2021 Owen Sound City Budget Book

Page 1


taBle of contents Transparency & Accountability

3

Mayor's Message

4

City Councillors

5

City of Owen Sound Organizational Structure

6-7

City Manager's Message

8

Owen Sound by the Numbers

9

Budget at a Glance

11

Where Are My Taxes Going?

12

2021 Property Tax Impact

13

Whats Funds the Operating Budget

14

Operating Budget Expenses & Revenues

15

Service Structure of the City of Owen Sound

16

Investment in City Services & Infrastructure

17

What Funds the Capital Budget?

18

Capital Budget Breakdown

19

Capital Budget Mapped Projects

20

Operating Overview (Book)

21-36

Capital Overview (Book)

37-68

2

APPENDICES INCLUDED FOR FURTHER DETAILS: Appendix A - Operating Budget Details Appendix B - Business Cases Appendix C - Fleet Replacement Schedule Appendix D - Roads & Road Resurfacing Projects Appendix E - City Facilities Projects Appendix F - Downtown Improvement Projects Appendix G - Invest-Renew-Manage Projects


transparencY & accoUntaBilitY One of the main purposes of this Budget Book is to help Council, citizens and other stakeholders understand how the City’s revenues and other sources of funds are allocated to programs, services, infrastructure building and maintenance, and reserves that help ensure the long-term financial sustainability of the City. The Operating Budget supports the Capital Budget and ensures the City’s core services provision and customer service are of the highest priority and quality. To help maintain transparency and accountability in regards to the City of Owen Sound’s annual budget, detailed budget reports, financial statements, tax rates, financial informations returns and more can be found on our website at:

oWensoUnD.ca/BUDGet

or

oWensoUnD.ca/taX

3


MaYor's MessaGe I am pleased to present to you the 2021 City of Owen Sound Budget. This has been an unprecedented and challenging year as we continue to work through COVID-19. The 2021 Budget has been prepared under Council direction to achieve a fiscally responsible budget, as we continue to face levels of uncertainty impacting the health and wellbeing of our residents, and increasing demand for the services the City and other levels of government provide. This budget supports our community through the current pandemic and continues to strengthen our City for future growth, connectivity, and fiscal sustainability. It also ensures that the City’s strong financial position is maintained and our residents and business owners continue to receive the programs and high-level services they value. On behalf of members of Council, I would like to extend a sincere thank you to staff for all of their hard work during this process which began in June 2020. Staff was engaged to bring their ideas on the budget, in particular how we can do things differently. It was this collaboration that has resulted in a budget that will move the City of Owen Sound forward toward the accomplishment of our vision of where you want to live and our mission of strengthening our community through sound leadership. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me, any member of Council or Senior Leadership Team! Visit www.owensound.ca to find our contact information. Regards,

Ian Boddy Mayor of the City of Owen Sound

4


citY coUncillors

DEPUTY MAYOR BRIAN O’LEARY

COUNCILLOR TRAVIS DODD

COUNCILLOR SCOTT GREIG

COUNCILLOR BROCK HAMLEY

boleary@owensound.ca

tdodd@owensound.ca

sgreig@owensound.ca

bhamley@owensound.ca

COUNCILLOR MARION KOEPKE

COUNCILLOR CAROL MERTON

COUNCILLOR JOHN A. TAMMING

COUNCILLOR RICHARD THOMAS

mkoepke@owensound.ca

cmerton@owensound.ca

jtamming@owensound.ca

rjthomas@owensound.ca

5


corporation of the citY of oWen soUnD

citY coUncil

CITY MANAGER TIM SIMMONDS

CORPORATE SERVICES

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIRECTOR PAM COULTER

DIRECTOR KATE ALLAN

ACCOUNTING

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

BUILDING

PROPERTY & FACILITIES

REVENUE

CLERKS & BY-LAW

PARKS & OPEN SPACE

PLANNING & HERITAGE

PURCHASING, RISK & ASSET MANAGEMENT

HUMAN RESOURCES

6

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & MARKETING


POLICE SERVICES

NORTH GREY UNION PUBLIC LIBRARY

CHIEF CRAIG AMBROSE

CEO & CHIEF LIBRARIAN TIM NICHOLLS HARRISON

PUBLIC WORKS & ENGINEERING DIRECTOR DENNIS KEFALAS

ENGINEERING

ROADS & WINTER MAINTENANCE

STORMWATER

WATER & WASTEWATER

WASTE MANAGEMENT

TRANSPORTATION

FIRE & EMERGENCY SERVICES

TOM THOMSON ART GALLERY

CHIEF DOUG BARFOOT

DIRECTOR & CHIEF CURATOR AIDAN WARE

7


citY ManaGer's MessaGe The year 2020 has been a difficult one worldwide, in our province, and in our City. The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have been far-reaching and have touched every person who lives in, does business in, or works in Owen Sound. We have taken a conservative and flexible approach to build the 2021 Budget. In recognition of the financial challenges faced by residents and businesses due to the pandemic, City Council directed staff to prepare a 2021 Budget with options for a property tax increase of no more than three per cent, dedicating one per cent to capital. A three per cent increase assumes regular operations, including additional operating costs due to the pandemic, addresses critical risks and service gaps, and covers the City’s annual inflationary fixed cost increases. The combined 2021 Operating and Capital Budget for Council consideration is $51.9 million. Given the City has restarted most of its public services and reopened most facilities, we will need to continue to manage costs closely. With my great appreciation to the many City staff members who helped develop this budget, I submit to the City Council and Owen Sound Community the Fiscal Year (FY) 2021 Budget. The objective used in creating this budget was to do the best job possible to maintain current excellent service levels and implement the Council’s dedication to Capital infrastructure. I would also be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge the tremendous dedication and support of Kate Allan, Director of Corporate Services and City Treasurer and the City’s Senior Leadership Team. They focus on the big picture and look beyond their department’s boundaries to contribute to problem-solving and improve programs and services critical to our community’s quality of life. Finally, I want to thank the City Council for its commitment to the community.

Tim Simmonds Owen Sound City Manager

8


OWEN SOUND BY THE NUMBERS 24/7 210,000

Winter maintenance Public Works staff operate

unique visitors to the City’s

to clear snow & ensure public safety

of roadway to maintain in Owen Sound

209,864

500,000

10 SECONDS

page views

in-person Library visits in 2019, total materials borrowed was

phone calls to the City in the past 12 months; average wait time to speak to a staff member is

website in 2020, with over

282 KM

64,000

1.4 MILLION + 192,756

square metres of outdoor recreation space in the City

regular service passenger trips on City buses in 2019

317,436

new business licences issued in 2020, plus

111 KM 22,000

33

of stormwater drainage in Owen Sound

13

changes in ownership or location of existing local businesses

total visitors to the Tom Thomson Art Gallery in 2019

204 BUILDING 17,520

permits issued in 2020, with a construction value of

$66,430,163

total social media followers on the City’s Instagram & Facebook pages

44

new trees planted in 2020 throughout Owen Sound. These trees are considered mature and not saplings.

160 KM

of maintained trails throughout the City


the scenic citY Protected by the Niagara Escarpment, Owen Sound is a beautiful, green city home to cultural riches. With a residential population of 22,000 and a daytime population of 40,000 people, the City of Owen Sound continues to be the urban heart of Grey County and a welcoming community to raise a family, start a business, or just enjoy an unrivalled quality of life.

10


BUDGet at a Glance The City of Owen Sound’s 2021 Budget represents a public investment of $51.9 million to provide infrastructure and daily services to its residents and visitors, while advancing Council’s priorities and long-term objectives.

$51.9 MILLION (GROSS)

INVESTED IN CITY SERVICES & INFRASTRUCTURE

$39.0

$12.9

MILLION (GROSS)

MILLION (GROSS)

2021 OPERATING BUDGET

2021 CAPITAL BUDGET

$31.7

MILLION (GROSS)

2021 NET TAX LEVY 11


Where are MY taX Dollars GoinG? GREY COUNTY 19%

CITY OF OWEN SOUND - 72% The City’s portion of residential taxes financially supports all City-provided services and infrastructure. In 2021, the average tax bill will dedicate $2,814 to the City.

SCHOOL BOARD 9% 12


2021 propertY taX iMpact • Total municipal tax levy increase is estimated at 2.76%

2.76%

• Factoring in growth figures reduces the increase on City tax payers to 1.98% • Bringing in the County (2.13%) and Education (0.0%) estimates a total tax bill increase of 1.85%

• The average assessed value of a home in Owen Sound in 2020 is $220,000 • An increase of 1.85% will mean an increase of $54.75 in average yearly residential taxes • This is an increase of $4.56 per month on the average Owen Sound tax bill • The estimated average total tax bill in 2021 will be $3,888

13


What fUnDs the operatinG BUDGet? PROPERTY TAXES

GRANTS

Property tax bills are divided between the City of Owen Sound, the County of Grey and the local school boards. Owen Sound uses its portion (the municipal tax levy) of the taxes to pay for City programs and services. This includes the services Owen Sound families rely on, including fire and emergency prevention services, parks and trails, recycle collection, snow removal and Capital Budget assets, repairs and investments such as road repairs and building maintenance.

The City of Owen Sound benefits from over $3 million in grant funding for the 2021 Operating Budget. City Staff work hard to utilize grants from the government and other organizations to extend the investment of each tax payer’s dollar in City services.

USER FEES & OTHER REVENUE

OMPF

12%

5%

76%

User fees and other revenue contribute significantly to the operating budget to help maintain the high value of services provided by the City that are only used by a portion of residents, visitors and developers. This also helps ensure that tax payers’ receive the highest value for their dollars spent on core services.

14

7%

Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund (OMPF) is the Province’s main general assistance grant to municipalities. The program primarily supports northern and rural municipalities across the province with limited property assessment. The 2021 OMPF will provide a total of $500 million to 389 municipalities across the province.


2021 BUDGeteD operatinG eXpenDitUres & reVenUes BY serVice tYpe

15


serVice strUctUre of the citY of oWen soUnD

Governance &

A Greener City

Program Support

Ensuring Community Safety

• Mayor & Council

• By-Law

• Waste Collection &

• Corporate Management • Corporate Legal • Strategic Initiatives • Service Owen Sound • Information Technology • Revenue & Tax Collection • General Debenture

• Animal Control • Police Services • Fire Services • Emergency Management • Crossing Guards

Disposal • Solar Energy Projects

Maintaining

Encouraging

Supporting Arts &

Connections

Recreation

Culture

• Road Maintenance

• Parks, Sportsfields

• Art Gallery

• Engineering

• Library

• Planning

• External Grants &

• Building

& Debt Payments • Winter Control & Snow Removal

• Landfill Monitoring

• Transit

• Stormwater

• Airport

Management • Cemetery Services

• Public Works Staff,

& Open Spaces • Playgrounds • Bayshore & Rec Centre Facilities • Park & Rec Facilities Debt Payments

Fleet & Facility

• Recreation

• Traffic Control &

Programs

Streetlights • Parking

Transfers

Fostering Growth

• Community Development • Tourism • Downtown

• Facility Booking Revenues • Special Events

• GIS Services • Facility Management • City Hall

16

Please note that Water & Wastewater fees and revenues are not included in the 2021 Operating Budget. On May 11, 2020 Council approved that surcharges will remain unchanged from the 2019-2020 water and wastewater rates. Water Operations are a separate and self-funded operation of the City that functions independently of other services offered in order to ensure that respective systems, pipes, and equipment are properly maintained, tested and replaced in accordance with provincial regulations and continues to offer water of the highest quality to City of Owen Sound residents. Water operations account for approximately $12 million annually.


inVestMent in citY serVices & infrastrUctUre

Governance & Program Support

Total Operating Investment

Portion Funded by Property Taxes

Ensuring Community Safety

A Greener City

Maintaining Connections

Encouraging Recreation

Supporting Arts & Culture

Fostering Growth

$4.6

$16.9

$2.4

$6.5

$4.8

$1.9

$2.0

$4.3

$14.4

$1.2

$5.4

$3.0

$1.6

$1.2

* $ values in millions

17


What fUnDs the capital BUDGet? PROPERTY TAXES

GRANTS & EXTERNAL FUNDING

Property tax bills are divided between the City of Owen Sound, the County of Grey and the local school boards. Owen Sound uses its portion of the taxes to pay for City programs and services. This includes the services Owen Sound families rely on, including fire and emergency prevention services, parks and trails, recycle collection, snow removal and Capital Budget assets, repairs and investments such as road repairs and building maintenance.

The City of Owen Sound benefits from over $5 million in grant and external funding for the 2021 Capital Budget. This includes $1 million dollars from the Federal Gas Tax Fund directed to road repaving and accessible trail maintenance. City Staff work hard to utilize grants from the government and other organizations to extend the investment of each tax payer’s dollar in capital projects.

RESERVES

WATER & WASTEWATER RATES

The City of Owen Sound maintains Reserve Funds that are committed to fund capital projects identified in long term capital plans. These reserves offset project costs that are contingent on grant funding, so tax dollars are dedicated to capital projects that are guaranteed.

These are paid by residents and property owners for water-related services to ensure the City can provide safe drinking water, collect wastewater effectively, manage stormwater to mitigate flooding and save for future infrastructure needs.

18


capital BUDGet BreaKDoWn

ROADS & ROAD RESURFACING

CITY FACILITIES

IMPROVING THE DOWNTOWN CORE

67%

8.7%

2.3%

22%

$8,630,000

$1,118,000

$295,000

$2,842,800

total capital BUDGet:

INVEST - RENEW - MANAGE

$12,885,800 19


capital BUDGet MappeD proJects The City of Owen Sound has created an interactive Capital Budget map! Beginning in early 2021, the map is available online at OwenSound.ca/CapitalMap2021 or on the GIS page at OwenSound.ca/Maps Users are able to click on each Capital item for more details, including the 2021 budget associated with each project and location.

20


2021

operatinG BUDGet oVerVieW

owensound.ca


operational efficiencies 2020

inDiGenoUs oUtreach coorDinator

The Tom Thomson Art Gallery was successful in achieving full grant funding for a four-month Indigenous Outreach Coordinator position that will support building Indigenous relationships in 2020 and 2021 and contribute to the development of an important exhibition project in 2021. Artwork featured here is an installation shot of Indigenous artist Emily Kewageshig’s exhibition. 22


2021 BUDGeteD operatinG eXpenDitUres & reVenUes BY serVice tYpe

23


non-taX reVenUe

The City of Owen Sound implements user fees and service charges to help offset the required tax levy for core services provided. These other sources of revenue contribute to the Operating Budget and help enhance the quality of services offered. A few samples of such fees and the average total yearly amount they provide the City are listed below:

24

• Garbage Bag Tags - $416,000

• Campground Rentals - $273,000

• Marriage & Business Licences - $73,000

• Bus Tickets & Passes - $332,000

• Parking Tickets & Fines - $87,000

• Facility Bookings - $909,000


operational efficiencies 2020

WaterinG trUcK refill efficiencY

The City uses a 2500L water tank truck each day to water flowers in the downtown and on bridges. In 2020, staff identified that this truck (that needs to be refilled two to three times a day) could be filled using the yard hydrant at Harrison Park (intended to flood the outdoor ice rink) instead of driving to Public Works to fill with bulk water. Without the commute to Public Works and avoiding line ups at the fill station, staff save an estimated three hours per eight hour shift in driving and wait times. This operational efficiency allowed for the watering run to be completed in full each day and ensured the flowers growing season be extended as long as possible. 25


operatinG eXpense BUDGet sUMMarY BY tYpe EXTERNAL TRANSFERS

CONTRACT SERVICES

4%

12%

MATERIAL & SUPPLIES

15% WAGES & BENEFITS

CAPITAL DEBT & RESERVE TRANSFERS

61%

8%

26

total operatinG BUDGet:

This chart accounts for expenses only and does not include offsetting revenues or internal allocations.

$39,001,072


operational efficiencies 2020

CONFINED SPACE COLLABORATION

Often confined space entries, complete with a designated on site rescuer and a rescue plan, are required by law for work in some locations in the wastewater system. When this need arises, it is arranged to have City Fire staff on hand to perform that task. This has two benefits: 1) it saves the external cost of a third party performing that on site rescuer function and 2) it provides good refresher training for Fire staff who may be required to rescue people from those locations, or other small and confined spaces, in the future. 27


1,079,344

operational efficiencies 2020

the liBrarY's coViD response

total liBrarY serVices proViDeD to pUBlic in 2019

The library has been able to quickly and safely modify and adapt services to continue to support our community’s educational, employment and entertainment needs.

While the Library building was required to stay closed to the public, staff designed, developed and implemented a successful ‘curbside’ pickup option for patrons.

Collaboratively working with nearby partners, the Library loaned their 3D printers to NPX Innovation in Kincardine so that personal protective equipment (PPE) could be made for health workers and other front line staff in our community.

The Library began extending regular opening hours for Seniors (60+) to access the Library for an additional two hours on Thursday mornings. Known as ‘Silver Services,’ this helps older patrons feel more confident and safe while visiting the library.

Focusing on online support and services has allowed the Library to support teachers and students through Virtual Class Visits and Book Picks for classes. Online resources have launched or expanded to include access to over 7000 newspapers and magazines from around the world, online children and youth programming on Youtube, Facebook, Zoom and through blog posts. 28


operatinG BUDGet sUMMarY BY serVice 43% 17% 12% 12% 6%

ENSURING COMMUNITY SAFETY

MAINTAINING CONNECTIONS

GOVERNANCE & PROGRAM SUPPORT ENCOURAGING RECREATION

A GREENER CITY

5%

SUPPORTING ARTS & CULTURE

5%

FOSTERING GROWTH

29


2021 OPERATING BUDGET INCREASES BUDGET CATEGORY 2020 Operating Budget

For full budget & variance detail sheets, please see Appendix A

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

TAX LEVY VARIANCE

30,810,000

Base Budget Commitments1

173,770

0.56

Prior Year Commitments

121,700

0.40

Growth Impact

(105,000)

-0.34

Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund (OMPF)2

(140,000)

-0.45

91,243

0.30

Corrections Total Operating Increases

141,713

Service Level Changes

110,000

0.36

Total Capital Increases

390,000

1.27

General Budgetary Increases

641,713

Police Services Increases

207,475

0.67

Total 2021 Budgetary Increases

849,188

2.76%

2021 Operating Budget

BUDGETARY VARIANCE (%)

0.69

2.77

2.73

31,659,188 For business cases regarding Service Level Changes, please see Appendix B

1 2

Base Budget Commitments reflect unavoidable changes given current contracts. The 2021 OMPF will provide a total of $500 million to 389 northern and rural municipalities across the province.

30


operational efficiencies 2020

pUBlic WorKs optiMiZations

citY staff are a MUnicipalitY's Greatest asset.

SNOW PLOW UPGRADES

OWN FORCES

OPTIMIZING SAND

Staff switched to more durable and longer lasting equipment on snow plows used throughout the City. Polar Flex Plow Blades are built to last five winters, where previous blade materials were required to be replaced twice a winter. Rubber sideboards have also been installed and are made to last much longer than previous wood ones did.

Utlilizing a work force strategy to complete projects or jobs with internal staff instead of outsourcing. This typically saves time and money. Some examples of ‘Own Forces’ include annual storm ravine repair program, sanitary sewer repairs, and fabrication of road barricades.

To maintain excellent and necessary winter maintenance on the roads, staff have been working hard to optimize a combination of sand and salt use together. This results in significantly less salt being used than historically was, meaning the City saves considerable expenses and helps protect the environment from harsh salt affects.

31


VALUE OF ONE RESIDENTIAL TAX DOLLAR

$0.19

COUNTY OF GREY Supports County Operations and County-wide Capital

$0.32 ENSURES COMMUNITY SAFTEY

32

$0.18

$0.09

SCHOOL BOARD Education support for local schools

$0.09

ENCOURAGING MAINTAINING

CURRENT & FUTURE CAPITAL (INCLUDING CAPITAL DEBT REPAYMENT)

$0.04

CONNECTIONS

RECREATION


$0.03 GOVERNANCE & PROGRAM

$0.02

$0.02 SUPPORTING ARTS

A GREENER CITY

$0.02 FOSTERING GROWTH

& CULTURE

SUPPORT

33


oWen soUnD fire & eMerGencY serVices 724 total 9-1-1 call responses1 OSFES training officer provides mandatory First Aid and CPR training for City staff working in Facilities, City Hall, Parks, Operations and Police Services. This eliminates hiring an outside agency to conduct training.

In April 2020 our tiered response agreement with Grey County was adjusted to prevent unneeded exposure of fire staff to Covid-19. This adjustment brought our department in line with all Grey County Fire Departments tiered response agreements. To date there has been no reported incidents where this adjustment has negatively influenced the outcome of any medical response in Owen Sound. On scene paramedics have the ability to override the adjusted response level at any time to request our staff attend and assist.

Mutual Aid; we requested the Inter-Township Fire Department (ITFD) to assist us under Mutual Aid for two (structure fire) incidents. The ITFD requested our assistance for four incidents.

Owen Sound Fire & Emergency Services at Heritage Place Mall, Halloween Parade 2020

The 10th Street Bridge Agreement was put in place to deal with response time impacts due to the bridge reconstruction. We have shared services under this agreement on several incidents over the year. 1

34

Year to date statistics - January 1 - October 31, 2020.


oWen soUnD police serVices

YOUTH IN POLICING INITIATIVE

COVID-SAFE RALLY

COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

In the summer of 2020 despite the Covid pandemic the Owen Sound Police Service was the only service that continued to oer the Youth in Policing Initiative (YIPI) through a partnership between the service and the Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services. This provided an opportunity for three local youth to be employed and learn about community policing. The youth assisted with several initiatives including a virtual bicycle safety program with Rogers Television, new immigrant family partnership programs and positive ticketing campaign with McDonalds Canada and Circle K Convenience stores.

Members of the Owen Sound Police Service showed support for the local community while still maintaining Covid restrictions. The police Chief and Mayor attended the local Black History Cairn in Harrison Park taking a knee as a show of support. The police service also assisted in the planning and supported a planned rally and march from City Hall to Harrison Park by arranging for assistance with traffic and physical distancing and assisting with gathering personal protective equipment for those taking part to minimize the risk of transmission of Covid.

Working with community partners including Grey Bruce Public Health, Canadian Mental Health Association Grey Bruce, YMCA Grey Bruce Housing, United Way and others, members of the police service regularly participate in discussions surrounding homelessness and poverty issues and assist with solutions. Members also regularly refer those in need to proper supports and assist community partners in locating and attending to those in need.

35


“We will be a financially stable and responsible municipality, and will manage finances in a resilient and forward-thinking manner. We will address the infrastructure deficit by focusing on critical priorities first and approaching these issues one step at a time, with a view to long-term financial sustainability and prosperity.� OWEN SOUND STRATEGIC PLAN FINANCE GOAL

owensound.ca


2021

capital BUDGet oVerVieW owensound.ca


2021 Draft capital BUDGet oVerVieW introDUction Capital projects in Owen Sound represent a body of work that enhances and improves the lives of all residents of the City. Under the guide of Council’s Capital Priorities, projects have been identified that most benefit City residents, businesses and visitors, as well as utilize funding opportunities to extend the value of every tax dollar put towards capital projects. The 2021 Capital Budget and Five-Year Forecast builds on the successful 2020 budget process outcomes delivered earlier this year. This proposed 2021 budget of $12.9 million and five-year forecast totaling $86 million continues the progress which has been accomplished over the last three budgets to incrementally close the City’s infrastructure gap, improve the overall condition of our assets and support the policy directions of Council. Each budget year, staff use a continuous improvement outlook on budget development to incorporate learnings and feedback received from all stakeholders including internal staff, the community, media and Council. This year is no different and notable improvements and betterments to this process include: •

Enhanced communication to provide clarity and education about the City’s capital funding strategies and how they are supporting the journey to sustainability Better linkages between the Capital Budget funding and the related operating budgets Enhanced summarization of the 5-year forecast for improved understandability

• •

The City is continuing to put the building blocks of a long-term financial plan in place as the journey to sustainability continues over the next five-years and beyond. As revenue-neutral departments, water and wastewater rates do not impact the City’s budget as it relates to the tax levy. In order to comply with provincial legislation and ensure all water systems are properly maintained and tested, water and waste water capital plans have been reviewed separately and a deferral program that spreads capital spending over a greater period has been created. It should be noted that the deferred plan does not eliminate the burden for capital spending, however, it will potentially soften the future increases required. The City will review water and wastewater multi year capital and operating plans in detail each spring when water and wastewater rates are reviewed, evaluated and presented to Council. With the refreshed Strategic Plan coming into effect next year, a complete integration of its stated goals and objectives will be an outcome of the strategy teams and reflected in the 2022 budget. The current budget and forecast have been reviewed to ensure that principal projects proposed will align with the refreshed Strategic Plan. The 2021 Capital Budget continues the work of previous budgets in moving toward a sustainable level of capital investment that focuses balancing the demands of Infrastructure Renewal, Growth and City Building.

