft (59.1m) 82ft (30m) 110ft (33.5m) 100ft (30.5m) 90ft (27.4m) 112ft (34.1m) 40ft (12m) 80ft (24.4m) 84ft (25.6m) 92ft (28m) 120ft (36.6m) 120ft (36.6m) 95ft (30m) 120ft (36.6m) 65ft (19.8m) 92ft (28m) 72ft (21.9m) 50ft (15.3m) 110ft (33.5m) 120ft (36.6m) 103ft (31.4m) 130ft (39.6m) 90ft (27.4m) 108ft (32.9m) 98ft (29.9m) 65ft (19.8m) 60ft (18.3m) 115ft (35.1m) 70ft (21.4m) 118ft (36m)

TYPE SY (Ketch) SY (Cutter) SY (Sloop) SY (Sloop) SY (Sloop) MY (Canal Barge) SY (Auxiliary Ketch) SY (Sloop) Steam Launch SY (Ketch) SY (Yawl) SY (Ketch) MY MY MY SY (J Class) SY (12 Metre Class) SY (Gaff Cutter) SY (Sloop) SY (Sloop) SY SY (Sloop) SY (Ketch) MY (Diesel Schooner) SY (Sloop) SY (Gaff Schooner) SY (Yawl) SY (Sloop) SY (Sloop) MY (ex Pilot Vessel) SY (Yawl) MY SY (Ketch) SY (Ketch) SY (Gaff Ketch) SY (12 Metre) SY (Schooner) SY (Ketch) SY (Sloop) SY (Ketch) MY SY (Ketch) MY SY (Sloop) SY (Sloop) SY (Ketch) SY (Sloop) MY MY MY (Brave Class) SY (Ketch) SY (Ketch) SY (Gaff Schooner) SY (Ketch) SY (Sloop) SY (Ketch) MY SY (Sloop) SY (Gaff Ketch)

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SPIRIT: A JOURNEY

SUE & DICK HAMMILL OYSTER 575 // SPIRIT During 40 years together, Sue and Dick Hammill from the United States have sailed all over the world, taking regular sailing holidays with their friends and family. With time and opportunity afforded to them by retirement, the couple decided to expand their horizons, commissioning Oyster 575, Spirit. Sue and Dick Hammill set sail from Ipswich in May 2015 for their maiden voyage, the start of a great adventure.

WORDS & PHOTOS BY SUE & DICK HAMMILL

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// OWNER STORY

In January 2014, Sue and Dick Hammill started a blog, the first entry

“With just over 250 days before Spirit sets sail, almost all of the major

sums up their ambitions... “We all have dreams, and this website is

decisions have been made and it’s now down to what colours we want

all about the realisation of our dream – the building of a new yacht.

on our asymmetr ical spinnaker, the types of cushions in the cockpit

For over 30 years we’ve enjoyed bare boating, sailing with friends and

and cabin accessor ies.

gawking at beautiful yachts in anchorages from the Caribbean to The Kingdom of Tonga. Fast forward to about six months ago when we made

“It has been quite a journey building a yacht on the other side of the

a life-changing decision to build a yacht – not just any yacht, but an

Atlantic, but what a terrific education. I’m just returning from a second

Oyster 575. While we live in an age of instant gratification, the building

visit to the Oyster facilities in Wroxham and Ipswich, England where

of our yacht is anything but ‘instant’. We will take deliver y in May of

I could see first hand the progress being made, and touch and feel this

2015 in Ipswich, England.”

incredible soon-to-be sailing machine. Just like our last visit, I couldn’t be more impressed with the incredible craftsmen and the level of detail that

Over the build period for Oyster 575 Spirit, Sue and Dick Hammill

is going into Spirit and the support and guidance of our project manager,

visited Oyster’s boatyard in Wroxham and received regular updates and

Luke. Everything, and I mean everything, is right on track.”

pictures depicting the Oyster craftsmen at work. Spirit is the 28th Oyster 575 to be built and like all Oyster Yachts, the owners have the ability to

With a full keel, centre cockpit and raised saloon and all the creature

customise the finish to their own specification.

comforts required for long distance bluewater cruising, Spirit was finished to the specification of the Hammills under consultation from Oyster project

I COULDN’T BE MORE IMPRESSED WITH THE INCREDIBLE CRAFTSMEN AND THE LEVEL OF DETAIL THAT IS GOING INTO SPIRIT AND THE SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE OF OUR PROJECT MANAGER, LUKE.

manager, Luke Porter. Spirit has air conditioning, a full galley with both a dishwasher and a washer dryer, ample refrigeration, satellite communications and state of the art audio and visual systems. The spacious layout includes an incredibly large aft Owners’ Cabin, a forward VIP cabin and two bunk cabins accommodating a total of eight. Sue and Dick Hammill’s adventures with Oyster 575, Spirit are shared in a wonderful blog, candidly portraying the build process and their thoughts and experiences for life at sea. >>

“It’s fun to look at the pictures that our project manager, Luke so dutifully sends us ever y couple of weeks. Like the building of a house, after the initial structure is complete where changes have been evident daily, the physical changes will now slow down as the craftsmen tend to the thousands of details that will make Spirit a ver y special yacht.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 29


MAY

16

It’s been a long time coming but we’re finally onboard and

We rounded Isle D’Ouessant and started our southwest 350 nautical mile

waking up to the realisation of a life long dream.

crossing of the Bay of Biscay – a bay that is notorious for challenging water but that was not our experience – just rolling seas with winds less

This past week has been a whirlwind of preparation activities – from

than 10 knots from the north. Our ‘wind’ was the steady hum of a 150hp

sea trials to loading almost 50 boxes of supplies, from figuring out where

Volvo marine engine.

everything goes to testing all the systems, and from cleaning all the pots and pans to making the beds. We couldn’t have done all this without our

As we travelled these waters of many shipping lanes we became intensely

ver y able crew, Tom and Hannah, and enough can’t be said about the

involved with Spirit’s AIS (automatic identification system). It’s essentially

entire Oyster team who have been incredible partners – especially our

the same as what the airline industry uses to avoid traffic conflicts – we

project manager, Luke and commissioning skipper, Duncan who oversaw

set the system to sound an alert anytime a vessel closes to within a mile -

all the last minute details of what became one incredible yacht.

sure helps us sleep better at night.

Now, with much anticipation we’ll be departing Ipswich in the next

We’ve all adjusted nicely to offshore sailing – watch schedules,

fe w days and heading for the Mediter ranean. It’s been quite a r ide

wonderful dinners, moving about hanging on to hand rails, wearing

and it’s only just begun.

layer upon layer upon layer of clothing and sleeping with lee cloths.

MAY

21

We departed Ipswich on a cold rainy morning heading south for

The last few days we’ve had a pleasant change of weather – blue skies,

Guer nsey. After a day of heavy winds and tired wet and cold

much war mer temperatures, and easing winds and we’ve just ar r ived

souls, we stopped in Dover overnight but not before capturing a glorious

in a beautiful port town of Cascais, Portugal – life is good.

sunset behind the White Cliffs. After only a few hours of sleep we were up by 4:30am. Given the significant tides in this part of the world, entry into major ports needs to be timed properly to ensure favourable currents – tropical sailing with a rum punch this isn’t.

MAY

28

We left Cascais, Portugal for a two-day sail down to Gibraltar under totally clear skies and light winds (and more importantly

temperatures in the 70s). Cascais was a wonderful stop, which gave us all a chance to take a break from the night watches and wander around

Spirit is performing like a dream – her ability to handle all the conditions that

a beautiful port town. As we were sailing into Cascais we were treated

the English Channel is throwing at her is impressive and our entire crew is

to seeing the Volvo ocean racers, who had just crossed the Atlantic from

enjoying the ride. Tomorrow morning we’ll be departing for the Bay of Biscay

Newport and were approaching the finish for their leg to Lisbon – one

and down to Cascais, Portugal. The dreaming is done. The reality is here.

passed us going over 20 knots!

MAY

22

We departed Guernsey in a fog bank which we were sure would

From Cascais we headed south for a two-day sail to Gibraltar. Besides

burn off by mid-morning – wishful thinking. After two days

gawking and taking photos of ‘the rock’, we were dwarfed by a sea of

Spirit was still in the fog with the yacht’s fog horn sounding every few

20+ super tankers. The most important reason for stopping in Gibraltar

minutes (to scare off the mega-container ships). Shortly after departure

was to replenish our diesel fuel at the lowest prices in Europe. No value

we encountered our first family of dolphins frolicking in Spirit’s bow

added tax ( VAT)! >>

wave. Remarkable, lovable mammals.

30 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 31


32 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


The next 3+ days we enjoyed sunny war m weather with a relatively slight sea state – the kind of conditions that put everyone in a reflective mood staring at the horizon. We also were entertained almost daily by dolphin visits. The one thing that seems consistent on most days at sea are magnificent sunrises and sunsets – this last week certainly didn’t disappoint.

A FEW FIXES HERE AND THERE AND WE THINK WE’RE GOOD TO GO JUNE

07

We have now arrived in Palma, the undisputed yachting capital of the Mediterranean. Palma – simply beautiful!

We’ve spent five days here in the Marina Port de Mallorca after the transit from England to get ever ything back in shape – a few fixes here and there and we think we’re good to go. It’s a sailor’s paradise. Known for its sun and beach tourism, it also has an incredible historic quarter. The Cathedral, the Almudaina Palace, the Lonja fish market and Plaza Mayor are just a few of the sites. The most beautiful monuments are surrounded by fishing boats, pine forests and palm trees. The landscape of the island is full of coves, beaches and cliffs on the coast, and inland are towns and mountain ranges up to 5,000 feet high. Spirit is starting its exploration of this idyllic Mediterranean island today, now that the 2,000 mile transit from England is behind us – high expectations abound. JUNE

15

We’ve now logged our first cruising week sailing around Mallorca. The scener y has been stunning, the ports quaint,

and we’re refining our taste for Sangr ia. Unlike the Car ibbean, the Mediter ranean winds are not ver y predictable, so ever y day we let Mother Nature deter mine where we’ll be going – yesterday, because of the wind shifts, we backtracked three hours to the quiet anchorage of Cala For mentor, ar r iving just before nightfall. In one week we’ve made almost a dozen stops, done all t ypes of sailing, and had the motor r unning more than we would have liked – but no complaining, we’re taking it all in and enjoying ever y minute.

JUNE

2016

What a year! We took delivery, sailed the Mediterranean, did the A RC+ crossing, spent time in the Windward and Leeward

Islands and participated in our first Oyster Regatta in Antigua. Over 10,000 nautical miles, over 30 ports of call, a second place finish in our class at the A RC+ Cape Verde to St. Lucia 2,000nm leg and capped it all off with winning our Class at the Oyster Regatta in Antigua. Oyster and Spirit have served us well, and the journey continues.

See Oyster 575 Spirit participating in the Antigua Regatta on page 68.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 33


MAGRATHEA

TERRY SNOW OYSTER 72 // MAGRATHEA Interviewed at the Oyster Regatta Antigua 2016, the owner of Oyster 72 Magrathea, Terry Snow, tells us his story.

WORDS BY LOUAY HABIB

34 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


// OWNER STORY

In 1978, Terry Snow graduated from Florida University and founded the Bonnier Corporation publishing house. By 2007, with over 1,000 employees and more than $350million in annual revenue, Bonnier Corp. ranked in the top 10 USA publishing companies. The company has owned numerous publications, many in the maritime sector. Terry retired from the company in 2013 and purchased Magrathea, a stunning Oyster 72, with a performance carbon rig and Spectra sails. The rich teak interior and light leather cushions in the main saloon invite comfort and style for dining and relaxing. However, Magrathea is fast and nimble as well, winning her Class at the 2016 Oyster Regatta Antigua. “When I started looking at boats, I quickly zoomed in on Oyster as the one I wanted to buy. I considered a new boat but that would have been a long project, which didn’t suit my time frame. When you come onboard an Oyster, it is so much better than the competition, especially the design and the standard of finish and when I saw Magrathea, I really liked the sexiness of the boat. To be honest, the asking price was well above my budget but I found a way!

WHEN YOU COME ONBOARD A N OYSTER , IT IS SO MUCH BETTER THAN THE COMPETITION I plan to take the boat to the Mediterranean this summer and explore Italy and Montenegro with my girlfriend and friends during various parts of the trip. Maybe Croatia and Greece as well – when you tell your friends you are cruising through Europe, it is a big incentive to join you! Since I was a kid, my favourite time was just being on the water, waking up on a boat or watching the sun go down on the ocean; there is nothing like that, you don’t get that feeling in a house or hotel. I have explored the Caribbean quite a lot on boats but Europe has so many different cultures. I used to run a business trying to understand what the readership wanted; after the trip around Europe, I think I could probably help to write a better magazine. I am still very much a novice when it comes to sailing, so this is a learning experience for me. Giles and Becci will be boat captain and first mate and they can handle the boat just fine by themselves. The Oyster Regatta in Antigua was a new experience for me; we didn’t really come here to win but Giles put together a really good team, which were a lot of fun and when you win a race, it does give you a real buzz. Usually there are just four of us on the boat, but having a race crew means there is a lot more interaction and there are some interesting characters onboard, which make it a lot of fun. Long term, I am interested in doing the Oyster World Rally, but I don’t think I am quite ready for that yet.”

Magrathea is also available for others to enjoy through Oyster Charter, www.oystercharter.com

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 35


2015 ATLANTIC RALLY FOR CRUISERS The 2015 Atlantic Rally for Cruisers (ARC) certainly was a memorable

The boat is extremely well thought out with a large cockpit with all sailing

rally with some superb stories. 198 yachts took part in the ARC, 15

controls behind (winches, steering position etc.) this makes for a clean and

of which were Oyster yachts. Three Oyster yachts also did the ARC+

tidy boat. The sail changes and manoeuvres were hassle free and very easy

(via Cape Verde), starting in Gran Canaria all the way to St. Lucia

despite the boat being over 80ft. It is a credit to Oyster that we crossed

in the Caribbean, this journey saw many fulfilling the dream of sailing

the Atlantic without a single problem onboard. All the onboard systems

across the Atlantic. The Oyster owners’ party was held at the Santa

performed past expectations. My biggest regret was that the ARC wasn’t

Catalina Hotel, Las Palmas just before the ARC departure on 22

longer as it was such a joy to sail on such a beautiful yacht.”

nd

November and a stunning evening was enjoyed. Charlie Hatfield, professional Bowman said, “Crossing the Atlantic ARC+: Three Oyster yachts took part in the ARC+. Nikitoo II,

on Maegan was a very enjoyable experience, I was amazed at how she

Oyster 54, Shelena , Oyster 545 and Spirit, Oyster 575 - departed

managed with the constant 20kts winds and Atlantic swells. She was very

on 8th November and completed the ARC+ with the fleet of 59 boats

comfortable to be on at all times, and never felt on edge or unstable. To

this time. All in Cruising Class A, Nikitoo II was 12th in Leg 1 and

arrive in St. Lucia with only some sail damage, it shows the high standards

6th in Leg 2. Shelena was 8th in Leg 1 and 4th in Leg 2. Spirit was 4th

the boat is built to, and this race was a great test on the boat to prove this.”

in Leg 1 and 2nd in Leg 2. All arrived safely into Rodney Bay by 30

th

November with the prize giving ceremony having taken place

Javier Jaudenes, Naval Architect/Designer of WinWin said, “Sailing

on 9th December 2015.

across the Atlantic on SY Maegan was a fantastic experience. I was delighted by her comfort during the crossing. Her interior layout was

Oyster ARC Support Team: Topping the table on customer service,

able to accommodate ten race crew without any clashes. She truly

the Oyster ARC Support Team checked and serviced systems and kit

is a worldwide cruising vessel with excellent reliability.”

before departure to assist owners and crew to make the journey to Rodney Bay, St. Lucia. Philip Wilson of Oyster 575, Isabel, said the

Gerald Veniard, Professional Navigator with multiple Figaro/Open

following about the Oyster ARC Support Team, “Thanks to so many

60 campaigns behind him said, “Ver y nice sailing and ver y good

people starting with the Oyster guys who are a credit to their product

atmosphere onboard Maegan, with a very adaptable and highly motivated

and organisation.”

group of ten people. English, NZ, Irish, Spanish and French, Maegan speaks ever y language! She was always happy to push the limits that

The Results: Oyster 56, Raya, completed the ARC first in their Class,

racing requires. I was very impressed by the reliability of the electrical

as did winners of Racing B Oyster Lightwave 48, Scarlet Oyster.

and hydraulic systems onboard this Oyster 825. It is a great challenge

Oyster 625, Delicia, completed the ARC in the shortest distance

to compete in an offshore race, 310hrs of racing and 3152nm covered,

closest to the Rhumb line in 2810nm, sailing 340nm less than

it’s more than two thirds of the boat’s life, with zero technical issues –

Oyster 825, Maegan.

that’s outstanding!”

Despite trying too hard and blowing their A2 spinnaker, Oyster 825,

Team Brunel got both the line honours for Division II (IRC Racing) and

Maegan, arrived on 5th December, 5th in Racing Class A and coming

overall division winner, with ARC regular Oyster Lightwave 48, Scarlet

in 8th out of all boats on the water. Maegan received some superb

Oyster picking up first in Racing Class B. Whether swept up by the

feedback from the crew.

emotion of the evening or as a carefully planned move, the ARC crowd were on their feet cheering after Scarlet Oyster crewmember Tijs Van

David Kenefick, an ex-Figaro Sailor said, “…For the first few days of

Langenhove proposed marriage on stage to his partner of three years

the race we had in excess of 35 knots on a number of occasions and

Anna Vugbblija; the couple having met originally sailing on Scarlet

the boat performed extremely well in these difficult conditions. The

Oyster. A surprised and delighted Anna said, “Yes!”

deck remained dry despite surfing at close to 20 knots, while down below was so comfortable you would have thought we were still tied to the Marina in Las Palmas. As the days went on Maegan stretched

For further information about the Atlantic Rally for Cruisers,

her legs with ease of doing 250-mile days in pure comfort and style.

visit www.worldcruising.com/arc

36 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


// OWNER STORY ARC 2015 OYSTER ENTRIES MODEL

BOAT NAME

Oyster Lightwave 48

Scarlet Oyster

Oyster 49 Pilot House

Blew Beyond

Oyster 53

Crackerjack

Oyster 56

Aliena

Oyster 56

Britican

Oyster 56

El Mundo

Oyster 56

Into The Blue of Lowestoft

Oyster 56

Raya

Oyster 575

Isabel

Oyster 62

Dalliance

Oyster 625

Alpha Eden Island

Oyster 625

Delicia

Oyster 66

Marlene F

Oyster 825

Albatros

Oyster 825

Maegan

MANFRED KERSTAN OYSTER 825 // ALBATROS Manfred Kerstan is a man with tremendous energy and a love for life.

ARC+ Oyster 54

Nikitoo II

Manfred completed the 2015 ARC aboard his brand new Oyster 825,

Oyster 545

Shelena

Albatros. He was 6th in Cruising A Class, quite extraordinary for

Oyster 575

Spirit

a man who turned 80 in May 2016. Named Mr ARC by the German media, Manfred said, “It is now my 20th ARC, and I still like it. It’s just a lot of fun every year and a great personal experience for me, plus my doctor told me I should go sailing as long as I could to keep me healthy. So I will follow his instructions and go on!” Born in Berlin in 1936, Manfred sold his business in 1979 and has been virtually at sea ever since, clocking up over 250,000 nautical miles. “Sailing gives me freedom, I can choose to stay where I am or I can pull up the anchor and go. I don’t really like regattas, but I do like to sail to wonderful places with nice people. I own a house which I like to stay in sometimes but I have no car just a bicycle – I am a sailor and the sea is my home. I have been around for 80 years but I can still do my jobs onboard and I love to go sailing and come to a beautiful bay like this (Nonsuch Bay). My Oyster 825 has a shallow draft compared to other designs and I do not need a commercial crew - I love to sail with the people I meet, so many sailors are really nice people and sometimes that is not the same with a professional crew. I have done 20 A RCs and also other Atlantic crossings and sailed around the world. I never ship it anywhere. As far as my next adventure, I have sailed through the Pacific but far too quickly and I didn’t really exper ience it and Colombia, that is a place I would love to experience more.”

WORDS BY LOUAY HABIB

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 37


OYSTER WORLD RALLY 2017-2019: THE BIG BLUE ADVENTURE Four part harmony makes for beautiful music, and a four part circumnavigation sounds pretty good, too! So much so that an incredible 34 Oyster owners have signed up for the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019 starting from Antigua next January. Given the generally frenetic nature of life, this could be thought even more remarkable as, at 27 months’ duration, this is a full 12 months longer than the inaugural rally from 2013-2014. Fantastically, that and the fact the voyage is split into four distinct parts is what makes it so attractive, because this extension doubles the time island-hopping in the South Pacific to six months, and later similarly extends cruising around the top of Australia and on through Indonesian waters. So a long spell away yes, but with the best bits made even better, it is just too tempting. And if needs must then there is time for participants to break out or ship back.