38


terMs & Definitions Asset Management is a combination of management, financial, economic, engineering, and other practices applied to physical assets with the objective of providing the required level of service in the most cost-effective manner at an acceptable level of risk. It involves data-driven decision-making and actions throughout the life cycle of physical assets. Assessment growth refers to property taxes from new and/or expanded homes and/or businesses to pay for the services they receive. Capital Budget funds investments in municipal infrastructure (or assets) that provide a long-term benefit to the community. Examples of capital costs include building or replacing roads, vehicles, community centres and parks. Debt is funding the City has borrowed to complete capital projects. Existing Capital Balances are capital funding that have already been approved by Council, but have not been spent. Some capital projects take multiple years to complete (e.g. road reconstruction, building a new community centre), so the funding may accumulate for future spending. It may also be referred to as a ‘Carried Over’ item. Federal Gas Tax is annual funding provided to the City by the federal government for capital improvements. Grants are a sum of money given by a government or other organization for a particular project. Growth in terms of Capital Budget planning refers to the growth of the City’s residental population. Operating Budget funds the day-to-day costs of the municipality to provide its programs and services. Examples of operating costs include salaries and wages for city employees; utility costs, such as water and electricity; and operating supplies, such as road salt. Reserve/Reserve Funds are used to set aside funding now to be used for a specific purpose in the future. The City maintains reserves for both operating purposes (e.g. rate stabilization reserve funds), capital purposes (e.g. fleet and equipment reserve fund) and as required by legislation (e.g. federal gas tax reserve fund). Tax Levy is the amount of funding required from property taxes. It equals all of the tax supported gross expenditures minus all other revenues. 39


achieVinG resUlts in 2020

10th street BriDGe replaceMent

40

approXiMatelY 300 cUBic Metres of concrete anD 5,000 Metres of reBar Were reQUireD for the BriDGe DecK alone


Council voted unanimously to dedicate the 10th Street bridge as the Gitche Namewikwedong Bridge. The name means ‘Great Sturgeon Bay’ in Anishinaabemowin & acknowledges Owen Sound’s Indigenous history. With completion of the Municipal Class Environment Approval (MCEA) and the approval of $3M in grant funding from the Province of Ontario through the MTO’s Connecting Links Funding Program, City Council decided to proceed with the 10th Street

Bridge Replacement project. Currently on Milestone 7 - the concrete superstructure is expected to be open to traffic by the end of 2020 and completed in its entirety by May 2021. In addition to the bridge replacement, the trunk watermains and other watermains supplying the City’s north-west area have been replaced and upgraded. Storm sewer/drainage, traffic signals and road improvements are included in the project as well.

More than 35% of the 10th Street Bridge Replacement budget was funded by grant dollars, relieving tax payers of $3,000,000 toward the arterial City project.

41


citY Mission: strenGtheninG oUr coMMUnitY throUGh soUnD leaDership The purpose is to strengthen our community and to make Owen Sound an attractive and prosperous place to live. This will be accomplished through sound leadership and visionary and forward-looking direction at the municipal government level. Sound leadership is multifaceted and means acting with integrity, being creative and innovative, listening to and collaborating with our community, neighbouring municipalities and Grey County, and ultimately acting in the best interest of Owen Sound residents as we work towards shared goals.

citY Vision: the citY of oWen soUnD - Where YoU Want to liVe Owen Sound’s vision exemplifies the desired future for our City. Owen Sound is a great place to live, work and play and we oer the small-town feel with big-city amenities. The vision statement reflects this and serves as an inspiration for our community.

42


citY ValUes carinG We care about our community. We are a welcoming, inclusive, and age-friendly City. We strive for positive change and are committed to continue working in a collaborative fashion towards the city’s vision of being “Where You Want To Live”.

creatiVitY We are a creative community that embraces innovation to find solutions with the greatest benefit for Owen Sound. As a City, we are resourceful and creative in order to thrive, regardless of external pressures.

inteGritY We demonstrate integrity by being open, transparent and communicative. We believe that continuing to communicate in an honest and informative way with residents will lead to more fruitful two-way conversations.

sUstainaBiltY We demonstrate sustainability by acting in a financially, environmentally and socially responsible manner. 43


capital BUDGet process 2021 Identifying where a City’s greatest need for replacement and investment in new infrastructure or assets is one of the most important responsibilities a municipality has. With respect to the 2021 budget process, staff recommended a change, as per Report CR-20-045, which outlined a pre-budget session with Council to have the opportunity to provide input into the budget parameters used by staff in the budget development process.

44

JUne 2020

JUlY - septeMBer 2020

octoBer 2020

Pre-budget session with Council to identify 2021 Capital common priorities and set spending thresholds. To adhere to current COVID precautions and safety measures, an online survey was completed by each Councillor in lieu of an in-person meeting. Council endorsed common priorities and budget thresholds presented from survey results at a Council Meeting on June 29, 2020.

Staff developed a detailed 2021 Capital and Operating Budget, employing the priorities identified by Council to recommend 2021 Capital Projects. Five Year Financial Plans were completed for proposed Capital projects, as well as a Capital Detail sheet for each project.

Staff reviewed and prioritized recommended Capital projects based on Budget Guiding Principles. This identified a project’s priority scoring based on Council’s direction as well as available financial resources.


noVeMBer 2020

DeceMBer 2020

JanUarY 2021

Council budget deliberations for final proposed 2021 Capital Budget.

Full Budget Meeting with Council on December 3rd and 4th.

Final full budget consideration by Council at regular Council Meeting on January 18th.

45


achieVinG resUlts in 2020

tot lot plaYGroUnD

$100,000 harrison parK plaYGroUnD UpGraDe septeMBer 2020 coMpletion

46


achieVinG resUlts in 2020

plaY strUctUre UpGraDes

capital inVestMents can MaKe oUr coMMUnitY More accessiBle anD inclUsiVe.

HARRISON PARK

TIMBER MCARTHUR PARK

ENGINEERED WOOD FIBRE

The new playground features accessible amenities, offering a safe and inclusive outdoor recreation space for children of all ages and abilities. The upgrades provide accessibility enhancement in the areas of Mobility, Vision, Hearing, Mental Well-Being and Sensory. The Harrison Park Tot Lot is a central and heavily used space for park-goers. The new playground provides for a more modern feel and includes climbers, slides and spinners that support physical activity, intellectual development, social interaction and emotional wellness.

On Owen Sound’s east side, Timber McArthur Park had a new playground installed in August 2020 to enhance and improve free outdoor recreational space for local and visiting families. Anticipated life expectancy for new playground equipment is 25 years.

Playgrounds throughout the City have been upgraded with engineered wood fibre. This material is compliant with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act as it easily compacts down for wheelchair accessibility, is softer, and is less prone to splitting than real woodchips. It’s manufactured specifically for playground use.

TOT LOT UPGRADE

PLAYGROUND UPGRADE

FOR SAFER PLAY

47


BUDGet GUiDinG principles 01

COUNCIL PRIORITIES

In June 2020, Council identified three priority areas for 2021 Capital Budget projects to focus: Roads & Road Resurfacing; Improving the Downtown Core; and City Facilities.

DETAIL SHEET

02

Every Capital project has a detail sheet created by the staff lead to organize and categorize projects by Title, Capital Code & Priority Level.

SCORING MATRIX

03

04

48

Priority level of each project is aligned with a score based on a scoring matrix. The same matrix is used by all staff and is reviewed by two others not directly involved in each project. The matrix rationale is based on 10 scoring categories - each scored out of five, but each weighed differently toward overall score, reflective of Council’s identification of direct impacts. Scoring categories and relative weight out of five are outlined to the right.

STAFF TIME RESOURCES

Capital budget planning not only includes projects that can be financially afforded by the City, but also considers staff time as a resource. This budget includes a plan that we believe is achievable in 2021.

SCORE

CATEGORY

EXPLANATION

4.57

Operational Performance

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance?

4.43

Health & Safety

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed?

4.14

Finance

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available?

4.14

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

4.00

Legislation

Is the project required for legislative or regulatory compliance?

3.57

People

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

3.57

Asset Management

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan?

3.29

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives?

3.29

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement?

2.71

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in a Master Plan?


capital BUDGet BreaKDoWn

ROADS & ROAD RESURFACING

CITY FACILITIES

IMPROVING THE DOWNTOWN CORE

67%

8.7%

2.3%

22%

$8,630,000

$1,118,000

$295,000

$2,842,800

total capital BUDGet:

INVEST - RENEW - MANAGE

$12,885,800 49


coUncil prioritY #1

capital BUDGet BreaKDoWn ROADS & ROAD RESURFACING

67%

$8,630,000

CAPITAL TAX DOLLARS

85%

Of the $2.6 million tax dollars in the Capital budget, $2.2 million (or 85% of Capital Tax Dollars) are dedicated toward Council’s number one priority: Roads & Road Resurfacing. See full budget funding breakdown on page 25.

50


coUncil prioritY #1

capital BUDGet proJects: roaDs & roaD resUrfacinG

RANKING

PROJECT TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

1

10th St Bridge Replacement

83.8

1,000,000

6

Concrete Replacement & Asphalt Resurfacing

74.8

875,000

9

Resurfacing 16th St E - Phase One: 9th Ave E to 16th Ave E

71.4

25,000

10

Rehabilitation 16th St E - Phase Two: 16th Ave E to 18th Ave E

71.4

930,000

11

East Bayshore Rd (Grey Rd 15) - 3rd Ave E north to East Bayshore Rd Sewage Pump Station 69.6

5,300,000

15

Downtown & 10th St Corridor Traffic Signal Control

62.4

150,000

16

Reconstruction 9th Ave E - 20th St E to 23rd St E

61.8

350,000

For full budget detail sheets, please see Appendix D for Roads & Road Resurfacing Projects

51


coUncil prioritY #2

capital BUDGet BreaKDoWn CITY FACILITIES

8.7%

$1,118,000

52


capital BUDGet proJects: citY facilities RANKING

coUncil prioritY #2 PRIORITY SCORE

PROJECT TITLE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

14

Public Works Generator Set

63.0

90,000

19

Harrison Park Sanitary Connection, Replacement & Dumping Station Upgrades

54.0

100,000

28

Harrison Park Workshop Hot Water Heater System Replacement

50.4

15,000

30

Courthouse Windows & Doors Boarding

49.8

20,000

31

Courthouse Roof Replacement

49.8

100,000

32

Greenwood Cemetery Chapel Design & Drawings

49.0

30,000

40

Tom Thomson Art Gallery Flooring Replacement

46.6

50,000

41

Tom Thomson Art Gallery Roof Section 1 & 2 Replacement

45.2

150,000

43

Bayshore Roof Section 1 Restoration

44.2

65,000

44

Fire Station Roof Section 1 Replacement

41.4

350,000

45

Harrison Park Workshop Roof Replacement

41.0

20,000

47

East Side Boat Launch Building Upgrades

39.4

15,000

51

Harrison Park Senior Centre Grading Improvement & Eavestrough Replacement

36.8

13,000

52

Tom Williams Building Upgrades

36.6

15,000

54

Public Works Channel Drain

31.6

50,000

56

Greenwood Cemetery Office Basement Rehabilitation

30.6

15,000

62

Water Bottle Fill Stations

24.8

10,000

63

Cemetery Parking Lot Drainage

20.8

10,000

For full budget detail sheets, please see Appendix E for City Facilities Projects

53


coUncil prioritY #3

capital BUDGet BreaKDoWn IMPROVING THE DOWNTOWN CORE

2.3%

$295,000

54


capital BUDGet proJects: DoWntoWn iMproVeMents

RANKING

PROJECT TITLE

coUncil prioritY #3

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

12

Downtown River Precinct (DRP) - Phase One: 1st Ave E (800 Block)

67.0

30,000

13

Downtown River Precinct (DRP) - Phase Two: 1st Ave E (900 Block)

65.0

110,000

22

Pedestrian Crossing - 8th St E at 1st Ave E

52.2

25,000

23

Decorative Streetlight Replacement

52.0

60,000

36

Downtown Street Greening Initiative

48.0

10,000

48

Downtown Wayfinding Signage

38.8

60,000

For full budget detail sheets, please see Appendix F for Downtown Improvement Projects

55


capital BUDGet BreaKDoWn INVEST - RENEW - MANAGE

22%

$2,842,800

3%

7%

1%

4%

1%

5%

1%

FLEET

PARKS & OPEN SPACES

CONTRACT SERVICES

PROGRAM SUPPORT

BUILDING & PLANNING

FIRE

POLICE SUPPORT

$402,500

$906,500

$121,000

$497,400

$152,500

$662,900

$100,000

56

For full budget detail sheets, please see Appendix G for Invest-Renew-Manage Projects


capital BUDGet BreaKDoWn BY fUnDinG soUrce GRANTS & EXTERNAL FUNDING

42% $5,417,000 PROPERTY TAXES

20% $2,631,500 DEBT FINANCING

8% $1,000,000

WATER & WASTEWATER RATES

5% $672,900

RESERVES

25% $3,164,400

57


achieVinG resUlts in 2020

16th street east rehaBilitation roaDWorK

58


achieVinG resUlts in 2020

16th street east rehaBilitation roaDWorK Being a well-travelled and arterial roadway, the rehabilitation of the road and structures along 16th St E/Highway 26 from 9th Ave E intersection to 16th Ave E is no small undertaking. This project has received 90

per cent grant funding in the amount of $933,427 for the road and structures through Connecting Link (CL) grant funding.

Additional work on 16th St E included 490 metres of watermain replacement, 155 metres of sanitary sewer replacement and 255 metres of new sidewalk construction.

59


2021 CAPITAL PROJECT SUMMARY RANKING

60

PROJECT TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

1

10th St Bridge Replacement

83.8

1,000,000

2

Kelso Waterfront Trail Restoration

81.4

150,000

3

East Waterfront Trail Restoration

81.4

150,000

4

Electronic Records Management Application

75.8

325,500

5

Software Transformation Project Needs Assessment

75.2

175,000

6

Concrete Replacement & Asphalt Resurfacing

74.8

875,000

7

Zoning By-law Review

74.2

10,000

8

Harrison Park Channel Wall Repair

72.2

25,000

9

Resurfacing 16th St E - Phase One: 9th Ave E to 16th Ave E

71.4

25,000

10

Rehabilitation 16th St E - Phase Two: 16th Ave E to 18th Ave E

71.4

930,000

11

East Bayshore Rd (Grey Rd 15) - 3rd Ave E north to East Bayshore Rd Sewage Pump Station 69.6

5,300,000

12

Downtown River Precinct (DRP) - Phase One: 1st Ave E (800 Block)

67.0

30,000

13

Downtown River Precinct (DRP) - Phase Two: 1st Ave E (900 Block)

65.0

110,000

14

Public Works Generator Set

63.0

90,000

15

Downtown & 10th St Corridor Traffic Signal Control

62.4

150,000

16

Reconstruction 9th Ave E - 20th St E to 23rd St E

61.8

350,000

17

Transit Study

58.4

80,000

18

Genoe Landfill Site Flush & Camera Work

55.0

15,000

19

Harrison Park Sanitary Connection, Replacement & Dumping Station Upgrades

54.0

100,000

20

Harrison Park Bridges Maintenance

53.2

35,000


2021 CAPITAL PROJECT SUMMARY RANKING

PROJECT TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

21

Forestry Gear

52.8

5,000

22

Pedestrian Crossing - 8th St E at 1st Ave E

52.2

25,000

23

Decorative Streetlight Replacement

52.0

60,000

24

Employee Engagement Survey

51.6

25,000

25

Brooke Basin A-3 Master Plan - Completion

51.0

10,000

26

Harrison Park Campground Playground Replacement

50.6

91,000

27

Duncan McLellan Park Playground Replacement

50.6

45,000

28

Harrison Park Workshop Hot Water Heater System Replacement

50.4

15,000

29

Phragmites (Invasive Species) Removal

50.2

40,000

30

Courthouse Windows & Doors Boarding

49.8

20,000

31

Courthouse Roof Replacement

49.8

100,000

32

Greenwood Cemetery Chapel Design & Drawings

49.0

30,000

33

Salt & Sand Storage Containment

49.0

50,000

34

Citizen Satisfaction Survey

48.8

25,000

35

Harrison Park Pool Filtration System Replacement

48.4

60,000

36

Downtown Street Greening Initiative

48.0

10,000

37

Kenny Drain Pond #4 Clean Out

47.5

20,000

38

Council Audio Visual

47.0

189,000

39

Greenwood Cemetery Water System Reserve Contribution

46.6

15,000

40

Tom Thomson Art Gallery Flooring Replacement

46.6

50,000 61


2021 CAPITAL PROJECT SUMMARY RANKING

62

PROJECT TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

41

Tom Thomson Art Gallery Roof Section 1 & 2 Replacement

45.2

150,000

42

AGW Properties (PGW 2261 9th Ave E)

45.0

350,000

43

Bayshore Roof Section 1 Restoration

44.2

65,000

44

Fire Station Roof Section 1 Replacement

41.4

350,000

45

Harrison Park Workshop Roof Replacement

41.0

20,000

46

Tennis/Pickle Ball Court Renewal

39.8

30,000

47

East Side Boat Launch Building Upgrades

39.4

15,000

48

Downtown Wayfinding Signage

38.8

60,000

49

Sanitary Sewer Relocation - 3rd Ave E & 297 18th St E (Georgian Landing Apartments)

38.4

5,000

50

Paving Around New Fuel System - Public Works

37.6

20,000

51

Harrison Park Senior Centre Grading Improvement & Eavestrough Replacement

36.8

13,000

52

Tom Williams Building Upgrades

36.6

15,000

53

YMCA New Playground at Julie McArthur Regional Rec Centre

35.2

50,000

54

Public Works Channel Drain

31.6

50,000

55

St. George’s Backstop Replacement

31.2

15,000

56

Greenwood Cemetery Office Basement Rehabilitation

30.6

15,000

57

Interpretive Plaques

27.8

2,500

58

Artificial Athletic Field Business Case

27.0

10,000

59

Auto Body Shop Development - 23rd St E - Contribution for Storm Drainage

26.4

15,000

60

Cemetery Benches Replacement

25.8

15,000


2021 capital proJect sUMMarY RANKING

PRIORITY SCORE

PROJECT TITLE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

61

Digitize Building Plans for AMANDA

25.4

20,000

62

Water Bottle Fill Stations

24.8

10,000

63

Cemetery Parking Lot Drainage

20.8

10,000

2021 capital BUDGet: neW fleet + police sUpport ITEM #

TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

Fleet A

Drop Sander/Material Spreader

53.4

12,000

Fleet B

Building Vehicle Charging Station(s)

21.4

20,000

Fleet C

Building Vehicles

19.2

100,000

Police Support

Tax-Funded Police Capital

100,000

63


achieving results in 2020

SIDEWALK REPAIRS

as part of the 2020 Resurfacing program, the city reinstated 35 linear metres of sidewalk and 16 linear metres of curb

Along with annual sidewalk repairs and improvements, the City partnered with Top Hat Robotics smart technology to undertake its annual sidewalk inspections. Previously, annual sidewalk inspections were labour intensive and took a significant amount of time. The Top Hat Robotics state of the art depth cameras detect lips, cracks, dips and other sidewalk deficiencies, accurate to within one millimetre - much better than traditional human judgement. 64


achieVinG resUlts in 2020

Kelso Beach shoreline protection City staff completed work at Kelso Beach to protect sections of the shoreline from erosion due to wind driven wave action and historically high lake levels. This project had an approved budget of $150,000 in 2020.

BEFORE

AFTER 65


FIVE YEAR CAPITAL FORECASTS (FUNDED & UNFUNDED) BUDGET CATEGORY

2021 - 2025 FUNDED

2021 - 2025 REQUIRED

2021 - 2025 DIFFERENCE (UNFUNDED)

Roads & Road Related

46,886,000

48,301,000

(1,415,000)

Facilities

17,902,000

19,610,000

(1,708,000)

Downtown Improvements

5,244,000

5,244,000

-

Program Support (General Government)

1,933,100

1,933,100

-

Parks & Open Spaces

3,226,000

5,018,000

(1,792,000)

Contract Services (Transit & Waste)

588,000

588,000

-

Airport

-

1,545,040

(1,545,040)

Police Support

700,000

700,000

-

Building, Planning & Heritage

692,500

692,500

-

Fleet

2,597,745

2,597,745

-

TOTAL CAPITAL PROGRAM

79,769,345

86,229,385

(6,460,040)

66


fiVe Year capital forecasts (fUnDeD & UnfUnDeD) $5M

$1,415,000 FUNDED CAPITAL BUDGET

$4M

UNFUNDED CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS

$3M $1,708,000

$2M $1M

$1,792,000 $1,545,040

0 ROADS

FACILITIES

DOWNTOWN

PROGRAM SUPPORT

PARKS

CONTRACT SERVICES

AIRPORT

POLICE

BUILDING & PLANNING

FLEET

67


“We will be a financially stable and responsible municipality, and will manage finances in a resilient and forward-thinking manner. We will address the infrastructure deficit by focusing on critical priorities first and approaching these issues one step at a time, with a view to long-term financial sustainability and prosperity.� OWEN SOUND STRATEGIC PLAN FINANCE GOAL

owensound.ca


APPENDIX A

OPERATING BUDGET & VARIANCE DETAIL SHEETS

owensound.ca 69


2021 PROPOSED BUDGET - TALLY SHEET DIV 1000 2000 2370 6000 2301 2302 2502

Division Name Mayor and Council City Manager Climate Change Initiatives DIA Management Non Departmental Debentures Grants

2100 2110 2513 2511 2512 2120 2130 2230 2310 2320 2360 2330 2140

Corporate Services Director City Clerk Animal Control Bylaw Parking Human Resources WSIB Information Technology Accounting Purchasing GIS Tax Office Service Owen Sound

2400 2401 2402 2410 2411 2412 2412 2426 2501 2440 2413 2416 2417 2425 2500 2510 2520 2532 2533 2414 2415 2530 2540 2541

2020 Approved Budget $281,853 $257,070 $105,632 $59,700 $357,200 $1,374,639 $210,147

2021 Draft Budget $286,242 $295,165 $0 $59,700 $611,200 $1,676,517 $172,353

Difference $4,389 $38,095 ($105,632) $0 $254,000 $301,878 ($37,794)

163,839 503,765 55,950 243,823 66,973 258,829 102,817 400,962 336,518 118,996 12,396 64,894 42,863

157,824 515,174 60,950 271,122 69,470 256,442 107,984 416,069 339,116 119,881 8,959 63,400 45,416

($6,015) $11,409 $5,000 $27,300 $2,498 ($2,386) $5,167 $15,107 $2,598 $885 ($3,437) ($1,494) $2,553

Operations Director Transit Airport Works Administration Labour and Fleet Works Maintenance Winter Control Storm and Drainage Source Water Protection Engineering Traffic and Street Lights Waste Management Solar Revenue Landfill

85,005 992,481 227,916 223,600 45,219 973,391 1,839,804 123,718 6,500 302,256 401,977 548,432 ( 121,262 ) 198,220

87,793 1,044,726 232,573 274,370 39,589 1,022,485 1,878,617 174,497 6,500 200,770 465,395 542,177 ( 120,704 ) 219,746

$2,789 $52,245 $4,657 $50,770 ($5,630) $49,094 $38,813 $50,779 $0 ($101,486) $63,418 ($6,255) $558 $21,526

Community Services Director Building/Plumbing Inspections Planning Community Programs Facilities Bookings Parks and Open Spaces Cemetery Community Development Tourism Special Events

41,577 8,101 295,254 ( 7,800 ) ( 857,865 ) 1,511,856 338,191 245,897 157,856 145,267

55,137 ( 262 ) 289,172 ( 6,309 ) ( 852,457 ) 1,484,102 358,298 226,716 167,173 160,054

$13,560 ($8,363) ($6,083) $1,491 $5,408 ($27,754) $20,107 ($19,182) $9,317 $14,788

70


2021 PROPOSED BUDGET - TALLY SHEET DIV 2430 2431 2432 2433 3436 2435

Division Name Building Manager City Hall Police Building Bayshore Regional Recreation Complex Other Properties

2600

Fire Department

2020 Approved Budget 41,861 211,105 281,246 989,951 923,066 201,513

5,332,304

($11,897)

20,737,402

21,486,238

$748,836

400,000 953,776

475,000 956,478

$75,000 $2,703

22,091,177

22,917,716

826,538

38,403 6,235,639 1,056,726 282,519

37,133 6,409,256 1,035,970 335,901

($1,270) $173,617 ($20,756) $53,382

29,704,464

30,735,975

1,031,511

2,329,500.00 457,957

2,610,500.00 156,079

Sub Total Net Expenses

32,491,921

33,502,554

Supplemental Assessment Education Portion Retained Appealed Tax Write Off's & Rebates Penalty and Interest on Taxes Payment In Lieu of Taxation (H & B's) OMPF

( 175,000 ) ( 85,000 ) 770,000 ( 350,000 ) ( 85,696 ) ( 1,756,000 )

( 175,000 ) ( 85,000 ) 718,000 ( 325,000 ) ( 78,696 ) ( 1,897,600 )

$0 $0 ($52,000) $25,000 $7,000 ($141,600)

Sub Total Other Revenues

( 1,681,696 )

( 1,843,296 )

($161,600)

30,810,225 $

31,659,258

$849,033

Art Gallery Library Sub Total Net Operations Before Police

3000 3100 3200 3300

Police Services Board Police Officers Police Civilians Court Security Sub Total Net Operations After Police Tax Supported Capital Matured Debt

100 100 100 103 101 102

Difference $2,243 ($4,523) ($1,962) ($4,884) $43,023 ($11,848)

5,344,200

Sub Total Net General Expenses 4000 5000

2021 Draft Budget 44,104 206,582 279,285 985,067 966,089 189,665

Difference to Raise From Taxation

$

Net Levy Increase

Increase Realized by Tax Payers Combined Increase

$1,010,633

2.76%

Previous Year's Growth Difference to Raise From Taxation

$281,000 ($301,878)

$

30,810,225 $

( 216,000 ) 31,443,258

($216,000) $633,033 2.05% 1.90%

71


VARIANCE LEAD SHEET Initiative ID

A.3 A.4 A.7 A.8 A.10 A.19 A.23 B.2 C.8 D.1 D.2 D.5 D.9 D.10 D.12 D.14 D.15 F.2 G.2 I.1

Dept.

General General General General General General General City Manager Information Technology Transit Airport Roads - sign and safety Waste Management Waste Management Recycling Recycling Landfill All Facilities Fire Services Library Services

Description

Increase as a result of step in grid Increase as a result of 1.5% cola Corporate Training estimated increase on fire wages including benefits Increased Insurance Decrease CIP program costs Increase contingency Increase with new contract negotiation Increase software maintenance fees Increase Contract Increase Contract Line painting contract Increase tipping fees Increase curbside pickup contract Increase Stewardship Grant Increase curbside pickup contract Increase Leachate Increase security costs courthouse Increase dispatch costs paid to OSPS Estimated Levy increase

Increase Summary BB PYC GROWTH OMPF CORR

Impact

53,000 28,000 15,000 (50,000) 123,000 (143,000) (35,000) 24,000 35,500 49,500 5,000 8,000 10,600 6,500 (35,000) 13,170 20,000 4,000 35,000 6,500 173,770

TYPE BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB BB

% Impact 0.56% 0.40% -0.34% -0.45% 0.30%

BASE BUDGET PRIOR YEAR DECISION IMPACT GROWTH IMPACT ONTARIO MUNCIPAL PARTNERSHIP FUND (TBA) CORRECTIONS

173,770 121,700 (105,000) (140,000) 91,243

OPERATING INCREASE

141,713

SLC

SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES CURRENT YEAR

110,000

0.36%

CAP

CAPITAL

390,000

1.27%

GENERAL BUDGETARY INCREASE 2.73%

POLICE SERVICES

TOTAL BUDGETARY INCREASE

0.69%

641,713

2.77%

207,475

0.67%

849,188

2.76%

72


VARIANCE LEAD SHEET Initiative ID

A.9 A.17 A.20 B.3 C.1 C.3 C.4 C.5 C.6 E.6 E.7 E.8 E.11 F.3 F.4

Dept.

General General General City Manager Clerks Purchasing Purchasing Human Resources Human Resources Community Development Special Events Special Events Tourism City Hall City Hall

Description

Reduce Fire Overtime for minimum staffing Enhance CIP program Remove MRI contribution Allocate Strategic Planning Add Maintenance Fee for eScribe Add Purch Coordinator Offset Purchasing Manager Increase HR Admin to FT (Contract) Allocate HR to Police Remove Calendar Add Special Events Assistant Reduce Events Coordinator Increase publication costs Decrease transfer to reserve Increase Contract Services

Increase Summary BB PYC GROWTH OMPF CORR

Impact

(50,000) 40,000 (25,000) 139,000 22,200 65,000 (75,000) 32,000 (22,500) (6,000) 60,000 (64,000) 6,000 (10,000) 10,000 121,700

TYPE PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC PYC

% Impact 0.56% 0.40% -0.34% -0.45% 0.30%

BASE BUDGET PRIOR YEAR DECISION IMPACT GROWTH IMPACT ONTARIO MUNCIPAL PARTNERSHIP FUND (TBA) CORRECTIONS

173,770 121,700 (105,000) (140,000) 91,243

OPERATING INCREASE

141,713

SLC

SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES CURRENT YEAR

110,000

0.36%

CAP

CAPITAL

390,000

1.27%

GENERAL BUDGETARY INCREASE 2.73%

POLICE SERVICES

TOTAL BUDGETARY INCREASE

0.69%

641,713

2.77%

207,475

0.67%

849,188

2.76%

73


VARIANCE LEAD SHEET Initiative ID

A.11 A.12 A.13 A.15 A.16 A.21 C.7 D.13 E.13

Dept.

General General General General General General Animal Control Recycling Parks and Cemetery

Description

Change in labour charged to rate funded Remove Grant in Lieu to Legion (exempt in 2020 and onward) Decrease Legal Fees (corporately) Reduce Tax certificate Revenue Reduce Interest and Penalty on Taxation Reduction in Georgian Collage Capacity PIL Adjust professional fees and SPCA Reduce revenues Increase Campground Revenue

Increase Summary BB PYC GROWTH OMPF CORR

Impact

59,243 (13,000) (10,000) 7,000 25,000 7,000 5,000 15,000 (4,000) 91,243

TYPE CORR CORR CORR CORR CORR CORR CORR CORR CORR

% Impact 0.56% 0.40% -0.34% -0.45% 0.30%

BASE BUDGET PRIOR YEAR DECISION IMPACT GROWTH IMPACT ONTARIO MUNCIPAL PARTNERSHIP FUND (TBA) CORRECTIONS

173,770 121,700 (105,000) (140,000) 91,243

OPERATING INCREASE

141,713

SLC

SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES CURRENT YEAR

110,000

0.36%

CAP

CAPITAL

390,000

1.27%

GENERAL BUDGETARY INCREASE 2.73%

POLICE SERVICES

TOTAL BUDGETARY INCREASE

0.69%

641,713

2.77%

207,475

0.67%

849,188

2.76%

74


VARIANCE LEAD SHEET Initiative ID

A.18 D.11 E.1 E.4

Dept.

General Waste Management Building Inspection Planning

Description

Increase tax write off/adjustment expense Increase Bag Tag revenue Increase Building permit revenues Planning Application Revenue

Increase Summary BB PYC GROWTH OMPF CORR

BASE BUDGET PRIOR YEAR DECISION IMPACT GROWTH IMPACT ONTARIO MUNCIPAL PARTNERSHIP FUND (TBA) CORRECTIONS

Impact

50,000 (25,000) (100,000) (30,000) (105,000)

173,770 121,700 (105,000) (140,000) 91,243

TYPE

GROWTH GROWTH GROWTH GROWTH

% Impact 0.56% 0.40% -0.34% -0.45% 0.30%

OPERATING INCREASE

141,713

SLC

SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES CURRENT YEAR

110,000

0.36%

CAP

CAPITAL

390,000

1.27%

GENERAL BUDGETARY INCREASE 2.73%

POLICE SERVICES

TOTAL BUDGETARY INCREASE

0.69%

641,713

2.77%

207,475

0.67%

849,188

2.76%

75


Initiative ID

B.1 C.2 D.4 E.2 E.3 E.5 E.9 E.10 J.1

Dept.

City Manager ByLaw Roads Building Inspection Building Inspection Community Development Special Events Special Events TTAG General

VARIANCE LEAD SHEET Description

Reallocate Climate Change Initiative responsibilities Add contingency funds for hot spots Increase 2 FTE for roadside maintenance Increase contribution from Reserves Increase Building Inspection Staff Reallocate DRP activation Update Music at the Market Reduce Canada Day Increase in wages as result of reorganization

Increase Summary BB PYC GROWTH OMPF CORR

Impact

(105,000) 10,000 130,000 (120,000) 120,000 (15,000) 25,000 (10,000) 75,000 110,000

TYPE SLC SLC SLC SLC SLC SLC SLC SLC SLC

% Impact 0.56% 0.40% -0.34% -0.45% 0.30%

BASE BUDGET PRIOR YEAR DECISION IMPACT GROWTH IMPACT ONTARIO MUNCIPAL PARTNERSHIP FUND (TBA) CORRECTIONS

173,770 121,700 (105,000) (140,000) 91,243

OPERATING INCREASE

141,713

SLC

SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES CURRENT YEAR

110,000

0.36%

CAP

CAPITAL

390,000

1.27%

GENERAL BUDGETARY INCREASE 2.73%

POLICE SERVICES

TOTAL BUDGETARY INCREASE

0.69%

641,713

2.77%

207,475

0.67%

849,188

2.76%

76


VARIANCE LEAD SHEET Initiative ID

A.14 D.7 D.8 E.12 G.1 G.3

Dept.

General Storm Water Management Storm Water Management Parks and Cemetery Fire Equipment Fire Equipment

Description

Dedicated increase in capital spending Increase reserve contribution for 17th St Storm Create backflow protection program in operating Decrease Campground Debt Payment Increase reserve contribution Increase reserve contribution for clothing

Increase Summary BB PYC GROWTH OMPF CORR

Impact

301,000 50,000 10,000 (31,000) 50,000 10,000 390,000

TYPE CAP CAP CAP CAP CAP CAP

% Impact 0.56% 0.40% -0.34% -0.45% 0.30%

BASE BUDGET PRIOR YEAR DECISION IMPACT GROWTH IMPACT ONTARIO MUNCIPAL PARTNERSHIP FUND (TBA) CORRECTIONS

173,770 121,700 (105,000) (140,000) 91,243

OPERATING INCREASE

141,713

SLC

SERVICE LEVEL CHANGES CURRENT YEAR

110,000

0.36%

CAP

CAPITAL

390,000

1.27%

GENERAL BUDGETARY INCREASE 2.73%

POLICE SERVICES

TOTAL BUDGETARY INCREASE

0.69%

641,713

2.77%

207,475

0.67%

849,188

2.76%

77


CITY OF OWEN SOUND GOVERNANCE DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1000 2000 2160 6000 2301 2302 2502

COUNCIL CITY MANAGER AND EMERGENCY CEMC CLIMATE CHANGE INITIATIVES DIA ADMINISTRATION NON DEPARTMENTAL DEBENTURES GRANTS AND EXTERNAL TRANSFERS

BUDGET BREAKDOWN WAGES DEBT PAYMENTS MATERIALS LEGAL AND CONTRACT EXTERNAL TRANSFERS Net Operating Budget

DIA TAX LEVY NET TRANSFERRED TO OTHE R DEPARTMENTS FUNDED FROM RESERVES TAX BURDEN

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE 4,389 38,095 (105,632) 254,000 301,878 (37,794)

286,242 295,165 59,700 611,200 1,676,517 172,353

281,853 257,070 105,632 59,700 357,200 1,374,639 210,147

3,101,177

2,646,242

454,936

2021 787,050 1,676,517 654,550 45,350 108,600

2020 747,492 1,374,639 543,050 55,350 146,600

change 39,558 301,878 111,500 (10,000) (38,000)

3,272,067

2,867,132

(235,000) 47,610 16,500 3,101,177

(235,000) (2,390) 16,500 2,646,242

404,936

50,000 454,936

78


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CITY COUNCIL DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 9 members Mayor Deputy Mayor 7 Councillors

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

296,942 35,050 250 332,242 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

292,553 35,050 250 327,853 -

4,389 4,389 -

Net Cost

332,242

327,853

4,389

Internal Cost Allocation

(46,000)

(46,000)

-

Division Levy Requirement

286,242

281,853

4,389

79


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CITY MANAGER DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2 FTE City Manager Executive Assistant

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

357,505 15,550 373,055 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

324,410 10,550 334,960 -

33,095 5,000 38,095 -

Net Cost

373,055

334,960

38,095

Internal Cost Allocation

(77,890)

(77,890)

-

Division Levy Requirement

295,165

257,070

38,095

80


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CLIMATE CHANGE INITIATIVES - NEW 2020 DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Specialist

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

-

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

-

Net Cost

-

Internal Cost Allocation

-

Division Levy Requirement

-

Gross Costs

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

102,132 3,500 105,632 -

105,632 105,632

(102,132) (3,500) (105,632) -

(105,632) -

(105,632)

81


CITY OF OWEN SOUND DOWNTOWN IMPROVEMENT AREA (DIA) DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

43,700 55,500 6,000 105,200

43,700 55,500 6,000 105,200

-

Grants DIA Levy Other Revenue

Revenue

(235,000) (235,000)

(235,000) (235,000)

-

Net Cost

(129,800)

(129,800)

-

6,500 183,000

6,500 183,000

-

59,700

59,700

-

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

To Reserves Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requireme

82


CITY OF OWEN SOUND NON DEPARTMENTAL DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

29,000 544,600 39,100 612,700 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

(75,000) 434,600 49,100 408,700 -

Net Cost

612,700

408,700

Net Transfer to Reserves Internal Cost Allocation

10,000 (11,500)

10,000 (61,500)

Division Levy Requirement

611,200

357,200

104,000 110,000 (10,000) 204,000 -

204,000 50,000

254,000

83


CITY OF OWEN SOUND DEBENTURES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Net Transfer to Reserves Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

1,676,517 1,676,517 1,676,517 1,676,517

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

1,374,639 1,374,639 -

1,374,639 1,374,639

301,878 301,878 -

301,878 -

301,878

84


CITY OF OWEN SOUND GRANTS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

34,903 3,850 108,600 475,000 622,353

34,697 3,850 146,600 400,000 585,147

206 (38,000) 75,000 37,206

Revenue

25,000 25,000

25,000 25,000

-

Net Cost

647,353

610,147

37,206

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services External Transfers Internal Transfers (Art Gallery) Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Net Transfer to Reserves Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

647,353

610,147

-

37,206

85


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CORPORATE SERVICES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2100 2110 2513 2511 2512 2120 2130 2230 2310 2320 2360 2330 2140

DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE SERVICES CLERKS ANIMAL CONTROL BY-LAW PARKING HUMAN RESOURCES WSIB INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCOUNTING PURCHASING GIS REVENUE SERVICE OWEN SOUND

BUDGET BREAKDOWN WAGES DEBT PAYMENTS MATERIALS LEGAL AND CONTRACT REVENUE AND USER FEES FINES AND PENALTIES

2020 BUDGET

157,824 515,174 60,950 271,122 69,470 256,442 107,984 416,069 339,116 119,881 8,959 63,400 45,416

163,839 503,765 55,950 243,823 66,973 258,829 102,817 400,962 336,518 118,996 12,396 64,894 42,863

2,431,808

2,372,626

2021 2,955,679 84,574 758,945 522,510 (430,950) (59,260)

2020 2,725,038 84,574 704,245 507,510 (437,950) (59,260)

VARIANCE (6,015) 11,409 5,000 27,300 2,498 (2,386) 5,167 15,107 2,598 885 (3,437) (1,494) 2,553 59,182

change 230,642 54,700 15,000 7,000 -

Net Operating Budget

3,831,499

3,524,157

307,342

NET TRANSFERRED TO OTHER DEPT TRANSFERS TO RESERVES

(1,422,691) 23,000

(1,174,531) 23,000

(248,160) -

TAX BURDEN

2,431,808

2,372,626

59,182

86


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CORPORATE SERVICES DIRECTOR DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2 FTE Director Admin Assistant

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

274,482 8,350 282,832 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

266,597 8,350 274,947 -

7,885 7,885 -

282,832

274,947

7,885

(125,008)

(111,108)

(13,900)

157,824

163,839

(6,015)

87


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CITY CLERK DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 5 FTE Clerk Deputy Clerk Admin Legislative Services Manager Legislative Coord. Records Mgmt Coord.

Contracts Integrity Commis. Election Crossing Guards

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

547,970 55,700 135,000 738,670

537,061 53,200 135,000 725,261

10,909 2,500 13,409

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

(93,450) (93,450)

(93,450) (93,450)

-

Net Cost

645,220

631,811

13,409

20,000 (150,046)

20,000 (148,046)

515,174

503,765

Gross Costs

Reserve Transfers Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

(2,000)

11,409

88


CITY OF OWEN SOUND ANIMAL CONTROL DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Contracts Animal Control

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

26,450 80,000 106,450

26,450 75,000 101,450

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

(45,500) (45,500)

(45,500) (45,500)

-

Net Cost

60,950

55,950

5,000

-

-

-

60,950

55,950

5,000

Gross Costs

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

5,000.00 5,000

89


CITY OF OWEN SOUND BYLAW DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2 FTE ByLaw Officers

Contracts Prosecution

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

157,272 10,350 20,000 187,622 (5,000) (5,000)

2020 BUDGET 154,973 10,350 10,000 175,323 (5,000) (5,000)

VARIANCE 2,300 10,000 12,300 -

182,622

170,323

12,300

5,000 83,500

5,000 68,500

15,000

271,122

243,823

27,300

90


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PARKING DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Contracts Parking Enforcement

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

5,123 86,350 47,510 84,574 223,558

5,126 86,350 47,510 84,574 223,560

-

Revenue

(183,000) (59,260) (242,260)

(183,000) (59,260) (242,260)

-

Net Cost

(18,702)

(18,700)

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

88,173

85,673

2,500

Division Levy Requirement

69,470

66,973

2,498

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants (DIA Contribution) Other Revenue

(2)

(2)

(2)

91


CITY OF OWEN SOUND HUMAN RESOURCES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE HR Manager

1 PTE

HR Admin

Contracts HR Legal 3rd Party Investigation EAP

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

217,594 22,400 101,000 340,994 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

169,980 22,400 101,000 293,380 -

47,614 47,614 -

Net Cost

340,994

293,380

47,614

Transfer from reservers Internal Cost Allocation

(84,551)

(34,551)

(50,000)

Division Levy Requirement

256,442

258,829

(2,386)

92


CITY OF OWEN SOUND WSIB DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Health and Safety Coordinator

Contracts Disability Case Mgmt HR Coordinator

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

85,009 21,625 10,000 116,634 116,634 (8,650) 107,984

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

79,842 21,625 10,000 111,467 111,467 (8,650) 102,817

5,167 5,167 -

5,167 -

5,167

93


CITY OF OWEN SOUND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 4 FTE IT Manager Systems Specialist Software and Training Help Desk Analyst

Contracts Network Support

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

427,060 435,250 56,000 918,310 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

379,829 377,550 56,000 813,379 -

47,232 57,700 104,932 -

918,310

813,379

104,932

(502,242)

(412,417)

(89,825)

416,069

400,962

15,107

94


CITY OF OWEN SOUND ACCOUNTING, ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND PAYROLL DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 4 FTE Deputy Treasurer AP Coordinator Financial Analyst Payroll Coordinator

Contracts Financial Audit

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

393,585 11,610 30,000 435,195 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

383,487 11,610 30,000 425,097 -

10,098 10,098 -

Net Cost

435,195

425,097

10,098

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

(96,079)

(88,579)

(7,500)

Division Levy Requirement

339,116

336,518

2,598

95


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PURCHASING, ASSET AND RISK MANAGEMENT DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 3 FTE Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Purchasing, Asset and Risk Mgr Contract Services Asset and Risk Admin Debt Payments Gross Costs

Contracts n/a

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

335,486 18,450 353,936 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

253,499 18,450 271,949 -

81,987 81,987 -

353,936

271,949

81,987

(234,055)

(152,953)

(81,103)

119,881

118,996

885

96


CITY OF OWEN SOUND GEOGRAPHICAL INFO SYSTEM DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE GIS Specialist

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts n/a

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

105,754 3,000 108,754 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

104,191 3,000 107,191 -

1,563 1,563 -

Net Cost

108,754

107,191

1,563

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

(99,795)

(94,795)

(5,000)

12,396

(3,437)

Division Levy Requirement

8,959

97


CITY OF OWEN SOUND TAXATION AND WATER BILLING DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 3 FTE Revenue Manager Tax Collector Water Billing Coord.

Contracts MTE Tax Specialists Tax Sale Support Water Meter Reading

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

275,278 56,160 39,500 370,938

275,740 56,160 39,500 371,400

Revenue

(104,000) (104,000)

(111,000) (111,000)

7,000 7,000

Net Cost

266,938

260,400

6,538

(2,000) (201,538)

(2,000) (193,506)

(8,032)

64,894

(1,494)

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

63,400

(462) (462)

98


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CUSTOMER SERVICE DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE, 1 PTE SOS representative SOS representative Summer Student

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts Grants Banking Agreement Other Revenue Revenue

131,066 3,250 3,500 137,816 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

120,213 3,250 3,500 126,963 -

10,853 10,853 -

Net Cost

137,816

126,963

10,853

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

(92,400)

(84,100)

(8,300)

45,416

42,863

2,553

Division Levy Requirement

99


CITY OF OWEN SOUND OPERATIONS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2020 DRAFT BUDGET 2400 2401 2402 2410 2411 2412 2426 2412 2413 2416 2417 2440 2425

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS TRANSIT AIRPORT MANAGERS LABOUR AND FLEET ROADS MAINTENANCE STORM AND DRAINGE WINTER CONTROL TRAFFIC AND STREETLIGHTS WASTE MANAGEMENT SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING LANDFILL

87,793 1,044,726 232,573 274,370 39,589 1,022,485 174,497 1,878,617 465,395 542,177 (120,704) 200,770 219,746

6,062,034 BUDGET BREAKDOWN WAGES DEBT PAYMENTS MATERIALS LEGAL AND CONTRACT EXTERNAL TRANSFERS GRANTS REVENUE AND USER FEES Net Operating Budget NET TRANSFERRED FROM OTHER DEPT'S TRANSFERRED TO RESERVES TAX BURDEN

2020 BUDGET 85,005 992,481 227,916 223,600 45,219 973,391 123,718 1,839,804 401,977 548,432 (121,262) 302,256 198,220

VARIANCE 2,789 52,245 4,657 50,770 (5,630) 49,094 50,779 38,813 63,418 (6,255) 558 (101,486) 21,526

5,840,758

221,276

2021 3,247,649 168,627 1,656,879 3,014,270 267,294 (643,700) (1,223,250)

2020 3,167,419 168,627 1,621,079 2,898,100 267,294 (610,500) (1,248,250)

change 80,231 35,800 116,170 (33,200) 25,000

6,487,768

6,263,768

(803,234) 377,500

6,062,034

(750,510) 327,500

5,840,758

224,001

(52,725) 50,000 221,276

100


CITY OF OWEN SOUND OPERATIONS DIRECTOR DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Director

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

189,293 6,350 1,500 197,143 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

186,505 6,350 1,500 194,355 -

2,789 2,789 -

197,143

194,355

2,789

(109,350)

(109,350)

-

85,005

2,789

87,793

101


CITY OF OWEN SOUND TRANSIT DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE, 1 PTE Transit Terminal Op Transit Terminal Op

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts First Student Snow Removal

109,976 161,100 1,323,600 1,594,676

2020 BUDGET 108,491 160,700 1,274,100 1,543,291

VARIANCE 1,485 400 49,500 51,385

Revenue

(255,000) (384,250) (639,250)

(255,000) (384,250) (639,250)

-

Net Cost

955,426

904,041

51,385

89,300

88,440

860

1,044,726

992,481

52,245

Grants Other Revenue

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

102


CITY OF OWEN SOUND AIRPORT DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET N/A

Contracts

VARIANCE

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

17,000 80,349 133,500 230,848

17,343 80,349 128,500 226,191

(343) 5,000 4,657

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

(56,000) (56,000)

(56,000) (56,000)

-

Net Cost

174,848

170,191

4,657

30,000 27,725

30,000 27,725

-

232,573

227,916

4,657

Gross Costs

Airport Mgmt

2020 BUDGET

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

103


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PUBLIC WORKS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 3 FTE Roads Supervisor 2 x Admin Assistant

Cleaning

VARIANCE

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

319,655 112,905 24,000 456,560

313,886 112,905 24,000 450,790

5,770 5,770

Grants Other Revenue (bulk water)

Revenue

(15,000) (15,000)

(15,000) (15,000)

-

Net Cost

441,560

435,790

5,770

(167,190)

(212,190)

45,000

274,370

223,600

50,770

Gross Costs

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

104


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PWT LABOUR AND FLEET DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 22 FTE 6 Seasonal LEO

Salaries and Benefits Less Charged Out Materials and Supplies Less Charged Out Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts None

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

1,903,547 (1,702,914) 503,956 (925,000) (220,411) -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

1,869,571 (1,655,507) 496,156 (925,000) (214,781) -

33,976 (47,406) 7,800 (5,630) -

(220,411)

(214,781)

(5,630)

260,000 -

260,000 -

-

39,589

45,219

(5,630)

105


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PWT ROADS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

Roads and Roadside Maintenance Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts Maintenance Sidewalk Condition Reflectivity Survey Line painting

Grants - County Contribution Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

645,955 383,531 155,500 1,184,985 (127,500) (127,500) 1,057,485 (35,000) 1,022,485

624,861 363,531 147,500 1,135,891 (127,500) (127,500) 1,008,391

21,094 20,000 8,000 49,094 -

49,094

(35,000)

-

973,391

49,094

106


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PWT ROADS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

Winter Control Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

990,674 863,443 24,500 1,878,617 1,878,617 1,878,617

951,861 863,443 24,500 1,839,804 1,839,804 1,839,804

38,813 38,813 -

38,813 -

38,813

107


CITY OF OWEN SOUND STORM WATER MANAGEMENT DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET

VARIANCE

20,000 20,000

20,000 20,000

-

Revenue

-

-

-

Net Cost

20,000

20,000

-

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

75,000 79,497

25,000 78,718

50,000 779

174,497

123,718

50,779

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Grants Other Revenue

Division Levy Requirement

108


CITY OF OWEN SOUND SOURCE WATER PROTECTION DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services External Transfer Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