WORDS BY MIKE OWEN

38 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


OYSTER WORLD RALLY 2017-2019

INTRODUCTION It’s fair to say any circumnavigation tells a story of resolve. This

James and Tiggy have not made many changes to the boat but have increased battery

Oyster World Rally entry list though emphasises that long before

capacity, upgraded the Raymarine nav and comms kit, pulled the rig and generally

even the start. Sixteen participants, virtually half the fleet, are new

brought the typical ten-year service five years forward. The ARC+ will lead them

to Oyster and have bought in specifically to sail the rally. Eleven

across for the start which they’ll sail with friends and the hope that their two grown

existing owners have traded up and nine new builds have been

children will join them at points. Meanwhile, Miss Tiggy’s old owners are still in

commissioned especially. Two owners are going around for the

the rally but with their new build On Liberty, a very comfortable and beautifully

second time, with one upsizing, having sold his first ride to another

specified 725-03.

entrant! This all says so much for the reputation and success of our first Oyster World Rally, with all the support and co-ordination of

This hankering is a common theme, often more from one side of a relationship.

the event team circling the globe just ahead of the fleet to prepare

But it is interesting how things can change. David Tydeman recounts the tale

and assist with all matters from immigration to maintenance and

of the Kierebinski family from Poland.

local exploration.

“ When I first met Mariusz and Paulina, it was in Las Palmas at the start  “We learned so much through the 2013-2014 rally, and in enabling lengthier adventures in the most favoured parts, the regional seasons and weather patterns have set the timeline and opened new destinations for 2017-2019. Sensibly you sail with the seasons, and taking the time to do this also explains why and how we have divided the voyage into the four parts: Pacific Rally, Antipodean Cruise, Asian Rally and lastly Passage Home via South Africa to Antigua. The Australasian stay is what enables such greater opportunity to explore and, if necessary, allows returns to home or business.”

of their first ocean adventure, the 2009 ARC. When planning, Paulina had really been quite apprehensive and had persuaded Mariusz that if they were to fulfil their dream they needed to buy a proper boat, so they commissioned Oyster 46-22 SunSuSea. From early concern great confidence has grown and in the regattas Paulina now can be seen racing hard, calling the shots from the helm, and the family’s about to sail right the way around with the Oyster World Rally.”

And when David says family, that’s a full three generations shipping aboard, Paulina’s father joining daughter and grandchildren for Galapagos and Tahiti. Already deep into preparation they have new sails, generator and watermaker among other updates.

David Tydeman , Oyster CEO The core of the fleet from Oysters 45 to 575 is very much owner-driver, sailing with family and friends, while those from 62 to 885 are mainly crew-supported, excepting Among the new Oyster sailors are Tiggy and James Nathan who

655-02 Meteorite sailed by three couples. Twenty-two entries have advance-booked

traded their Maxi 1100 for 575-01 On Liberty bought through

the whole way around and three have chosen to avoid the long ocean haul from

brokerage and renamed Miss Tiggy. James talks of this as quite

Indonesia to South Africa and are shipping home after Part Two.

a step up but something he has always hankered after, having long admired Oysters and being inclined to sail home to native Australia

From Rolf Riel who is taking his Oyster 56-53 Mariella around for the second time,

which he left ten years back. Having sold down his shareholding in

to Hamish Hurley and Mandy Gray both novices aboard their new Oyster 825-06

his business the timing was right and minds were made up to take

Enso, there’s every kind of sailor from 11 nations. In the following pages we look

advantage of the first part of the rally, meandering in company

more closely at three participants, each sailing differently but all intent on enjoying

through those Pacific Islands and on to New Zealand.

this Big Blue adventure. >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 39


OYSTER WORLD RALLY 2017-2019 ROUTE MAP

ANTIGUA GRENADA

ASCENSION ISLAND SALVADOR

BALI

ST HELENA MAURITIUS REUNION DURBAN CAPE TOWN

INFLAGRANTI // RUEDI BRUNNHOFER With one of the more unusual Oyster World Rally stories, Swiss entrant Ruedi Brunnhofer is back for his second time. And for this rounding he has upsized from the 54-18 In Flagranti he commissioned for the first, to a new 575-36 Inflagranti for the second, with only a little space between, in time and spelling! In both cases handover completed just six months before departure, but Ruedi’s learning curve was initially steeper than most. Here he tells his story…

In Switzerland you need 1000nm experience for your offshore licence but I had only been motor boating on a Swiss lake before. I’d not sailed even dinghies, but I got my miles with a fellow Swiss entry, Thomas Meseck, sailing with him on the handover delivery of his 575-10 Satika. He was very encouraging. My handover was at the end of June, the same as this time, and then we had to be ready to go to Las Palmas for the ARC. First, together with a Swiss sailing friend and Marie-Theres, my partner, we sailed to the Baltic, then I had an RYA instructor aboard for three weeks. My son,

I was a completely new sailor with no experience at all when I ordered

Lukas, a non-sailor too, finished his studies in the September and went

my Oyster. It was learning by doing. On the rally I had to pay so much

straight to the RYA school in Gibraltar, sailing there for a couple of

attention to the boat that with such a fast circumnavigation I was always

months and then joining me on In Flagranti. I had to keep working until

thinking more about what we were doing than where we were. That is the

the end of October 2012 close to departure but I am not an anxious man.

main reason I am going again, to enjoy all the places we visit this time! At first I didn’t know about the Oyster World Rally, I only learned of it after I signed the contract for the boat. I had just decided I wanted to sail and looked to Oyster. I was going to go to the Mediterranean but then the pieces came together.

I ONLY LEARNED OF IT AFTER I SIGNED THE CONTRACT FOR THE BOAT. I HAD JUST DECIDED I WANTED TO SAIL AND LOOKED TO OYSTER

I am not an extreme adventurer, more the safety-orientated type. It was

For the ARC, we had experienced crew aboard and when we arrived

the sense that I do it now or never, knowing that with the organisation

we were much more able… and on our own. One thing I did last time

of the rally and all the support I am not alone with the yacht, I’m with

though, and which I will do again, is have a weather router who was

people who can help if I have a problem. Without this I would never,

available the whole way around, whenever I felt need, and I used this

ever have started this adventure. In terms of the confidence this built,

for any passage over, say, five or seven days. I’m German-speaking

now I would go alone, but it’s good there is this second edition!

Swiss and he was German so everything was very clear, easy for me. His forecasts were very precise. There was never a surprise. I always

Another encouragement was that to my surprise my son was ready

knew what weather was coming. At times this was winds of 50 knots

to come with me. His studies were finishing just as the rally was

and waves I guess six to eight metres high. The first time this was a

starting, so as well as family it was to be a father-son experience.

scary experience but it gave me a lot of confidence that Oyster yachts

If he started his career earlier it would never have happened.

really work, and there was never a critical situation.

40 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

COCOS (KEELING) ISLANDS


ANTIGUA

PANAMA CANAL

VANUATU

DARWIN CAIRNS HAMILTON ISLAND MACKAY

BORA BORA

FIJI

MARQUESAS ISLANDS

GALAPAGOS ISLANDS

TAHITI TONGA

AUCKLAND

When did I decide to go again? It was more or less immediately. It’s important to know that I don’t see myself as a sailor. I am somebody who loves travelling, and this time it was a sailing boat I chose as the thing to go from A to B. But with all the caring for our course and the boat I didn’t see a lot of where we visited. I especially missed places in the Pacific, this is the reason that I want to go back to the South Seas... and this decision was made rather quickly. The Pacific is heaven! We all dive (Lukas and I since 1997) and have a compressor on board both the old and new boat. We will do more this time. Lukas has started his career so can now come only for parts but some of the diving last time was for him just the best. In the Galapagos particularly, where we joined a dive charter boat for a seven-day trip. It had been his dream for years to dive with hammerhead sharks. They were in abundance, in huge groups, and it left him thinking the islands were the most amazing place on earth. I’m looking forward to revisiting and also diving in the Tuamotus and Fiji. I mainly just want more time to explore and I’m thinking maybe I’ll go to the Easter Islands. I have signed into the rally only until Australia, where I will think about what to do. Maybe it’s an idea to leave the boat there for some years, have a holiday home and sailing boat there… but this is completely open. >>

Visit www.oysterworldrally.com for more information and to follow the adventure.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 41


OYSTER WORLD RALLY 2017-2019

TALABA // ROBERT VAN DEN ENDEN While Ruedi Brunnhofer switched attention and affection to building his new boat, the original In Flagranti found a new owner in Robert van den Enden. Hailing from Holland but living in the Philippines, Robert had cruised widely including going transatlantic in the ARC. To celebrate 30 years in business with a break away, he turned his mind to sailing the world with his school-aged family. Renamed Talaba, Oyster 54-18 was set for a second circumnavigation. Robert picks up the story…

We were thinking of doing the long trip and we had chartered cats as well so I gave Marie Jane, my wife, and the kids the choice, a cat or yacht? They said it depends, if it’s an Oyster, then yacht… I mean! We had been planning to do this a few years ago when Sarah and Robbie were nine and 11, (they’re now 15 and 17) but started to worry about taking them away from friends and school. In the end we just did the three months in the Caribbean and realised it didn’t have any real impact. For now, we are only booked on to the rally through to Auckland so we’ll be away a year and we’re home schooling. We have friends in the Philippines who do this. It’s interesting, you actually lose all the wasted school hours

We bought Talaba through Oyster brokerage in Palma. She’s been

so you normally need only about four hours a day. To make a head start and reduce

around the world but was in very good condition, she was obviously

pressure on the trip, we started with a teacher at home trying to make full days to get

surveyed and anything that wasn’t right Oyster changed. But then once

as much as possible of the hard-core subjects, like maths and sciences, out of the way.

you start to look into doing the Oyster World Rally, naturally different

Whether this is successful I’ll tell you in November when we set off on the ARC+!

things come up, complete new rigging, new sheets, halyards, battery replacement, and that was only the beginning! Anything that runs and turns has been changed this winter. Oyster Palma has been very busy!

It is such a great opportunity. Since the children were born, because my companies are all over the world, I travel half the year and then when I’m home we have great family time. I take them to school, I pick them up, we cook every night together but then I’m

In June we’ll throw the lines. You have to at some point, every magazine

gone for six months. So I miss them a lot, and sailing for our family is a bonding time.

you read, every seminar you go to, you come back with new ideas and

Unlike some teenagers, my kids always say they can’t wait for us to go to the boat.

another work list. You have to stop. So we’ll sail across to Ibiza, then Gibraltar and Lanzarote where they have a good RYA school. I’ll fly

I have also had some training onboard with Eddie Scougall who’s been with Oyster for

back to Holland from there while the family has extra training. When

years and was on the last rally team. After a year’s sailing I know most of the common

I’m on board naturally the family tends to point to me but if I fell

things but with Eddie we went into the jobs you might have to do yourself in the Pacific

overboard I would appreciate them turning around! It’s good for them

and really understand where everything is. It was very, very good. Valuable sharing

to have more experience on their own, without the captain being on

of the knowledge he has from the last Oyster World Rally and also just understanding

board, so it will be interesting. 

so much more about the boat.

I was born by the sea so sailed and did other watersports but when

Biggest worry now is what to bring in spares. I have ordered a lot but I mean there is a limit

I started my company I stopped everything; too busy and travelling

to what you can take and at a certain moment you have to stop otherwise you have to bring

all the time. Then with the kids a bit bigger, we started chartering.

a second boat!

Everyone liked the lifestyle and five years ago we bought an XC45, first cruising the Mediterranean. In 2013 I crossed the Atlantic with

Most important to me is making sure this is an enjoyable trip for everybody. That it’s

the ARC and then, with the family, we did the whole Caribbean trip

the experience we’re all dreaming of and that we can look back to it or forward to more

through to spring. So they have done quite a few miles but it’s been two

adventures because the world is still big and I’m only 53. I’ve got a long way to go! >>

or three nights at sea max and now it is going to be a little bit more!

42 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 43


OYSTER WORLD RALLY 2017-2019

DALLIANCE // RORY MCGRATH

44 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


Having sailed Oyster 53-24 Spindrift for some years, Susie and Rory McGrath enjoyed, in their words, ‘modest’ cruising and more recently the Oyster regattas with family and friends and occasional pro-hand. Then a late night chat changed everything. A decision was made, they’d up the ante, buy an Oyster 62 and sail the World Rally. And with that came a very significant shift, the transition to sailing with a skipper. Rory explains…

I first had a lovely Nicholson 39 ketch I bought back in 1977 and then a Beneteau 44 centre cockpit, again a good boat but a long way short of an Oyster. On retirement we decided to get the best! Spindrift was lovely and Oyster Brokerage in Palma sold her very well to a delightful couple. We’ve not had to do much to Dalliance. She is very well set following a complete refit by Berthon in 2012, big spend (absolute telephone numbers), in extremely good order, fantastic for a ten year old boat. With Vortec we’re putting her up on the hard in Palma and checking

We’ve been sailing our 53 Spindrift with just the two of us, and if

everything from skin fittings to dropping the rudder, and we’ve

everything works fine there are no problems. But I’ve turned 70 this

a new set of Dolphin sails including the twin-headsail system. We’ll

year and you know how things can turn a little bit tricky, like coming

muck around with her there for a month or two and then head back

into a tight marina and there’s just the two of you. I’ve got Susie at the

across the Atlantic with the ARC ready for the start.

front either dropping the hook or getting the lazy line, and however loud I shout she can’t get to the back any quicker to throw warps.

I suspect we’ll come back for Christmas ’17 (during the four-month

We felt we were reaching our limit as two.

Australasian spell). People who do these trips say when you get into boat-mode you’re reluctant to hiccough the whole thing to get on

For help when needed we have a close relationship with Vortec [training

a plane and fly back to Blighty. But I think we’ll probably have to, I’ve

and refit specialists] and with their number one trainer Mark Washer…

an elderly mother and a business in Sheffield I have to keep an eye on.

and this is where the story goes a little to my embarrassment. Mark was sailing with us on Spindrift when one night I went to bed early

There are sure to be problems enroute, if not for us then others, but

leaving him up late with a bottle of wine and my wife. By the time

then the risk is part of it. It’s good for you to stretch yourself, look over

morning came they had agreed we’d buy a 62 and do the Oyster World

the edge. To be aware. Not just be a member of today’s society with

Rally. Sort of dropped it on me in the morning!

iPhones and celebrities, TV, X Factors and all that stuff and always comfortable. If you don’t sometimes frighten yourself then you are not

I was half-way there anyway but until then we had really only done

really aware you’re alive.

quite modest sailing, the occasional long trip in the Mediterranean but nothing more than a few days. Mark knew of a 62 for sale in beautiful

I think you have to do that and I’ve encouraged the children, too. It’s

condition. We bought her in September last year and then there we

a good example for them and how they see us. We love helicopter skiing

were sailing Dalliance (62-15) in the ARC and with Mark jumping ship

and we’re horse nuts, live on a stud farm. All our children ride. My

from Vortec to join us for the rally.

wife and daughter have represented England, and that’s another world. To ride competitively you know what being frightened is all about.

It is a big move up from DIY to skippered boat. Even a biggish boat is a small place and who you’re going to share that space with should

Some of the other boats taking young children are really stepping out. It

not be treated lightly. But we’ve found the right partner. We get

is quite a courageous move and full marks to them. I’m delighted they are,

on well and Mark is very knowledgeable, not just about sailing but

it will be of benefit to them and to us all having children in the gang. >>

Oysters in particular. We give each other space and it has so far worked well. The ARC went very smoothly, we spent a lot of time together in the Caribbean and we’re very much looking forward to doing the world trip. We could still have done it on our 53, a lovely boat that would manage it no trouble. But in that ‘space’ we would have needed another couple or family. We’re pleased with our decision although it is hard handing the baton to a skipper. When you’re running a boat DIY you do everything yourself, at your discretion. Mark knows more about Oysters than I ever will... if he thinks something should be done he’ll just do it and I’ll want to say what are you up to. But you can’t have two skippers so it takes sensitivity to cope with that relationship. I think we have it about right.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 45


“We now enter a period of final preparation for the yachts prior to the start of the Oyster World Rally in Antigua on 15th January 2017. Our Oyster World Rally Technical Support team will be in Las Palmas this coming November to support those boats joining the ARC+ and ARC as they head to the Caribbean. The Oyster World Rally team then looks forward to joining the whole fleet in Antigua in late December ’16. Thank you to all the participants who have joined us over our series of seminars, and thank you all in advance  for joining us on this great adventure. See you in Antigua!”

Sarah Harmer, Event Manager for the Oyster World Rally

Visit www.oysterworldrally.com for more information and to follow the adventure.

46 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


OYSTER WORLD RALLY 2017-2019 PARTNERS We are delighted to be working with the following partners during the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019. Here’s some great advice from them before the adventure begins.

sales@cathelco.com www.cathelco.com

richard.hamer@foxsmarina.com www.foxsmarina.com

LESS IS MORE WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR DESALINATOR

FOX’S RIGGING RECOMMENDS A FULL RIG INSPECTION On longer voyages it’s important to keep your desalinator membranes as fresh as possible. “It’s much better to use your desalinator for one hour every day

Prior to any long, offshore passage, a full rig inspection by a professional rigger

rather than a continuous six hour period once a week. This should include

should be undertaken. Once at sea, daily routines should include a visual check

manual fresh water flushing on start up and shut down,” said Chris Bell,

over the rig, especially prior to deteriorating weather. Binoculars can be useful

director of Cathelco’s desalinator division. If you keep to this regime every day,

for daily checks, but there is no substitute for periodically going aloft.

you can switch off the automatic fresh water flush on your desalinator, that will save water from being produced and then wasted.

Particular attention should be paid to wire/rod terminations, block attachments, running rigging and furling systems - if something sounds or feels odd, further investigation should be undertaken.  Regular adjustment of running rigging and control lines will reduce wear, whilst spinnaker halyards, pole guys and boom sails@dolphin-sails.com www.dolphinsails.com

preventers will require specific chafe protection and lines end-for-ending.

UV PROTECTION FROM DOLPHIN SAILS LEWMAR SAYS SERVICE YOUR WINCHES

techsupport@lewmar.com www.lewmar.com

UV protection was the hot topic of conversation during the Oyster World Rally seminar held at the Dolphin Loft in April 2016. ‘Weather’ protection for

Lewmar’s Tech Support Team recommends that you give your winches the once

the boat and the crew is going to be extremely important throughout the trip.

over before every season.

Using the WeatherMax80 fabric, custom made covers can make the difference especially the unique over boom and foredeck Tensile Awnings. Durability

“Servicing your winches is easy with very little effort required! Lewmar Ocean

was the focus for the sails, something that Dolphin are specialist in, and

winches require no tools to service: simply unscrew the top cap to remove the

secondly should they go for asymmetric or twin headsail set ups for offwind

drum and provide access to the gear train. Before every season we recommend you

sailing. For trouble-free sailing, servicing and inventory management will be

carefully check all components; cleaning and greasing the gears is key to keeping

required, so the Dolphin team will be contactable around the clock to assist.

your winches running smoothly and operating efficiently for the season ahead.”

info@formulamasts.co.uk www.formulamasts.co.uk

nick.holland@mastervolt.com www.mastervolt.co.uk

EXTEND YOUR BATTERY LIFE

CLEAN, LUBRICATE AND INSPECT SPARS AND PARTS At a recent rally seminar, Mastervolt’s Nick Holland addressed the subject of Keeping spars and all their related parts clean is one of the most important things

battery life, as the biggest killer of lead acid batteries is regular deep discharge

you can do to ensure your mast and boom give you many years of enjoyable sailing.

beyond 50% of capacity.

Washing down with fresh water in order to remove salt after every trip substantially increases the life expectancy of all systems; also make sure all moving parts are

Nick advises fitting a very accurate battery monitoring system, such as the new

properly lubricated. Prior to a long crossing Formula Masts recommend making

BattMan Pro, and to diligently recharge the batteries from the engine when

a visual inspection of the spars top to bottom. Check all the split pins are opened

they near this 50% discharge rate. An alternative is to replace lead-acid batteries

correctly, and any bolts or screws are tightened and sufficiently locked if required.

with Mastervolt’s latest generation of lithium ion equivalents, which are almost immune from repeated, very deep (up to 80%) discharge. >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 47


james@stellamarisyachting.com www.stellamarisyachting.com

info@pantaenius.com www.pantaenius.com

KNOW YOUR BOAT FROM STEM TO STERN AROUND THE CLOCK GLOBAL ASSISTANCE FROM PANTAENIUS Andy Willett, Technical Director of Stella Maris Yachting explains how As the Oyster World Rally approaches, Pantaenius would like to wish fair winds

advantageous it is for yacht owners to know how every inch of their yacht

to all crews participating in this great adventure. We are proud to be able

operates prior to long voyages, saving money and lost time.  SMY gives owners

to partner with this magnificent fleet and to provide our service on such an

who bring their yachts to the company’s Southampton and Spanish facilities the

exceptional occasion. Oyster Yachts and Pantaenius share the commitment to

opportunity to work alongside their shipwrights and engineers to refit, restore

provide customers with an unparalleled yacht ownership experience in any given

and recommission every part of each boat.  “We witnessed during last winter’s

situation. For the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019 this means that Pantaenius will

ARC how our refitted yachts were trouble-free on their crossing.” said Andy. 

be ready to assist and support participating vessels around the clock and in every

“Knowing your boat thoroughly results in confident and safe passage making.”

cruising area around the globe. For any insurance related service, please do not hesitate to contact us.

info@vortecmarine.com www.vortecmarine.com

Enjoy the adventure!