6,500 267,294 273,794 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

6,500 267,294 273,794 -

-

273,794

273,794

-

(267,294)

(267,294)

-

6,500

6,500

-

109


CITY OF OWEN SOUND ENGINEERING DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 7 FTE Engineering Mgr 4 x Technologists 1 Assistant Contracts Manager

Contracts Bridge Inspections Road Condition

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

715,293 15,100 39,500 769,893

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

697,830 15,100 29,500 742,430

17,464 10,000 27,464

(35,000) (35,000)

35,000 35,000

769,893

707,430

62,464

(569,123)

(405,174)

(163,950)

200,770

302,256

(101,486)

-

110


CITY OF OWEN SOUND STREETLIGHTS AND TRAFFIC CONTROL DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Contracts Traffic Signal Maint Streetlight Maint

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

1,754 178,097 75,000 147,816 402,666 402,666 62,729 465,395

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

1,064 178,097 75,000 147,816 401,977 401,977 401,977

689 689 -

689 62,729

63,418

111


CITY OF OWEN SOUND SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Contracts Waste Management Transfer Station Recycling Collection Compost Station

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

61,183 252,086 1,016,170 1,329,439

2020 BUDGET 56,808 244,486 992,500 1,293,795

VARIANCE 4,375 7,600 23,670 35,645

Revenue

(261,200) (619,900) (881,100)

(228,000) (609,900) (837,900)

(33,200) (10,000) (43,200)

Net Cost

448,339

455,895

(7,555)

12,500 81,338

12,500 80,038

1,300

542,177

548,432

(6,255)

Grants Other Revenue

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

112


CITY OF OWEN SOUND ENERGY REVENUES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Contracts Hydro One Grasshopper

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

100 20,811 20,911

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

100 20,811 20,911

-

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

(145,750) (145,750)

(145,750) (145,750)

-

Net Cost

(124,839)

(124,839)

-

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

4,135 (120,704)

3,578 (121,262)

558

558

113


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CLOSED LANDFILL AND GARBAGE DISP DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Contracts Leachate hauling Snow Removal Monitoring

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

2,734 4,862 214,500 222,096 (2,350) (2,350) 219,746 219,746

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

1,207 4,862 194,500 200,570 (2,350) (2,350) 198,220 198,220

1,526 20,000 21,526 -

21,526 -

21,526

114


CITY OF OWEN SOUND COMMUNITY SERVICES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2500 2510 2520 2514 2415 2532 2533 2530 2540 2541

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY SERVICES BUILDING INSPECTION PLANNING PARKS AND GREENSPACES CEMETERY AND PLAYSPACES GENERA PROGRAMS FACILITY BOOKING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TOURISM SPECIAL EVENTS GENERAL

BUDGET BREAKDOWN WAGES DEBT PAYMENTS MATERIALS LEGAL AND CONTRACT EXTERNAL TRANSFER GRANTS REVENUE AND USER FEES Net Operating Budget NET TRANSFERRED TO OTHER DEPT'S TRANSFERRED TO RESERVES TAX BURDEN

2020 BUDGET

55,137 (262) 289,172 1,484,102 358,298 (6,309) (852,457) 226,716 167,173 160,054

41,577 8,101 295,254 1,511,856 338,191 (7,800) (856,865) 245,897 157,856 144,517

1,881,623

1,878,584

2021 2,998,157 58,668 760,309 350,145 40,000 (10,000) (2,604,300)

2020 2,780,061 89,967 748,509 348,045 40,000 (10,000) (2,380,050)

1,592,979

1,616,531

252,143 36,500

135,153 126,900

1,881,623

1,878,584

VARIANCE 13,560 (8,363) (6,083) (27,754) 20,107 1,491 4,408 (19,182) 9,317 15,538 3,039

change 218,097 (31,298) 11,800 2,100 (224,250) #

(23,552)

116,990 (90,400) 3,039

115


CITY OF OWEN SOUND COMMUNITY SERVICES DIRECTOR DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2 FTE Director Admin Assistant

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

270,332 4,750 1,500 276,582 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

256,772 4,750 1,500 263,022 -

13,560 13,560 -

276,582

263,022

13,560

(221,445)

(221,445)

-

41,577

13,560

55,137

116


CITY OF OWEN SOUND BUILDING DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 4 FTE CBO Deputy CBO Development Coordinator Building Admin

Contracts none

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

434,505 24,300 1,550 460,355

314,173 24,300 1,550 340,023

120,332 120,332

Revenue

(470,000) (470,000)

(305,000) (305,000)

(165,000) (165,000)

Net Cost

(9,645)

35,023

(44,668)

(80,000) 53,078

(95,000) 131,305

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

(175,000) 184,383 (262)

8,101

(8,363)

117


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PLANNING AND HERITAGE DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 3 FTE Planner 2 x Int Planner

none

VARIANCE

333,883 21,750 22,500 378,133

317,992 21,750 22,500 362,242

15,891 15,891

Revenue

40,000 (230,000) (190,000)

40,000 (165,000) (125,000)

(65,000) (65,000)

Net Cost

188,133

237,242

(49,109)

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

101,039

58,013

43,026

Division Levy Requirement

289,172

295,254

(6,083)

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Grants Other Revenue

118


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PROGRAMS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET

(1,109) (1,109)

Revenue

(137,550) (137,550)

(137,550) (137,550)

-

Net Cost

(56,472)

(55,362)

(1,109)

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

50,163

47,563

2,600

Division Levy Requirement

(6,309)

(7,800)

1,491

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Contracts YMCA

VARIANCE

2,938 12,150 67,100 82,188

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

1,828 12,150 67,100 81,078

2020 BUDGET

119


CITY OF OWEN SOUND FACILITY BOOKING DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Facility Booking Coordinator

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

82,462 4,460 86,922

VARIANCE 1,258 1,000 2,258

Revenue

(378,150) (93,500) (520,200) (78,000) (1,069,850)

(378,150) (93,500) (520,200) (78,000) (1,069,850)

Net Cost

(980,670)

(982,928)

2,258

50,000 75,063

3,150

(857,865)

5,408

Grants Bayshore Revenue Attack Revenue RRC Revenue Sportsfield Revenue Other Revenue

Contracts

83,720 5,460 89,180

2020 BUDGET

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

50,000 78,213 (852,457)

-

120


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PWT PARKS AND GREENSPACES AND DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 8 FTE 13 SEASONAL 10 STUDENT

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Parks Manager Gross Costs Parks Supervisor Parks & Cem Admin 5 x Parks Labour Grants Other Revenue

Contracts Camp Security

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

1,258,921 425,502 109,600 42,557 1,836,580 (374,000) (374,000) 1,462,580 99,000 (77,478) 1,484,102

2020 BUDGET 1,261,171 415,502 109,600 73,855 1,860,128 (370,000) (370,000) 1,490,128 99,000 (77,272) 1,511,856

VARIANCE (2,250) 10,000 (31,298) (23,548) (4,000) (4,000)

(27,548) (206)

(27,754)

121


CITY OF OWEN SOUND PWT CEMETERY AND PLAYGROUNDS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2 FTE 2 Seasonal

VARIANCE

231,815 68,877 8,200 16,112 325,003

228,822 58,877 8,200 16,112 312,011

2,992 10,000 12,992

Revenue

(168,150) (168,150)

(174,150) (174,150)

6,000 6,000

Net Cost

156,853

137,861

18,992

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

40,000 161,445

40,000 160,330

1,115

Division Levy Requirement

358,298

338,191

20,107

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

122


CITY OF OWEN SOUND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Manager of Community Dev.

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

123,481 43,410 20,000 186,891 -

2020 BUDGET 121,662 52,410 35,000 209,072 (3,000) (3,000)

VARIANCE 1,818 (9,000) (15,000) (22,182) 3,000 3,000

186,891

206,072

(19,182)

39,825

39,825

-

226,716

245,897

(19,182)

123


CITY OF OWEN SOUND TOURISM MANAGER DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Tourism Coordinator

3 Students

VARIANCE

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

114,023 66,650 180,673

110,706 60,650 171,356

3,317 6,000 9,317

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

(13,500) (13,500)

(13,500) (13,500)

-

Net Cost

167,173

157,856

9,317

Gross Costs

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

167,173

157,856

-

9,317

124


CITY OF OWEN SOUND SPECIAL EVENTS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Events Coordinator

VARIANCE

145,650 87,460 115,895 349,004

83,362 92,660 98,795 274,817

62,288 (5,200) 17,100 74,188

Revenue

(10,000) (137,450) (147,450)

(10,000) (137,450) (147,450)

-

Net Cost

201,554

127,367

74,188

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

22,500 (64,000)

17,900 -

4,600 (64,000)

Division Levy Requirement

160,054

145,267

14,788

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Grants Other Revenue

125


CITY OF OWEN SOUND FACILITIES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2430 2431 2432 2433 2435 2436

FACILIITES MANAGER CITY HALL POLICE BUILDING BAYSHORE GENERAL FACILITIES REGIONAL RECREATION CENTRE

BUDGET BREAKDOWN WAGES DEBT PAYMENTS MATERIALS LEGAL AND CONTRACT REVENUE AND USER FEES Net Operating Budget

NET TRANSFERRED TO OTHER DEPT'S TRANSFERRED TO RESERVES TAX BURDEN

2020 BUDGET

44,104 206,582 279,285 985,067 189,665 966,089

41,861 211,105 281,246 989,951 201,513 923,066

2,670,792

2,648,742

2021 1,117,686 42,631 1,088,990 407,750

2020 1,118,288 42,631 1,064,990 395,750

(55,964) 2,601,092

(44,300) 114,000

2,670,792

(55,964) 2,565,695

(40,953) 124,000

2,648,742

VARIANCE 2,243 (4,523) (1,962) (4,884) (11,848) 43,023 22,051

change (602) 24,000 12,000 35,398

(3,347) (10,000)

22,051

126


CITY OF OWEN SOUND FACILITIES MANAGER DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Sr Manager Parks and Facilities

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

152,454 4,700 157,154 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

150,211 4,700 154,911 -

2,243 2,243 -

157,154

154,911

2,243

(113,050)

(113,050)

-

41,861

2,243

44,104

127


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CITY HALL DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Contracts Cleaning Service Agreements

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

18,282 85,500 60,000 163,782 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

20,805 85,500 52,000 158,305 -

(2,523) 8,000 5,477 -

163,782

158,305

5,477

35,000 7,800

45,000 7,800

(10,000) -

206,582

211,105

(4,523)

128


CITY OF OWEN SOUND POLICE STATION DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Contracts Cleaning Snow Removal

Gross Costs

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

5,485 169,000 97,000 271,485 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

7,446 169,000 97,000 273,446 -

271,485

273,446

7,800

7,800

279,285

281,246

(1,962) (1,962) -

(1,962) -

(1,962)

129


CITY OF OWEN SOUND BAYSHORE DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 5 FTE Salaries and Benefits Facility Supervisor Materials and Supplies 4 x Facility Attendant Contract Services Debt Payments Gross Costs

Contracts Snow Removal Equipment Service

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

535,077 388,490 111,250 1,034,817 (26,050) (26,050) 1,008,767

2020 BUDGET 540,961 387,490 111,250 1,039,701 (26,050) (26,050) 1,013,651

VARIANCE (5,884) 1,000 (4,884) -

(4,884)

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation

12,500 (36,200)

12,500 (36,200)

-

Division Levy Requirement

985,067

989,951

(4,884)

130


CITY OF OWEN SOUND REGIONAL REC CENTRE DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 3 FTE, 2 PT Facility Attendants

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts Snow Removal Equipment Service

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

327,489 382,800 134,000 844,289 -

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

309,966 359,800 134,000 803,766 -

17,523 23,000 40,523 -

844,289

803,766

40,523

62,500 59,300

62,500 56,800

2,500

966,089

923,066

43,023

131


CITY OF OWEN SOUND OTHER PROPERTIES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2 FTE Facility Carpenter Facility Labourer

Contracts

VARIANCE

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

78,899 58,500 5,500 42,631 185,530

88,899 58,500 1,500 42,631 191,530

(10,001) 4,000 (6,001)

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue

(29,914) (29,914)

(29,914) (29,914)

-

Net Cost

155,615

161,616

(6,001)

4,000 30,050

4,000 35,897

(5,847)

189,665

201,513

(11,848)

Gross Costs

Service Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

132


CITY OF OWEN SOUND FIRE PROTECTION SERVICES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2020 BUDGET

2021 DRAFT BUDGET 2101 2120 2130 2135 2140 2180 2185

FIRE GENERAL FIRE PREVENTION EMERGENCY OPER C C FIRE AND RESCUE TRAINING WATER RESCUE EQUIMENT PROPERTY

BUDGET BREAKDOWN WAGES DEBT PAYMENTS MATERIALS LEGAL AND CONTRACT GRANTS REVENUE AND USER FEES Net Operating Budget NET TRANSFERRED TO OTHER DEPT'S TRANSFERRED TO RESERVES TAX BURDEN

4,822,092.91 4,500.00 3,000.00 428,150.00 74,560.64

4,883,989.77 4,500.00 3,000.00 378,150.00 74,560.64

-61,896.87 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 50,000.00 0.00

5,332,303.54

5,344,200.41

-11,896.87

2020 4,635,813.54 237,555.00 112,435.00

2020 4,734,645.41 237,555.00 78,000.00

(11,500.00) $

VARIANCE

4,974,304

-98,831.87 0.00 0.00 34,435.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

(11,500.00) $

5,038,700

# $

(64,397)

9,000.00 349,000.00

16,500.00 289,000.00

-7,500.00 60,000.00

5,332,304

5,344,200

(11,897)

133


CITY OF OWEN SOUND FIRE DEPARTMENT DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 29 FTE Fire Officers

1 FTE

Fire Chief

1 FTE

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

4,635,814 237,555 112,435 4,985,804

2020 BUDGET 4,734,645 237,555 78,000 5,050,200

VARIANCE (98,832) 34,435 (64,397)

Deputy Fire Chief

Contracts

Dispatch (OSPS)

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

(11,500) (11,500)

(11,500) (11,500)

-

4,974,304

5,038,700

(64,397)

349,000 9,000

289,000 16,500

60,000 (7,500)

5,332,304

5,344,200

(11,897)

134


CITY OF OWEN SOUND TOM THOMSON ART GALLERY DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2020 DRAFT BUDGET 7501 7510 7520 7522 7525 7530 7533 7540 7550 7560 7562 7571 7585

6 FTE

GALLERY GENERAL GIFT SHOP MOVIES SPECIAL EVENTS ENDOWMENT FUNDS MEMBERSHIP COMMUNITY OUTREACH EXHIBITIONS COLLECTION MANAGEMENT EDUCATION STUDIO ONTARIO SEED BUILDING

BUDGET BREAKDOWN WAGES DEBT PAYMENTS MATERIALS LEGAL AND CONTRACT GRANTS REVENUE AND USER FEES

2020 BUDGET

(21,867) (16,650) (28,650) (30,000) (5,000) (15,500) 400 33,600 15,250 (3,700) (500) 1,775 72,950

(39,906) (16,708) (27,650) (12,500) (12,500) (15,500) 400 32,275 15,250 (3,700) (3,000) 1,775 72,950

2,108

(8,814)

2021 545,053 50,000 134,100 34,200 (133,171) (151,700)

2020 461,048 50,000 136,975 33,700 (138,171) (152,058)

VARIANCE 18,039 58 (1,000) (17,500) 7,500 1,325 2,500 -

10,922

84,005 (2,875) 500 5,000 358

Net Operating Budget

478,482

391,494

86,988

NET TRANSFERRED TO OTHER DEPT'S CITY CONTRIBUTION

(1,375) (475,000)

(308) (400,000)

(1,067) (75,000)

2,108

(8,814)

TAX BURDEN

10,922

135


Owen Sound & North Grey Union Public Library 2020 Draft Operating Budget - with unaudited actuals to August 31, 2020

Approved

ACTUAL

Over /Under

Proposed

2020

31-Aug-20

Budget YTD

2021

987,189.00 -----------------987,189.00

658,126.00 -----------------658,126.00

329,063.00 -----------------329,063.00

993,752.00 -----------------993,752.00

162,076.00 351,983.00 135,881.00 -----------------Total Township Support: ** 649,940.00 Total Municipal Support Before Rebate:1,637,129.00 Rebate to Municipalities -72,589.00

108,051.00 234,655.00 90,588.00 -----------------433,294.00 1,091,420.00

54,025.00 117,328.00 45,293.00 -----------------216,646.00

160,657.00 362,720.00 139,125.00 -----------------662,502.00 1,656,254.00 -72,589.00 -----------------1,583,665.00 ------------------

NOTES

LIBRARY OPERATING BUDGET:

UNION LIBRARY SUPPORT: MUNICIPAL REVENUE: CITY SUPPORT: City Operating Grant Total City Support: ** TOWNSHIP SUPPORT Township of Chatsworth** Township of Georgian Bluffs** Municipality of Meaford**

TOTAL UNION LIBRARY SUPPORT:

1,564,540.00 1,091,420.00 473,120.00 ------------------ =========== ===========

NON-MUNICIPAL REVENUE: Legislative Grant(Prov) 72,589.00 Pay Equity 3,391.00 Employment Grants - YCW, CAP, ALC, etc 3,500.00 Non-Resident Memberships 500.00 Fines 25,000.00 Non-Member Computer/Internet Fees 1,500.00 Copying/Printing 5,440.00 Room Rentals/AV Rentals 3,000.00 Publicity & Programming 2,000.00 Interest 9,000.00 Misc Revenue 5,000.00 Donations - HWB / AAM 27,000.00 Transfers from Reserves Current Year 150,500.00 Transfers from Reserves Previous Year 0.00 ALC Administration 50,000.00 -----------------TOTAL NON-MUNICIPAL REVENUE: 358,420.00

GRAND TOTAL ALL REVENUE:

72,589.00 3,391.00 0.00 160.00 4,265.00 255.00 1,095.00 319.00 -4.00 9,512.00 11,331.00 8,340.00 125,000.00 0.00 67,865.00 -----------------304,118.00

0.00 0.00 3,500.00 340.00 20,735.00 1,245.00 4,345.00 2,681.00 2,004.00 -512.00 -6,331.00 18,660.00 25,500.00 0.00 -17,865.00 -----------------54,302.00

1,922,960.00 1,395,538.00 527,422.00 ============ ============ ============

based on August 31, 2020 membership Municipal overall increase of 1.22 % after rebate

72,589.00 3,391.00 3,500.00 500.00 3,500.00 1,500.00 5,000.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 12,000.00 5,000.00 27,000.00 30,000.00$15,000 for Lib. Collection from Book Sale Reserve, $10,000 for Lib. Collection from 0.00 Trust & Donations Reserve, $5,000 from Poet Laureate 60,000.00 -----------------226,480.00

1,810,145.00 ============

136


Approved

ACTUAL

Over /Under

Proposed

2020

31-Aug-20

Budget

2021

NOTES

YTD SALARIES & BENEFITS: Wages - Full/Part Time Wages - Shelving Assistants Wages - Summer/Special Grants Allotment for 27th pay WAGES: Sub-Total:

BENEFITS: Sub-Total:

TOTAL WAGES & BENEFITS:

LIBRARY COLLECTION: Adult Books/Audio Visual Magazines & Newspapers Juv Books/Audio Visual/Toy Yard e-Resources Processing & Delivery TOTAL LIBRARY COLLECTION:

OCCUPANCY EXPENSE: Caretaking Supplies Utilities Elevator Service Insurance Repairs & Maintenance Operating Capital Landscaping Security Systems TOTAL OCCUPANCY EXPENSE:

977,188.00 34,384.00

671,198.00 14,712.00

305,990.00 19,672.00

1,009,586.00 32,928.00

12,000.00

0.00

12,000.00

10,000.00

4,000.00 ----------------1,027,572.00

4,000.00 ----------------689,910.00

----------------337,662.00

4,000.00 ----------------1,056,514.00

293,938.00

194,809.00

99,129.00

308,181.00

1,321,510.00 884,719.00 436,791.00 =========== =========== ===========

1,364,695.00 ===========

includes 2021 increase

increase over 2020 = 3.27 %

73,000.00 12,000.00 30,000.00 50,000.00 10,000.00 -----------------175,000.00

28,597.00 9,880.00 15,310.00 45,381.00 4,463.00 -----------------103,631.00

44,403.00 2,120.00 14,690.00 4,619.00 5,537.00 -----------------71,369.00

73,000.00 12,000.00 30,000.00 50,000.00 10,000.00 -----------------175,000.00 $15,000 from Book Sale Reserve & $10,000 from Trust & Donations Reserve

2,000.00 62,000.00 7,500.00 8,500.00 25,000.00 20,000.00 3,500.00 2,000.00 -----------------130,500.00

2,586.00 24,215.00 4,850.00 0.00 10,355.00 0.00 2,403.00 132.00 -----------------44,541.00

-586.00 37,785.00 2,650.00 8,500.00 14,645.00 20,000.00 1,097.00 1,868.00 -----------------85,959.00

3,500.00 60,000.00 7,500.00 8,500.00 15,000.00 10,000.00 3,500.00 2,000.00 -----------------110,000.00

137


Approved

ACTUAL

Over /Under

Proposed

2020

31-Aug-20

Budget YTD

2021

10,000.00 2,000.00 6,000.00 8,500.00 12,000.00 2,500.00 9,000.00 2,000.00 3,500.00 27,000.00

TOTAL OTHER EXPENSES:

26,000.00 2,900.00 50.00 6,500.00 3,500.00 1,000.00 23,500.00 135,000.00 15,000.00 -----------------295,950.00

5,631.00 1,033.00 5,722.00 4,412.00 1,628.00 2,127.00 5,445.00 528.00 633.00 29,117.00 0.00 22,380.00 0.00 0.00 3,016.00 1,855.00 381.00 0.00 80,759.00 0.00 -----------------164,667.00

4,369.00 967.00 278.00 4,088.00 10,372.00 373.00 3,555.00 1,472.00 2,867.00 -2,117.00 0.00 3,620.00 2,900.00 50.00 3,484.00 1,645.00 619.00 23,500.00 54,241.00 15,000.00 -----------------131,283.00

10,000.00 2,000.00 6,000.00 8,500.00 5,000.00 2,500.00 9,000.00 2,000.00 3,500.00 27,000.00 26,000.00 2,900.00 50.00 6,500.00 3,500.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 40,000.00 0.00 -----------------160,450.00

TOTAL COMBINED EXPENSES:

1,922,960.00

1,197,558.00

725,402.00

1,810,145.00

LIBRARY OPERATING SURPLUS (DEFICIT): 0.00 ==========

197,980.00 ==========

-197,980.00 ==========

0.00 ==========

OTHER EXPENSES: Photocopier Postage/Frieght & Courier Telephone Staff Education & Travel Publicity & Programming Memberships Fees Library Supplies Library Furnishings Machine Repairs & Expense IT / LAN / Computers IT Service Contract Automated Systems Maintenance RFID/Self Checkout Maintenance Bindery Professional/Audit Fees Miscellaneous Expense Board Expenses-Ed/Training Poet Laureate Special Project Expenses Transfers to Reserves

NOTES

$5000 Poet Laureate

138


CITY OF OWEN SOUND POLICE SERVICES DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 3000 3100 3200 3300

POL SERV BOARD POLICE FORCE POLICE CIVILIANS COURT SECURITY

BUDGET BREAKDOWN WAGES DEBT PAYMENTS MATERIALS GRANTS REVENUE AND USER FEES

Net Operating Budget Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation TAX BURDEN

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

37,133 6,409,256 1,035,970 335,901

38,403 6,235,639 1,056,726 282,519

-1,270 173,617 -20,756 53,382

7,818,259

7,613,287

204,972

2021 9,739,624 389,122 235,706 (619,581) (1,894,112)

2020 9,513,940 389,232 229,406 (619,581) (1,867,211)

change 225,684 -110 6,300 0 -26,902

7,850,759 (32,500) 0

7,818,259

7,645,786 (32,500) 0

7,613,287

#

204,972

0 0 204,972

139


CITY OF OWEN SOUND POLICE SERVICES BOARD DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Events Coordinator

VARIANCE

31,630 20,150 9,000 60,780

31,750 21,300 9,000 62,050

(120) (1,150) (1,270)

Revenue

-

-

-

Net Cost

60,780

62,050

(1,270)

(32,500) 8,853

(32,500) 8,853

-

37,133

38,403

(1,270)

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Grants Other Revenue

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

140


CITY OF OWEN SOUND POLICE OFFICERS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

Grants Other Revenue

Revenue Net Cost

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

6,080,984 285,072 226,706 6,592,762 (197,368) (42,000) (239,368)

2020 BUDGET 5,914,206 284,532 220,406 6,419,145 (197,368) (42,000) (239,368)

6,353,394

6,179,777

55,862

55,862

6,409,256

6,235,639

VARIANCE 166,777 540 6,300 173,617 -

173,617 -

173,617

141


CITY OF OWEN SOUND POLICES CIVILIANS DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Events Coordinator

VARIANCE

2,877,297 75,500 2,952,797

2,872,151 74,500 2,946,651

5,145 1,000 6,145

Revenue

(1,852,112) (1,852,112)

(1,825,211) (1,825,211)

(26,902) (26,902)

Net Cost

1,100,684

1,121,441

(20,756)

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Grants Other Revenue

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

(64,715) 1,035,970

(64,715) 1,056,726

-

(20,756)

142


CITY OF OWEN SOUND COURT SECURITY DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 1 FTE Events Coordinator

VARIANCE

749,713 8,400 758,113

695,832 8,900 704,732

53,882 (500) 53,382

Revenue

(422,213) (422,213)

(422,213) (422,213)

-

Net Cost

335,901

282,519

53,382

Salaries and Benefits Materials and Supplies Contract Services Debt Payments

Gross Costs

Contracts

2020 BUDGET

Grants Other Revenue

Reserve Contribution Internal Cost Allocation Division Levy Requirement

335,901

282,519

-

53,382

143


CITY OF OWEN SOUND CAPITAL LEVY DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 11-2304-1410-65620 11-2304-1410-65622 11-2230-1480-65620 11-2413-4701-65620

TRANSFER TO CAPITAL RESERVE MATURED DEBT ROOM TRANSFER TO IT RESERVE TRANSFER TO STREETLIGHT

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

2,475,500 156,079 85,000 50,000

2,329,500 457,957 -

146,000 (301,878) 85,000 50,000

2,766,579

2,787,457

(20,878)

144


CITY OF OWEN SOUND GENERAL REVENUE DRAFT 2021 OPERATING BUDGET 2021 DRAFT BUDGET 0110 0120 0140 0160 0101 0102 0103 0103

TAX REVENUE SUPPLIMENTALS REBATES (CIP, VACANCY, CHARITY ETC…) TAX WRITE OFF PAYMENTS IN LIEU ONTARIO MUNICIPAL PARTNERSHIP FUND PENALTY AND INTEREST ON TAX INTEREST REVENUE/EXPENSE

2020 BUDGET

VARIANCE

(31,744,258) (175,000) 318,000 400,000 (78,696) (1,897,600) (325,000) -

(30,895,225) (175,000) 420,000 350,000 (85,696) (1,756,000) (350,000)

(849,032) (102,000) 50,000 7,000 (141,600) 25,000 -

(33,502,554)

(32,491,921)

(1,010,632)

General Revenues are Taxes other revenues that cannot be attributed to a specific department. No staff or services are accounted for under this division.

145


APPENDIX B

SERVICE LEVEL CHANGE BUSINESS CASES

owensound.ca 146


ADDITIONAL STAFFING DEDICATED TO DOWNTOWN SURFACE REPAIR WORK BUSINESS CASE Version 1.0 11/18/2020

147


VERSION HISTORY Versio n# 1.0

Implemented By D. Kefalas

Revision Date 11/09/20

Approved By

Approval Date

Reason

148


149


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................ 5 2 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................ 6 2.1 Purpose of Business Case........................................................................... 6 3 PROJECT DESCRIPTION ......................................................................................... 6 4 HIGH-LEVEL BUSINESS IMPACT ............................................................................ 6 5 ALTERNATIVES AND ANALYSIS ............................................................................ 6 5.1 Alternative A ................................................................................................ 7 5.2 Alternative B ................................................................................................ 7 6 PREFERRED SOLUTION .......................................................................................... 8 6.1 Financial Considerations ............................................................................. 8 6.2 Preliminary Acquisition Strategy/Plan .......................................................... 9 6.3 Preliminary Work Breakdown Structure ....................................................... 9 7 EVALUATION .......................................................................................................... 10 7.1 Schedule .................................................................................................... 10 7.2 Communication Plan .................................................................................. 10 7.3 Evaluation .................................................................................................. 10 APPENDIX A: BUSINESS CASE - LITE APPROVAL ................................................. 11 APPENDIX B: REFERENCES ..................................................................................... 12 APPENDIX C: KEY TERMS ......................................................................................... 13

150


1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The prepared business case deals with transitioning two seasonal staff in Public Works to full time. The seasonal staff in question are hired on an annual basis to conduct winter control activities. The reason for the transitioning is to have additional resources that would be dedicated to making repairs of the flat surface (i.e., concrete sidewalks, paving stone boulevards) work in the downtown core. Work that needs to be done. The cost to the City will be approximately $110,000 in additional wages and approximately $20,000 in the purchase of materials needed to complete the work. The net benefit for the City by bringing this work in-house will be approximately $154,000 over the five year financial analysis. The additional resources will also provide additional benefits in the preparing the City for winter control in the late fall and transitioning out of winter control in the spring. The new two full time staff will spend approximately 22 weeks doing winter control and 30 weeks dedicated to the flat surface repair work in the downtown core on an annual basis.

151


2 INTRODUCTION 2.1

PURPOSE OF BUSINESS CASE The intended audience of the Additional Staffing Dedicated to Downtown Flat Surfacing Work Business Case is City Council, the project sponsor and senior leadership.

3 PROJECT DESCRIPTION This project involves retaining two seasonal winter control staff full time in Public Works who will be dedicated to making repairs and maintaining the flat surface (i.e., concrete sidewalks, paving stone boulevards) work in the downtown core.

4 HIGH-LEVEL BUSINESS IMPACT The additional staffing will increase the 2020 salaries and wages for PWT Labour & Fleet by $110,000. Additional concrete will have to be purchased in order to provide staff the required materials to complete the anticipated work. It is anticipated that approximately $20,000 worth of concrete will be required on annual basis.

5 ALTERNATIVES AND ANALYSIS Over time the paving stone brick work downtown has started to settle creating trip hazards that need to be addressed. The City has also experience heaving of the sidewalks associated with expansion of the concrete during the hot summer months. Upon investigation it appears that partial penetrating expansion joints were used during the Big Dig and this appears to be the cause of the problem. The biggest issue the City faces is lining up contractors to do the work. Some years like 2019 the City could not find contractors interested in doing the concrete work, other years like 2020 the City finds a contractor willing to do the work but they don’t show up to do the work because they find more lucrative work to do and keep pushing off the City work. In some cases the issues pose a threat to pedestrians and has to be completed in a timely manner. Several of these problem areas are located adjacent to entrances of businesses located on 2nd Ave. East. This just compounds the trip hazard because foot traffic is coming from 3 different directions. This is work that must be done and a necessary investment in the City’s downtown core. The City spent millions of dollars in beautifying the downtown during the Big Dig but as expected this work requires increasing maintenance costs to keep it in good repair. Maintaining the status quo of not investing isn’t an alternative that was considered because by doing so the City would not be adhering to the minimum maintenance standards for sidewalks.

152


5.1

ALTERNATIVE A Bring in-house the concrete repairs and paving stone brick work in the downtown core. The major benefits for bringing this work in-house include: • Making repairs in a timely manner. • Not paying markups on materials, supplies and labour (industry norm is 15%). • Not paying profit on materials, supplies, labour and equipment (industry norm 10%). • Adhering to the provincial minimum maintenance standards for sidewalks. • Reducing the potential for trip hazards. • Reducing trip and fall claims against the City. • • •

Meet the scheduling needs of the businesses in the downtown core (City staff can and have worked with businesses to schedule work around their hours of operations). Fully burden hourly rate $34.63 - $36.15. Concrete price $145 per cubic meter (Year 1).

The following analysis is based on 2 staff, 30 weeks of work on an annual basis when the staff won’t be involved in winter control and purchasing $20,000 of concrete in Year 1 and equal amounts each year after. It also assumes a CPI increase of 2% on an annual basis and an annual wage increase of 1.50%. Alternatives Analysis Alternative A Cost of Alternative Cost Savings Cost Avoidance Stakeholder Benefit Total Benefit

5.2

Year1

Year2

Year3

Year4

Year5

Total

($103,112) $0 $152,812 $0 $49,700

($108,461) $0 $155,868 $0 $47,407

($110,190) $0 $158,985 $0 $48,795

($111,947) $0 $162,165 $0 $50,218

($113,732) $0 $165,408 $0 $51,676

($547,442) $0 $795,238 $0 $247,796

ALTERNATIVE B The alternate solution would be to contract out all the repair work. The benefits of contracting the work out include: • Adhering to the provincial maintenance standards for sidewalks. • Reducing the potential for trip hazards. • Reducing trip and fall claims against the City.

153


Disadvantages of contracting the work out include: • Not making repairs in a timely manner or at all. • Not meeting the operational needs of the business and shop owners. • Higher hourly rates ($42/hr.). • Paying markups for both overhead (15%) and profit (10%). • Concrete price $183 per cubic meter (Year 1). The analysis above includes the costs associated with contracting the same work out to the private sector and is reflected as “Cost Avoidance”

6 PREFERRED SOLUTION 6.1

FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS The analysis above clearly shows that it is more cost effective to bring the repair work of the flat surfacing in house. Over a five year span the City could save close to $250,000 for this specific type of work. There are financial costs associated with transitioning staff from seasonal to full time that will offset these savings. Transitioning the staff will mean keeping two employees for additional three weeks for winter control, seasonal staff are hire for 19 weeks of winter control, which will cost the City approximately $8,700 in Year 1 and increasing to approximately $9,200 by Year 5. The City will also be paying the full time staff slightly more than the seasonal staff for the remaining 19 weeks of winter control. This equates to approximately $7,600 in Year 1 and increase to approximately $10,500 by Year 5. Over the five-year period the City will incur approximately $93,500 in additional Winter Control costs. Thus, the net financial benefit over the five-year financial analysis is approximately $154,000. One other significant benefit in having two additional bodies that are consider full time is having this staff at our disposal to help with the transition periods at both the beginning of winter control and at the end of winter control. Times when we are trying to complete the last major cleanup of the City and the downtown core before the first major snowfall or in the spring when trying to remove the winter sand in anticipation of cycling season. Other benefits include:

154


6.2

Having the flexibility of being able to assign staff to work on various pieces of equipment depending on the need during winter control. Currently the seasonal staff can only operate the sidewalk plows/MV’s and not the street plows or heavy equipment. Transitioning the seasonal staff to full time staff will allow the Superintendent or Lead Hands to assign staff to equipment that is required based on the need. For example, during heavy snowfalls the number one priority is keeping the Class II streets and hills clear of snow. If the Superintendent/Lead Hand only has 2 or 3 full time staff and 2 seasonal staff available, they can only assign 2 or 3 plows to keep the roads and hills clear. In this example if one of the seasonal staff was a staff that transitioned to full time then we have the capability of getting one more plow on the road.

Reduces grievances related with the assignment of work and overtime associated with concrete and paving stone repairs. In the past management has had to deal with grievances from the union because the concrete work was deemed not to have been assigned fairly and equitably. In some cases, overtime was required to complete the work so that it didn’t interfere with the operating hours of businesses along 2nd Ave. East (i.e., doing the work on a Sunday when the specific store was closed). Having dedicated staff assigned for this type of work should reduce if not eliminate such grievances. Grievances that require significant management and Human Resource Staff’s time when dealing with the process.

PRELIMINARY ACQUISITION STRATEGY/PLAN The implementation plan is to complete the winter control schedule for 2020/21 and then start the hiring process for the two full time Operators who will be dedicated or assigned the flat surfacing repair work in the downtown core. The winter schedule ends in mid-April. The hiring process and start up time will range between 6 to 10 weeks resulting in starting date range of the full time employees sometime between June 1st and July 2nd. Moving forward PW will only be hiring two Temporary Seasonal PW Labourers for winter control as opposed to the four that have been hired previously. The City will still be hiring the four Temporary Seasonal PW Snow Shovellers.

6.3

PRELIMINARY WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE On an annual basis the two new full time Operators will be assigned winter control duties from the beginning of the year to midApril. Upon completion of winter control the Operators will be assigned a list of specific repairs of the flat surface work in the downtown core. This list of repairs will be generated by the “patroller” who will identify the sections of sidewalks and paving stones requiring repairs. The “patroller” is a Lead Hand or Temporary Lead Hand who is assigned the task of patrolling the streets with the mandate to identify problem areas and ensuring the City’s roads and sidewalks meet the minimum maintenance standards regulated by the province. From time to time this list will be revised when higher priority repairs (i.e., heat heaves) are identified. At the beginning of November, the Operators will be re-assigned to winter control duties. The beginning of winter control may vary from year to year but it’s usually with the first ten days of the month of November.

155


7 EVALUATION 7.1

SCHEDULE Annual Work Schedule: January 1st to April 15th - Winter Control April 16th to October 31st - Flat Surface Repairs November 1st to December 31st – Winter Control

7.2

COMMUNICATION PLAN As the list of repairs is prepared each repair will also be evaluated to determine if it has a potential impact on an adjacent business. If the repair does impact an adjacent business the business will be contacted and staff will work with business owner to schedule the work so that the impact is minimized as much as possible within reason. Media releases will be issued notifying the general public that this work is taking place.

7.3

EVALUATION Initially the goal of the program will be to repair any emergency/high priority concrete repairs within 10 business days of identifying the repair, knowing that it will take at least 5 business days to do locates for underground utilities. As each repair is completed it will be evaluated to determine the actual cost and over time the average cost on a linear or area basis in order to generate a unit price. As this data is collected management will be able to determine if and when certain work might be better contracted out based on an economy of scale. The issue that the City has faced is private contractors aren’t interested in doing the repair work because it isn’t worth their while due to the scale being too small. On larger scale projects it may end up being more cost effective to hire contractors because their unit prices might be less expensive. If this becomes the case then these larger projects will be identified to be included in the capital concrete repair program. As each repair is completed management will also be able to determine the average production rate of staff. This will help in planning the work so that we don’t have long sections of sidewalk or paving stones disturbed at any given time with the goal of having all the sidewalks and boulevards accessible over the weekend when the downtown core is the busiest.

156


Appendix A: Business Case - LITE Approval The undersigned acknowledge they have reviewed the Additional Staffing Dedicated to Downtown Surfacing Repair Work and agree with the approach it presents. Changes to this document will be coordinated with and approved by the undersigned or their designated representatives. Signature: Print Name:

Date: Dennis Kefalas, P. Eng

Title: Role: Signature:

Tim Simmonds

Date:

Print Name: Title: Role:

157


APPENDIX B: REFERENCES The following table summarizes the documents referenced in this document. Document Name and Version

Description

Location

158


APPENDIX C: KEY TERMS The following table provides definitions for terms relevant to this document. Term

Definition

159


BUILDING INSPECTOR/PLANS EXAMINER BUSINESS CASE Version <1.0> 10/01/2020

160


VERSION HISTORY Versio n# 1.0

Implemented By Kevin Linthorne

Revision Date

Approved By

Approval Date

Reason

161


TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................................5 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................6 Purpose of Business Case ................................................................................................................ 6 PROJECT DESCRIPTION ................................................................................................................6 HIGH-LEVEL BUSINESS IMPACT ..................................................................................................9 ALTERNATIVES & ANALYSIS ........................................................................................................9 Alternative A ........................................................................................................................................ 9 Alternative B ...................................................................................................................................... 10 PREFERRED SOLUTION ............................................................................................................... 11 Financial Considerations ................................................................................................................. 11 Preliminary Acquisition Strategy/Plan............................................................................................ 11 Preliminary Work Breakdown Structure ........................................................................................ 11 EVALUATION .................................................................................................................................. 12 Schedule ............................................................................................................................................ 12 Communication Plan ........................................................................................................................ 13 Evaluation .......................................................................................................................................... 13 APPENDIX A: BUSINESS CASE - APPROVAL .......................................................................... 14

162


163


Executive Summary The past three years have seen unprecedented increases in construction value in the City of Owen Sound. Building Permits have been issued for Southbridge long-term care facility, Owen Sound Gardens Retirement Home, Marriott Hotel, Strathcona School and ODAWA Heights at Owen Sound Municipal Non-Profit Housing totalling to 536 residential units. There are also medium and high-density residential condominiums and purpose built rental projects ongoing at the former Strathcona School, Georgian Landing, and Sydenham Condominiums. Development activity is not anticipated to decrease with the recent approval of a large commercial development (Heritage Grove) and two large subdivisions on the City’s east side (Bremont Homes and Redhawk Subdivision). The number and scale of proposed development applications in pre-consultation and early stage approvals with the Development Team is further indication that the volume of Building Permit applications is not anticipated to return (slow) to pre-2018 levels. Current and anticipated development activity coupled with ongoing renovations and alterations by existing homeowners and business has created immense pressures on the City’s Building Division. For new construction a minimum of nine (9) mandatory inspections must be completed. Inspecting interior units in these new buildings will have a minimum of six (6) inspections per unit equalling around 3200 required inspections. Building Division Staff are completing 2000 to 3000 inspections per year (based on permits issued x 9 mandatory inspections) along with all other administrative duties, necessitating the new position. This position will be funded in part by a combination of increased Building Department revenue and a possibly a contribution from the obligatory Building reserves.

164


Introduction Purpose of Business Case The intended audience of the Building Inspector/Plans Examiner Business Case is City Council, the project sponsor, and senior leadership.

Project Description We require the addition of a Building Inspector/Plans Examiner to support key changes in our staffing model which will result in the increased demand of inspection services mandated timelines being realized. The following staff chart reflects the key changes in staff positions being implemented by the Director for 2021 in order to support the Gallery’s operational stabilization and programming growth and diversification.

Name

Current Position

New Position 2021

Kevin Linthorne

Chief Building Official

No Change - overseeing all aspects of the division operations including: fiscal, staff, incoming permit applications and issuance, inspections, orders, plans review and approval, key member of Development Team, strategic planning, and health and safety, policies

(F/T)

Wes Reidt

Summary of Key Duties

Deputy Chief Building No Change - inspections, plans review, customer Official enquiries, duties of the CBO in his absence (F/T)

165


Becky Hillyer (parental leave)

Development Coordinator

No Change - Intake, circulation and monitoring all incoming applications for Building and Planning, front-line customer service, stat reporting, creating reports for committees, record keeping, scheduling inspections, statistics reporting, records management (TOMRMS, AMANDA, Sharepoint)

Building Inspector/Plans Examiner

New

Being filled by Kim Weppler

New

- field inspections and plans review prior to permit issuance

(F/T)

These staff changes will allow the Building Division to keep pace with the inspection and permit issuance schedule mandated in the Ontario Building Code. The OBC states permits shall be issued within the following time frames: Part 9 buildings (houses or small buildings): 10 days Large buildings:

10-15 days (depending on size)

Retirement Homes:

20 days

Post Disaster buildings:

30 days

There are at least nine required mandatory inspections required under the OBC: Footings; Foundation prior to backfill; structural framing; Underground plumbing, plumbing rough-in including water service pipes, drain waste and vent system, water distribution system, plumbing fixtures and appliances, Insulation and vapour barrier; Air barrier; Occupancy; Final Inspection. Larger projects also can include inspections for fire separations, fire stopping, fire service mains, fire routes, and fire alarm system verification.

166


The recent surge in building activity shows no signs of easing anytime soon. The Development Team continues to meet with developers to assist them in getting their projects in the ground for construction. Recently the team met with a developer proposing an additional 224 residential units in Owen Sound. We have also had large scale development proposals in other areas of the City. Checking with our comparator municipalities finds Owen Sound trailing in the amount of inspection staff to meet demand for inspection services. Comparator municipalities staffing levels: Town of Orangeville (4 F/T) Chief Building Official Inspectors (2) Office Administration (1)

Town of Collingwood (6 F/T) Chief Building Official Deputy Chief Building Official Inspectors (2) Plans Examiner (1) Office Administration (1)

City of Brockville (2 F/T) Chief Building Official Inspector (1) Town of the Blue Mountains (8.5 F/T) Chief Building Official Deputy Chief Building Official Inspectors/Plans Examiners (4) Zoning Co-ordinator (1) Permit Intake Assistant (1) Office Administration (.5)

167


City of Stratford (6 F/T) Chief Building Official Inspectors (3) Plans Examiner (1) Office Administration (1) City of Orillia (7 F/T) Chief Building Official Inspectors (5) Office Administration (1) In addition to the added inspector, other methods of streamlining service delivery have been implemented including upgraded laptops with the ability to connect via SIM card to the City’s network to access needed programs; asking architects, engineers and designers for electronic versions of building plans to make them accessible in the field; and currently working with IT to deploy mobile printers to work and produce reports within the AMANDA system.

High-level Business Impact The Building Inspector/Plans Examiner position will impact the Division in the following ways: (1) Budget – this position is to be funded from Building Permit revenue and Building Reserves and will have no impact on the ratepayer (2) Physical Resources – we will need to provide an additional computer and relevant software for this employee. (3) Training – the employee will need to undertake standard and ongoing training as well as professional development.

Alternatives & Analysis Alternative A

168


Staffing Levels Remain Status Quo In this alternative the Building Division continues as is without the addition of this position. Cost - Potential to commit errors due to understaffing and competing priorities (e.g., missed required inspections, errors in plans review) - Permit issuance process (i.e., Building plans review will take longer and could be up the maximum days allowed under the OBC) - Customer service at the counter will be extremely limited as Building staff will be primarily out in the field conducting required inspections Benefit - No additional budget required Return on Investment - No investment therefor no return

Alternative B Full Time Building Inspector/Plans Examiner In this alternative, the Building Division will be able to achieve the targets set under the OBC for timeliness of building permit issuance and mandatory inspections. Cost - To be funded from building permit revenue and reserves Benefit - Increased service level to the ratepayer and developer

169


Return on Investment - This increase in staff will allow the Building Division to keep pace with the current and anticipated levels of construction in Owen Sound and maintain the expected high customer service levels at City Hall and in the field

Preferred Solution Full Time Building Inspector/Plans Examiner Position

Financial Considerations The primary financial consideration is the salary plus benefits to support the acquisition of this position.

Preliminary Acquisition Strategy/Plan This position will be posted on the City’s and the Ontario Building Official’s Association website

Preliminary Work Breakdown Structure - Plans Examiner will scrutinize incoming applications with building plans and communicate any deficiencies with the applicant

170


- Building Inspector will assist in the field with inspection services and providing advice to contractors working on project - Building Inspector will assist customers at the counter with questions - participates in code discussions with CBO and D/CBO - forms part of the City Development Team - Works within all Health & Safety protocols and other SOP’s

Evaluation Schedule The Building Inspector/Plans Examiner position will have a direct impact on the service level mandated by the Ontario Building Code. Hours of work will be Monday to Friday 8:30-4:30 with occasional overtime and weekend work.

171


Communication Plan The Chief Building Official will conduct annual performance review meetings and evaluations in order to discuss goals, successes, and challenges.

Evaluation We will evaluate the success of this project on key measurable objectives, including: - meeting the permit issuance and inspection requirements of the Ontario Building Code

172


Appendix A: Business Case - Approval The undersigned acknowledge they have reviewed the Building Inspector/Plans Examiner and agree with the approach it presents. Changes to this document will be coordinated with Date:

Signature: Print Name:

Kevin Linthorne

Title:

Chief Building Official

Role:

Project Sponsor

Date:

Signature: Print Name:

Pam Coulter

Title:

Director of Community Services

Role:

Manager

173


Budget Variance Memo DATE:

November 24, 2020

TO:

Council

FROM:

Brent Fisher

DIV: Community Development and Marketing

DEPT: Community Services

SUBJECT: OPERATING BUDGET VARIANCE – COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING – EVENTS STRATEGIC INITIATIVES: Objective 1: Retain and grow existing local businesses and business opportunities. 1.4 Continue to promote the downtown. 1.5 Implement the Downtown River Precinct Objective 7: Encourage and promote participation in cultural activities and active lifestyles. 7.2 Continue to deliver select free City events to residents COMMENTS: In the area of Community Development (Events), the 2020 Council approved budget included: $15,000 for activation and animation of the River Precinct; and $15,250 for the planning and delivery of Riverside Reunion – a large one time event planned in 800 block of 1st Avenue East

174


The City applied for and received a TIAO grant in the amount of $150,000 that allowed for the creation, planning and implementation of Music at the Market, a highly successful lunchtime concert series. The operating funds budgeted were not required or used due to the grant that was received. Music at the Market occurred for an eight-week period and was well received by members of the public and local businesses, providing a hyper-local focus on culinary tourism. Local entertainers, local restaurants and local businesses have all benefited from this unique concert series. A full wrap up of the event will be coming to Council in December of 2020. The success of the 2020 Music at the Market event along with the challenges of planning and implementing a larger event with the uncertainty of 2021 has made staff suggest that some of the events funds be prioritized on smaller more frequent events as opposed to a large one time event. Overall, within the Community Development & Marketing area it is proposed that: $15,000 $15,250 $10,000

DRP Activation Riverside Reunion in Events Budget 2020 increase in Canada Day Budget

This $40,000 would be used to plan and deliver a 2021 Music at the Market concert series in July and August on Thursday’s and Fridays. The full details of the program as well as budget details would come forward through a future report at Community Services Committee.