PLANNING, PREPARATION AND TRAINING ARE KEY dos@pelagosyachts.com www.pelagosyachts.com

With more than 15 years’ experience working with Oyster Yachts around the world, Vortec Marine Managing Director, Ross Collingwood testifies that preventative maintenance and a well-trained crew keep you sailing. “A poorly

PELAGOS ‘CREW-SAFE’ BESPOKE SECURITY TRAINING COURSE

maintained vessel is a danger to you and your crew. Before you set off on the Oyster World Rally, make sure your Oyster is serviced and checked throughout,

Pelagos Yachts are passionate about protecting their clients and want your

and all crew are sufficiently trained, with at least two members confident to

experience to be the thrill seeking adventure it should be.

take control of the vessel or deal with a medical emergency.” For information on how Vortec Marine can help you prepare and for bespoke training courses,

Pelagos are delighted to have already offered their clients the opportunity to

visit www.vortecmarine.com

safeguard their voyage by arranging a bespoke security training course, ‘Crew-Safe’, which practically addresses international marine safety onboard. Pelagos have

teamed up with Oyster and will be flying our expert maritime security division,

GO FURTHER I SAIL BETTER I BE INSPIRED November 2015 | sailingtoday.co.uk | £4.20

NEW BOAT TEST

Oyster 545

GREAT NEWS - you can benefit from this too! Claim your spot today.

Sailing a bluewater dream

SAILING TODAY MEDIA PARTNER For more information contact Declan O’Sullivan: dos@pelagosyachts.com

p

TECHNICAL

Light show

Underwater lighting makes sense for sailing boats

CARIBBEAN

Caribbean

With six months to go before the start of the Today has come aboard as a media partner.

Don Street’s secret Windward anchorages

SCILLY CRUISE

The wild paradise right on your doorstep SWAN’S SONG

Enrico Chieffi explains why Swan is building smaller

JIMMY’S BACK

Cornell fights through ice in the NW Passage

11

second Oyster World Rally in January 2017, Sailing harry.heasman@raymarine.com www.raymarine.com

HO YOU RT R G -A A, UID tla A E T nti ZO O cp R its ES to

Mid

WHAT CHART?

We review the best and worst of digital charts

WINNERS

Find out who triumphed in our 2015 awards

9 770044 000205

Allmode, to the 2016 Palma Regatta and the 2016 Southampton Boat Show.

The bluewater sailing magazine will follow the progress of the Rally with

RAYMARINE IS AVAILABLE FOR TECHNICAL ADVICE AND SUPPORT GLOBALLY ON THEIR PRODUCTS For many years marine electronics specialists Raymarine has enjoyed a successful

regular updates and in-depth features, and plans to run a photo competition for the participants. Sailing Today editor Sam Fortescue said: “We are very excited to be partnering

partnership with Oyster Yachts, with many of its award-winning Raymarine

with the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019. As adventurous cruisers, many of our

products being specified on Oyster’s custom-built yachts.

readers dream of this sort of experience, so we are looking forward to bringing the 27-month circumnavigation to life through the stories and images of owners

Renowned for world-leading technical advice, support, service and warranty,

and crew. You may even see us at some of the stop-overs!”

all available globally, Raymarine offers additional piece of mind to all Oyster owners taking part in the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019.

Sailing Today is keen to hear from rally participants who would like to write for the magazine, whether that is an article on their experiences or a blog,

The partnership between the two brands enables both organisations’ product

or who would love to see their photos in print. To find out more, email

development teams to work together to produce the electronics, navigation,

editor@sailingtoday.co.uk. You can keep tabs on coverage at

communication and safety equipment systems, specified by discerning owners

www.sailingtoday.co.uk and look out for exclusive Sailing Today

of Oyster’s sophisticated and masterfully-designed yachts. 

offers for Oyster owners.

48 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


// OWNER STORY

SAILING AROUND THE WORLD – A TEENAGER’S PERSPECTIVE

THE MANSFIELD FAMILY OYSTER 45 // RAINBOW SPIRIT In 1996, the Mansfield family bought their 45 foot Oyster yacht and set sail from the United Kingdom with their three young daughters to circumnavigate the world. Their oldest daughter, Samantha kept a travel journal onboard Rainbow Spirit, recording the highs and lows of their three-year adventure at sea. Follow Samantha’s personal story as she takes you on her family’s memorable trip of a lifetime around the globe. The Mansfield family received the 17th award for Oyster yachts circumnavigating and we have presented 50 more since then over the past 15 years. Samantha’s father regularly contributed to the Oyster magazine during their trip and her parents thoroughly enjoyed reading Samantha’s book as it brought back many fond memories. We hope you enjoy reading this extract from Samantha’s memoirs. WORDS BY SAMI SAUNDERS // PHOTOS BY THE MANSFIELD FAMILY

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 49


16 MAR

‘99

CHAPTER 9: THE PACIFIC CROSSING After a morning of stocking the boat up with fresh food

supplies from ashore, filling the boat up with fuel and water and doing the last minute safety checks onboard we set sail on our three-week trip across the Pacific. When we came to get the stern anchor up by hand in the dinghy it was impossible to budge as it was so well dug in. We had to connect it to the anchor winch on the front of the boat to help pull it up. Even the electric winch struggled with it so it must have been dug in ver y well indeed. As usual we were one of the last remaining rally boats to leave port again. This was probably due to the fact that we were normally late ar r iving in. The others always seemed to be days and some even weeks ahead of us. We weren’t the last boat though, there were a couple of other yachts that seemed to tag along at the back with us. It was on this trip we decided to call our little group ‘the back enders club’ and kept in touch daily via VHF radio. When we lost VHF signal we reverted to using the SSB instead, which travelled further away. But ever y time we used the SSB, strange things seemed to happen with the other instruments and the autopilot on board, so it was interfering somehow. I guess the ser vice shop in Panama hadn’t fixed it properly as ever y time Dad used the SSB the autopilot went off, taking the boat off in a random direction, so we had to hand steer instead. One of the wives on another boat began to read daily stor ies over the radio. We tuned in at the same time ever y evening to share our position, talk about the weather and listen to the next part of the

CHAPTER 10: FRENCH POLYNESIA

stor y. This particular stor y was one she had written about a family

After 20 days of being at sea, we finally made landfall into Taiohae Bay, on the island

of blue-footed boobies.

of Nuka Hiva, the largest island of the Marquesas. My gosh it looked a little like Jurassic Park from a distance, the land was covered in lush green steep high rise mountains.

For the first few days there was ver y little wind, so we ended up motoring quite a bit and our fuel supply was going down quite fast.

The Marquesas Islands consisted of about ten different volcanic islands that were

The seas were so calm that we were able to fill up the boat with

part of French Polynesia, of which the official languages were French and Tahitian.

spare fuel from plastic jerr y cans that had been stored on deck at the back of the boat. The only wind we got was when a nasty squall

We anchored in the large and very beautiful bay in around 20 metres of water. When

went over us giving us a little wind and lots of rain. It was good

we got in the dinghy to go ashore we were shocked by the huge amount of weed that

to have fresh water on the decks again as it helped wash the salt

had grown on the hull of the boat. The barnacles at the ver y back must have been

water and dead flying fish off.

about four inches long. It’s funny how they just appear from nowhere after being at sea for three weeks.

Some of the other boats didn’t have spare fuel so they decided to head a little south to pick up some wind. We had a limited fuel

THE STORY CONTINUES...

supply and would run out if we had to motor all the way, but we

During the trip, when the Mansfield family were sailing through the Mediterranean,

decided to stay on track and after a few more days the wind picked

they had to take shelter quickly in a nearby marina due to some approaching bad

up and we averaged about 6-7 knots. We started fishing and one

weather. It was there that Samantha met a young British boy called Dean who lived

day caught three fish. The first was a bonito again but we ended up

with his parents on their boat in the marina, Samantha was 15 at the time. 15 years

losing it just before we landed it. The second fish was a very small

later they are now happily married and live in New Zealand. So Samantha is forever

baby dorado, but it was so small that Dad decided to free it and

grateful for that bad weather that brought them together.

then third time lucky we caught a much bigger dorado which we decided to eat. ‘My Round the World Journal’ by Samantha Saunders

At one point we came across a massive whale that came ver y

is available to purchase on www.amazon.co.uk and www.amazon.com

close to the boat before deciding to circle us. It must have been

To find out more about the Oyster World Rally visit www.oysterworldrally.com

about 20 foot, about half the size of the boat, so it was a little intimidating being circled by it. I think it must have just been inquisitive because it eventually swam away.

50 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


// OWNER STORY

SAILING IN NEW ZEALAND

DR. MICHAEL YOKELL OYSTER 56 // QUESTER Dr. Michael Yokell and Debbie Rahm have owned their Oyster 56 Quester for the last nine years. They have shared their knowledge of sailing in New Zealand and have some very useful hints and tips for a successful trip exploring what this beautiful country has to offer.

WORDS BY DR. MICHAEL YOKELL // PHOTOS BY DEBBIE RAHM & JENNIFER WHALLEY

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 51


New Zealand is a small country, both geographically and in the number of inhabitants. But, there is perhaps nowhere else on the planet other than England where the people are as enthusiastic about sailing as here. The country was first settled by the Maori people who first arrived from Polynesia in significant numbers around 1350. It was first sighted by westerners when the Dutch Captain Abel Tasman passed by the top of the South Island but did not make landfall. Captain Cook arrived in 1769 and the islands were gradually settled by Englishmen thereafter. New Zealand has two main islands – North and South. The North Island is closer to the equator than the South Island, and therefore warmer. The greatest concentration of sailboats is in Auckland (Latitude about 36.5 degrees S), which is at the head of the Hauraki Gulf and surrounds Waitemata Harbor. It is said that there are more boats per capita in Auckland than in any other city in the world. The largest marina in Auckland, Westhaven, has roughly 1,600 ships and is said to be the largest marina in the southern hemisphere. Westhaven also hosts a yacht club the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron - which is quite nice (reciprocity required). Because of the concentration of sailboats, every type of boating expertise and product is available in Auckland and very conveniently as well. Greater Auckland dominates the New Zealand economy, and has roughly half the population of the country as well as its principal international airport. It is a small wonder that many of the world’s prominent racing captains hail from Auckland. Not to be missed in Auckland is the maritime museum, located in the small, but very nice Viaduct Marina downtown. In spite of the prominence of Auckland, most international boats arrive from the north and clear Customs in Opua. We were told recently that Opua clears 80% of all entering sailing vessels. Opua is at the head of the Bay of Islands on the northeast coast of the North Island (Latitude about 35 degrees S). The town has a sizable marina, a 50 ton Travel Lift, two chandleries, and at least one provider of nearly every type of service. Meals are served most evenings at the local cruising club (reciprocity not required) and there is an excellent local cafe. Restaurants and accommodation are largely in Paihia, about 5km to the northwest. Our 56, Quester, is on the hard at the yard in Opua for the second time, and will be re-rigged there by a local rigger.

52 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


Very close to Opua are a group of small islands with delightful anchorages. Just across from Paihia is Russell, the country’s original capital, and now a pleasant anchorage with a variety of shops and restaurants ashore. Not far from Paihia on the mainland is the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, commemorating the treaty between the English and Maori peoples signed in 1840 at this location. Among other displays is a Maori war canoe.

THERE ARE A LARGE NUMBER OF ANCHOR AGES IN THE M AIN CRUISING GROUND SO THAT ONE CA N OFTEN SELECT A N A NCHOR AGE SHELTER ED FROM THE WIND

The vast majority of cruising sailboats in the country are found in Auckland, Opua, or in-between. While there are a couple of lovely harbours north of Opua, the bulk of the anchorages are nearby, along the way to Auckland, and northeast of Auckland. The whole area is stunningly beautiful. Not far south of Opua is Whangarei (for some reason “Wh” is pronounced like an “F”), which is a large

Marlborough Sounds is simply delightful. The rather well known

and industrialised harbour. Whangarei sports several marinas

walking track, the Queen Charlotte Track, is here. Connected to

(the closest one to the mouth of the harbour is Marsden Cove),

Marlborough Sounds through a series of intricate passages, is the

a 100 ton Travel Lift, an oil refinery (with an interesting exhibition

small city of Nelson, which is at the head of Tasman Bay. Nelson is

open to the public) and typical urban services.

a nicely situated small city that is reputed to have the sunniest climate in New Zealand. A point to note about the area between Wellington,

New Zealand is well south of the SE trade wind belt of the South Pacific.

Picton and Nelson is that the entire area is tidal, so taking care with tidal

Yet only the southern section of the South Island is far south enough

flows, which can be quite strong in some of the narrower passages,

to consistently catch the Westerlies. While the prevailing winds are

is a good idea. Even the Cook Strait has a significant current, and

more or less SW, they don’t prevail that often and the main cruising

it is best, as usual, to avoid wind against current situations.

grounds are truly in the ‘variables’. In other words, the weather a cruising boat is likely to encounter is controlled mainly by frontal

Most local sailors spend their time either racing around the buoys,

passages, and winds can come from any direction. Luckily, there are

or spend weekend and holidays at their favourite islands (Waiheke,

a large number of anchorages in the main cruising ground so that one

Great Barrier, Mercury Island). Waiheke Island is very close to

can often select an anchorage sheltered from the wind.

Auckland, and along with the Coromandel Peninsula, is a weekend holiday ground. Great Barrier Island has multiple lovely anchorages.

Although most of the cruising activity takes place between Auckland

Ferries from Auckland arrive in Waiheke Island frequently during

and Opua, there is another concentration of sailing vessels in the vicinity

the day and a bit less often at Great Barrier Island. The Mercury

of the Cook Straits, between the two islands. The capital, Wellington,

Islands are equally beautiful but a bit further afield. Most local

on the southern tip of the North Island, has a nice marina downtown

cruising boats make passages to and from ‘the islands’ when the

(Chaffer’s) and is a very nice small city. There is a yacht club (Royal

fancy strikes them.

Port Nicholson Yacht Club) near to the marina. But not for nothing is Wellington known as ‘Windy Wellington’ and care must be taken

‘The islands’ are Fiji, Tonga, and less visited New Caledonia. The

entering the narrow channel leading from Cook Strait into the bay.

rare cruiser may circumnavigate the North Island (normally done counter-clockwise) and the even rarer cruiser may circumnavigate

On the southern side of the Strait, on the northern tip of the South

the South Island. Note: The West coasts of both islands are steep-to,

Island, lies the cruising ground known as the Marlborough Sounds,

have few harbour, and are on lee shores, so a good weather window

with Picton at its head. This area is truly gorgeous, and has two marinas,

is required on the west side of the islands. These circumnavigations

one quite large one in Picton itself and one not far north of Picton.

are akin to an ocean passage, and not to be taken lightly. For example,

When we made landfall in Picton after a nine day crossing of the

when leaving Wellington for Auckland, the first harbour is in Napier,

Tasman Sea from Newcastle, Australia this February, we found

230 nautical miles to the north, around Cape Palliser. And the trip from

it simply marvellous.

Gisborne up around East Cape to Auckland is 240 nautical miles. >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 53


In addition to being enthusiastic boaters, we found the Kiwis to be very friendly to visiting sailors. While we were anchoring in Hawke’s Bay north of Napier, we were accosted by a recreational fishing boat and the couple aboard insisted on giving us three large crayfish (we call them lobsters in the States). On another occasion an amateur photographer photographed our vessel and presented us with a printed copy of the photo. Transportation in New Zealand is good and there are ample opportunities for tourism off the boat. Popular spots on the South Island are Queenstown, Mt. Cook, and Milford Sound, all worthwhile expeditions. Kiwis are great lovers of the outdoors, and there are many well-maintained hiking trails. All manner of outdoor sports and activities are enjoyed, both on and off the water. For example, even though water temperatures are much lower than in the tropics, Kiwis are enthusiastic divers. And, of course, bungee jumping was invented here. Dairy farming is the largest export industry in the country and is practised on both islands. The second largest export industry is silviculture, concentrated on the North Island in the area between Napier and Gisborne. This area also produces a lot of wine. New Zealand also produces fruits and vegetables, especially in the area just north of Opua and in the vicinity of Kerikeri (where the airport serving Opua is located).

USEFUL RESOURCES CHARTS

CUSTOMS CLEARANCE

PILOTS

Paper charts are readily available. Navionics has

Incoming vessels must contact Customs 48 hours

All the popular areas are covered by readily

several charts chips that include New Zealand.

in advance of clearing. Foreign vessels can remain

available pilots. The pilots for the Hauraki Gulf

A local resource is a CD containing all the Raster

in New Zealand for 24 months without being

and the Northlands (which covers the Bay of

charts for the country along with a mapping

imported. At clearance a ‘Temporary Import

Islands) are particularly good.

programme for a PC. The disk is called Memory-

Exemption’ (TIE) document is obtained. This

Map and is available, among other places, at

document can be used to eliminate GST on

Boat Books near Westhaven in Auckland.

purchases for the boat while in the country.

WEATHER FORECASTS The official weather site is the Met Office: www.metservice.com/national/home

COMMUNICATIONS

ELECTRICITY

There are weather broadcasts on the VHF every

Vodafone offers a good cell phone service

Shore power connections require an electrical

few hours (listen on Channel 16) and in the

and decent cell-phone based internet. We

inspection and sticker.

Auckland area continuously on Channel 21.

had a ‘hot-spot’ on board that could support

A more useful site is MetVuw: www.metvuw.com

five devices and we had coverage all the way from Picton to Opua.

GAS

... perhaps the best site is Windyty:

Gas suppliers in New Zealand will only refill

www.windyty.com

cylinders that are stamped in New Zealand.

54 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


// OWNER STORY

WORKING AROUND THE WORLD

LIBBY & PATRICK ALLAWAY OYSTER 545 // PEGASUS Sydney sailors Libby and Patrick Allaway found their ideal boat, but on the far side of the world and it had yet to be built. Problem? Not at all. Research and reputation gave the reassurance to go ahead, and without yard visit or trial sail, Oyster 545-08 Pegasus was commissioned and project managed long distance. Shipped to Australia in February, Pegasus now has pride of place on the Allaway family berth in front of the Royal Prince Alfred Yacht Club in New South Wales’ spectacular Pittwater National Park. Patrick takes up the story…

WORDS BY PATRICK ALLAWAY & MIKE OWEN // PHOTOS BY PATRICK ALLAWAY

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 55


I’m ecstatic about Pegasus. It’s been a long time coming, a two-year project, and Oyster has been absolutely fabulous to deal with, right from the planning stage through project management to delivery with a commissioning skipper from Oyster coming out to Australia for a week-long handover. It’s been a great experience, a credit to Oyster. We visited only once, and that was late in the project when she came out of the shed.

I NEEDN’T HAVE WORRIED. THE HANDOVER WAS OUTSTANDING, SO THOROUGH. It was a big leap in confidence but we did our research, looked at lots of different options in different companies. Everything kept pointing to Oyster. I had a colleague in Australia who’d sailed an Oyster before, and the more I heard, the more I felt this was the right boat for us. Then I spoke also to a couple of Oyster customers, had very good feedback, and once we started dialogue with the Oyster team, we just felt more and more comfortable that this was the right choice. Then the real question was what size.  We were graduating from a Beneteau Oceanis 41 that we’d had for four years but mostly only day sailed with no extended cruising. It was a bit over two years ago that we decided we wanted to go bluewater with a boat that could safely, comfortably, cross oceans with us as a couple or variously with friends and our two grown children, 24 year old James and 22 year old Maddy. I was a bit concerned that anything much over 50ft would be too big for Libby and me alone but we got comfortable after talking to Oyster. We had a good think about the 575, seriously considered the 475 also, but after discussions decided the 545 was right for us. Commissioning an Oyster, there is a significant number of choices and decisions to be

We keep Pegasus just 40nm north of Sydney, at the Royal Price Alfred

made, so much more than with production builders. A little bit tough from far away but

Yacht Club in Newport on a beautiful protected inland waterway

our project manager Luke Porter was fantastic, ran the process really well, always on

called Pittwater, which has an outlet to the ocean about 10nm from

hand and communicating, sending samples, photographs. Really helpful.

the yacht club. We have a beach house about 10 minutes from the boat and our home in Sydney is just 30 minutes away. It’s a great lifestyle.