175


FULL TIME ASSISTANT CURATOR POSITION BUSINESS CASE Version <1.0> 10/01/2020

176


VERSION HISTORY Versio n# 1.0

Implemented By Aidan Ware

Revision Date

Approved By

Approval Date

Reason

177


TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................................5 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................6 Purpose of Business Case ................................................................................................................ 6 PROJECT DESCRIPTION ................................................................................................................6 HIGH-LEVEL BUSINESS IMPACT ................................................................................................ 12 ALTERNATIVES & ANALYSIS ...................................................................................................... 12 Alternative A ...................................................................................................................................... 12 Alternative B ...................................................................................................................................... 13 PREFERRED SOLUTION ............................................................................................................... 14 Financial Considerations ................................................................................................................. 14 Preliminary Acquisition Strategy/Plan............................................................................................ 14 Preliminary Work Breakdown Structure ........................................................................................ 15 EVALUATION .................................................................................................................................. 15 Schedule ............................................................................................................................................ 15 Communication Plan ........................................................................................................................ 16 Evaluation .......................................................................................................................................... 16 APPENDIX A: BUSINESS CASE - APPROVAL ........................................................................... 17

178


179


Executive Summary The Assistant Curator position is required to support expanded public hours as well as the achievement of the exhibition program, curatorial vision, community development, health safety coordination, and will also fulfill a key role in terms of succession planning as they will work closely with the Curator of Collections on matters relating to the administration, care, and curation of the collection. The addition of this position is vital to supporting the Gallery’s long-term success and more immediately as we transition to a new staffing model. The implementation of this position will have a significant impact on our community by providing us with the necessary resources to build partnerships, deliver innovative projects, work collaboratively, and engage more diverse audiences. The position will support the Gallery in addressing feedback from the Ontario Arts Council regarding our programming and to achieve better results in our operating grant application. It will also increase our fundraising capacity and assist in broadening our revenue generation (ex. Grouping of Seven Art Auction in 2020, exhibition sponsorships). The current Tom Thomson Art Gallery staffing model does not meet the needs of the organization and is underdeveloped when compared with other similar public art gallery models.

180


Introduction Purpose of Business Case The intended audience of the Full Time Assistant Curator Position Business Case is City Council, the project sponsor, and senior leadership.

Project Description We require the addition of a Full Time Assistant Curator Position to support key changes in our staffing model which will result in broader community engagement, support long-range planning, and ensure the care and continuity of the work associated with the permanent collection. The following staff chart reflects the key changes in staff positions being implemented by the Director for 2021 in order to support the Gallery’s operational stabilization and programming growth and diversification.

Name

Current Position New Position Summary of Key Duties 2021

Aidan Ware

Director & Chief Curator (F/T)

N/A

- overseeing all aspects of the Gallery operations and programming including: fiscal, staff, and facility management; exhibition curation; education and community programming; collection management; policy implementation; membership and fundraising development; grant submissions; strategic planning; and health and safety - works with the Advisory Committee and leads the staff towards the fulfillment of the Gallery’s Mission, Vision, and Strategic

181


Goals Kim Skene

Education & Operations Engagement / Coordinator Acting Operations (F/T) (F/T)

- coordinating financial information and conducting daily financial operations - assisting with budget development; providing financial reporting - supporting grant applications - Recording Secretary for the Advisory Committee - coordinating overall administration

Heather McLeese

Curator of Curator of Contemporary Art Public Projects and Education (F/T) (F/T)

- development and curation of interdisciplinary public projects that fundamentally engage the community, support Priority Groups, and advance the Strategic Plan - development and delivery of innovative educational approaches to projects and exhibitions - building community partnerships and collaborations - development of a diversity plan to support broader educational outreach - development and delivery of lectures, talks, collaborative programs, events, activations

182


- writes project grant applications

David Huff

Curator of Collections

N/A

(F/T)

- responsible for the care, preservation, curation, and presentation of the permanent art collection - works with the team to develop and curate exhibitions that support the Curatorial Vision and which explore themes determined by the exhibition and strategic plans - proposes acquisitions and de-accessions

Shannon Bingeman

Exhibitions Assistant (Maternity Leave Contract)

Assistant Curator (F/T)

- assists with the development of contemporary and collection exhibitions as well as public projects - works with the Curator of Collection with respect to the planning, administration, and care of the collection -coordinates and installs exhibitions and projects - works with artists to establish exhibition plans and contracts - prepares exhibition charts and budgets - coordinates health and safety protocols - coordinates the Exhibition Assistance Grant, contributes to other grants

183


Hillary Weppler

Visitor Services / Membership Coordinator

Community Engagement Coordinator

(F/T)

(F/T)

- working with the Curator of Public Projects and Education to develop and deliver innovative approaches to public engagement through projects and educational initiatives - support exhibitions through development of unique public engagement opportunities - coordinating gallery shop operations and visitor reception - developing and executing marketing and communication plan, designing ads - coordinating gallery shop administration - coordinating the membership program - coordinating the Volunteer program including recruitment, training, and scheduling

These staff changes highlight a fundamental focus on community and an overwhelming commitment to engaging people with art. The Curator of Public Projects and Education is an innovative new position that has been similarly established in other public art galleries and its implementation at the Tom Thomson Art Gallery will represent a clear and substantive action towards addressing the feedback we have previously received from the Ontario Arts Council as we work to offer experiences that are innovative, experiential, and non-traditional to more diverse audiences and which expand beyond the walls of our facility. Prior to the hiring of the Director, the Gallery received substantial cuts to funding based on a jury assessment. Key feedback items included: - Programming was too “safe” and felt gallery was “filling slots in the calendar” - Priority Group artists – better relationship development with diverse communities is required - the programs and exhibitions seem like one-offs

184


- No clear artistic vision to carry the Gallery forward and concern with the overall trajectory of the Gallery This position, formerly the Curator of Contemporary Art role, will enable the Gallery to directly address this feedback and to be fundamentally more dynamic and inclusive by designing and delivering projects that are broadly engaging and inherently community based. Committing our resources to our community and to our public in this way will inject the Gallery with new vitality and presence. The pandemic has taught us that we cannot rely solely on the physical attributes of our spaces, but that we must extend ourselves in new directions, including into digital realms. We must work collaboratively and openly with our community in order to build stronger relationships and to find expansion through partnerships that seed into inspiring projects that have a legacy of lasting impact on the people we serve. This position is squarely centered on this philosophic approach. The change in focus of this role (Curator of Contemporary Art to Curator of Public Projects and Education) represents no change in salary however it is made achievable by the addition of the Assistant Curator position which will be responsible for ensuring proper art handling and installation practices (including health and safety), undertaking short and long-range planning, and being involved in all aspects of supporting and learning from the Curator of Collections. The position will also assist with grant writing and fundraising initiatives to support broader revenue generation for the Gallery. The current Tom Thomson Art Gallery staffing model is under-resourced at 5 F/T positions when compared with other similar public art galleries in Ontario. The most comparable institution is the Woodstock Art Gallery which is a department of their municipality, serves a similar population size, but has a collection that is half of the size of the Tom Thomson Art Gallery permanent collection:

Woodstock Art Gallery Staff (7 F/T) Director/Curator Head of Education Head of Collections Education Assistant Gallery Operations Coordinator Communications Coordinator Facilities Maintenance Coordinator Other relevant public art gallery staffing models comparable include:

185


Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery Executive Director Senior Curator Assistant Curator & Registrar Curatorial Assistant Preparator Director of Public Programs Public Programs Coordinator Education Coordinator Development Officer Manager, Media and Communications Visitor Services and Volunteer Coordinator Gallery Attendants Gallery Assistants

Judith & Norman Alix Gallery (Sarnia) Community Art & Education Coordinator Facility & Exhibition Supervisor Senior Clerk/Community Engagement Gallery Operations Supervisor Collections/Preparator Curator/Supervisor Facilities/Preparator Gallery Clerk Thunder Bay Art Gallery Director Assistant to the Director

186


Administrative Coordinator Accountant Curator Registrar and Curatorial Assistant Public Programming Coordinator Education Coordinator Communications and Marketing Coordinator Visitor Services Supervisor Fundraising Coordinator

High-level Business Impact The Assistant Curator position will impact the Gallery in the following ways: (1) Budget – we require the additional funds to over this full-time position. However, this position will also support the gallery in achieving funding through commitment to raising our status with Ontario Arts Council and by supporting revenue generation (fundraising initiatives, sponsorship). (2) Physical Resources – we will need to provide an additional computer and relevant software for this employee. (3) Training – the employee will need to undertake standard and ongoing training as well as professional development. Professional development as been increased within the Gallery’s budget to accommodate and encourage learning opportunities.

Alternatives & Analysis

Alternative A

187


Staffing Levels Remain Status Quo In this alternative the Gallery continues as is without the addition of this position. Cost - Gallery will be unable to implement expanded hours - Gallery unable to focus resources on broadening/diversifying community engagement - Succession planning for the Curator of Collections role will be delayed - Gallery will only be able to respond in a limited way to provincial funder feedback - Less capacity for fundraising Benefit - No additional budget required Return on Investment - No investment therefor no return

Alternative B 2-Year Assistant Curator Contract Position In this alternative, the Gallery will be able to achieve some of its goals for growth however, it will not be able to address long-term succession planning related to the Curator of Collections role. Cost - Gallery will not be able to undertake succession planning for the Curator of Collections role - Potential to lose a talented candidate to a permanent position elsewhere

188


-Short term goals and planning will be prioritized over long term goals and objectives - Funders will not see a commitment to long-term change Benefit - Less overall additional budget required due to savings on benefits (in the short term) - Role could be considered for permanency in the future

Return on Investment - Support for fundraising initiatives will result in enhanced revenue - Support for organizational changes will result in better outcomes for core operating grants

Preferred Solution Full Time Assistant Curator Position

Financial Considerations The primary financial consideration is the salary plus benefits to support the acquisition of this position.

Preliminary Acquisition Strategy/Plan The current Exhibition Assistant will be considered for this role.

189


Preliminary Work Breakdown Structure - assists with the development of contemporary and collection exhibitions as well as public projects - works with the Curator of Collections with respect to the planning, administration, and care of the collection - coordinates and installs exhibitions and projects - works with artists to establish exhibition plans and contracts - prepares exhibition charts and budgets - coordinates health and safety protocols, attends JHSC meetings as a representative - coordinates the Exhibition Assistance Grant, contributes to other grants - supports fundraising initiatives and development opportunities

EVALUATION SCHEDULE The Assistant Curator Position will have measurable goals assigned based on the outcomes of the Tom Thomson Art Gallery Strategic Plan which will be approved in early 2021 and will continue to be assigned tasks as related to the following schedule deadlines: - Operating and Project Grants - Exhibition Schedule - Advisory Committee and Sub-Committee Meeting Schedule and Tasks - Joint Health & Safety Committee Schedule and Tasks

190


COMMUNICATION PLAN The Gallery Director will conduct annual performance review meetings and evaluations in order to discuss goals, successes, and challenges. The Gallery Director will meet with the Assistant Curator on an ongoing basis to ensure that the objectives for the position are being met and that they are on track to achieving the goals defined for the organization.

EVALUATION We will evaluate the success of this project on key measurable objectives, including: - expansion of public hours from 20 to 30 hours per week hours (which is an increase of 50%), including some evening hours - creation of public projects that engage people of diverse backgrounds in our community - development of a succession plan for the care and development of the collection - positive feedback from Ontario Arts Council operating grant jury - implementation of health and safety practices (inspections, recommendations) - delivery of new fundraising initiatives and pursuit of development opportunities

191


Appendix A: Business Case - Approval The undersigned acknowledge they have reviewed the Full Time Assistant Curator Position and agree with the approach it presents. Changes to this document will be coordinated with Date:

Signature: Print Name:

Aidan Ware

Title:

Director and Chief Curator

Role:

Project Sponsor

Date:

Signature: Print Name:

Tim Simmons

Title:

City Manager

Role:

Manager

192


APPENDIX C

FLEET REPLACEMENT SCHEDULE

owensound.ca 193


CONSOLIDATED CITY OF OWEN SOUND FLEET AND EQUIPMENT

2021

Fleet Reserves Opening Balance Annual Planned Purchases Total Annual Tax Funding Annual Funding User Fees Estimated Interest Earned @ 2% Fleet Reserves Closing Balance Balance of Waste Management Fleet Reserves w/o Waste Mgmt

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

1,277,088

1,188,684

1,466,258

2,179,463

3,120,903

3,022,421

3,028,369

3,003,015

3,886,975

3,870,214

-944,245 755,000 75,000

-642,000 815,000 80,000

-275,500 875,000 85,000

-162,000 970,000 90,000

-1,257,500 1,005,000 95,000

-1,195,500 1,040,000 100,000

-1,266,832 1,075,000 105,000

-385,000 1,100,000 110,000

-1,335,500 1,125,000 115,000

-759,011 1,150,000 120,000

25,842

24,574

28,705

43,439

59,018

61,448

61,477

58,960

78,739

77,904

1,188,684

1,466,258

2,179,463

3,120,903

3,022,421

3,028,369

3,003,015

3,886,975

3,870,214

4,459,107

872,222 316,462

889,667 576,592

907,460 1,272,003

925,609 2,195,293

944,121 2,078,299

963,004 2,065,365

982,264 2,020,751

1,001,909 2,885,066

1,021,947 2,848,267

1,042,386 3,416,721

194


WORKS EQUIPMENT RESERVE 2021 338001 338002

2006 2006 Forklift 2017 Enclosed Trailer

338010 338011 338014 338016 338018

2019 2008 2017 2016 2014 2010 2017 2020 2009 2017 2010 2004 2011 2017 2011 2012 2014 2012 2010 2018 2008 2018 2012 2017 2008 2017 2016 1994

338020 338021 338022 338023 338024 338025 338028 338030 338031 338032 338035 338036 338037 338039 338042 338043 338045 338046 338047 338048 338049 338052 338053 3380## 3380##

Small Equipment One Ton Dump Truck 2008 Chevy Silverado 2017 GMC SIERRA GMC Sierra 3500 2014 RAM 1500 4 x 4 (2 dr) 1/2 ton 2010 INT TANDEM 6 TON INTERNATIONAL 6 TON TANDEM PLOW INTERNATIONAL 6 TON TANDEM WITH PLOW AND WING 2009 INTERNATIONAL VACTOR INTERNATIONAL 6 TON TANDEM PLOW 2010 FORD F150 30,000 CONCRETE/ASPHALT PLANER 2011 JOHN DEERE GRADER 2017 JD 870G Grader 2011 3 WHEEL STREET SWEEPER 300,000 2012 JOHN DEERE LOADER LM220M SNOWBLOWER 2012 JOHN DEERE LOADER P185 INGERSOLL RAND COMPRESSSOR Articulated Tandem Vibratory Roller 2008 JOHN DEERE BACKHOE 2018 Graco LineLazer 130 HS 2012 TRACKLESS MT SIDEWALK PLOW 160,000 2017 MV SIDEWALK PLOW 07 MT TRACKLESS 2017 MV SIDEWALK PLOW GRINDER/ROLLER TRAILER 94 THOMPSON STEAMER 2019 Plate Tamper 2019 Vactor G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

22,500

58,500 37,500 350,000

350,000 350,000

350,000 800,000 350,000 35,000

225,000 103,500 22,500 135,000

160,000 160,000 27,000

374,584 490,000

152,076 360,000

80,117 0

391,720 0

734,554 781,000

328,245 760,000

-40,190 320,000

49,006 0

484,986 938,500

16,186 377,000

260,000 7,492

285,000 3,042

310,000 1,602

335,000 7,834

360,000 14,691

385,000 6,565

410,000 -804

435,000 980

460,000 9,700

485,000 324

152,076

80,117

391,720

734,554

328,245

-40,190

49,006

484,986

16,186

124,510

195


WATER EQUIPMENT RESERVE 2021 418051 418052 418054 418055 418057 418058 418059 418060 418061 418062 418063 418064 418065 418066 418067

2017 2014 2019 2010 2011 1996 2008 2004 1997 2013 2014 2016 2016 2012 2008

2017 CREW CAB 2014 HALF TON 2019 FULL TON 2010 3/4 TON CARGO VAN 2011 INTERNATIONAL DUMP 2020 CRANE COMPRESSOR SMALL TAPPING MACHINE LARGE TAPPING MACHINE VALVE TURNING TRAILER SHORING TRAILER John Deere 410L Backhoe EARTH POWER SNOW BLOWER GENERATOR NPK HYDRUALIC HAMMER G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

22,500

25,000

35,000

40,000 65,000 220,000 18,000 4,500 63,000 35,000 10,000

225,781 35,000

245,597 10,000

291,309 81,000

265,515 57,500

263,175 220,000

95,039 0

147,939 4,500

197,308 105,000

145,154 0

199,057 25,000

50,000 4,816

50,000 5,712

50,000 5,206

50,000 5,160

50,000 1,864

50,000 2,901

50,000 3,869

50,000 2,846

50,000 3,903

50,000 4,481

245,597

291,309

265,515

263,175

95,039

147,939

197,308

145,154

199,057

228,538

WASTEWATER EQUIPMENT RESERVE 2021 438012 438013 438014 438015 438058 438008

2009 2008 2011 2016 1995 2000

3/4 Ton Chev SEWER PUMP TRAILER UTILITY TRACTOR Sewer Rodding Machine Sewer Camera G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

90,000 55,000 45,000 65,000 15,000

20,000

33,147 0

58,810 80,000

9,986 0

45,185 0

86,089 0

132,811 45,000

140,467 0

198,276 145,000

117,242 0

184,587 20,000

25,000 663

30,000 1,176

35,000 200

40,000 904

45,000 1,722

50,000 2,656

55,000 2,809

60,000 3,966

65,000 2,345

70,000 3,692

58,810

9,986

45,185

86,089

132,811

140,467

198,276

117,242

184,587

238,279

196


PARKS EQUIPMENT RESERVE 2021 378052 378053 378054 378055 378056 378057 378058 378059 378060 378061 378062 378063 378065 378067 378068 378069 378071 378072 378073 378074 378075 378076 378078 378079 378081 378082 378083 378086 378087 378088 378097

2016 2017 2010 2012 2020 2017 2014 2020 2014 2011 1998 2014 2012 2016 2016 2008 2020 2014 2004 2017 2018 2010 2007 2003 2016 2017 2017 2016 2016 2018 2020 2020 2020 2019

X534 Lawn Tractor Inner Harbour Triplex Finishing Mower Ram 1500 3/4 Ton- 4X4 5420- Tractor ZT Mower Loader Tractor- 72 HP Dodge Ram Bucket Truck (replace 2032) Loader Tractor Flail Mower 1 Ton Walk Behind Snowblower Utility Vehicle (Kubota) Chipper Reist Infielder Refuse Truck\Litter Vacuum- 2 Ton Mid Mount Mower 997 Aerator Portable Irrigation Unit 1/2 Ton Utility Vehicle Ice resurfacer 2500 DIA Truck Mower- zero turn Kubota Tractor (replace 2032) Golf Cart Flatbed Trailer Landscape Trailer Dump Trailer Utility Vehichile Replace Roadside Rotary Cutter Drop Sander/Material Spreader DIA- Electric Watering Equipment Glutton SMALL EQUIPMENT G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

8,000

2028

2029

2030

8,000 20,000 40,000

53,000 20,000

22,000 75,500

45,000

2,000

2,500 18,000 7,500 200,000 25,000

21,000

10,000 15,000 65,000 21,000

25,000 8,000

10,000 6,000 7,500 18,000 15,000 12,000 7,500 7,500.00

7,500.00

7,500.00

7,500.00

7,500.00

7,500.00

7,500.00

7,500.00

40,000 7,500.00

7,500.00

317,511 42,000

371,861 98,500

370,798 51,500

416,714 43,500

471,548 53,500

517,479 155,500

462,329 7,500

554,076 70,000

585,157 333,000

353,860 47,500

90,000 6,350

90,000 7,437

90,000 7,416

90,000 8,334

90,000 9,431

90,000 10,350

90,000 9,247

90,000 11,082

90,000 11,703

90,000 7,077

371,861

370,798

416,714

471,548

517,479

462,329

554,076

585,157

353,860

403,437

197


Cemetery Reserve Fund 2021

388012 388011 338040 388022 388031 388018 388016 388017 388015 388010 388041 388042 388043 388044 388045

388010

2018 RTV 2012 Backhoe 2002 Hydraulic Lift 2014 Ram 2500 2016 Dump Trailer 2017 Zero Turn Mower 2016 Zero Turn Mower 2017 Front Turn Mower 2015 72 in bucket, snow blower 2016 Small Equipment 2014 Agrimetal Snowblower BW 2500 2014 420CC Snowblower 2001 Plate Tamper 2015 Tiller 2014 Casket Lowering Device 2012 Casket Lowering Device 2010 Casket Lowering Device truck attachment G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

22,000 152,000

12,832 19,000

25,000

19,000

25,000 19,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

19,000 5,000 7,000 2,500

5,000

5000

5,000

5,000

28,043 5,000

5,000

2,500 1,000 6,500 6,500 6,500

10,000 16,468

13,000 268,724 14,000

300,098 43,500

302,600 43,000

305,652 21,000

340,766 28,000

369,581 5,000

421,972 194,832

285,580 30,000

311,292 24,000

343,517 59,511

40,000 5,374

40,000 6,002

40,000 6,052

50,000 6,113

50,000 6,815

50,000 7,392

50,000 8,439

50,000 5,712

50,000 6,226

50,000 6,870

300,098

302,600

305,652

340,766

369,581

421,972

285,580

311,292

343,517

340,876

198


AIRPORT 2021 308010 308011 308012 308013 308014

2000 2005 2002 2017 2018

Tractor Mower 6 Ton Rotary cutter Toro Walk Behind Snow Blower G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

100,000 20,000 230000

230,000 15000

74,910 100,000

6,408 0

46,536 0

97,467 0

159,416 0

232,605 230,000

87,257 0

179,002 35,000

237,582 0

332,334 230,000

30,000 1,498

40,000 128

50,000 931

60,000 1,949

70,000 3,188

80,000 4,652

90,000 1,745

90,000 3,580

90,000 4,752

90,000 6,647

6,408

46,536

97,467

159,416

232,605

87,257

179,002

237,582

332,334

198,980

199


WASTE AND RECYCLING COLLECTION

2021 No Vehicles or equipment G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

855,120 0

872,222 0

889,667 0

907,460 0

925,609 0

944,121 0

963,004 0

982,264 0

1,001,909 0

1,021,947 0

0 17,102

0 17,444

0 17,793

0 18,149

0 18,512

0 18,882

0 19,260

0 19,645

0 20,038

0 20,439

872,222

889,667

907,460

925,609

944,121

963,004

982,264

1,001,909

1,021,947

1,042,386

FACILITIES 2021 628020 578011 578013 578012 588012 558021 578020

2008 2008 2014 2007 2017 2018 2018 2017

By-Law Car Resurfacer - Bayshore Facility 3/4 Ton Resurfacer - RRC Olympia Resurfacer Dump Trailer Electrician Truck Silverado G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

50,000.00

2027

2028

2029

2030

50,000 100,000 40,000 100,000 40,000 65,000

194,802 0

233,698 50,000

223,372 100,000

162,839 40,000

161,096 0

199,318 0

238,305 215,000

63,071 0

99,332 40,000

96,319 0

35,000 3,896

35,000 4,674

35,000 4,467

35,000 3,257

35,000 3,222

35,000 3,986

35,000 4,766

35,000 1,261

35,000 1,987

35,000 1,926

233,698

223,372

162,839

161,096

199,318

238,305

63,071

99,332

96,319

133,245

200


FIRE 2021 218003 218004 218002 218010 218007

1995 2005 2007 2012 2003

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

1995 NOVA QUINTECH AERIAL (A-3) 2005 ALF 75' AERIAL (A-4) 2007 ALF PUMPER RESCUE (P-2) PUMPER (P-5)

525,000

BOAT SCBA

G/L Balance @ Beginning of Year

Less Purchases Funding for the year: Estimated Interest (2%) Transfers to/from Capital Fund G/L Balance at End of Year Over/(Underfunded)

175,000 263,245 -1,067,491 263,245

-1,052,085 0

-748,127 0

-413,089 0

-21,351 175,000

203,222 0

607,286 525,000

494,432 0

904,321 0

1,322,407 0

300,000 (21,350)

325,000 (21,042)

350,000 (14,963)

400,000 (8,262)

400,000 (427)

400,000 4,064

400,000 12,146

400,000 9,889

400,000 18,086

400,000 26,448

-1,052,085

-748,127

-413,089

-21,351

203,222

607,286

494,432

904,321

1,322,407

1,748,855

201


APPENDIX D

ROADS & ROAD RESURFACING DETAIL SHEETS owensound.ca

202


COUNCIL PRIORITY #1

CAPITAL BUDGET PROJECTS: ROADS & ROAD RESURFACING

RANKING

PROJECT TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

1

10th St Bridge Replacement

83.8

1,000,000

6

Concrete Replacement & Asphalt Resurfacing

74.8

875,000

9

Resurfacing 16th St E - Phase One: 9th Ave E to 16th Ave E

71.4

25,000

10

Rehabilitation 16th St E - Phase Two: 16th Ave E to 18th Ave E

71.4

930,000

11

East Bayshore Rd (Grey Rd 15) - 3rd Ave E north to East Bayshore Rd Sewage Pump Station 69.6

15

62.4

150,000

61.8

350,000

16

Reconstruction 9th Ave E - 20th St E to 23rd St E

5,300,000

204


17P.3

10th Street Bridge Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total

Partial

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Department: Staff Contact:

Public Works and Engineering Chris Webb

100 Year 2

Year 3+

$

20,000 $

7,000 $

3,500

$

100,000 $

10,000 $

8,000

$

780,000

$

100,000 $

83,000 $

88,500

$

1,000,000 $

100,000 $

100,000

-

-

Impact on Operating Budget $

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

$

Description and rationale: Capital budgets in 2021/2022 are for construction, contract administration, inspection, quality assurance/materials testing and staff time. After all revenue sources are exhausted, the balance would be converted to long-term debt expense.