An early issue was whether to go with in-mast furling or fully battened main, and I went

Currently we are just getting used to the boat, coastal cruising and

fully battened as I am racing her in the offshore series here off Sydney. Having the bigger

the short offshore races the club runs. But in July I’m taking the

sail and the battens does make a difference, so that helped the decision. I have gone  with all

boat up to the Whitsunday Islands on the Great Barrier Reef, about

the electronic winches and the electric furling headsail. Then, as well as the  standard 

a 2,000nm trip from Sydney.

Dolphin sails, I bought an asymmetric spinnaker here in Australia from North Sails.  We’ll leave Pegasus up there through the Australian winter, then have Otherwise on deck she’s fairly standard, although I extended the pushpit benches more

most of September on the boat sailing the islands before bringing her

around the corners, similar to on the 575, and padded the back railing. I’ve also davits

back to Sydney in early October. Then next year we plan to join the

for the RIB, helpful for when we’re sailing in the islands. From the communications

Oyster World Rally fleet in Fiji. I was hoping to spend more time on

perspective I have gone for sat phone, put on radar, two satnavs, one downstairs, the

the Pacific Rally but unfortunately because of board commitments

other upstairs on the pedestal. I’ve gone with bow thruster and I went for a pretty

we’ll have the boat delivered to Fiji in late August, then join the Rally

comprehensive set of spares given we’re so far away. The guys were really helpful

in September and sail back from there to Sydney.

in recommending what I should have. The future? More cruising, offshore racing, and maybe the Sydney My biggest concern about buying the boat was in being stuck such a long way away

Hobart when more experienced. That would be something to tick off

without much in the way of handover or knowing what I was doing. But I needn’t

the bucket list!

have worried. The handover was outstanding, so thorough. Pegasus was shipped to Newcastle, about 100nm north of Sydney. We were joined by local agent Michael Bell

We love the boat, she’s far better than we ever expected. I couldn’t

and commissioning skipper Duncan Bush who came out from England, helped us sail

have hoped for a better result and we’ve been blown away by the

back down to our home berth and was here with us for a week going through the boat,

service, the help and the support from Oyster. They have been

and out on numerous sailing sessions. He knew the boat backwards and there was hardly

absolutely fabulous. My biggest concern, being so far away, was

a question he couldn’t answer. A very helpful process and outstanding job. The after sales

whether this would work. It has, extremely well.

has been very good, too, any teething problems responded to and rectified very quickly.

56 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


FOCUS ON PALMA

Palma de Mallorca has been a focal point for Oyster Yachts for a long time, and we have valued our relationship with the Real Club Nàutico de Palma (RCNP) for over a decade, running the Oyster regattas with them. Building on this solid foundation, and recognising that regularly there have been 50 or more Oyster yachts somewhat scattered around the Island, it was clearly time to invest in lifting our services to another level. Taking the first steps in 2011, Oyster CEO David Tydeman, established the business strategy and announced our commitment to having a base in Palma. He recruited Jamie Collins to help develop the plans; Jamie’s first task was to find an office base, establish a Spanish operating company and to shift the previously Ipswich-centric brokerage operations to become a network of three offices – Newport, Palma and UK – led from Palma. In parallel, a meeting of minds with Mark Durham (pictured with his team) whilst he was Captain of Oyster 100 Penelope led to David recruiting Mark to strengthen the team. Jamie’s success with the brokerage network and his focus there meant that daily operations of the Palma office could be handed over to Mark with a brief that he create a top-class service centre for all Oyster yachts. By a bit of good luck and timing, the regatta relationships came to the fore and RCNP

Middle Image: Oyster Service Centre Palma Team

offered Oyster the chance to focus some of the new service operations on a dedicated

Photos by Stuart Pearce / Oyster Yachts

Oyster Dock with exclusive berthing arrangements for some lucky Oyster owners. 18 months’ since launch, the Oyster Service Centre in Palma is going from strength

These combined efforts led to a new Oyster office at Moll Vell being

to strength. It offers an array of services, including:

opened in 2013 and we have created a clear focal point for Oyster owners to meet, greet, compare notes and plan their sailing

• Guardienage – providing weekly technical and maintenance checks and cleaning

and maintenance! Key suppliers and other partners of Oyster

by our in-house Guardienage Captain, Bosun, and Deckhand.

have watched and reacted, strengthening our services – we are

• Maintenance – with a direct line to Oyster UK, we can tap in to the history

delighted that Dolphin Sails now have their own office in Palma.

of your yacht, and ensure that every yacht is cared for and looked after to the

Angus Roberts has relocated from Essex, where he was the cover

owners’ specific needs and to Oyster standards.

department production manager, to a Service Loft in Santa Catalina.

• Technical and Engineering Works – frequent systems servicing by qualified and trusted engineers.

Overall our commitment to Palma has been a great success.

• Refit Management – project management of diverse and varied works

The above services are available all year round, providing ideal

to the highest of standards.

timing for preparation before our next Oyster Regatta Palma,

• Anti-fouling/Haul-out – full service haul-out with all associated works.

4th-8th October 2016.

• Spares and Supplies – we work closely with Oyster Customer Services to provide spares and parts. • Berthing Arrangements – liaison with marinas and local authorities to ease your

Contact the team at: Oyster Service Centre Palma, Edificio Moll Vell,

arrival in the port of Palma. Including the Oyster Dock at RCNP. We are in discussion

Locales 6-7, Calle Muelle Viejo 6, Palma de Mallorca, 07012 Spain

with other marina operators to extend this type of service as best we can too.

T: +34 971 287 474 E: palma@oysteryachts.com

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 57


OYSTER REGATTA PALMA 2015 The turn of September-October may mark the near ending of the European season but in Mallorca it more happily signifies time for the annual Oyster Regatta based out of the Real Club Nรกutico de Palma. For its 11th running, 30 yachts from nine nations tied up alongside the welcoming club, all set for the four days of racing, as always with every level of experience from first time owners and racers to professionally guest-crewed contenders.

WORDS BY MIKE OWEN // PHOTOS BY NICO MARTรNEZ

58 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


RACE DAY ONE // RACE ONE // SPONSORED BY RAYMARINE What a start, waking to tipping rain and thunder crashing around the bay. But the

ultimately for the Oyster World Rally. The deck work was efficient,

worst of the storm passed and in a lull, although still wary of a forecast with wind

effective and certainly courteous. Co-owner Hugh Bishop at the

strengthening to a possible 40 knots, a window opened. Game on, and it sure was,

helm, in true Corinthian spirit, dipping his otherwise good start to

just laying a course in 60-70° shifts. But the fleet was away on a two-hour triangle,

allow 655 iSNL space where there was none on the pin. Meteorite’s

staggered starting in small groups.

smart, hardly used Elvstrom EPEX membrane racing sails then set well as she climbed higher away to the mark and then onto her

“We were delighted to get a start and run a race,” said Race Officer and Oyster CEO,

podium spot followed by Simon Pillar driving Oyster 625 Tiger.

David Tydeman. “More normally there might have been an abandonment but it’s all credit to the Oyster fleet that they wanted to go.”

In Class 3 two boats shone bright even through the overcast and squalls, Charles Billson’s Oyster 54 Sara Blue V and Peter Blackmore’s

Best reading the many big wind shifts and avoiding the holes, the top ten boats on

49 Pied Piper, followed closely by Susie and Rory McGrath’s 53

corrected time spread nicely across all three Classes.

Spindrift and Stephen Lambert’s 575 Atalanta. First things first, these four led the whole fleet by a mile, deep into the final leg before

In Class 1 Oyster 885, Lush with Eddie Jordan, family, friends and crack crew aboard,

Lush finally sailed through the tail three but failing to take Sara

powered faultlessly through the fleet, consolidating a four-minute corrected lead

Blue V. And all four of these Class 3 came in ahead of all Class 1 on

over Cathey and Joe Leitch’s new Oyster 725 On Liberty which fought a close battle

corrected. A real reflection of the Oyster regattas’ attraction.

with Oyster 82 Starr y Night of the Caribbean, ending a tight 17 seconds ahead on corrected. On Liberty’s original challenge was with Infiniti of Cowes, Diana and Ken

Beyond this, in tough match racing, Pied Piper and Spindr ift

Randall’s Oyster 72, which then lost time with spinnaker issues on Leg 2 of the four

(respectively 2nd and 3rd) crossed the same start and sailed hard,

legs around the triangle.

closeby each other throughout to finish just two seconds apart. Atalanta sailed the next start and finished with an elapsed time only

Class 2 fell to the carbon-rigged Oyster 625 Angel that simply flew around the

another seven seconds after Pied Piper. Stephen Lambert reported,

course after breaking away from the six other 625s all bunched in the zephyr

“It was fluky with tricky shifts in the final stages, we were pleased

2.5 knot start line breeze. Going for pressure and boat speed, Angel with Jeremy

with our calling, and we got a good start, too.”

Robinson calling the shots for Klaas Meertens sailed through the fleet on a course pretty much on their own.

Rounding off a day of great unpredictability, everyone later headed out of Palma for the certainty of a great evening’s dining and

Rudolf Kaegi followed in 2nd ten minutes behind on his friends and family sailed

Raymarine and Pantaenius-sponsored Prize Giving at the Sa Font

625 Flying Spirit, in turn six minutes ahead of similarly crewed 655 Meteorite,

Seca, a grand ancient olive press converted to exceptional social

delighted with 3rd in the first race on recently acquired ex-Acheron, bound

setting in the foothills of the Tramontana. >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 59


RACE DAY TWO // RACE TWO // SPONSORED BY LEWMAR While the fleet prepared to leave the RCNP dock, the breeze built to eight knots but with

In Class 1 honours went to new boat on the dock Oyster 725 On

the still chilled, soaked land ashore precluding any strong sea breeze, the gradient wind,

Liberty with owner Cathey Leitch and daughter Amy onboard to

set to lighten later, gave the fleet its only opportunity. An earlier laid course was swapped

enjoy the family’s first win after many regattas aboard the original

for a double triangle and with no time to reset, a biased start line saw some interesting

575 On Liberty. “Fantastic day,” said Cathey, “So exciting. 1st

line-play from match race manoeuvres to sailing the line and tacking out on the gun, not

never happened before… wonderful!” And it had been exciting, it

forgetting of course simply storming the pin on port.

was On Liberty that led a match race start taking close rival Oyster 72 Infiniti of Cowes out and on beyond the pin then tucking back behind

In the fluky, shifty conditions, pressure chasing and boat speed were priority number one,

the line to speed out onto the beat with the inside lead. Skipper Harry

and impressively the top ten boats all came in within around 13 minutes, both corrected

Blazeby says, “It was a good tussle, we did shut them out, but we’re

and elapsed. With the race ending in just two to three knots, the fleet had spread wide,

all friends. They pulled us up on the run but we managed to stay

the back-enders taking the knock.

ahead. We had a really clean gybe but Infiniti got a little caught with another boat. On the beat we kept reeling in but didn’t get

First in Class 3 (Oysters 49 to 575) again went to an Oyster 54, today Hugh Johnson’s

Lush [Oyster 885].”

Nikitoo II, taking also 1st overall across the fleet. Hugh’s home berth is in Lefkas, Greece from where he was en route via Palma to the ARC+ and, fully laden for the crossing

On corrected, of course, they did, Lush settled in 3rd in Class 1.

including filled tanks, stuffed lazarette and chain locker, and perhaps the most individual of all Oyster customisations, an integrated 100 litre deck-filled rum tank. Yes, you read

Second corrected went to Oyster 82 Starry Night of the Caribbean

that right. So, such swift sailing on the course had to be 100 percent proof of good tactics

which sailed consistently well and as crew Steve Branagh says of the

and time saved by Hugh’s minimised tacking. That won him, his partner, sister and crew

last beat, “We did well bouncing out left on the shifts making big

a beautiful, mounted, golden Lewmar winch.

gains.” The inner forestay gone for the regatta also of course helped faster tacks in these light winds.

Class 2’s winner Oyster 625 Great Bear V also sailed in fully loaded cruising mode, with owner Graham Hetherington delighting in his team’s 1st after the previous day which

Fifth placed Oyster 82 Bare Necessities, sailing with new owner Matt

he described as, “… a day to forget! Today’s totally different.” Great Bear V had also

Newing and a mostly novice, eager crew of friends aboard, conversely

romped home 2nd overall.

tacked slower with the constraint of inner forestay.

60 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


But there was a high onboard with all the new experiences and quick learning under the good management of long-term skipper Alex Drummond. The racing was also more about out-sailing the other similarly rigged 82s, Bill Mapstone’s OofleDust and Alan Carr’s Dama de Noche. In Class 2 behind Great Bear V, Richard Smith’s 655 Sotto Vento placed 2nd after a cracking start fully powered up on port right on the pin with the best start of the day at just two seconds off the gun. Even better was seeing Sotto Vento, so time-tight, squeezing inside the two other 655s, Meteorite and iSNL , caught in a duel on the line which left Meteor ite forced over early to take a place penalty of 20 percent. iSNL stayed on to take 3rd while Meteorite slipped back. Fourth went to Rudolf Kaegi’s 625 Flying Spirit, creating the perfect mix with the top four slots spread equally between 625s and 655s. Class 3 saw the biggest reshuffling for second placing with Philip Wilson’s centreboard Oyster 575 Isabel after a really great day’s sailing. Commissioned to join the Oyster World Rally 2017-2019, this was the couple’s first ever regatta which, with skipper James McDonald, was to be followed with the ARC and a Caribbean season. Today the sun shone on them here. In a great turnaround, too, Tara, Hasip Gencer’s Oyster 56 took 3rd, jumping nine places, sailing a tight and tidy two seconds corrected ahead of yesterday’s Class winner Sara Blue V, Charles Billson’s Oyster 54, today 4th. So come what may there was much for everyone to play for ahead. >> 

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 61


RACE DAY THREE // RACE THREE // SPONSORED BY DOLPHIN SAILS And at the end of this next race there still was. After a cracking good contest, all in a fair

says by the fact that with a mixed English and Bulgarian crew there’s

breeze that at last held, all three classes had still not one single clear winner: in Class 3

a problem with body signals. “Unfortunately in Bulgaria a British

nothing between the first three boats, all on 7.75 points; in Class 2 the top two shared 8.5;

‘nod’ means ‘no’ and a ‘shake’ means yes!”

and in Class 1 the leading trio stood together at 5.75. It seemed only the last day’s fourth and final race would be the decider for who took trophies home. But that story’s to come.

Third place went to Oyster 54 Sara Blue V who sailed a spectacular race with the shortest elapsed time by some seven minutes but

After two days of fickle winds and shortened courses, the wind for this third race built

unfortunately suffering a place penalty for crossing the line early

and stayed, the fleet all finishing in a 12 to 15 knot southerly, by a long shot the best wind

after a forced manoeuvre. In the knock on, Robert van den Enden’s

of the week. The race ran close to three hours for most, laid on a course rounding the Isla

54 Talaba took a penalty, too. But Sara Blue V then pulled away.

de Sech off the western shore of the bay through seas possibly more challenging than the

“Sailed like a dream,” says owner Charles Billson, “We’d stayed out

wind, the early sloppy swell making it hard to maintain momentum. Keeping boat speed

on the beat to the island and didn’t risk anything on the reach. Took

was key, working waves and shifts.

some height with the white sails after Sech then popped the kite on a good line with the mark. And we took boat speed to 10 knots,

Reflecting the effect, the afternoon brought a course alteration, Classes 1 and 2 going on

that’s good in these conditions.”

to sail 19 miles while Class 3 was finished on 15 with Peter Blackmore’s Oyster 49 Pied Piper the clear winner despite blowing a spinnaker. Incredibly for a crew that hadn’t

The only boats out in front as they finished were Oyster 82 Starr y

sailed together before this week, another kite was up within two minutes. “We’ve a pretty

Night of the Caribbean and 885 Lush who’d both sailed the extra four

competitive crew,” said Peter, whose part local team also knew to sail right into the shore

miles given to Classes 1 and 2.

for the lifts. “Just 200m under the cliff, the sounder still read 47 metres! A great day.” Fourth went to Stephen Lambert’s 575 Atalanta after a good Nikitoo II, Hugh Johnson’s Oyster 54, and the previous day’s victor, took 2nd slot.

course-rounding, impaired on the final leg home by the unfortunate

Response? “I can’t believe this!” He’d had his share of troubles too, blowing a halyard

obstructing movement of a vast Aida cruise liner after a perfect layline

and dumping the kite in the sea, taking time and a struggle to sort, made no easier he

gybe that would have seen them home early… if only.

62 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


Starts in Class 2 were proving some of the closest, the 625s and 655s mixing and muscling

hadn’t helped Starry Night, described as pretty gruesome with the

it up, and this day 1st placed for the second day running, Graham Hetherington’s Oyster

wave angle knocking one tack’s 7.5 knots back to 4.8 on the other.

625 Great Bear V wrestled with the pro-tactician led 625 Angel for position and won, getting the line they needed to storm the beat. Two crew down, and also with the slower

Lush giving Star r y Night time pulled a 2nd, skipper Tim Beebe

tacking of the cutter rig, they kept the tack count down on previous days, did what had

reporting, “We always have fun with Star r y Night on the start

to be done and won.

line. Today they got the better of us. We tacked on mark 1, got a good line, higher than everyone with Starry Night also lower than

Against apparent odds, Rudi Kaegi sailed his Oyster 625 Flying Spirit into 2nd despite

everyone. We kept right in close to the shore by the island and got

a spinnaker snuffer line struggle that went with them onto the beat and a drenched,

a good few lifts. Then a lot of thinking about the kite. Didn’t seem

bouncing foredeck. But clearly much else went right.

to hold for ever yone. But, fortune to the brave, we did about ten minutes from the mark. Kite up and 13.5 knots boat speed, surfing

Oyster 625 Tiger, helmed daily by different memebrs of the crew but led by Simon Pillar,

big waves. Ever y mark we’re thinking ‘Starr y Night’. Our other

sailed into the finish and 3rd place a close 30 seconds behind Flying Spirit, and 90 behind

nemesis is On Liberty.” So, in this mix, On Liberty, took 3rd today,

Great Bear V. After the island, Tiger had held to white sails as at 9.5 knots there seemed

her own nemesis, Oyster 72 Infiniti of Cowes, 4th behind.

little to gain until closer to the mark when they popped the kite and flew. The day’s racing done it was time to head for the terraced battlements Fourth went to 655 iSN L . Chris Walmsley aboard reporting the 655 starts as very

of the Museo Es Baluard and a rather stylish tented buffet, with of

competitive and today had to make a break and tack out before funnelling back into

course a prize giving from the day’s race sponsor Dolphin Sails. The

a crowded top mark. “It was enjoyable sailing in a stronger breeze. We held our own

discretionary daily Race Committee Award went to Henrik Nyman

for a while but couldn’t pull time back on the three leading 625s.”

and crew aboard Oyster 625 Delicia in recognition of battling on in the face of sheer adversity. They had suffered the true Gordian Knot of

Among the jostling 655s, the Bishop/Smith Meteorite unfortunately had to retire after the

riding turns taking 20 minutes to resolve, another winch blowing its

genoa blew. A half of the third couple who sail Meteorite together, Doug Williams quickly

electrics, and a spinnaker problem that drew Henrik’s entire crew onto

ascended the rig made even more awkward by the crossing swell of a fast, large motoryacht,

the foredeck leaving him alone at the helm with the boat about to gybe.

“My first time up a mast at sea… a very good learning curve for our Oyster World Rally.” Good point. Crash hat and full harness were now on the shopping list.

“I felt very lonely at the back,” Henrik said, then with a grin, “but good friends always come back!”

The clash of the Titans continued in Class 1, this time Oyster 82 Starry Night winning the start off 885 Lush in their two boat group, then taking the lead to the top mark and

The final straw was the cruise liner that had kindly let others go

sailing pole-squared sails on deeper angles than everyone else. It was their day, the only

through suddenly shifted and Henrik, kite flying on a perfect line,

holdback a clustering of smaller boats dousing kites on the bottom mark as Starry Night

had nowhere to go. No option other than to bail and drop. Ducking

approached at speed and decided to stay low to keep clean air. Higher to weather than

the Aida, neither easy nor quick, he then still sailed the final two legs.

Starry Night, Lush managed a tighter rounding and pulled ahead. The early slop also

That’s tenacity! >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 63


64 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


FINAL DAY // What a week, a great few days’ racing ending with everyone sailing away with something among the long list of trophies, prizes and good memories. Just one more race to go, but the breeze just wouldn’t blow and there was no fourth start to unravel all the tied Class leaders. But good sailors always have a way to unknot a tie, and at the final night’s prize giving at the Cap Rocat hotel, an awe inspiring shoreside, converted and contemporised, monumentally built historic fortress, the winners were awarded their booty using the Countback process that prioritises the sequence of scores. But first, roof terrace welcoming drinks and a stunning view of Palma Bay’s full panorama sailed in the week and now seen sunset-painted in true perspective. “We’ve had a great time running this regatta for you all” said Oyster CEO and Race Officer, David Tydeman, “and we’re pleased this time to have had more first timers and family boats. I feel we’ve all recreated the real spirit, the original principal, of this regatta which perhaps had started to become a little too focused on winning!” So, in good Corinthian spirit, among a fleet spanning fully four generations with the age difference between youngest and oldest 80 years, and you can’t get more ‘family’ than that, the prize giving played out. No-one could, though, deny a sense of possibly competitive glee in the walk-up to collect trophies and prizes for everything from winning on the water to best dressed boat and almost anything in between!

The next Oyster Palma Regatta runs 4th-8th October 2016

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 65


RESULTS OVERALL RESULTS // ALL RACES TO COUNT. NO DISCARDS CLASS

POSITION

YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER

1

1 st

Starry Night of the Caribbean

82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

2

3

2 nd

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

3 rd

On Liberty

725-03

Cathey & Joe Leitch

4 th

Infiniti of Cowes

72-12A

Diana & Ken Randall

5 th

Bare Necessities

82-01

Matt Newing

6 th

Dama de Noche

82-09

Alan Parker

7 th

OofleDust

82-17

Bill Mapstone

1 st

Flying Spirit

625-07

Rudolf Kaegi

2 nd

Great Bear V

625-08

Graham Hetherington

3 rd

Sotto Vento

655-07

Richard Smith

4 th

Tiger

625-04

Simon Pillar

5 th

iSNL

655-11

Cascina Int Ltd

6 th

Angel

625-03

Klaas Meertens

7 th

Delicia

625-09

Henrik Nyman

8 th

Meteorite

655-02

Debbie Smith

9 th

Alpha Eden Island

625-12A

Tinus Slabber Peter Blackmore

1 st

Pied Piper

49-12A

2 nd

Nikitoo II

54-19

Hugh Johnson

3 rd

Sara Blue V

54-11

Charles Billson

4 th

Isabel

575-30

Jane & PhilipWilson

5 th

Atalanta

575-22

Stephen Lambert

6 th

Spindrift

53-24

Susie & Rory McGrath

7 th

Britican

56-32

Simon Brown

8 th

Boarding Pass III

575-04

Bill Munro

9 th

Ostra

53-23

Ritchie Gatt

10 th

Tara

56-68

Hasip Gencer

11 th

Distraction

53-50

Simon Tysoe

12 th

Talaba

54-18

Rob Van den Enden

13 th

Venture

53-48

Nigel Betts

RACE 1

SPONSORED BY

CLASS

POSITION

YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER

1

1 st

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

2

3

2 nd

On Liberty

725-03

Cathey & Joe Leitch

3 rd

Starry Night of the Caribbean

82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

4 th

Infiniti of Cowes

72-12A

Diana & Ken Randall

5 th

Bare Necessities

82-01

Matt Newing

1 st

Angel

625-03

Klaas Meertens

2 nd

Flying Spirit

625-07

Rudolf Kaegi

3 rd

Meteorite

655-02

Debbie Smith

4 th

Tiger

625-04

Simon Pillar

5 th

Sotto Vento

655-07

Richard Smith

1 st

Sara Blue V

54-11

Charles Billson

2 nd

Pied Piper

49-12A

Peter Blackmore

3 rd

Spindrift

53-24

Susie & Rory McGrath

4 th

Atalanta

575-22

Stephen Lambert

5 th

Nikitoo II

54-19

Hugh Johnson

OTHER RESULTS // CLASS 1 - 6th 82-17 OofleDust, 7th 82-09 Dama de Noche. CLASS 2 - 6th 655-11 iSNL, 7th 625-08 Great Bear V, 8th 625-09 Delicia, 9th 625-12A Alpha Eden Island. CLASS 3 - 6th 56-32 Britican, 7th 575-30 Isabel, 8th 53-23 Ostra, 9th 54-18 Talaba, 10th 575-04 Boarding Pass III, 11th 53-50 Distraction, 12th 56-68 Tara, 13th 53-48 Venture.

66 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


RACE 2 CLASS 1

2

3

SPONSORED BY POSITION

YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER Cathey & Joe Leitch

1 st

On Liberty

725-03

2 nd

Starry Night of the Caribbean

82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

3 rd

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

4 th

Infiniti of Cowes

72-12A

Diana & Ken Randall

5 th

Bare Necessities

82-01

Matt Newing

1 st

Great Bear V

625-08

Graham Hetherington

2 nd

Sotto Vento

655-07

Richard Smith

3 rd

iSNL

655-11

Cascina Int Ltd

4 th

Flying Spirit

625-07

Rudolf Kaegi

5 th

Delicia

625-09

Henrik Nyman

1 st

Nikitoo II

54-19

Hugh Johnson

2 nd

Isabel

575-30

Jane & Philip Wilson

3 rd

Tara

56-68

Hasip Gencer

4 th

Sara Blue V

54-11

Charles Billson

5 th

Pied Piper

49-12A

Peter Blackmore

OTHER RESULTS // CLASS 1 - 6th 82-09 Dama de Noche, 7th 82-17 OofleDust. CLASS 2 - 6th 625-04 Tiger, 7th 625-03 Angel, 8th 655-02 Meteorite, 9th 625-12A Alpha Eden Island. CLASS 3 - 6th 53-24 Spindrift, 7th 56-32 Britican, 8th 575-22 Atalanta, 9th 53-50 Distraction, 10th 575-04 Boarding Pass III, 11th 53-23 Ostra, 12th 53-48 Venture, 13th 54-18 Talaba.

RACE 3

SPONSORED BY

CLASS

POSITION

YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER

1

1 st

Starry Night of the Caribbean

82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

2 nd

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

3 rd

On Liberty

725-03

Cathey & Joe Leitch

4 th

Infiniti of Cowes

72-12A

Diana & Ken Randall

5 th

Bare Necessities

82-01

Matt Newing

1 st

Great Bear V

625-08

Graham Hetherington

2 nd

Flying Spirit

625-07

Rudolf Kaegi

3 rd

Tiger

625-04

Simon Pillar

4 th

iSNL

655-11

Cascina Int Ltd

5 th

Sotto Vento

655-07

Richard Smith

1 st

Pied Piper

49-12A

Peter Blackmore

2 nd

Nikitoo II

54-19

Hugh Johnson

3 rd

Sara Blue V

54-11

Charles Billson

4 th

Atalanta

575-22

Stephen Lambert

5 th

Isabel

575-30

Jane & Philip Wilson

2

3

OTHER RESULTS // CLASS 1 - DNS 82-09 Dama de Noche, DNS 82-17 OofleDust. CLASS 2 - 6th 625-09 Delicia, RTD 625-03 Angel, RTD 625-12A Alpha Eden Island, RTD 655-02 Meteorite. CLASS 3 - 6th 575-04 Boarding Pass III, 7th 53-23 Ostra, 8th 53-24 Spindrift, 9th 56-32 Britican, 10th 53-50 Distraction, 11th 53-48 Venture, 12th 54-18 Talaba, RTD 56-68 Tara.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 67


OYSTER REGATTA ANTIGUA 2016 An impressive fleet of Oyster yachts, flying the flags of Germany, Ireland, Russia, Sweden, United Kingdom and the United States of America gathered in Antigua, West Indies for the 37th Oyster Regatta. Nelson’s Dockyard in English Harbour was the starting and finishing point for the six day event, which included four days of racing in the superb sailing grounds of Antigua, and featured fabulous parties at some of the Caribbean island’s most famous locations. The impressive fleet includes 14 examples from the Oyster range, including four of the very latest models.

WORDS BY LOUAY HABIB // PHOTOS BY TIM WRIGHT / PHOTOACTION.COM

The Superyacht dock in Nelson’s Dockyard was a hive of activity on Monday 4th April with owners, their family and friends, preparing their yachts for the regatta. The Concours d’Elegance judging was the first competition. Gleaming in Caribbean sunshine, the magnificent fleet was a spectacular sight in the historic surroundings of Antigua’s Georgian dockyard. Registration for the regatta was followed by the Skippers’ Briefing in the Copper & Lumber Hotel. David Tydeman, Oyster Group CEO, acting as Principle Race Officer, greeted the competitors. “Welcome everybody to our 37th regatta, we have seven first timers, which is great to see. We also have Manfred Kerstan from Albatros, who will be celebrating his 80th birthday this week and Starry Night of the Caribbean, who are taking part in their 23rd regatta. We also have young children on at least three other Oysters and two yachts, Ayesha II and Dalliance, which will be taking part in the next Oyster World Rally. “Oyster Regattas have two main objectives, that they are fun and safe and we have two very different levels of experience on the race course at the same time. We have experienced racing sailors on high performance yachts, as well as less experienced sailors, or those with young families. The experienced sailors know how to keep the racing safe and we rely on those experts in the fleet to make the right judgement calls when there are relatively inexperienced people around them. Oyster Regattas’ fundamental principle is to be safe on the race course. There is a comprehensive Oyster team that have come to Antigua from Britain, Hamburg and Newport, Rhode Island and we are here to help you in any way we can during the regatta, feel free to come and talk to us and we will do everything we can to assist you. Thank you all for coming, I hope we have a safe and thoroughly enjoyable regatta.” The Welcome Party was held at Boom, Gunpowder Suites, an exclusive part of the Admiral’s Inn at English Harbour, dating back to the 18th century. The Oyster family gathered on the vast outdoor terrace boasting an infinity-edged pool with views across English Harbour and the stunning Oyster fleet.

68 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

6


RACE DAY ONE // RACE ONE FROM ENGLISH HARBOUR TO NONSUCH BAY // SPONSORED BY RAYMARINE The south coast of Antigua provided shifty conditions for the first day of racing with the wind oscillating between south and south east and varying in strength from 6 to 16 knots. A course taking in some of Antigua’s greatest landmarks was sensational; Curtain Bluff, Shirley Heights and York Island. The final destination, Nonsuch Bay, is one of the most stunning natural bays in Antigua and was a fitting location to end a wonderful day’s racing. Principle Race Officer and Oyster Group CEO, David Tydeman, set a reaching start for all yachts with staggered time intervals of three minutes. Equally matched groups of yachts started together, producing several highly competitive encounters. None more so than in Class 1 between Maxim Kudryashov’s Oyster 885, Guardian Angel and Oyster 885, Lush, sailed by Eddie Jordan. The two magnificent Oysters, both with spinnakers flying, were locked in a duel for several minutes, before Guardian Angel managed to pull away from Lush and extend a healthy lead on the water, taking line honours by just over 13 minutes from Lush. However, Terry Snow’s Oyster 72, Magrathea, kept playing the shifts to their advantage and corrected out to win Class 1 for the first race, ahead of Lush and Guardian Angel. “That is the first time I have raced Magrathea. So it feels great.” smiled Terry Snow. “I have to put it down to teamwork. We went out for a practice yesterday and today we were very focused on looking ahead and anticipating the moves. I have to say Ross Applebey did a great job on the strategy and that was part of a great effort by all of the team.” Henrik Nyman’s Swedish Oyster 625, Delicia took line honours and the win on corrected time in Class 2. Two Oyster 575s had a battle royale for 2nd place. Leslie and David Joyce’s Ayesha II and Dick Hammill’s Spirit enjoyed a close race. Ayesha II was in 2nd by less than three minutes after time correction. “We have had a wonderful race.” commented Delicia’s Henrik Nyman. “Delicia is a beautifully built boat and we were ver y happy with the project manager Jean Pier re Cardin, who excelled both technically and with the inter ior design dur ing the build. As far as winning, we are just a team of fr iends with no professionals on board, I wouldn’t have it any other way.” After racing, the Oyster fleet anchored in Nonsuch Bay, one of the most stunning locations in Antigua. At the Prize Giving, Class winners received the fantastic prize of Flir Night Vision Cameras from regatta sponsor, Raymarine. After the awards, the Oyster family enjoyed a seated dinner of a sumptuous beach barbecue from award-winning chef, Mitchell Husbands. >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 69


RACE DAY TWO // RACE TWO FROM SPINNAKERS TO JOLLY HARBOUR // SPONSORED BY LEWMAR The impressive Oyster fleet weighed anchor in the stunning natural harbour of Nonsuch

“In Class 3 it was great to see Oyster 53, Crackerjack gain confidence,

Bay for the second day of racing. The forecast for the day was not looking promising, the

switch from being a social entry and join the race fleet with two very

typical Trade Winds from the east were forecast to be affected by a low pressure system

young children onboard. It was delightful to see the whole family in

to produce light southerly winds for the morning, with a dying breeze backing to the east.

costumes crossing the line! Simon Brown’s Oyster 56, Britican was

The race from York Island to Jolly Harbour was downwind for the duration. However,

impressive today, scoring the biggest winning margin of any Class and

the fickle breeze kept the Oyster fleet on their toes. Heating up the angle in the lulls, and

Ian Galbraith’s Jig Saw had another consistent race to take 2nd with

coming down towards the next mark on bullets of pressure, was a key technique. In terms

the first of the new Oyster 545s, Shelena, taking 3rd.”

of strategy, choosing when to gybe, to stay in pressure, was the key to performance. The Oyster Regatta Party was held at The Tamarin Restaurant at Curtain David Tydeman summarised the day’s racing; “For once, the forecast was right, with the

Bluff Resort, one of Antigua’s finest and long established beach resorts.

breeze dying off early in the afternoon and we had very close racing, leg after leg, until perhaps

Oyster owners, their guests and crew arrived to a spectacular sunset

the very last, which was where some big gains and losses were made. Starting today was

and enjoyed a very warm welcome from the Managing Director, Rob

much smarter than yesterday, with everyone less than a minute from the gun. Oyster 82,

Sherman in the resorts fabulous facilities. Curtain Bluff proved its

Starry Night of the Caribbean was just two seconds shy of the line for the best start.

reputation for service offering nearly 130 people choices from a menu created especially for Oyster and serving some wonderful fine wines.

“In Class 1 the top four boats were just six minutes apart on corrected time, however their

After dinner, live music packed the dance floor, with sailors energised

order had been continuously changing during the race. Oyster 885 Guardian Angel was the

by the knowledge of a lay day the following day.

winner of Class 1 but at Curtains, the penultimate mark, Guardian Angel was in 3rd place. “In Class 2, Dick Hammill’s Spirit had a fantastic race, especially considering that this was the first time they had raised their spinnaker on the new Oyster 575 and it was only in the last mile of the last leg that Henrik Nyman’s Oyster 625 Delicia got their strategy spot on, to save their time and win the Class.

70 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


LAY DAY // Antigua has a beach for every day of the year and without doubt one

“I am a boat owner myself and I wanted to produce an atmosphere

of the finest beaches on the Caribbean island was enjoyed to the full

that would attract yacht owners and crew to come and enjoy

by the Oyster family on Lay Day.

themselves, so it is very satisfying to have been chosen by Oyster to come to Jacqui O’s.”

Jacqui O’s Love Beach on the leeward coast of Antigua is blessed with fine white sand, crystal clear Caribbean water and a perfect

The playful nature of the occasion was evident in the afternoon

view of Antigua’s volcanic neighbour, Montserrat. For Lay Day

with all manner of beach games including tug of war, beach cricket

at the regatta, Jacqui O’s beach restaurant became the exclusive party

and water polo. What a perfect way to enjoy Lay Day at the Oyster

location for Oyster owners, their guests and crew. Famous for lobster

Regatta Antigua.

and fresh fish, with a wine list to rival any establishment on the island, the Oyster family enjoyed a fabulous long lunch.

David Tydeman, Oyster CEO commented, “It was a wonderful day and a great oppor t unit y for O yster owners to have f un in each

“I wanted to create the perfect Caribbean beach rendezvous and

other’s company – one owner said to me that he had more fun than

I travelled through many Caribbean islands before I found Jacqui O’s.”

whilst racing!” >>

commented Jacqui O’s owner Lance Leonhardt.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 71


RACE DAY THREE // RACE THREE FROM FIVE ISLANDS HARBOUR TO SOUTH COAST OF ANTIGUA // SPONSORED BY DOLPHIN SAILS Race Day Three was truly magnificent, with the Oyster fleet enjoying exhilarating racing with solid Trade Winds piping up to 20 knots in brilliant sunshine and a turquoise Caribbean sea. The race area for the third race of the series was the west and south west coast and with an easterly air flow, there were several big wind shifts in the transition zone south west of Antigua. David Tydeman sent the fleet out on a reaching start from the picturesque Five Island Harbour to Sandy Island. Then a deep-water downwind leg to a laid mark Albatros, west of Antigua. Followed by what proved to be a fickle upwind leg, skirting Cades Reef down to Curtains Mark for the smaller yachts and Legacy for the larger. A long downwind leg back to Albatros was followed by a beat back to Sandy and a fetch to the finish at Irish, just outside Jolly Harbour Marina. Race Three was probably the most tactical race so far, with several downwind and upwind legs. Judging lay lines and playing the shifts were key areas and there were several gentlemanly duels on the water, adding to the thrill. At the Prize Giving David Tydeman summed up the action across the three classes racing at the Oyster Regatta. “With the wind back in the east, the laid marks would have just provided reaching courses, so we laid a mark three miles offshore due west and with the wind out of the south east, the fleet enjoyed long and testing beat after the reaching start. With the wind bending around the north and south of the island, the east coast created a tactical environment with gains and errors far outweighing any handicap variations. Those teams that got their strategy spot on reaped the benefits and with a long race the times were relatively close – all within a few percent in each class. Once again we had some incredibly close finishes after time correction the best being just six seconds between the two 575s in Class 2. Tomorrow will be the last race and taking into account the discard, there is everything to play for across all three Oyster Classes.” Class 1 was set a 29 mile course and halfway into the race there was barely a minute separating the fleet of five boats on corrected time. In the second half of the race, the wind shifts and the long downwind leg stretched out the fleet. Terry Snow’s Oyster 72, Magrathea corrected out to win the Class just holding off Oyster 82, Starry Night of the Caribbean which finished 2nd. Oyster 885, Lush, sailed by Eddie Jordan was close behind in 3rd – they sailed their best tactical race so far in the regatta and finished on the water ahead of Guardian Angel – a great duel between these powerful yachts. In Class 2, two Oyster 575s had a fantastic race. David and Leslie Joyce’s Ayesha II had a cracking start, just three seconds shy of the line at the gun. Dick Hammill’s Spirit had chosen to race with downwind sails and by the second leg had caught up with Ayesha II. However, Ayesha II had a lower rating as the team were racing with just white sails and Spirit needed to put distance on, to save their time. Spirit crossed the finish line first and after time correction, won the race by just six seconds on corrected time. Henrik Nyman’s Oyster 625, Delicia, who has won the previous two races, was 3rd. In Class 3, Sully O’Sullivan’s Oyster 53, Crackerjack nailed the start but Simon Brown’s Oyster 56, Britican, showed their experience, especially in tactics, to take their second win of the regatta. Ian Galbraith’s Oyster 53, Jig Saw was 2nd, despite tearing a headsail and Phil Scourfield’s Oyster 545, Shelena was 3rd. The Oyster Regatta party was held at The Akropolis Greek Restaurant in Jolly Harbour Marina in full view of the Oyster fleet. Delicious Greek tapas and a full bar for the Oyster family was a fine way to end the evening. >>

72 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 73


RACE DAY FOUR // RACE FOUR FROM FIVE ISLANDS HARBOUR TO ENGLISH HARBOUR // SPONSORED BY PELAGOS YACHTS On the final day of the Oyster Regatta Antigua, two of the three Classes were so close that the winners were decided on the last race. Spectacular sailing conditions prevailed with a brisk 20 knots of wind from the south east. Oyster yachts are built to sail the oceans and revelled in the conditions. Performance in the early part of the race was achieved by getting a good start and playing the gusts and lulls to maximise VMG, velocity made good. Along the south coast of Antigua, tactics came into play, especially staying inshore to avoid the worst of the current, enjoy flatter water and lifting pressure off the land. David Tydeman sent the fleet out on a reaching start from the stunning Five Island Harbour to Sandy Island. Followed by another reaching leg past Jolly and Curtains, keeping the fleet over a mile offshore. After two days of solid breeze, the sea state had built to a significant swell. The Oyster fleet was in its element, powering to windward after Curtains towards Legacy, a tricky upwind mark located near to Cades Reef in Carlisle Bay. The bigger yachts in Class 1 then returned to Curtains and back to Legacy, whilst Classes 2 and 3 powered on to the finish off English Harbour. Class 1 Terry Snow’s American Oyster 72, Magrathea and Maxim Kudryashov’s Russian Oyster 885 Guardian Angel, went into the last race, knowing that for each, a win could secure the big boat class. Magrathea got away well but knew that the powerful yachts starting behind them would be hard to match on the beat and Magrathea was passed by Guardian Angel, Oyster 82, Starry Night of the Caribbean and Oyster 885, Lush, sailed by Eddie Jordan. Magrathea fought back passing Starry Night of the Caribbean but there was no possibility of catching Guardian Angel and Lush on the water. Guardian Angel took line honours followed by Lush. Magrathea crossed the finish line 11 minutes after Guardian Angel, which was just enough to take the race win just 52 seconds ahead on corrected time and thus the Class 1 title for the regatta. The final Oyster Regatta party and prize giving was held at the Copper & Lumber Hotel, in the heart of Nelson’s Dockyard. A plated gourmet buffet was served on the water’s edge next to the magnificent Oyster fleet and the exclusive al fresco bar was buzzing with stories from the regatta. David Tydeman welcomed the Oyster family to the ceremony, “Antigua has provided the Oyster fleet with fantastic sailing conditions and we have had safe yet very competitive racing; most of all, tremendous fun. Ian Galbraith’s Jig Saw has an entourage of 16 here with many years of experience and we also have a large number of Oysters sailing with children, which is great to see. This year, we have been to a number of great new venues and each and every one of them should be congratulated for their efforts and their warm welcome”. World famous Antigua band, Asher Otto with Itchy Feet, played a high energy live set which filled the dance floor, as the Oyster party went into full swing in the magnificent surroundings of Nelson’s Dockyard. The Royal Southern Yacht Club has launched a repeat of their very successful ‘Oyster Week’ of 2010 and will run another event, exclusively for Oyster Yachts, taking place 4th-9th July 2016 in the Solent. The 38th Oyster Regatta will take place in Palma Mallorca, from 4th-8th October 2016.