-

1,200,000 Completed in 2019

(insert photo here)

October 1, 2019 June 30, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

1,000,000

17P.3 10th St Bridge Replacement

205


17P.3

10th Street Bridge Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 5 proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management 5 plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on 3 operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 3 are there partnership funds available

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Justification / Rationale for Rating This project was required to connect a major traffic corridor.

Existing bridge was at risk of collapsing Legislative requirements dictate a level of standard for all bridges Concrete replacement is a high priority in the asset management plan.

With this new asset larger driving lanes and sidewalk allow for easier operational maintenance.

This Project has grant funding associated with its purchase

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

5

Improves on the new standards for bridge deck draining so salt and sand do not directly drain into water bodies.

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

5

Facilitates recreation and sports activities. Maintains inclusive public spaces, supports activity for the aging through easy travel throughout the city.

Master Plan Public Input

To what degree is the project addressed in 5 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 4 public engagement

Is specifically identified in the Harbour and Downtown master plan as well as the transportation master plan. Has been identified through public feedback on poor bridge condition.

17P.3 10th St Bridge Replacement

206


Concrete and Asphalt Annual Program

21P.1

Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Maintenance

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total

No

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

40 Year 2

Year 3+

$

14,000 $

12,000 $

15,000

$

774,000 $

708,000 $

745,000

$

87,000 $

80,000 $

90,000

$

875,000 $

800,000 $

850,000

-

-

Impact on Operating Budget $

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

$

-

Description and rationale: Annual program to upgrade and replace failed concrete infrastructure such as sidewalks and curb and gutter throughout the City. Locations are often coordinated with the asphalt resurfacing program. To rejuvenate hot mix asphalt surfaces and maintain the expected service life of roads throughout the City. Road segments tentatively recommended in 2021 include: 14th St W - 2nd Ave W to 4th Ave W, 8th St W - 4th Ave W to 4th Ave "A" W, 20th St E - 20th Ave E to 28th Ave E, 9th St W - 7th Ave W to 8th Ave W, 8th Ave W - 9th St W to 10th St W, 16th Ave E - 20th St E to 23rd St E, 2nd Ave E R - 2nd Ave E to east end, 15th St W - 3rd Ave W to 4th Ave W, 18th St W - 5th Ave W to west end, 26th St W - 2nd Ave W to 3rd Ave W, 9th St "A" E - 8th Ave E to east end, 6th Ave E - Just south of 4th St E to northerly cul-de-sac. Tentative list attached.

2,525,000 February 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

June 1, 2021 November 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Federal Gas Tax $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

700,000

175,000 21P.1 Concrete Replacement and Asphalt Resurfacing

207


Concrete and Asphalt Annual Program

21P.1

Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

The different locations on arterial and local roads identified will allow for accessible pedestrian traffic and improve commutes for residents.

What is the risk to the health and safety of Trip hazards due to uneven surfaces, icing from ponding and accessible hazards are all the public or Staff if the project does not 3 examples of risks. proceed? Is the project required for Legislative requirements goal is to be barrier free and fully accessible by 2025. 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for Concrete replacement and road resurfacing is a high priority in the asset management 4 replacement in the asset management plan. plan If the project proceeds (or fails to Replacing sidewalks and resurfacing roads reduces operational costs by increasing proceed), what will be the impact on 4 sidewalk widths allowing for plows to clear the sidewalk and reduces the need for operational performance? Comment on public works to patch potholes and fix failing infrastructure. any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or This project is funded by Federal gas tax. 5 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

3 Little or no improvement to the natural environment will result from road resurfacing. 4

Facilitates recreation and sports activities. Maintains inclusive public spaces, supports activity for the aging.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan

Is specifically identified in the Harbour, Downtown and Traffic master plan.

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

Has been identified through public feedback on poor sidewalk conditions.

2

21P.1 Concrete Replacement and Asphalt Resurfacing

208


Resurfacing 16th St E - Phase 1 9th Ave E to 16th Ave E Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

18P.3

Maintenance No

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

Road - 25 years, Watermain - 80 years

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering $ Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc. Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

5,000 $

5,000

20,000 $

20,000

25,000 $

25,000 $

-

$

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

-

50,000

Design Start Date:

Completed

Construction Start Date:

Completed

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

-

Description and rationale: This project involved rehabilitating the road and selected concrete structures along 16th St E/Highway 26 from 9th Ave E to 16th Ave E including the intersections. This work had approved MTO Connecting Link grant funding at 90% of eligible costs for the road and structures components of the project. Additional work that took place that is not eligible for CL grant, includes 490 m of watermain replacement from 60 m east of 12th Ave E to 16th Ave E, 80 m of sanitary sewer replacement under 16th Ave E and 255 m of new sidewalk construction (14th Ave E/Wendy's Restaurant driveway to 49 m west of 16th Ave E/Pioneer Petroleum driveway. This budget is for the 2 year maintenance period.

December 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

25,000 18P.3 16th St East Rehabilitation - Phase 1 - 9th Ave E to 16th Ave E

209


Resurfacing 16th St E - Phase 1 9th Ave E to 16th Ave E Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

18P.3 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for 3 legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Justification / Rationale for Rating This improvement will benefit traffic travelling on 16th St E Improvements to the road surface and sidewalk will allow for safer travel

Legislative requirements dictate the level of standard required by municipalities.

Is the project a high priority for This section of road was identified in the cities asset management plan as being in 5 replacement in the asset management need of repair plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on 4 This will reduce the operational cost associated to repairing the road and sidewalks operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 5 This program has confirmed cost sharing partnership through connecting link funding. are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement 3 to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support 1 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

3

There is no improvement to the natural environment This project will support cultural significance in the sense to allow for easier travel throughout the city Improvement can be connected to the Downtown Master plan Has been identified through public input on the poor condition of the road as well as sidewalks "just ending".

18P.3 16th St East Rehabilitation - Phase 1 - 9th Ave E to 16th Ave E

210


Rehabilitation 16th St E - Phase 2 16th Ave E to 18th Ave E Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation Partial

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

Road - 25 years, Watermain - 80 years

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total

21P.10

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

$

10,000 $

2,000 $

2,000

$

80,000 $

8,000 $

8,000

10,000 $

10,000

$

$ $

Impact on Operating Budget $

760,000

80,000 930,000 $ -

$

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

-

950,000 January 1, 2020

Design Start Date:

Description and rationale: Engineering design completed in 2020 with Phase 1. The 2020 approved budget and CL grant funding was insufficient to cover the road rehabilitation and watermain replacement from 16th Ave E to 18th Ave E. There is no sanitary sewer replacement planned in this segment. The City will be applying for 2021 Connecting Link funding for this Phase 2 project. The full road rehabilitation portion of the project would proceed in 2021 only if there is a successful grant funding application. The watermain replacement would proceed regardless of the full road rehabilitation due to the advanced deterioration of this main.

(insert photo here)

April 1, 2020

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

November 30, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) Grant (Specify) Water Rates Select from List Select from List Taxation

$ $ $

$

50,000 Capital 450,000 Connecting Link 380,000

50,000

21P.10 16th St East Rehabilitation - Phase 2 - 16th Ave E to 18th Ave E

211


Rehabilitation 16th St E - Phase 2 16th Ave E to 18th Ave E Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment

Cultural Significance

21P.10 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

5

This will improve the road for traffic on 9th Ave E while also implementing required infrastructure for Odawa Heights Ph. 3 development.

3

Improvements to the road surface and sidewalk will allow for safer travel

3

Legislative requirements dictate the level of standard required by municipalities.

Is the project a high priority for replacement 5 in the asset management plan

This section of road was identified in the City's asset management plan as being in need of repair

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on 4 This will reduce the operational cost associated to repairing the road and sidewalks operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 5 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? 3 To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

1

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in a 2 Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

3

This program has confirmed cost sharing partnership through connecting link funding. There is no improvement to the natural environment This project will support cultural significance in the sense to allow for easier travel throughout the city Improvement can be connected to the Downtown Master plan Has been identified through public input on the poor condition of the road.

21P.10 16th St East Rehabilitation - Phase 2 - 16th Ave E to 18th Ave E

212


East Bayshore Rd - GR 15 - 3rd Ave E Northerly to East Bayshore Rd SPS Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation Partial

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

Road - 50 years, Watermain and Sewers - 100 years.

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total

21P.2

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

$

20,000 $

2,000 $

2,000

$

450,000 $

23,000 $

23,000

25,000 $

25,000

$ 4,672,000 $

58,000

$

100,000

$ 5,300,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

$

-

5,350,000

Design Start Date:

July 1st, 2018

Construction Start Date:

April 1, 2022

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: This project involves reconstruction of Grey Road 15 and construction of new sanitary forcemain, sanitary sewer in conjunction with construction of the East Bayshore Road SPS. The forcemain and sanitary sewer will be funded from Wastewater rates. Road reconstruction will be from 3rd Ave E to the new East Bayshore SPS. The first phase of construction in 2020 includes commencing construction of the sewage pumping station. The second phase in 2021 will include the road reconstruction and forcemain construction. Grey County is responsible for road/road drainage costs only. The 2021 budget is for tendering, contract administration, inspection, construction and materials testing costs. Budget figures in the cash flow projection include the County's share of cost because the project is being managed and administered by the City with all funding and payments flowing through the City. The City will invoice the County for its share of the cost.

(insert photo here)

November 30, 2022

Current Year Funding Sources: Waste Water Rates Grant (Specify) Water Rates Carry Forward Select from List Taxation

$ $ $ $

474,000 2,850,000 County Share 125,000 25,000

$

1,826,000 21P.2 East Bayshore Rd 3rd Ave E to SPS

213


East Bayshore Rd - GR 15 - 3rd Ave E Northerly to East Bayshore Rd SPS Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

21P.2

Score 1 - 5

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

3

This project is identified to improve the pedestrians and traffic flow though the downtown

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed?

2

Improvements to the road surface and sidewalk will allow for safer travel

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

Legislative requirements dictate the level of standard required by municipalities.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

5

This section of road was identified in the City's asset management plan as being in need of repair

5

This will reduce the operational cost associated to repairing the road and sidewalks since it is a new development.

5

Part of the cost will be shared with Grey County

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the 3 community? To what degree does the project support 0 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed 3 in a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

2

There is no improvement to the natural environment This project will support cultural significance in the sense to allow for easier travel throughout the city Improvement can be connected to the Downtown Master plan Has been identified through public input on the downtown over all look

21P.2 East Bayshore Rd 3rd Ave E to SPS

214


Downtown and 10th St Corridor Traffic Signal Control Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Enhancement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering $ Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

18Q.1 No

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

20 Year 2

Year 3+

15,000

135,000

150,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: This project involves the full implementation of the traffic management and safety plan commenced in 2020 and required following the 10th Street Bridge replacement including operational improvements for the 10th Street Corridor from 4th Ave E to 3rd Ave W and the Downtown core (8th Street, 9th Street, 2nd Avenue East and 3rd Avenue East) for traffic and pedestrian signals. This budget addresses required MTO approvals, traffic control hardware and software, timing/programming, traffic and pedestrian signal improvements, Accessible Pedestrian Signal (APS) and vehicle detection system upgrading. Geometric improvements (lane widening, lane additions, islands, curb radii, pole relocation and replacement etc.) are not included or expected to be part of this project.

150,000 October 1, 2020

(insert photo here)

March 1, 2021 November 30, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

150,000 Traffic Signal

18Q.1 Downtown and 10th St Corridor - Traffic Signal Control

215


Downtown and 10th St Corridor Traffic Signal Control Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

18Q.1 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of 3 the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

This improvement will benefit traffic heading down town and through the 10th St corridor. Improves traffic signals to allow for safer travel for traffic and pedestrians Legislative requirements dictate the level of standard required by municipalities.

4

Concrete replacement is a moderate priority in the asset management plan.

4

Upgrading this equipment will reduce maintenance costs on old failing equipment

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 1 are there partnership funds available

This improvement has no cost sharing opportunities.

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

2

There is no improvement to the natural environment

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

1

Does not support cultural initiatives set out by the city

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

4

Improvement can be connected to the Downtown Master plan Has been identified through public feedback on poor traffic signal timing.

18Q.1 Downtown and 10th St Corridor - Traffic Signal Control

216


9th Ave E - 20th to 23rd St E - Reconstruction Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total

19P.3

Partial

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

50 Year 2

Year 3+

$

20,000 $

20,000 $

5,000

$

280,000 $

280,000 $

2,000

$

50,000 $

3,480,000 $

13,000

$

350,000 $

4,130,000 $

20,000

-

-

-

$

Impact on Operating Budget $

$

350,000

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

$

Description and rationale: Engineering design to be undertaken in 2021 with phased (possibly) construction to follow in future years. Storm sewer upgrade construction on 8th Ave E - 21st St E to 23rd St E required to accommodate Odawa Heights Ph. 3 development. Construction in 2022 is tentative for road, sanitary and storm sewer upgrades on 9th Ave E to accommodate development in the area. Timing would be contingent upon development advancing on vacant properties fronting 9th Ave E. The City is collecting a Capital Infrastructure Charge from applicable property developers for the capital cost of water, sanitary and storm related works and services. All costs are related to sanitary and storm sewers plus road and sidewalk reconstruction or construction. Only minor water system related expenses are anticipated at this time such as installation of additional fire hydrants or service stubs to property line.

4,500,000 January 1, 2020

Design Start Date:

(insert photo here)

April 1, 2021

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

November 30, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Water Rates Grant (Specify) Carry Forward Select from List Select from List Taxation

$ $ $

$

50,000 50,000 Frontage 50,000

200,000 19P.3 9th Ave E - 20th to 23rd St E - Reconstruction

217


19P.3

9th Ave E - 20th to 23rd St E - Reconstruction Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

3

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

This will improve the road for traffic on 9th Ave E while also implementing required infrastructure for Odawa Heights Ph. 3 development. Improvements to the road surface and sidewalk will allow for safer travel

4

Legislative requirements dictate the level of standard required by municipalities.

4

This section of road was identified in the City's asset management plan as being in need of repair

4

This will reduce the operational cost associated to repairing the road and sidewalks

5 This program has confirmed cost sharing partnership through connecting link funding.

1

There is no improvement to the natural environment

1

This project will support cultural significance in the sense to allow for easier travel throughout the city

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 1 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

2

Improvement can be connected to the Downtown Master plan Has been identified through public input on the poor condition of the road.

19P.3 9th Ave E - 20th to 23rd St E - Reconstruction

218


APPENDIX E

CITY FACILITIES DETAIL SHEETS owensound.ca

219


CAPITAL BUDGET PROJECTS: CITY FACILITIES RANKING

PROJECT TITLE

COUNCIL PRIORITY #2 PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

14

Public Works Generator Set

63.0

90,000

19

Harrison Park Sanitary Connection, Replacement & Dumping Station Upgrades

54.0

100,000

28

Harrison Park Workshop Hot Water Heater System Replacement

50.4

15,000

30

Courthouse Windows & Doors Boarding

49.8

20,000

31

Courthouse Roof Replacement

49.8

100,000

32

Greenwood Cemetery Chapel Design & Drawings

49.0

30,000

40

Tom Thomson Art Gallery Flooring Replacement

46.6

50,000

41

Tom Thomson Art Gallery Roof Section 1 & 2 Replacement

45.2

150,000

43

Bayshore Roof Section 1 Restoration

44.2

65,000

44

Fire Station Roof Section 1 Replacement

41.4

350,000

45

Harrison Park Workshop Roof Replacement

41.0

20,000

47

East Side Boat Launch Building Upgrades

39.4

15,000

51

Harrison Park Senior Centre Grading Improvement & Eavestrough Replacement

36.8

13,000

52

Tom Williams Building Upgrades

36.6

15,000

54

Public Works Channel Drain

31.6

50,000

30.6

15,000

56 62

Water Bottle Fill Stations

24.8

10,000

63

Cemetery Parking Lot Drainage

20.8

10,000

220


21M.16

Public Works Generator Set Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

Addition No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Public Works and Engineering Jeff Follis

25 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

15,000 75,000

90,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

90,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

N/A

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: The Generator Set at the East Hill Booster Pumping Station was replaced in 2019 as a capital project, due to weathering and failure of the enclosure and the base fuel tank. At the time, outright replacement of the entire assembly was more logical and economical than piecemeal disassembly, replacement/reassembly of the enclosure and fuel tank alone, and also took less time (a significant consideration for a booster station.) The City retained ownership of the generator and motor assembly, which is in good condition with low hours. It is proposed to utilize this generator for sitewide power at Public Works. Current standby power at this location is partial only; emergency services radio tower (generator and batteries) and the fuel system only (manual generator). Renewed consideration of this site as an emergency services dispatch location has provided additional rationale.

(insert photo here)

Fall 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Water Rates $ Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

45,000 45,000 Capital

-

21M.16 PW Generator

221


21M.16

Public Works Generator Set Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

This would allow Public Works, Water, and Emergency services (comms and fuel and backup dispatch) to operate in a sustained hydro outage. Operating the shop without standby power increases health and safety risk including heating, air quality alarms, mechanics shop, inadequate indoor/outdoor lighting Operating the shop without standby power would violate health and safety legislation around the above mentioned aspects. moderate probability of failure; low consequence

3

Standby Power at this location would allow all aspects of the site to operate regardless of whether Hydro power is online. This includes the Emergency Dispatch and Comms tower, the City fleet fuelling system, the fleet repair shop, all fleet 5 storage, the sand/salt depot, the water distribution shop, and the Public Works Admin area. 2

Funded through reserves

1

No impact positive or negative

3

Supports two Actions

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 1 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identifed through public engagement

Project relates to the completion of another project identified

0

21M.16 PW Generator

Has not been identified by the public

222


HARRISON PARK Sanitary Connection, Replacement and Dumping Station Upgrades Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 2

Year 3+

15,000 85,000

100,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

100,000

Design Start Date:

TBD

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

20D.5

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

Corporate Services Kristan Shrider

This project combines three components: Community Hall connection to municipal sanitary system, the main washroom sanitary service replacement and the dumping station upgrades. In the 2020 budget, the sanitary connection was a separate project and this capital project combines these three components due to similar nature and efficiency of procurement. The Community Hall is the only building remaining on septic in Harrison Park and the existing system is failing. Pump outs of the holding tank has increased over the past year and it is believed that groundwater is penetrating the tank. The main washroom in Harrison Park is one of the busiest buildings in the park and the City invested in a complete interior renovation in 2018. This has been well received by the park users and general public. This year, the condition of the sanitary infrastructure servicing the washroom has declined causing backups in the building. The interior of the pipe is reducing in size, the fall of the pipe is not positive and the flushing of unwanted items causes blockages. The line from the washroom to the main will be replaced. Completion of this work will be done by contractors.

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

40,000 Campground 60,000

20D.5 HARRISON PARK Sanitary Connection, Replacement and Dumping Station Upgrades

223


HARRISON PARK Sanitary Connection, Replacement and Dumping Station Upgrades Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Environment

Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

20D.5

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating Thousands of people visit Harrison Park annually.

What is the risk to the health and safety of Failure of the system will cause maintenance issues and H&S issues. Possible exposure the public or Staff if the project does not 2 to sanitary system contents if failure occurs. proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

The City is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

4

The sanitary system in the park is an asset and the facilities that operate on the system are assets.

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

3

Maintenance on the failing system will be required if work does not occur. Back ups occur and staff must clear and disinfect the affected buildings.

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 0 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Project is not eligible for rebate.

3

To avoid leak in system, which would leak in the ground, the repair needs to occur.

5

Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities. Supports activities for the aging. Maintains inclusive public space.

To what degree is the project addressed in 1 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement

Has not been identified in a master plan. Has not been identified by the public

20D.5 HARRISON PARK Sanitary Connection, Replacement and Dumping Station Upgrades

224


HARRISON PARK WORKSHOP HWH System Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

21D.1

Replacement No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

15 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

15,000

15,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

15,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

N/A

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: The existing HWH system at the workshop is not adequate for the demand required to fill the flood water tank on the park Zamboni implement for the Harrison Park Ice Rink. It currently takes approximately 45 minutes for staff to fill the water holding tank on the Zamboni implement and the system runs out of hot water prior to the tank being filled. The new system will include 2 natural gas tanks less water heaters that will work in tandem to provide 100G of 140° in 15 minutes. The replacement will save on staff time but is an upgrade to more efficient equipment. Rebate or incentive programs will be explored. Completion of this work will be done by a contractor.

(insert photo here)

Summer 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000 Capital

-

21D.1 HARRISON PARK WORKSHOP HWH System Replacement

225


HARRISON PARK WORKSHOP HWH System Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

21D.1

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

Priority Level:

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

The City as a whole will benefit from the improved operational performance from this replacement. There are thousands of members of the public that enjoy the Harrison Park Ice Rink annually.

What is the risk to the health and safety of Poorly maintained ice surfaces could create potential health and safety hazards. Hot the public or Staff if the project does not 2 water is a key ingredient in well maintained ice surfaces. proceed? The city is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and Is the project required for 4 staff. legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

1

Enhancement to an existing asset

4

The new HWH system will save staff at least 30 minutes per day, 7 days a week in the winter season. This will create an improvement in our operating performance.

Financing

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

0

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

No improvement as a result of the project

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

5

Promotes Heritage Delivery of free events. Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities. Maintains inclusive public spaces. Supports activities for the aging.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

0

Harrison Park Master Plan. Has not been identified by the public.

21D.1 HARRISON PARK WORKSHOP HWH System Replacement

226


21M.7

COURTHOUSE Windows and Doors Boarding Rehabilitation No

Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials $ Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

5 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

20,000

20,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

20,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

N/A

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: Staff retained Taylor Hazell Architects to complete a Heritage Impact Assessment and Demolition Approvals Plan of the Jail property. The public consultation phase is underway and future action on the property will be implemented upon council approval. The Courthouse is designated under the Ontario Heritage Act. Boarding up the windows and doors is an important step in mothballing a building and will assist with the future steps and prevent further deterioration to make it attractive for investment. The windows and doors will be boarded up with plywood to protect the interior of the building from the elements and also preserve the original wood work of the windows and doors. The completion of this work will be done by city staff.

(insert photo here)

Summer 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

10,000 Land Sale

10,000

21M.7 COURTHOUSE Windows and Doors Boarding

227


21M.7

COURTHOUSE Windows and Doors Boarding Justification for Matrix Values

People

Health and Safety Legislation

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

The City as a whole will benefit from the development of this property. Boarding up 5 the windows and doors is an important step in mothballing a building and will assist with the future steps of improving its condition to make it attractive for investment.

What is the risk to the health and safety of Leaking windows and doors creates unsafe conditions on the interior of a building the public or Staff if the project does not 3 and allows unwanted entry into the building. This will be a security measure as well. proceed? Is the project required for The City is required to maintain its property to ensure the safety of the public and 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? staff. Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

4

Windows and doors are critical components of a buildings envelop. The boarding is required to protect the interior components and the building structure.

3

Repairing broken windows and doors is done on an as need basis and will continue to cost the city both in staff resources and related costs.

0

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding

Will the project result in an improvement 1 to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support 0 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

4

Little or no improvement as a result of the project N/A N/A Public feedback and consultation is a component of CHER and HIA.

21M.7 COURTHOUSE Windows and Doors Boarding

228


21M.8

COURTHOUSE Roof Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

Replacement No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

25 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

100,000

100,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

Impact on Operating Budget $

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Description and rationale: At the July 15, 2020 Community Services Committee Meeting, resolution CS-200715004 directed staff to bring forward the cost of replacing the Courthouse roof for the 2021 capital budget deliberations. Staff retained Taylor Hazell Architects to complete a Heritage Impact Assessment and Demolition Approvals Plan for the Jail property. The public consultation phase is underway and future action on the property will be implemented upon council approval. The Courthouse is designated under the Ontario Heritage Act. The roof is a critical component of the building envelop and is the first step in protecting the asset and improving its condition to make it attractive for investment. The size of the roof is approximately 6000 square feet. The replacement roof will be a similar asphalt shingle as the existing. Completion of this work will be done by a contractor.

100,000

Design Start Date:

TBD

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

20,000 Land Sale

80,000 21M.8 COURTHOUSE Roof Replacement

229


21M.8

COURTHOUSE Roof Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan? If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

The City as a whole will benefit from the development of this property. The roof replacement is one step in maintaining the property to be attractive for investment. A leaking roof creates unsafe conditions on the interior of a building.

4

The City is required to maintain its property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

4

The roof is a critical component of a buildings envelop. The replacement is required to protect the interior components and the building structure.

3

The roof condition is creating undesired conditions on the inside of the building. In order to continue with the heritage preservation, the roof needs to be replaced.

0

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding

Will the project result in an improvement 1 to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support 0 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

Priority Level:

4

Little or no improvement as a result of the project N/A Has not been identified in a master plan Public feedback and consultation is a component of the CHER and HIA.