74 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


WHAT LILY THOUGHT… Lily lives aboard Delphinus and her family had the opportunity to crew with Oyster 56 Britican during the Oyster Regatta in Antigua. Here’s a snippet from her blog:

WORDS BY LILY EAMES-JEVONS, AGED 13

We've had a very exciting week since the last post, since it has been the Oyster Regatta! On Sunday we packed a few clothes and took a taxi from Jolly Harbour to Nelson's Dockyard, where we were to meet up with our friends Kim, Simon and Sienna, who live on Britican, one of the Oyster boats that was to take part in the Regatta. We were the extra crew they needed for the races, so we were going to be spending a few nights on the boat. Here I'll explain a bit about the Oyster Regatta: it's an annual event where several boats of the Oyster type come together to take part in all sorts of exciting events, including races, parties, buffets and a Lay Day on the beach on Thursday where everyone could chill after two hard days of powerful racing, only to go through two more days until the

We arrived in Nonsuch Bay after the race, and got all dressed up for

Regatta ended on Saturday with a buffet, live music and singing, and

a little party. Throughout the Regatta, Mum and I were provided

on-stage prize giving. There are three Classes in the race: first, second

with special vegetarian dishes, being special vegetarian people.

and third. These Classes divide the bigger and better racing yachts

I don't remember the dishes we were served the first night, but I do

with the smaller cruising yachts. We were in Class 3. At the start line,

remember it was super yummy. :)

Class 3 get a three-minute headstart from Class 2, who get the same amount from Class 1. This isn't much, and the Class 1 boats can easily

I met some more kids that day! Sasha is the daughter of the race

catch up with the rest, so to make it fair the Class 1 boats have to take

committee announcer, and she knows a lot about the Oyster Regattas

a longer route to Class 2 and 3 boats. The race committee announce

since she has been going to them for six years.

the start line and finish line, the route, and basically everything you need to know about the race over the VHF. At the end of every race

I also met Chloë and Hector, who were on an Oyster boat in the

day there was a prize giving. Throughout the Regatta, twenty-two year

regatta but weren't racing, as well as Ted, who was sailing on

photographer Tim Wright took photos from all over, from land, the

Forever Young. They're all a pretty cool bunch to hang out with.

sky, the sea, you name it. And wherever the photo was and whatever it was of, it was always a fantastic one. I'll get some photos from his

The next day was Wednesday: our second race day, this time to Jolly

collection on this post. Thanks, Tim! :)

Harbour, where Delphinus was currently moored. This time we had an Australian man called Harry West with us, and you could

We were hanging around in Nelson's Dockyard for the rest of our

see he was an experienced sailor, knowing exactly what to do and

time there before we were to race against several other Oyster yachts

exactly when to do it.

to Nonsuch Bay (honest, that's its name). We saw one of the Atlantic rowing boats from 2005 on display outside a souvenir shop (if you

While we were tootling along, no boats ahead of us, we had a problem

don't understand the Atlantic rowing race, look up ‘Talisker Atlantic

putting the spinnaker up, and meant we lost time. We were

Whiskey Challenge’ on Google Search, or read my past blogs, as I will

more-or-less immediately thrown from leading the fleet of boats

have written something about them there) belonging to James ‘Tiny’

to trailing along after them. Poor Sienna was fast losing hope before

Little, which was quite exciting.

we suddenly flew past the boats and were ahead of the fleet again. That cheered Sienna up, and it cheered her even more when we only

Monday 4th April, was the first day of the Regatta, and therefore it was

went and WON the race in our Class! Yippee!

registration day. Paul, Kim and Simon went off to register Britican and pick up our t-shirts. We went to see a small, free museum to pass the

This time our prizes were a couple of tall glasses and a waterproof

time until the registration was done and dusted. It was all about old-time

bag made by Dolphin Sails, who sponsored that day's race. First

naval stuff, quite a bit of it about Sir Nelson.

place after nearly coming last... just goes to show what we're made of on Team Britican!

On the first race day we had a man called Simon (yep, another Simon. Confusing, eh?) doing it with us - and we came second place in our Class after a very exciting race day, winning a beautiful silver

To read the full story and follow Lily’s adventures, search for the

Oyster boat-shaped trophy.

Facebook Group called: ‘Sailing the Globe Delphinus’.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 75


RESULTS 6

OVERALL RESULTS CLASS

POSITION YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER

RACE 1 POINTS

RACE 2 POINTS

RACE 3 POINTS

RACE 4 POINTS

TOTAL POINTS

BEST THREE

1

1

2.25

2

3

Magrathea

72-10

Terry Snow

0.75

2.00

0.75

0.75

4.25

2 nd

Guardian Angel

885-04

Maxim Kudryashov

2.00

0.75

4.00

2.00

8.75

6.75

3 rd

Starry Night of the Caribbean 82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

4.00

3.00

2.00

4.00

13.00

9.00

4 th

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

3.00

4.00

3.00

3.00

13.00

10.00

5 th

Zig Zag

82-07

John McMonigall

5.00

5.00

5.00

6.00

21.00

15.00

1 st

Spirit

575-28

Dick Hammill

3.00

2.00

0.75

0.75

6.50

3.50

2 nd

Delicia

625-09

Henrik Nyman

0.75

0.75

3.00

2.00

6.50

3.50

3 rd

Ayesha II

575-16

Leslie & David Joyce

4.00

4.00

2.00

4.00

14.00

10.00

4 th

Dalliance

62-15

Susie & Rory McGrath

3.00

3.00

4.00

5.00

15.00

10.00

5 th

Forever Young

66-06

Forever Young Partnership

5.00

5.00

5.00

3.00

18.00

13.00

1 st

Britican

56-32

Simon Brown

2.00

0.75

0.75

0.75

4.25

2.25

2 nd

Jig Saw

53-01

Ian Galbraith

0.75

2.00

2.00

2.00

6.75

4.75

3 rd

Shelena

545-01

Phil Scourfield

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

12.00

9.00

4 th

Crackerjack

53-39

Sully O'Sullivan

5.00

4.00

4.00

4.00

17.00

12.00

st

RACE 1 CLASS 1

2

3

SPONSORED BY POSITION

YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER Terry Snow

1 st

Magrathea

72-10

2 nd

Guardian Angel

885-04

Maxim Kudryashov

3 rd

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

4 th

Starry Night of the Caribbean

82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

5 th

Zig Zag

82-07

John McMonigall

6 th

Albatros

825-04

Manfred Kerstan

1 st

Delicia

625-09

Henrik Nyman

2 nd

Ayesha II

575-16

Leslie & David Joyce

3 rd

Spirit

575-28

Dick Hammill

4 th

Dalliance

62-15

Susie & Rory McGrath

5 th

Forever Young

66-06

Forever Young Partnership

1 st

Jig Saw

53-01

Ian Galbraith

2 nd

Britican

56-32

Simon Brown

3 rd

Shelena

545-01

Phil Scourfield

POSITION

YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER Maxim Kudryashov

RACE 2 CLASS 1

2

3

SPONSORED BY 1 st

Guardian Angel

885-04

2 nd

Magrathea

72-10

Terry Snow

3 rd

Starry Night of the Caribbean

82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

4 th

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

5 th

Zig Zag

82-07

John McMonigall

1 st

Delicia

625-09

Henrik Nyman

2 nd

Spirit

575-28

Dick Hammill

3 rd

Dalliance

62-15

Susie & Rory McGrath

4 th

Ayesha II

575-16

Leslie & David Joyce

5 th

Forever Young

66-06

Forever Young Partnership

1 st

Britican

56-32

Simon Brown

2 nd

Jig Saw

53-01

Ian Galbraith

3 rd

Shelena

545-01

Phil Scourfield

4 th

Crackerjack

53-39

Sully O'Sullivan

76 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


6

RACE 3

SPONSORED BY

CLASS

POSITION

YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER

1

1 st

Magrathea

72-10

Terry Snow

2

3

2 nd

Starry Night of the Caribbean

82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

3 rd

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

4 th

Guardian Angel

885-04

Maxim Kudryashov

5 th

Zig Zag

82-07

John McMonigall

1 st

Spirit

575-28

Dick Hammill

2 nd

Ayesha II

575-16

Leslie & David Joyce

3 rd

Delicia

625-09

Henrik Nyman

4 th

Dalliance

62-15

Susie & Rory McGrath

5 th

Forever Young

66-06

Forever Young Partnership

1 st

Britican

56-32

Simon Brown

2 nd

Jig Saw

53-01

Ian Galbraith

3 rd

Shelena

545-01

Phil Scourfield

4 th

Crackerjack

53-39

Sully O’Sullivan

RACE 4

SPONSORED BY

CLASS

POSITION

YACHT NAME

MODEL

OWNER/SKIPPER

1

1 st

Magrathea

72-10

Terry Snow

2

3

2 nd

Guardian Angel

885-04

Maxim Kudryashov

3 rd

Lush

885-01

Eddie Jordan

4 th

Starry Night of the Caribbean

82-14

Starry Yachts Ltd

1 st

Spirit

575-28

Dick Hammill

2 nd

Delicia

625-09

Henrik Nyman

3 rd

Forever Young

66-06

Forever Young Partnership

4 th

Ayesha II

575-16

Leslie & David Joyce

5 th

Dalliance

62-15

Susie & Rory McGrath

1 st

Britican

56-32

Simon Brown

2 nd

Jig Saw

53-01

Ian Galbraith

3 rd

Shelena

545-01

Phil Scourfield

4 th

Crackerjack

53-39

Sully O'Sullivan

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 77


RETIREMENT… THE WAY IT SHOULD BE!

CHERYL & JOHN ELLSWORTH OYSTER 56 // SEA MIST In 2005 Cheryl and John Ellsworth set sail from Ipswich in their new Oyster 56 to travel around the world. After many years of exploring and creating memories they have returned for the next stage of their life, ready for Sea Mist to be enjoyed by her next owners…

WORDS & PHOTOS BY CHERYL & JOHN ELLSWORTH

78 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


// OWNER STORY RETIREMENT CHOICE Selling Sea Mist, our home for the last 11 years, is the gateway event to our next stage of life as we roll into our 70s. These past 11 years have been remarkably great for my wife and me in so many ways, all enabled by our having a yacht that gave us the qualities of a home of similar calibre to homes we were accustomed to through the years of living on land. We thought we would take a moment and reflect on these years.

TIMING AND PREPARATION As my later years of work-life advanced, we knew that I would be forced to retire aged 60 due to mandatory requirements in the organisation where I worked. That certainty enabled us to evaluate retirement options with a firm date in mind and, due to our shared experiences on business trips and vacations to various parts of the world during my working years, we readily narrowed in and focused on a life of sailing the waters of the world and experiencing its varied cultures and other features. We did not enter into this path with an objective of circumnavigation but rather the aim to create a viable and attractive retirement life through sailing in waters of the world and, if circumnavigation should happen as a by-product, so be it. We set out from the beginning with the aim of spending the ten years through our 60s in this life, and then, for our 70s, return to land and establish a land home under the cover of socialised medicine in Canada. As we well knew that later years’ health issues might command our path by then.

THESE PAST 11 YEARS HAVE BEEN REMARKABLY GREAT FOR MY WIFE AND ME IN SO MANY WAYS… ALL ENABLED BY OUR HAVING A YACHT

SELECTION OF OUR BLUEWATER YACHT With that interval clearly in our minds, we sold our expansive home in the New York area three years before retirement and moved into a small apartment that would condition us to less space, less ‘stuff’, and closer physical proximity to each other. With the house sale proceeds in hand, we then focused on selecting a yacht in which we would make a substantial investment, to give us the quality of life characteristics and sailing enjoyment/performance that were essential to our shared retirement dream. We had two previous sailing boats that gave us some degree of calibration of what we wanted. We looked at many bluewater makes of yachts, within which Oyster became our benchmark reference. We ultimately made the purchase decision on an Oyster 56 more than two years before retirement but with the build/delivery timing set for my retirement date in 2005. We knew that ‘the extras’ that we wanted to build into whatever would be our choice of boat amounted to over £250,000. The decision of an Oyster made that substantial add-on list more warranted given the value/cost of the base model build. Of course, none of the other bluewater yachts that we considered came even close to the base build quality and features inherent in the Oyster. And the Oyster 56 build gave us confidence that the two of us could short-handed manage the boat alone even if, on the odd occasion, we might have the benefit of family or friends as additional crew. >>

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 79


OUR TRAVELS After sailing away from Ipswich at the end of September 2005, we spent

From the Caribbean, we ventured north to Bermuda and cruised the north-east of the USA

the next 3.5 years exploring every corner of the Mediterranean. These

and into Canadian waters right to the beaches on which I grew up and had the pleasure of

early years connected us with the wonderful life in the company of other

reacquainting with friends of old, hosting them for enjoyable times onboard Sea Mist. We

cruisers from all over the world… the most valuable aspect of our life in

returned to the Caribbean via Boston, New York, Nantucket, Martha’s Vineyard, Annapolis

sailing wherein friendships and shared experiences built then will be carried

and the Chesapeake. In early 2010, we headed out across the Pacific where we enjoyed

as treasures for the rest of our days. We were fortunate in our timing as

marvellous, leisurely times over those next few years in the Galapagos Islands, French

we were then able to sail to the Eastern Med and experience many ancient

Polynesia, Cook Islands, Niue, Tonga, New Zealand, Fiji, Vanuatu, Australia, Indonesia,

sites of civilisation in countries which would not be possible in present

Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand.

day. We voyaged from all the oft-travelled southern European countries to the northern limits of Croatian waters and took in Trieste’s Roman

While in Malaysia, we moored Sea Mist at an extremely safe marina and used our home on water

Amphitheatre and then marvelled at what Venice had to offer before then

to venture by air travel into the countries of Asia and South-East Asia. For instance, we would put

heading south and east to Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, Israel, Jordan, Egypt,

together a month long trip to China and then return to Sea Mist to recuperate and assemble the

Tunisia and Morocco. By the end of 2008, we set off across the Atlantic

next air travel adventure to Vietnam for a month and so on. We knew we would not likely ever

from the Canaries, a crossing all on our own, not as part of a rally. This

again have the opportunity to explore this part of the world so we wanted to take full advantage

crossing once again proved to us that our yacht selection was a wise choice

of it while our home’s location was enabling us to live and ‘locally’ travel in this region.

as we averaged 192nm per day arriving in the Caribbean 13.5 days after departure. This passage reminds us of our 210nm per day gull-winged

After years of extensive sailing distances, the years of 2013-2016 had us do very little distance

passage from Vanuatu to Bundaberg, Australia, a distance of 1050nm in

but these times and experiences very much fulfilled our dream of ‘Retirement… The way it

five days without having to even turn on the Perkins propulsion. For sure,

should be!’ …living the rich life enabled through a floating home on the waters of the world.

Sea Mist is known among our cruising friends as a yacht that likes to go

Much of our time in these years followed the pattern we had established early on… living

FAST while being so very comfortable and controllable.

independently, anchored in wonderful bays and off white sand beaches with all the allure and possibilities of hiking, restaurants, provisioning etc. only a short dinghy ride away. And all this in the company of great cruising friends to join together for sundowners, beach bonfires and day trips to other features of these countries. We have been so fortunate to have these past 11 years but it is now past our timeline to return to land and build our next home in Eastern Canada. In some ways it is sad to part with Sea Mist as she has provided such a rewarding retirement to date, but, at the same time, we knew from the outset that the time would come and we would have to move on….even if we have stretched the timeline beyond the ten years that we had initially set as the end date to have Sea Mist sold to new owners to continue the bluewater life.

80 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


A FEW OF OUR BEST MEMORIES Above all else, the cruising friendships we have built and will forever

Mother Nature’s Endowments – the grandeur of New Zealand’s South

cherish and continue those rich connections.

Island; the ‘Sapphire Gin Colour’ in the waters of Hanamoenoa Bay, Tahuata, Marquesas; standing on the precipice of Mount Yasur, watching

Life underwater beyond our greatest expectations – colourful, vibrant,

in awe as the Tanna Islands very active volcano spewed out rocks big and

reefs with every variety of coral and teaming with so many living species

small; the sunsets including several ‘green flashes’ off Dominica; the rich

including the most memorable, close-proximity encounters of swimming

lushness of the Lebanese forests; the cliffs and rock formations of the

with varieties of sharks, most exceptional of all being Fakarava South in the

Marquesas; the orangutans of Borneo; the humpback whales swimming

Tuamotus; snorkelling at 9am each morning with so many manta rays in

next to Sea Mist moored off Niue; the caves of Gibraltar/Bermuda and the

the lagoon anchorage of Mapiti in the Society Islands; trying to alight from

hongs off Thailand’s south coast.

our dinghy without stepping on the abundance of rays covering the bottom at Stingray City off Moorea.

OUR WISHES TO SEA MIST’S NEXT OWNERS Quite simply… for you to enjoy Sea Mist and the life she can enable for you

Swimming – just jumping off the sugar-scoop swim platform as many

a continuance of the richness of what she provided us.

times in a day as wanted to cool off or exercise (or just to do the often needed cleaning of the waterline scum).

A CONTINUANCE OF THE RICHNESS OF WHAT SHE PROVIDED US

We have performed all of the major maintenance before offering her for sale so that you may get on with your life without needing to think of any refit or major work being required. We decided that we were already overdue on our timeline to migrate to life on land and therefore shipped Sea Mist from Phuket, Thailand to Flushing, Netherlands in March/April 2016 so

Peoples/Cultures – the sincere helpfulness of many of the Turks; the

that she would arrive back at home base in Ipswich in perfect condition.

warmth and welcoming of the most friendly Indonesians on the small

Our last sail across the North Sea from Breskens Marina to Ipswich under

islands as they welcomed us into their villages/communities and their

blue sky and warm sun will be remembered as our last final unique

homes; the Bula-Bula greetings of Fijians; the gestures in greetings of the

experience, before encountering the realities of the British ‘spring’ weather.

Thais; the reception of being taken in by a family on Palmerston Atoll as they ‘adopted’ us for our time with them and made us part of their family; the ‘story-telling’ dance performances of the Tahitians; the gaining of each

Oyster 56, Sea Mist is currently under offer through Oyster Brokerage.

Vanuatu Chief’s permission to anchor at any island through offering of kava

To find out further information visit www.oysterbrokerage.com

root at a welcoming reception ceremony; the friendliness of Aussies and their frequent BBQs; being invited to join with the locals at a circumcision ceremony on the Island of Tanna; witnessing the Reconciliation Ceremony of Vanuatians and Samoans on the island of Anelghowhat; shopping in the Souks in the ancient city of Fez, Morocco.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 81


WELCOME TO OYSTER CHARTER Oyster Charter is dedicated to matching client, yacht and crew solely aboard Oyster yachts, for the best of all tailored yacht holidays. Over the years Oyster Charter has organised many superb, bespoke charter holidays. With Oyster yachts spanning from 56 to 125ft (17-38m), we have an impressive fleet to offer the ultimate in flexibility to design the ideal Oyster Charter holiday for you. Whether you wish to cruise the Caribbean with friends, explore the most popular or secluded locations in the Mediterranean or enjoy the stunning east coast of America with your family, we have the right Oyster yacht and crew to meet your needs. Oyster Charter Manager, Molly Marston established Oyster Charter over ten years ago and having served as crew afloat for ten years prior to that, Molly is well-equipped to create the perfect charter for you. Molly will advise on location, boat and most importantly ideal crew for your personal tastes and lifestyle. We operate not just as a broker but with the full support of Oyster Yachts and our famed global customer care. With Oyster Charter you’re not on your own, you’re with the best.

82 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


// CHARTER

TWILIGHT // OYSTER 125 Year Built: 2013 Guests: 8

Summer: Italy, Sicily, Corsica, Sardinia, South of France and Croatia Winter: Caribbean

PENELOPE // OYSTER 100 Year Built: 2012 Guests: 6

Summer: Corsica, Sardinia and South of France Winter: Caribbean

LUSH // OYSTER 885 Year Built: 2012 Guests: 8

DAMA DE NOCHE // OYSTER 82 Summer: n/a Winter: Caribbean

Year Built: 2008 Guests: 6

Summer: Croatia Winter: Caribbean

CONTACT // MOLLY MARSTON T: +1 401 846 7400 M: +1 401 225 1216 E: molly.marston@oysteryachts.com OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 83


BARE NECESSITIES // OYSTER 82 Year Built: 2004 Guests: 6

MAGRATHEA // OYSTER 72 Summer: Palma Mallorca and Balaerics Winter: n/a

KEALOHA 8 // OYSTER 72 Year Built: 2006 Guests: 6

84 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

Summer: Croatia Winter: Caribbean

LUSKENTYRE // OYSTER 72 Summer: Croatia Winter: n/a

OCEAN INDIES II // OYSTER 68 Year Built: 1989 Guests: 6

Year Built: 2009 Guests: 6

Year Built: 2005 Guests: 6

Summer: Italy and Sicily Winter: Caribbean

HURRAH // OYSTER 665 Summer: Greece and Turkey Winter: Caribbean

Year Built: 2008 Guests: 6

Summer: Newport, US East Coast Winter: Caribbean


VAMOS // OYSTER 625 Year Built: 2012 Guests: 4 (6 on request)

DELICIA // OYSTER 625 Summer: n/a Winter: Caribbean

Summer: Newport and Maine, US East Coast Winter: Caribbean

SPIRIT // OYSTER 575 Year Built: 2015 Guests: 4

Summer: Croatia Winter: n/a

TIGER // OYSTER 625

BANDIDO // OYSTER 625 Year Built: 2011 Guests: 4 (6 on request)

Year Built: 2013 Guests: 4 (6 on request)

Year Built: 2013 Guests: 4

Summer: Croatia Winter: n/a

AMANZI // OYSTER 56 Summer: n/a Winter: Caribbean

Year Built: 2009 Guests: 4

Summer: Corsica, Sardinia and South of France Winter: Caribbean

CONTACT // MOLLY MARSTON T: +1 401 846 7400 M: +1 401 225 1216 E: molly.marston@oysteryachts.com OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 85


OYSTER 475 THE IDEAL FAMILY BOAT, OFFERING SPACIOUS AND LUXURIOUS ACCOMMODATION

OYSTER 475: AN OVERVIEW The Oyster 475 is more evolution than revolution. After all, why completely change

DIMENSIONS

something that is already so successful? The 475 has simply improved upon the already

Length Overall (Including Pulpit)

14.81m

other subtle enhancements both in styling and fit-out. With more than 35 Oyster 46

Length of Waterline

12.36m

and 475s sold, we like to think that their owners agree with us.

Beam

4.41m

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

2.16m

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Masthead sloop with fully battened main

to sail - almost certainly ‘best in class’ for righting movement and form stability.

Available Rig Options

In-mast furling, in-boom furling, cutter rig

Her cockpit design calls on lessons learnt from professional ergonomic studies, and

Displacement (Standard Keel)

16,738kg

well-proven Oyster 46 with a lengthened hull giving a larger aft deck, plus a host of

The Oyster 475 is the ideal family boat, using updated build techniques, the latest and most advanced design engineering, we have produced a hull and deck construction which is light, strong and stiff; so out on the water the 475 is a very balanced yacht

her generous deck space includes a large aft area with easy access down to the bathing platform. For the world cruiser, stowage space is a major consideration and the Oyster 475 has an outstanding lazarette, swallowing all that cruising kit.

86 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


SAIL PLAN

475

DECK PLAN

Oyster 475 Interior Layout

475

INTERIOR LAYOUT

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 87

475

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced withoutCopyright written permission. of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, cannotare form of any contract or and offer.may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer. Theseand drawings forpart promotional use only

Oyster 475 Deck Plan Oyster 475 Sail Plan


OYSTER 545 SPARKLING PERFORMANCE IS VITAL… AND SO IS THE SOCIAL SIDE

OYSTER 545: AN OVERVIEW At Oyster we pride ourselves on our past achievements. The original and much revered Oyster 54 was a wonderfully designed and deservedly popular yacht with its many

DIMENSIONS Length Overall (Including Pulpit)

16.43m

Length of Waterline

14.10m

This is precisely why the Oyster 545 is a worthy successor with spirited performance

Beam

4.75m

for those seeking comfort and all-round capabilities for their cruising adventures.

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

2.40m

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Masthead sloop with fully battened main

Available Rig Options

In-mast furling, in-boom furling, cutter rig

Displacement (Standard Keel)

21,315kg

owners, and we also believe in moving forwards, building on our strong heritage.

The 545’s clean hull lines, responsive rig and a low centre of gravity bulb keel have created a fast, stiff, comfortable passage maker, which has regularly proved herself at Oyster regattas. While good performance is important, the 545 offers genuine cruising comfort too, with a generously proportioned cockpit fitted with a hand crafted fixed table. The hull meets the deck via a Superyacht-influenced rollover bulwark, giving a clean contemporary look, which, added to the sleek, curved deck saloon styling, helps create a stunning outboard profile from any angle. The Oyster 545 – a great looking yacht designed to bring you that elusive combination of brilliant performance – in every respect, and in comfort and luxury, both above and below deck.

88 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


545 SAIL PLAN

DECK PLAN

Oyster 545 Interior Layout

545

INTERIOR LAYOUT

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 89

545

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written These drawings are for permission. promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

Oyster 545 Deck Plan

Oyster 545 Sail Plan


OYSTER 575 EXPERIENCE UNSURPASSED IN THIS CLASS OF DECK SALOON CRUISING YACHT

OYSTER 575: AN OVERVIEW Building on the experience of crafting 75 of the Oyster 56 – a benchmark model in the history of Oyster, the successor, Oyster 575 went through a revamp of her interior

DIMENSIONS Length Overall (Including Pulpit)

17.89m

vertical windows. With more than 40 Oyster 575s now sold, the yacht is well on her

Length of Waterline

15.72m

way to endorsing Oyster’s deep understanding of what makes a really good family yacht

Beam

5.00m

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

2.70m

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Semi-fractional sloop with fully battened main

Available Rig Options

In-mast furling, cutter rig, inboom furling, non-overlapping and double headsail rigs

Displacement (Standard Keel)

27,250kg

in 2012 to keep up with the newly launched Oyster 625 and her pioneering ‘Seascape’

between 55-60ft. Learning also from the 625, the chart area is raised to the same level as the rest of the saloon seating, increasing not just the visual sense of space but extending the social area and enabling the chart table to flow seamlessly into the surrounding cabinetry. The en-suite forward guest cabin is socially separated from the rest of the yacht so VIP guests can enjoy the same privacy as the owner in his/her master cabin. Our willingness to say ‘yes’ to owners’ ideas have led to many enhancements, including sculpted headliners, accent-lighting in the saloon, contemporary styling for the heads, upgraded cabin doors and door furniture, and custom saloon aircon outlets. On the practical side, the standard specification includes Formula spars, a Volvo D3 engine and Raymarine i70 sailing instruments. This wonderful yacht is also available in a shoal or centreboard/twin rudder option and with an extended deck and vertical transom.

90 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


SAIL PLAN

575

DECK PLAN

Oyster 575 Interior Layout

575

INTERIOR LAYOUT

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 91

575

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published orThese reproduced without written permission. drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

Oyster 575 Deck Plan Oyster 575 Sail Plan


OYSTER 625 HANDCRAFTED FIT-OUT TO A LUXURIOUS STANDARD USUALLY FOUND ONLY ON MUCH LARGER YACHTS

OYSTER 625: AN OVERVIEW The triple award-winning, innovative Oyster 625 is a superb example of contemporary

The Oyster 625 interior options also include a forepeak arrangement

styling both above and below deck and is designed for comfortable live-aboard, ‘family

for a full-time crew member with berth and heads, should operational

and friends’ easy sailing.

assistance be required, and shoal/centreboard options are available.

Breaking new ground for Oyster in 2010, when she was launched with the spacious

DIMENSIONS

saloon fitted with triple ‘Seascape’ vertical windows, this yacht influenced many of

Length Overall (Including Pulpit)

19.37m

continues to enjoy working with owners as they personalise their Oyster 625 and

Length of Waterline

17.24m

stretch the design opportunities.

Beam

5.44m

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

2.80m

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Semi-fractional sloop with fully battened main

Available Rig Options

In-mast furling, in-boom furling, cutter rig, non-overlapping and double headsail rigs

Displacement (Standard Keel)

33,500kg

the new Oyster models which followed. With more than twenty sold thus far, Oyster

Our open approach to interior design and detailing has produced excitingly different feels to the accommodation – sometimes crisp and very modern, sometimes very dark and classic. The platform is yours to develop, and we love working with your ideas. The sumptuous aft owners’ suite is full beam and has private access to the aft deck. There are two generous guest cabins, each with their own heads and shower, and a fourth cabin that can be configured as a workshop, additional guest cabin or a children’s cabin with linked access from the master cabin.

92 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


SAIL PLAN

DECK PLAN

Oyster 625 Interior Layout

625

INTERIOR LAYOUT

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

625

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 93

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer. Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

Oyster 625 Deck Plan 625

Oyster 625 Sail Plan


OYSTER 675 STYLE, FUNCTION AND PASSIONATE PERFORMANCE

Computer generated images

OYSTER 675: AN OVERVIEW Designed in line with her larger sleek sister, the Oyster 745, the first Oyster 675 is a very personal yacht. Significantly larger in volume than her predecessors – the Oyster 655 and 66 – the 675 allows the owners great scope to build a yacht to suit his or her private needs. Performance means different things to different owners so we have designed in to this flexible hull form the diversity to focus on smooth cruising or regatta results with a carbon rig and hi-tech sails. With two spacious double guest en-suite cabins complementing the full beam master suite and a fourth cabin for crew (with options for en-suite facilities), the Oyster 675 brings together choices to detail the yacht for family, for occasional charter or for long-distance exploring and adventure, with professional help aboard. As with the Oyster 745, there is a choice of rigs, choice of windows and an extended transom version, and with either the swinging centreboard or standard keel, comfortable performance is guaranteed, with reassuring, stable control from twin rudders. She is fast, comfortable and equally suited to long passages or ‘bit between the teeth’ day racing on the Oyster regatta circuit.

94 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

DIMENSIONS Length Overall (Including Stemhead)

21.07m

Length of Waterline

18.16m

Beam

5.65m

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

2.95m

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Semi-fractional sloop with fully battened main

Available Rig Options

In-mast furling, in-boom furling, cutter rig and double-headed rig

Displacement (Standard Keel)

37,500kg


DECK PLAN

Oyster 675 Interior Layout

675

INTERIOR LAYOUT

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 95

675

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published These or reproduced written permission. drawings without are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

Oyster 675 Deck Plan Oyster 675 Sail Plan


OYSTER 745 ELEGANT, POWERFUL AND INDIVIDUAL

OYSTER 745: AN OVERVIEW Denoting a sleek evolution of Oyster’s signature performance bluewater cruising yachts, the Oyster 745 is designed to fit between the ‘family and friends’ Oyster 475–625 and

DIMENSIONS Length Overall (Including Stemhead)

22.74m

Length of Waterline

20.07m

in clean symmetry with a sheerline that points to power and adventure. The first three 745s

Beam

5.91m

are uniquely different – endorsing Oyster’s willingness to customise.

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

3.10m

With a choice of rigs, the sail plan can be optimised for fully-crewed regatta speed or kept

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Semi-fractional sloop with fully battened main

Available Rig Options

In-mast furling, in-boom furling, cutter rig and double-headed rig

Displacement (Standard Keel)

52,600kg

the 825–885 with their separate crew quarters. Replacing the highly successful 72/725, of which an impressive 17 were built, the Oyster 745 introduces a new hull, twin rudder format and brings a sense of the sailing coupé with her distinctive deck saloon, extended

smaller for short-handed sailing; from carbon rigs and fully battened mainsails to cutter and joystick furling for friends and family sailing. The enabler behind this versatility is Oyster’s new twin-rudder hull configuration from naval architect Rob Humphreys; Oyster and Humphreys Yacht Design are the first ever to have so extensively researched and tank tested this arrangement solely for performance cruisers. The extended transom version further increases the practical nature of this latest Oyster design with increased lazarette space for all that essential cruising gear and a magnificent aft deck entertaining space. To suit all international sailing grounds, the Oyster 745 is also available in centreboard, shoal draft or standard keel version.

96 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


SAIL PLAN

DECK PLAN

Oyster 745 Interior Layout

745

INTERIOR LAYOUT

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 97

745

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer. Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

Oyster 745 Deck Plan 745

Oyster 745 Sail Plan


OYSTER 825 REFINED COMBINATION OF OWNER LUXURY AND CREW UTILITY FOR SIX-STAR SERVICE

OYSTER 825: AN OVERVIEW Designed as a very spacious five cabin yacht which can be run with just two crew, this yacht is a stunning example of a ‘small Superyacht’, which can take her owners and up to six guests in to luxurious cruising waters and can also be the entry ticket to some fantastic exclusive Superyacht events in some of the best sailing rendezvous in the world. With seven now sold and many wonderful stories to be recounted by their owners, this yacht is set to outperform her successor, the Oyster 82, of which 17 were built. Featuring Oyster’s latest striking contemporary styling, the Oyster 825 is available with a spacious lower saloon or with a raised saloon providing wonderful views out through the above-deck saloon windows. Optimising layout for guest privacy, she has a spacious three-cabin plan in the aft section, with expansive full beam master suite and mirrored guest suites either side of the central corridor, this way enabling, if required, dedicated, separate quarters and working area forward of the saloon for the professional crew to provide a ‘six-star’ service for the owner and guests. An option is just two crew and a fourth guest cabin. A powerful yacht, the Oyster 825 will easily eat up to 250 miles per day on long passages without drawing breath and without disturbing you snuggled up with your favourite book.

98 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

DIMENSIONS Length Overall (Including Stemhead)

25.15m

Length of Waterline

21.97m

Beam

6.31m

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

3.42m

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Semi-fractional sloop with fully battened main

Available Rig Options

In-mast furling, in-boom furling, cutter rig and double-headed rig

Displacement (Standard Keel)

56,000kg


825DS SAIL PLAN

Oyster 825DS Deck Plan

Oyster 825DS Interior Layout

DECK PLAN

825DS

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

Oyster 825DS Sail Plan

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 99


OYSTER 885 DESIGNED FOR SAILING THE WORLD’S OCEANS IN GLORIOUS COMFORT

OYSTER 885: AN OVERVIEW The Oyster 885 is the perfect solution for those who wish to share the unmatched pleasure of

broad stern also delivers a high level of form stability and off-wind

cruising aboard such magnificent yachts with the potential to recover some of the investment

potential, helping rattle away the miles in any trade wind passage, her

involved by chartering. Oyster 885-01 took part in the first Oyster World Rally – 30,000 miles

twin rudder configuration tracking true. For slick manoeuvring in

in the first 18 months following launch. So successful and reliable have these yachts been that

harbour she is fitted with both stern and bow thrusters. Detailing

885-02 has just decided to take part in the second Oyster World Rally starting in January 2017.

as always is individual and the Oyster Yachts’ custom team in Southampton will build a very personal yacht for each client.

Designed by Humphreys Yacht Design and the Oyster Design team to the limit of the MCA 24m load line length watershed, the Oyster 885 provides room for six to ten guests in four luxurious cabins and has a separated crew area forward, from which a quiet and high quality of

DIMENSIONS Length Overall (Including Stemhead)

27.08m

Length of Waterline

24.18m

Beam

6.33m

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

3.50m

extended by a large hydraulic bathing platform.

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Semi-fractional sloop with fully battened main

The hull of the Oyster 885 is balanced and powerful, and the fairly fine entry comfortably

Available Rig Options

In-mast furling, in-boom furling, cutter rig and double-headed rig

Displacement (Standard Keel)

71,500kg

service can be delivered comfortably and efficiently away from your guests. With two different deck moulds and three different approaches to the engine room layout, the seven Oyster 885s built to date have really proven Oyster’s willingness to customise and build very personal yachts. Among the 885’s many attractions are her huge, ergonomically-designed, split cockpit – perfect for al fresco dining and relaxation on passage – and her spacious, open deck areas,

cleaves through a seaway, maintaining excellent VMG (velocity made good), while a relatively

100 / OYSTER ISSUE 78


Oyster 885 Saloon Options

Oyster 885DS Deck Plan Oyster 885DS Sail Plan

885DS SAIL PLAN

DECK PLAN

885DS

INTERIOR LAYOUT

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

885DS

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 101

These drawings for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer. Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced withoutare written permission. These drawings are for promotional use only and may show optional equipment. They are subject to change without notice, and cannot form part of any contract or offer.

Copyright of these drawings is the property of Oyster Marine Ltd and they may not be published or reproduced without written permission.

Oyster 885DS Interior Layout

Raised Saloon Deck Saloon Lower Saloon


OYSTER 118 INTRODUCING THE NEW FLAGSHIP FROM THE OYSTER/HUMPHREYS YACHT DESIGN PARTNERSHIP

Computer generated images

OYSTER 118: AN OVERVIEW A true Superyacht at nearly 123ft overall including the bowsprit, the Oyster 118 offers its owner a truly global adventure. Built to DNV-GL classification standards and compliant with the MCA LY3 ‘Large Yacht Code’, Oyster has developed this design to offer each owner the opportunity to significantly customise his or her yacht, whilst retaining the benefits of a low maintenance gel coat finish from a ‘female mould tool’. Approaching the design in three principal areas: the accommodation aft, the guest and crew options forward and the expansive saloon space – many permutations are possible. Options allow for a huge master suite aft supported by two-three guest cabins or up to five guest cabins and a smaller master suite. One thing is for certain – the six crew layout will provide a wonderful environment for the owner and guests – whether that is six crew supporting 10-14 guests or perhaps six just looking after the owner and partner in unbridled luxury.

102 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

DIMENSIONS Length Overall (Including Bowsprit)

37.45m

Length of Waterline

32.90m

Beam

8.35m

Draft HPB Keel (Standard)

4.00m

Standard Rig and Spar Type

Semi-fractional sloop with fully battened in-boom furling main

Available Rig Options

Roller reefing staysail

Displacement - HPB Keel (Light Ship Trim)

155 tonnes


Oyster 118 Interior Layout - As Fitted to 118-01

Oyster 118 Interior Layout - Example 1 (Owners’ Suite and 3 Guest Cabins)

Oyster 118 Interior Layout - Example 2 (Owners’ Suite and 4 Guest Cabins)

Oyster 118 Deck Plan

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 103


TOTAL

E MOT I ON .

COM P L E T E

CO NTROL.

The Aston Martin V8 Vantage sits alone as a high-performance sports car of truly iconic status. Combining an instantly recognisable compact sporting design with exceptional technology, the V8 Vantage embodies all that is great about Aston Martin. Total emotion. Complete control.

W W W.AS TO NMART IN.COM Official government fuel consumption figures in litres/100km (mpg) for the Aston Martin V8 Vantage range: urban 19.6-19.0 (14.9-14.4); extra urban 10.4-9.2 (27.2-30.7); combined 13.8-12.8 (22.1-2.5). C02 emissions 321-296.The mpg/fuel economxy figures quoted are sourced from official regulated test results obtained through laboratory testing. They are for comparability purposes only and may not reflect your real driving experience, which may vary depending on factors including road conditions, weather, vehicle load and driving style.


OYSTER BROKERAGE

LOOKING TO BUY OR SELL? If you are looking to buy or sell a pre-owned Oyster, look no further. The vast majority of pre-owned Oysters that are sold each year come through Oyster Brokerage. We enjoy unparalleled access to the Oyster designers, project managers, production facilities and the original build files for almost every Oyster yacht launched. Our experienced team of brokers will be delighted to share their knowledge, ensuring that you receive friendly and professional guidance throughout the sale or purchase process. Established in 1984, Oyster Brokerage provides a truly international service, with offices in Palma, Ipswich and Newport. All three offer a permanent, year-round boat show of pre-owned Oysters available for viewing at any convenient time. Our brokers are also present at most of the key international boat shows. Brief details of all our listings, along with model profiles and upcoming events can be seen at www.oysterbrokerage.com with full specifications for any of our listed yachts available on request. Whether you are close to making a decision on your next yacht, or if you are at the very beginning of the planning stage, please feel free to get in touch with us to discuss your requirements.

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 105


UNDER OFFER

OYSTER 100 - 885 2012 OYSTER 100 // PENELOPE Launched 2013, magnificent as-new Oyster Superyacht, with three luxurious guest staterooms. Upper saloon with panoramic views, and more intimate lower saloon. Double header rig with in-boom furling gives powerful performance under sail. Lying: Oyster Palma

£6,000,000 VAT paid

2012 OYSTER 885 // LUSH A regular on the regatta circuit with her magnificent grey hull and black carbon spars, Lush is always ‘raring to go’.   Take this superb opportunity to acquire a tried and tested 885 without the long lead time. Lying: South of France

106 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

£4,950,000 ex VAT


OYSTER 82

2012 OYSTER 82 // OOFLEDUST The last 82 to be built, featuring the extended counter stern giving a vast aft deck. Luxurious accommodation for six guests and up to four crew with beautiful cherry wood interior and warm beige leather upholstery. Successful charter record. Lying: Oyster Palma

UK, IPSWICH T: +44 23 8083 1011 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

£2,400,000 ex VAT

USA, NEWPORT T: +1 401 846 7400 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

SPAIN, PALMA T: +34 971 287 474 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

www.oysterbrokerage.com

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 107


OYSTER 82 - 725

2007 OYSTER 82 // RAVENOUS II Lively performance rig for the racecourse, shallow draft for exploring, thirteen berths for a large cruising family. Built in gorgeous light maple for an American yachtsman as flagship of the Oyster Charter fleet. No expense was spared. Lying: Newport, Rhode Island

US $2,995,000 ex VAT

2005 OYSTER 82 // PANDEMONIUM New to the market and fresh from an extensive Oyster supervised refit: shoal draft with signature 82 raised saloon. Push button sailing, palatial owner’s head with full bathtub and bidet give a true Superyacht ambience. Professionally crewed and ready for charter. Lying: Greece

US $2,750,000 ex VAT

2006 OYSTER 82 // TILLY MINT

2011 OYSTER 725 // SPIRIT OF PHANTOM

Superbly presented and extremely well maintained. Tilly Mint is ideal for luxurious family cruising or chartering. Very attractively priced and ready to sail. Viewing highly recommended.

Professionally maintained with stunning lines and a superb accommodation plan, she makes a perfect solution for pleasurable cruising, with charter potential. Powerful performer, fully battened main and ten berths in four cabins.

Lying: West Med

Cruising Mediterranean Summer 2016

108 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

£1,750,000 VAT paid

€3,500,000 ex VAT


NEW LISTING

OYSTER 72 - 66

2010 OYSTER 72 // ALBERTONE3 Stylish 72 which has been used for family sailing in the Mediterranean. In her original ownership, and easy to sail with in-mast furling and cutter rig, she has cherry joinery below decks where she sleeps up to ten in five cabins. She presents beautifully and is for sale as the owner is purchasing a larger Oyster. Lying: Oyster Palma

£1,650,000 ex VAT

2006 OYSTER 72 // KEALOHA 8 Elegant 72 with cutter rig and hydraulic in-mast furling. Sumptuous interior finished in teak with contrasting cream upholstery giving a contemporary feel below the sleek deck saloon. Fully equipped for use as a family or charter yacht. Lying: Oyster Palma

£1,490,000 ex VAT

2000 OYSTER 66 // ANNACAY A mini Superyacht with superb upper and lower saloons. Hydraulic furling to her mainsail and headsails gives push button sailing. Ten berths in five cabins, all finished in hand-crafted light oak. Lying: East Med

UK, IPSWICH T: +44 23 8083 1011 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

£975,000 VAT paid

USA, NEWPORT T: +1 401 846 7400 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

SPAIN, PALMA T: +34 971 287 474 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

www.oysterbrokerage.com

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 109


OYSTER 66 - 655

UNDER OFFER

NEW LISTING

2000 OYSTER 66 // GOODWINDS

2005 OYSTER 66 // VALENTINE

Superbly maintained and ready to set sail. Below deck she has a magnificent raised saloon and sleeps ten in five cabins, all finished in teak. Hydraulic furling to the main and headsails. Owner has bought larger, so offers are encouraged.

Last Oyster 66 built. Ocean-ready cutter rig offers effortless push-button sailing with in-mast furling hydraulic main and furling headsails. Fully equipped for extended voyaging with all creature comforts. Recently proven circumnavigator and ready to go again.

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: Newport, Rhode Island

£750,000 VAT paid

$1,245,000 ex VAT

REDUCED PRICE

2008 OYSTER 655 // MATAWAI Impeccably maintained and presented in A+ condition, outfitted with cutting edge communications upgrades and more. Price just reduced and lying in Newport, Rhode Island to be sold. Perfect gentleman’s Bermuda racer. Lying: Newport, Rhode Island

US $1,900,000 ex VAT

2008 OYSTER 655 // ROCAS

2008 OYSTER 655 // PROTEUS

Powerfully rigged with fully battened mainsail, black carbon mast and V-boom. Superb teak interior joinery with ivory leather upholstery give a luxurious feel, she sleeps nine in four cabins. Comprehensively equipped and returning to the UK to be sold.

One of the most luxuriously appointed Oysters ever built, she has custom Harken deck gear and carbon spars by Hall. Shoal keel reduces draft to 7’3”. Not for sale or charter to US citizens or residents while in US waters.

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: Newport, Rhode Island

110 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

£1,350,000 ex VAT

US $1,900,000 ex VAT


2014 OYSTER 625 // ALPHA EDEN ISLAND

Originally specified for high latitudes and long distance cruising, Gundamain has been impeccably maintained, and shows exceedingly well both above and below decks. Cutter rig with slab reefing mainsail. Cherry joinery gives a luxurious feel to the accommodation.

Almost new 625 with very few miles under her keel. Unique custom layout offering three en-suite double cabins in addition to the owners’ luxurious double stateroom. An extra twin cabin forward gives a total of ten berths.

Lying: Oyster Palma

Lying: Oyster Palma

£1,275,000 ex VAT

£1,750,000 ex VAT

NEW LISTING

2013 OYSTER 625 // DELICIA Great opportunity to purchase a late example of the award-winning Oyster 625, Delicia – a superb family cruising yacht with a successful charter record. An Oyster Regatta Concours d’Elégance winner in 2016, Delicia is in superb condition and is very well equipped. Available to view in Palma September 2016. Lying: Oyster Palma

£1,495,000 ex VAT

REDUCED PRICE

2011 OYSTER 625 // BANDIDO

2011 OYSTER 625 // BLUE JEANNIE

Featuring a stunning light maple interior for a fresh and contemporary feel. Maintained in Bristol fashion and lightly used, Bandido presents ‘as new’. Professionally crewed and charter-ready.

A stunning yacht with maple joinery and triple ‘Seascape’ windows in the saloon. Simple sloop rig with furling mainsail and genoa. Ten berths in five cabins, enabling private or charter use. Owner has his eye on his next Oyster.

Lying: Newport, Rhode Island

Lying: Oyster Palma

UK, IPSWICH T: +44 23 8083 1011 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

US $1,900,000 ex VAT

USA, NEWPORT T: +1 401 846 7400 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

SPAIN, PALMA T: +34 971 287 474 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

£1,330,000 ex VAT

www.oysterbrokerage.com

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 111

OYSTER 655 - 625

2009 OYSTER 655 // GUNDAMAIN


OYSTER 62 - 56

2007 OYSTER 62 // GALLOPER OF HAMBURG

2001 OYSTER 62 // PEARLFISHER

2008 OYSTER 62 // UHURU OF LYMINGTON

Built in 2007 and very lightly used, this boat presents very well. Beautiful maple interior and very highly specified, push button sailing. Skipper-maintained from new and never chartered. Maintained regardless of cost.

ARC Class winner and powerful performer with taller carbon rig and fully battened mainsail, she is a capable and comfortable cruiser, visiting some of the most inaccessible places on earth. Superbly maintained.

A striking 62 with dark blue hull and g5 deck saloon. All furling cutter rig, teak joinery, and eight berths in four cabins, three of which are doubles. Fully equipped for high latitudes and warmer cruising. Recent refit.

Lying: West Med

Lying: UK South Coast

Lying: UK South Coast

£1,250,000 VAT paid

£1,195,000 VAT paid

£995,000 ex VAT

1998 OYSTER 61 // MODUS VIVENDI

1996 OYSTER 61 // SYDNEY ROCK OYSTER

2010 OYSTER 575 // BOARDING PASS III

Beautiful 61 with a superb custom layout, with vast Owners’ Stateroom forward, as well as sumptuous guest accommodation. The electronics package has been upgraded and a bow thruster has recently been added.

Fast, sleek and elegant, Sydney Rock Oyster is also easy to handle with hydraulic furling to her mainsail, genoa and staysail. Eight berths in four cabins, three of which are doubles. Superb interior joinery in crown cut oak.

Easy to handle with sloop rig and push-button hydraulic furling to the mainsail and genoa. Oak joinery below decks gives a spacious feel, where she sleeps eight in four cabins. Owner has ordered a larger Oyster.

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: Oyster UK

£450,000 VAT paid

£445,000 VAT paid

£850,000 ex VAT

NEW LISTING

2015 OYSTER 575 // ISABEL OF SOUTHPORT

2011 OYSTER 575 // CLOUD 9

2003 OYSTER 56 // RAGAMUFFIN

Originally specified for the Oyster World Rally 20172019, with oak joinery, she sleeps up to eight in four cabins. All hydraulic push button furling cutter rig. Super shoal version with lifting keel, which reduces the draft to just 1.65m. As new.

Highly specified, with £300K of optional equipment. The 575 is the perfect size for ocean sailing and live-aboard use, whilst easy to handle. Meticulously maintained, she is perfect for someone looking for a 575 without the long lead times.

Commissioned in 2004 / Oyster UK all encompassing refit in 2013 which included a new teak deck, new rigging and new sails. Loved and upgraded by one owner, Ragamuffin has some clever additions to the standard model. Recommended viewing.

Lying: Oyster Palma

Lying: Oyster Palma

Lying: Oyster Palma

112 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

£1,325,000 VAT paid

£995,000 ex VAT

£550,000 ex VAT


2008 OYSTER 56 // POWER OF TWO

2009 OYSTER 56 // TARA

Pedigree example. One of the last 56s built and the newest on the market. Lightly used and fit-out with elegant cherry joinery and many other thoughtful upgrades. Professionally maintained, turnkey and ocean-ready.

Young and lightly used 56 with a stunning maple interior. Electric in-mast and electric sail handling systems effortlessly enable shorthanded sailing. Well equipped and presented in excellent condition.

Superb late model 56 with performance enhancing fully battened mainsail and cutter rig. Beautiful blue hull and hand-crafted teak joinery make for a stunning yacht. She sleeps eight in four cabins. Owner has larger Oyster in build.

Lying: Newport, Rhode Island

Lying: Newport, Rhode Island

Lying: Oyster Palma

US $1,085,000 ex VAT

US $875,000 ex VAT

£595,000 ex VAT

2007 OYSTER 56 // AMANZI

2009 OYSTER 56 // DUCHESS

2004 OYSTER 56 // DREAMS COME TRUE

One of the last 56s to be launched, Amanzi is particularly appealing to the enthusiastic yachtsman thanks to her cutter rig and fully battened mainsail, which offers exhilarating sailing performance. Set up for world cruising, she has been skipper maintained from launch.

Late model 56, which presents in first class condition. Eight berths in four cabins, with light oak joinery and an impressive specification. Commissioned with a circumnavigation in mind and only for sale as the owner has a new larger Oyster.

A proven circumnavigator, with cutter rig and enhanced sailing performance due to her fully battened mainsail. She has been very well maintained, and presents beautifully. Below decks she has four cabins accommodating seven people and is finished in teak.

Lying: Caribbean

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: Oyster UK

£595,000 VAT paid

£585,000 ex VAT

UNDER OFFER

£550,000 VAT paid

UNDER OFFER

2005 OYSTER 56 // SEA MIST

2004 OYSTER 56 // SHAYA MOYA

2006 OYSTER 56 // SARABI

Sea Mist is a superb yacht, fresh from a comprehensive refit, she is brought to market in ready to go condition. Excellent specification, includes all new sails, new canvas, repainted mast and spars, beautiful interior, a true bluewater yacht.

A circumnavigator still in her original ownership. Cutter rig with hydraulic, push button furling. She sleeps six in three cabins and has a practical workshop/utility cabin. Maple joinery gives a light and airy feel.

Multiple Concours d’Elégance winner, and well specified for comfortable family sailing with all furling rig and comprehensive specification. Light and airy below decks with maple joinery and eight berths in four cabins.

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: East Med

Lying: Oyster UK

UK, IPSWICH T: +44 23 8083 1011 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

£525,000 ex VAT

USA, NEWPORT T: +1 401 846 7400 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

£525,000 VAT paid

SPAIN, PALMA T: +34 971 287 474 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

£522,500 ex VAT

www.oysterbrokerage.com

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 113

OYSTER 56

2010 OYSTER 56 // CHAMPLAIN


OYSTER 56 - 53

2003 OYSTER 56 // MOANA

2002 OYSTER 56 // WASABI

2000 OYSTER 56 // OLANTA

Highly specified 56, with taller carbon mast and customised interior layout that sleeps five in three cabins. Larger than standard Owners’ Stateroom, and huge sail locker forward are among the practical features that lend her to luxurious ocean sailing.

Wasabi is the ideal long distance live-aboard cruising boat. She is superbly equipped, and features extra additions such as wind generators and solar panels. Owned by a very experienced sailor, Wasabi shows beautifully and is now ready for her next adventures.

Hull number 14 of Oyster’s most successful Oyster 56 model, Olanta was designed with practical, ocean sailing in mind. She has a unique layout with six comfortable sea berths in three cabins - ideal for a family and extensive cruising.

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Lying: Oyster Palma

£499,000 ex VAT

US $579,000 ex VAT

£350,000 VAT paid

NEW LISTING

1986 OYSTER 55 // ICENIC

2010 OYSTER 54 // SARA BLUE V

2008 OYSTER 54 // PLAN SEA

Icenic is a great example of the Oyster 55, with many recent upgrades of her electrical and mechanical systems. She is ready to tackle the next Oyster World Rally, or cruise gently around the Mediterranean.

Highly specified and stunning 54 with sloop rig with electric in-mast furling for easy push button sailing. Well maintained since launch with luxurious cherry joinery below decks. Currently being prepared for the season by Oyster Palma, she’ll be ready to sail away soon.

Attractive blue hulled 54, with easily handled sloop rig featuring electric in-mast furling. New sails and many upgrades. Accommodation is finished in oak, with three cabins sleeping six. Ready to go following a full winter service programme.

Lying: West Med

Lying: Oyster Palma

Lying: Oyster UK

£195,000 VAT paid

£625,000 ex VAT

NEW LISTING

£585,000 VAT paid

NEW LISTING

2012 OYSTER 54 // NIKITOO II

2003 OYSTER 53 // JANUS OF LONDON

2004 OYSTER 53 // CRACKERJACK

Second in Class Oyster Regatta winner with inmast furling, Nikitoo II is in super condition after extensive family cruising on the Med/Caribbean circuit. New set of sails in 2015. Only for sale as owner is soon splashing his new Oyster.

A beautiful example of the popular Oyster 53. One owner from new, she represents a great opportunity. Cutter rigged with electric mainsail furling. Six berths in three cabins, with an additional single cabin/workshop.

Very well equipped and maintained family cruiser, updated and recently shipped back from the Caribbean to the Mediterranean. Sleeps seven in four cabins, beautiful teak interior. Equipment includes generator, air conditioning, water maker, davits and much more.

Lying: Oyster Palma

Lying: Oyster Palma

Lying: Genoa, Italy

114 / OYSTER ISSUE 78

£630,000 VAT paid

£395,000 ex VAT

€490,000 VAT paid


NEW LISTING

1989 OYSTER HP53 // OREGON NATIVE

2002 OYSTER 49 // JAM

Jarina is a very well specified bluewater cruiser, ready to explore the worlds oceans and anchorages. Her layout comprises six berths in three cabins, with ample storage and an electric furling rig.

The Oyster HP53 is a truly fantastic long distance bluewater cruiser, capable of cruising at 8+ knots with just a minimum number of crew. Realistically priced and conveniently located afloat in Newport, Rhode Island.

A first class family cruising yacht with a double headed, all furling rig which lends itself to easy short handed sailing. With timeless interior joinery in teak, she sleeps six in three cabins. A capable and tough bluewater cruiser.

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: Newport, Rhode Island

Lying: En-route Oyster UK

£385,000 ex VAT

US $265,000 ex VAT

Price TBA

NEW LISTING

1992 OYSTER HP49PH // RELENTLESS

2000 OYSTER 485 // FREQUENT FLYER

1990 OYSTER 48 LIGHTWAVE // OYSTER AZUL

A rare ‘Sovereign Edition’ Oyster 49 Pilot House, designed by Holman & Pye. Relentless is a well cared for, much loved family cruising yacht that has sailed back and forth between New England and the Caribbean since 2009.

The 485 is a classic Holman & Pye Oyster, an elegant and comfortable cruising yacht. Easy to sail short handed with in-mast furling sloop rig. She is highly specified and has oak interior joinery, sleeping six in three cabins.

Fast performance cruiser with brand new top side paint in light blue. Oyster Azul can accommodate six in three cabins and is furnished with teak joinery. Her in-mast furling rig enables short-handed sailing.

Lying: Newburyport, MA

Lying: Isle of Man

Lying: Portugal

US $295,000 ex VAT

£240,000 VAT paid

£100,000 VAT paid

UNDER OFFER

2002 OYSTER 47 // ESCAPADE OF LONDON

2006 OYSTER 46 // SOLWAY MIST

A beautiful example of the Oyster 47. Extremely well maintained with new sails, new canvas work and lots of additional extras. Lovely light oak interior joinery, she sleeps six in three cabins. Easy in-mast furling rig.

One of the most highly specified Oyster 46s ever built. Dark blue hull, hand crafted teak interior joinery and a fully battened push button rig. Regularly updated and maintained to the most exacting standards.

Lying: Oyster UK

Lying: Oyster Palma

UK, IPSWICH T: +44 23 8083 1011 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

£249,950 VAT paid

USA, NEWPORT T: +1 401 846 7400 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

SPAIN, PALMA T: +34 971 287 474 brokerage@oysteryachts.com

£390,000 VAT paid

www.oysterbrokerage.com

OYSTER ISSUE 78 / 115

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Rethink Convention.


If your Oyster is your world,

GBR16160

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let Pantaenius protect it.

Germany · Great Britain* · Monaco · Denmark · Austria · Spain · Sweden · USA** · Australia pantaenius.com *Pantaenius UK Limited is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (Authorised No.308688) **Pantaenius America Ltd. is a licensed insurance agent licensed in all 50 states. It is an independent corporation incorporated under the laws of New York and is a separate and distinct entity from any entity of the Pantaenius Group.


OUR REGATTA PARTNERS We are grateful to our regatta partners for the ongoing support that they provide, enabling us to create memorable events for our owners.

Established over 50 years ago in the UK, Dolphin Sails has been creating bespoke quality sails and canvas work ever since.

Leading sailboat and powerboat hardware supplier for the leisure marine industry.

For 40 years Pantaenius has been providing optimal coverage for your yacht, your assets and your paid crew.

Matthew Vincent T: +44 1255 243 366 E: sails@dolphin-sails.com www.dolphinsails.com

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International yacht consultants specialising in global yacht management and services.

The world’s leading manufacturer of recreational marine electronics.

Declan O’Sullivan T: +44 1624 819 867 E: dos@pelagosyachts.com www.pelagosyachts.com

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// CONTACT US

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OYSTER YACHTS // NEWPORT Will White T: +1 401 846 7400 E: newport@oysteryachts.com OYSTER YACHTS // PALMA Mark Durham T: +34 971 287 474 E: palma@oysteryachts.com OYSTER YACHTS // SOUTHAMPTON Steve Colley T: +44 23 8033 5266 E: southampton@oysteryachts.com

OYSTER REPRESENTATIVES OYSTER YACHTS // AUSTRALIA Michael Bell T: + 61 414 259 688 E: michael.bell@oysteryachts.com OYSTER YACHTS // RUSSIA Oscar Konyukhov T: +7 925 771 29 91 E: oscar.konyukhov@oysteryachts.com

AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA

Molly Marston T: +1 401 846 7400 E: charter@oysteryachts.com www.oystercharter.com

UK: T: +44 23 8083 1011 PALMA: T: +34 971 287 474 USA: T: +1 401 846 7400 E: brokerage@oysteryachts.com www.oysterbrokerage.com


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Oyster Magazine 2016 // Issue78