21M.8 COURTHOUSE Roof Replacement

230


GREENWOOD CEMETERY CHAPEL Design and Drawings Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

20D.64

Consulting

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 1

Year 2

30,000 $ -

150,000

150,000 $

-

-

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

$

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

Description and rationale: The Greenwood Cemetery Chapel, built in 1900, has been left unused for many years. As a part of the Greenwood Cemetery Master Plan, it is to be restored to provide space for services and indoor columbaria. In 2021 engineering and design work are to be conducted to assess the structural integrity and provide a detailed design. The design will be used as the basis for restoration and construction to be submitted in 2022 as a part of the capital budget process. Prior to commencing the engineering or design process, a report to Community Services Committee will be presented with the business plan for this initiative.

Year 3+

30,000 $

Priority Level:

180,000 June 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

March 1, 2022 June 1, 2022

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

Parkland 30,000 Cemetery

20D.64 Greenwood Cemetery Chapel-Design and Drawings

231


GREENWOOD CEMETERY CHAPEL Design and Drawings Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance Asset Management

20D.64 Score 1 - 5

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

4

5,000 to 9,999

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed?

2

Should the building continue without intervention, the structure will eventually require demolition.

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

Renovations will be compliant with the Ontario Building and electrical codes.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan 1

Yes

Operations Performance

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), The project is expected to generate additional revenue at Greenwood Cemetery. The what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on 2 Greenwood Cemetery Master Plan notes the Chapel is a location where accessible customer service can be provided post renovation. operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Finance

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or Design is to be funded via the Cemetery Reserve, pending a report to Council Via are there partnership funds available 2 Community Services Committee outlining a business case for indoor columbaria and space for quiet contemplation.

Environment

Cultural Significance Master Plan Master Plan

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

2

The project will avoid demolition and avoid sending materials to landfill.

6. Promote Owen Sound's Built Heritage 7. Encourage and Promote participation in cultural activities and active lifestyles 8. Support Community Safety and Social 4 Inclusion 4

Recommendation 4.2.13 of the Greenwood Cemetery Master Plan

4

Via the Greenwood Cemetery Master Plan Process in 2019.

20D.64 Greenwood Cemetery Chapel-Design and Drawings

232


21M.10

TTAG Flooring Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

Replacement No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Art Gallery Kristan Shrider

20 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

50,000

50,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Description and rationale: The age of the existing carpet in the gallery is unknown and is showing signs of wear and tear and creating potential trip hazards to the staff and public. The gallery is host to thousands of visitors each year and the flooring replacement will not only eliminate the safety concern, it will provide a new, fresh and clean look throughout the gallery. The options of finished flooring that are being explored are durable laminate and vinyl. Completion of this work will be done by a contractor.

50,000

Design Start Date:

TBD

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

50,000

-

21M.10 TTAG Flooring Replacement

233


21M.10

TTAG Flooring Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

5

Thousands of visitors enjoy the gallery annually.

2

The current condition of the flooring creates potential tripping hazards.

4

The city is required to maintain its property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

3

Flooring in the gallery is an asset that needs to be maintained for safety, functionality and appearance.

3

The cost to the city for continuing to maintain and repair the existing flooring will increase if flooring is not replaced. The cost to maintain new flooring is lower compared to the existing flooring.

Financing

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

0

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

Little or no improvement as a result of the project

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

5

Promotes Heritage Delivery of free events. Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities. Maintains inclusive public spaces. Supports activities for the aging.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

0

21M.10 TTAG Flooring Replacement

Has not been identified in a master plan Has not been identified by the public

234


TTAG Roof Section 1 and Section 2 Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

20M.7 No

Year 2

Year 3+

150,000

150,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Art Gallery Kristan Shrider

Description and rationale: This project was tendered in 2020 and the lowest compliant bid was over budget. This project will be retendered in the fall of 2020. The flat roof sections were installed in 1975 and had some repairs completed in 2018 to extend the life expectancy to 2020. The square footage of the roof is 3,500 and it is a Built Up Roof (BUR). It is comprised of wood deck, 1-ply felt, fibreglass insulation with a gravel surfacing. Issues with the existing roof include but not limited to ridges (felt lines buckle and protrude upwards), blueberries (dried out asphalt surface), reglet joint deterioration (expansion, contraction and sun damage to caulking and allow water to penetrate) and expansion joint deterioration (tears occur and water penetrate). Sections 1 and 2 of the roof will be replaced. Completion of this work will be done by contractors.

150,000

Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

150,000

20M.7 TTAG Roof Sections 1 and 2 Replacement

235


TTAG Roof Section 1 and Section 2 Replacement

20M.7

Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating Thousands of people visit the Art Gallery annually.

Potential minor injuries could occur if a the roof leak occurs (slip, trip and fall incidents).

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

The City is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

4

The roof is due for replacement. If delayed, the potential for leak and damage to assets within the building is greater. A roof is a critical component of a building envelop.

3

Maintenance on the failing roof will be required if the replacement does not occur. Staff time and resources will cost the City money. If leaks occur prior to the replacement, it may increase the cost of the replacement project.

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 0 are there partnership funds available

Environment

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Public Input

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed?

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

Master Plan

Priority Level:

Project is not eligible for rebate.

1

No improvement as a result of the project.

5

Promotes Heritage Delivery of free events. Supports activities for the aging. Maintains inclusive public spaces.

To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement 20M.7 TTAG Roof Sections 1 and 2 Replacement

Cultural Master Plan 2012. N/A. 236


20H.1

BAYSHORE Roof Section 1 Restoration Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 2

Year 3+

65,000

65,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

65,000

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

This project was tendered in 2020 and the lowest compliant bid was over budget. This project will be retendered in the fall of 2020. The Bayshore roof has five different sections that are included in our asset management plan. Section 1 is 6,100 ft² and a 2-ply modified bitumen mineral surface. Preventative maintenance repairs occurred in 2016 on Section 1 which increased the life cycle of the roof and prevented potential leaks. By performing the maintenance repairs in 2016 this section of roof will be restored in late 2020 or in the spring of 2021, not replaced. Scope of work include but not limited to: metal counter flashing, removal of loose debris, repair all ridges, blisters and deficiencies, caulking, apply primer and membrane to existing perimeter and projection flashing, fasten flashing, install new drains, apply primer, fabric reinforcement and asphaltic polyurethane entire roof surface and coat any exposed roof and projections. The warranty on membrane and labour is 10 years. The life expectancy of the restored roof is 15 years. This approach to asset management has prevented what would be a much higher cost replacement. Completion of this work will be done by contractors.

COMPLETED

Construction Start Date:

Priority Level:

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

65,000

20H.1 BAYSHORE Roof Section 1 Restoration

237


20H.1

BAYSHORE Roof Section 1 Restoration Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed?

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating Thousands of people visit the Bayshore annually.

Potential minor injuries could occur if a the roof leak occurs (slip, trip and fall incidents).

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

The City is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

4

The roof is due for replacement. If delayed, the potential for leak and damage to assets within the building is greater. A roof is a critical component of a building envelop.

3

Maintenance on the failing roof will be required if the replacement does not occur. Staff time and resources will cost the City money. If leaks occur prior to the replacement, it may increase the cost of the replacement project.

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 0 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

To what degree does the project support 4 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement

Project is not eligible for rebate.

No improvement as a result of the project. Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities.

20H.1 BAYSHORE Roof Section 1 Restoration

Supports activities for the aging. Maintains inclusive public spaces.

238


20U.1

FIRE STATION Roof Section 1 Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Replacement No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Fire Kristan Shrider

35 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

175,000 $

175,000

175,000 $

175,000 $

-

-

-

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

$

350,000

Design Start Date:

Complete

Construction Start Date:

Fall 2021

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Fall 2021

Description and rationale: Council approved a transfer to reserves for 50% of the required budget in 2020 with the remaining funds to be requested in 2021. The roof will be replaced in 2021. Existing flat roof was installed in 1990. The system is a Modified BUR (layered built up roof) with flood and gravel surfacing. The square footage is 17,094. Inspection occurred in 2013 and 2017 with an evaluation of poor both times. There are blueberries (erosion and dry out of the top coat of asphalt), ridges (felt lines protruding upwards through the surface layers), splits (weak or inflexible membranes that cannot accommodate movement causing the roof to split open) and blisters (soft/spongy pockets in the roofing materials that expand and rupture) present that have been and will continue to allow water to penetrate the building. Proposed roof replacement system is a modified membrane containing intermittent layers of asphalt and fiberglass felts covered by a top pour of asphalt and protective roofing gravel. The expected life of this system is 35+ years.

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

175,000 Fire Hall 175,000

20U.1 FIRE STATION Roof Section 1 Replacement

239


20U.1

FIRE STATION Roof Section 1 Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

4 4

3

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating The Fire Department provides services to the entire City of Owen Sound.

Potential minor injuries could occur if a the roof leak occurs (slip, trip and fall incidents). The City is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and staff. The roof is due for replacement. If delayed, the potential for leak and damage to assets within the building is greater. A roof is a critical component of a building envelop. Maintenance on the failing roof will be required if the replacement does not occur. Staff time and resources will cost the City money. If leaks occur prior to the replacement, it may increase the cost of the replacement project.

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 1 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

May be eligible for rebate

1

No improvement as a result of the project.

0

N/A

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

1

Has not been identified in a master plan. No (during the 2019 budget deliberations, this project was highlighted).

20U.1 FIRE STATION Roof Section 1 Replacement

240


HARRISON PARK WORKSHOP Roof Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

20D.1 No

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

25-50 Year 2

Year 3+

20,000

20,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

20,000

Description and rationale: This project was tendered in 2020 and the lowest compliant bid was over budget. This project will be retendered in the fall of 2020. There are three sections of roof that require replacement or repairs. The inspection and scan of this roof was complete to identify the repairs and replacements required. The installation dates of the roof sections is unknown. Two of the roof systems is a Modified BUR (layered built up roof) with flood and gravel surfacing. The third section is newer rolled asphalt surfacing. On the BUR sections there are blueberries (erosion and dry out of the top coat of asphalt), ridges (felt lines protruding upwards through the surface layers), splits (weak or inflexible membranes that cannot accommodate movement causing the roof to split open) and blisters (soft/spongy pockets in the roofing materials that expand and rupture) present that have been and will continue to allow water to penetrate the building. On the asphalt section there is slope, drainage and penetration issues that need to be addressed. Completion of this work will be done by contractors.

Completed

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

20,000

20D.1 HARRISON PARK WORKSHOP Roof Replacement

241


HARRISON PARK WORKSHOP Roof Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

20D.1

Priority Level:

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed?

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating Thousands of people visit Harrison Park and the various parks in the city.

Potential minor injuries could occur if a the roof leak occurs (slip, trip and fall incidents).

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

The City is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

4

The roof is due for replacement. If delayed, the potential for leak and damage to assets within the building is greater. A roof is a critical component of a building envelop.

3

Maintenance on the failing roof will be required if the replacement does not occur. Staff time and resources will cost the City money. If leaks occur prior to the replacement, it may increase the cost of the replacement project.

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available 0

Project is not eligible for rebate.

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

No improvement as a result of the project.

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

2

Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities.

Master Plan Public Input

To what degree is the project addressed in 1 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement

Has not been identified in a master plan.

20D.1 HARRISON PARK WORKSHOP Roof Replacement

N/A. 242


EASTSIDE BOAT LAUNCH Building Upgrades Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Enhancement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

21D.35

No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

25 years Year 2

Year 3+

15,000

15,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

-

$

-

-

$

-

Description and rationale: This building was constructed in 1994 and is located at the North End Parking Lot of the Bayshore. It is used heavily during the boating and fishing season. There is male and female washrooms and also storage/canteen space with its own entrance. The upgrades would include new partitions, new fixtures, epoxy flooring, painting and accessible openers. Magnetic locks were installed at the washrooms a few years ago. Currently the storage/canteen space is used for storage by the Owen Sound City Band. Staff would possibly like to explore options for upgrades and repurpose of this valuable space. Completion of this work will be done in combination of city staff and contractors.

15,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Grant (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000 Tom Williams

21D.35 EASTSIDE BOAT LAUNCH Building Upgrades

243


EASTSIDE BOAT LAUNCH Building Upgrades

Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation

21D.35 Score 1 - 5

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

Thousands of people use the boat launch and the washroom building annually.

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed?

0

No impact on health and safety

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

The City is required to maintain its property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

Asset Management

Is the project a high priority for replacement 1 in the asset management plan

The building is an asset owned by the city. The upgrades will assist staff in maintaining the asset in a more efficient manner.

Operational Performance

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational 2 performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

The upgrades will assist staff in maintaining the asset in a more efficient manner.

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

Will the project result in an improvement to 1 the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Confirmed Tom Williams grant.

4

4

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in a 2 Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

0

Little or no improvement as a result of the project Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities. Maintains inclusive public spaces. Supports activities for the aging Recreation, Parks and Facilities Master Plan. Has not been identified by the public

21D.35 EASTSIDE BOAT LAUNCH Building Upgrades

244


HARRISON PARK SENIOR CENTRE Grading Improvements and Eaves Trough Replacement

21D.25

Maintenance No

Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

20 years

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

Year 2

Year 3+

13,000

13,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Description and rationale: The Harrison Park Senior Centre plays host to activities and games on a daily basis for seniors in Owen Sound. The building is in good condition, however some exterior improvements are required. The grading at the back of the building is sloped towards the building and allows water to sit around the foundation. The eaves trough is in poor condition and leaks in several locations. The water leaking also sits around the foundation and creates interior conditions that are preventable. Completion of this work will be done in combination of city staff and contractor.

13,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

13,000

21D.25 HARRISON PARK SENIOR CENTRE Grading Improvements and Eaves Trough Replacement

245


HARRISON PARK SENIOR CENTRE Grading Improvements and Eaves Trough Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment

Cultural Significance

21D.25 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

1

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 2 proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

3

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating The Harrison Park Senior Centre has below 1,000 members.

If water penetrates the basement, it could potentially cause mould growth. The City is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and staff. The building is an asset owned by the City. Ensuring water diversion away from foundations is an important measure.

Repairing failing eaves trough will become a burden on staff time and costly. A 2 replacement is in the best interest of the city. Watering entering the building creates maintenance issues for staff. 0

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding

1

Little or no improvement as a result of the project

5

Promotes Heritage Delivery of free events. Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities. Maintains inclusive public spaces. Supports activities for the aging.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

0

Harrison Park Master Plan. Has not been identified by the public

21D.25 HARRISON PARK SENIOR CENTRE Grading Improvements and Eaves Trough Replacement

246


TOM WILLIAMS Building Upgrades Enhancement No

Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection:

21D.37

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

25 years Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Year 2

Description and rationale: This building was constructed in 1950. It is Owen Sound's only true baseball (hardball) diamond. The building is aged and requires upgrades to enhance its functions to the baseball community. There is male and female washrooms and a storage room. The upgrades would include new partitions, new fixtures, accessible upgrades, epoxy flooring, painting, lighting and accessible openers. Magnetic lock installation for the washrooms are requested in a separate project for 2021. The work will be funded through the Tom Williams Reserve. Completion of this work will be done by a combination of city staff and contractors.

Year 3+

15,000

15,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

15,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Grant (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000 Tom Williams Park

21D.37 TOM WILLIAMS Building Upgrades

247


TOM WILLIAMS Building Upgrades Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment Cultural Significance

21D.37 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

3

Owen Sound minor ball registration, the visiting teams and spectators will benefit from this upgrade.

0

No impact on health and safety

4

The city is required to maintain its property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

Is the project a high priority for replacement The building is an asset owned by the city. The upgrades will assist staff in maintaining 1 in the asset management plan the asset in a more efficient manner. If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational 2 performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

4

Will the project result in an improvement to 1 the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

4

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in a 2 Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

The upgrades will assist staff in maintaining the asset in a more efficient manner.

The work will be funded through the Tom Williams Reserve. Little or no improvement as a result of the project Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities. Maintains inclusive public spaces. Supports activities for the aging. Recreation, Parks and Facilities Master Plan.

0

21D.37 TOM WILLIAMS Building Upgrades

Has not been identified by the public

248


21M.15

Public Works Channel Drain Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

Addition No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Public Works and Engineering Jeff Follis

25 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

Description and rationale: The existing channel drain runs the length of the main vehicle bay at the Public Works facility (3 runs). It dates from the original building construction (1991) and the metal component of the drain assembly is failing. Parts of it are inoperable (does not drain), and are a significant tripping hazard.

50,000

50,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

50,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

N/A

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

(insert photo here)

Fall 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Water Rates $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

25,000

25,000

21M.15 PW Channel Drain

249


21M.15

Public Works Channel Drain Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

This positively affects Public Works staff The existing channel drain is a tripping/slipping hazard Health and Safety Legislation

1

Enhancement to an existing asset

2

Currently, the channel drain does not work well, and in some bay areas, does not work at all. Ponding results.

0

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the 1 community? To what degree does the project support 0 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identifed through public engagement

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

1

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for 3 legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

0

21M.15 PW Channel Drain

No impact positive or negative Little or no relationship to cultural strategic objectives Has not been identified in a master plan Has not been identified by the public

250


GREENWOOD CEMETERY OFFICE Basement Rehabilitation Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

20D.60

No Year 2

Year 3+

15,000

15,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

Description and rationale: The abatement of designated substances was complete in 2020 and the remaining funds will be used to rehabilitate the basement. The Greenwood Cemetery Office is understood to be one of the oldest city homes, dating back to 1840's. The basement foundation is allowing water to penetrate inside the building. Staff retained a consultant to complete a DSS (Designated Substance Survey) which includes but not limited to mould, asbestos and lead paint sampling. Staff use the basement for storage of seasonal items from the cemetery and parks operations. The current condition of the basement is not acceptable and repairs will include abatement, foundation repairs and rehabilitation. Staff will explore possible funding opportunities for heritage and structural elements. Completion of this work will be done in combination of city staff and contractors.

15,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000

20D.60 GREENWOOD CEMETERY OFFICE Basement Rehabilitation

251


GREENWOOD CEMETERY OFFICE Basement Rehabilitation Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

20D.60

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

1

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating Staff that work out of the building and use the basement for storage.

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed?

The rehabilitation will make the basement a better environment to work in and use for storage.

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

The City is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

1

The rehabilitation will make the basement a better environment to work in and use for storage.

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

1

The space will be easier to maintain.

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available 0

Project is not eligible for rebate.

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

4

The abatement of mould and asbestos has an impact to the workplace.

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

0

Little or no relationship to cultural strategic objectives

Master Plan Public Input

To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement

Greenwood Cemetery Master Plan 2020. Has not been identified by the public

20D.60 GREENWOOD CEMETERY OFFICE Basement Rehabilitation

252


Water Bottle Fill Stations Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc $ Contingency Total $

21M.1 Addition No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Other Kristan

15 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

10,000 $

10,000 $

10,000

10,000 $

10,000 $

10,000

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

-

30,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

N/A

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

$

Description and rationale: At its meeting on September 28, 2017, the Operations Committee recommended that Council approves the implementation of a phased program to increase access to tap water at city facilities over 5 years, without banning the sale of bottled water at city facilities. City staff have prioritized a list of facilities that the stations will be installed at and started the implementation process. The bottle filling stations allow people to fill reusable bottles by motion sensor. The unit tracks the amount of plastic bottles that are saved by filling reusable bottles. Previous installations have occurred at City Hall, CN Station, Bayshore, Duncan, Harrison Park Shop, Kiwanis Soccer, Transit Terminal, WTP, Harrison Park Inn, Art Gallery and Public Works (note: 2020 installations have not occurred yet due to covid). Potential locations for 2021 installations are Cemetery Shop, Tom Williams Park, Fire Station and Kelso Beach. Completion of this work will be done in combination of city staff and contractors.

(insert photo here)

Fall 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

10,000 21M.1 WATER BOTTLE FILL STATIONS

253


Water Bottle Fill Stations Justification for Matrix Values

People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

21M.1 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 0 proceed? Is the project required for 1 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

The existing bottle fill stations throughout the city are used on a daily basis. No impact on health and safety No known legislative/regulatory compliance requirement

0

Project is a new asset and therefore not included in an asset management plan

1

Little or no effect on current operations

0

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the 3 community? To what degree does the project support 0 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

Priority Level:

3

The diversion of plastic bottles will have a positive impact on the environment. Little or no relationship to cultural strategic objectives Has not been identified in a master plan Residents have discussed actions that should be taken with regards to climate change and environmental impact.

21M.1 WATER BOTTLE FILL STATIONS

254


Cemetery Parking Lot Maintenance i

20D.61

Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Year 1

No

Year 2

Year 3+

2,500 7,500

10,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Priority Level:

D - Low

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

Description and rationale: During rain events, runoff collects at the back door to the historic Greenwood Cemetery office, ponds and infiltrates the basement level of the building. This capital will be used to design and implement a suitable dewatering solution specific to this location that will protect the building and outlet water to the storm sewer. Completion of this work will be done by a combination of city staff and contractors.

10,000

Design Start Date:

Jan 1 2020

Construction Start Date:

May 1 2020

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

June 1 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

10,000

20D.61 GW Parking Lot Drainage

255


Cemetery Parking Lot D i

20D.61

Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Environment

Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

D - Low

Justification / Rationale for Rating >1000

1

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed?

Minor injuries not requiring medical attention may result

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

1

No known legislative/regulatory compliance requirement

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

4

The project has been identified as a high priority for this asset to remediate poor drainage during storm events that is impacting the building

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

1

Little or no effect on current operations

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 0 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

To what degree does the project support 2 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement

no opportunities for funding partnerships are known

minor improvement to the immediate area around the building.

Promotes heritage by maintaining a historic building a Greenwood Cemetery

20D.61 GW Parking Lot Drainage

This project is not identified in a master plan No input from the public has been received 256


APPENDIX F

DOWNTOWN IMPROVEMENT DETAIL SHEETS owensound.ca

257


CAPITAL BUDGET PROJECTS: DOWNTOWN IMPROVEMENTS

RANKING

PROJECT TITLE

COUNCIL PRIORITY #3

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

12

Downtown River Precinct (DRP) - Phase One: 1st Ave E (800 Block)

67.0

30,000

13

Downtown River Precinct (DRP) - Phase Two: 1st Ave E (900 Block)

65.0

110,000

22

Pedestrian Crossing - 8th St E at 1st Ave E

52.2

25,000

23

Decorative Streetlight Replacement

52.0

60,000

36

Downtown Street Greening Initiative

48.0

10,000

38.8

60,000

48

258


17P.12

DRP - Phase 1 - 1st Ave E (800 Block) Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Enhancement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total

Partial

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

50 Year 2

$

2,000

$

18,000

$

10,000

$

30,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

Year 3+

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: This is the first of four phases of construction to implement the Downtown River Precinct plan. This project will be in its last year maintenance/warranty period and the budget is for administration of the warranty period by City and Consulting Engineering staff.

30,000 October 1, 2018

(insert photo here)

May 1, 2019 Nov 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: OCIF Formula $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

30,000

17P.12 DRP - Phase 1 - 1st Ave E (800 Block)

259


17P.12

DRP - Phase 1 - 1st Ave E (800 Block) Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

3

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management 4 plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on 4 operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 5 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

This project is identified to improve the pedestrians and traffic flow though the downtown Improvements to the road surface and sidewalk will allow for safer travel Legislative requirements dictate the level of standard required by municipalities. This section of road was identified in the City's asset management plan as being in need of repair

This will reduce the operational cost associated to repairing the road and sidewalks since it is a new development.

This Project has grant funding associated with it's purchase

1

There is no improvement to the natural environment

3

This project will support cultural significance in the sense to allow for easier travel throughout the city

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 5 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

4

Improvement can be connected to the Downtown Master plan Has been identified through public input on the downtown over all look

17P.12 DRP - Phase 1 - 1st Ave E (800 Block)

260


21C.3

DRP - Phase 2 - 1st Ave E (900 Block) Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

New Asset

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering $ Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Partial

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

50 Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

8,000 $

13,000

102,000 $

50,000

$

$

1,007,000 $

15,000

80,000

110,000 $

1,150,000 $

15,000

-

-

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

$

1,275,000

Design Start Date:

May 1, 2021

Construction Start Date:

May 1, 2022

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: This is the second of four phases of construction to implement the Downtown River Precinct plan. The Engineering/Landscape design and approval phase is planned for 2021 with construction planned in 2022, subject to Council approval. This project will include reconstruction of the road between 9th St E and 10th St E. This project will also replace the sidewalk and address stormwater infrastructure improvements. The design aesthetics have been established as part of the Downtown River Precinct Master Plan public consultation process and approved Master Plan specifications.

(insert photo here)

November 30, 2022

Current Year Funding Sources: OCIF Formula $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

110,000

21C.3 DRP - Phase 2 - 1st Ave E (900 Block)

261


21C.3

DRP - Phase 2 - 1st Ave E (900 Block) Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment

Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

3

This project is identified to improve the pedestrians and traffic flow through the downtown

2

Improvements to the road surface and sidewalk will allow for safer travel

4

Legislative requirements dictate the level of standard required by municipalities.

3

This section of road was identified in the City's asset management plan as being in need of repair

4

This will reduce the operational cost associated to repairing the road and sidewalks since it is a new development.

5

This Project has grant funding associated with its purchase

2

There is no improvement to the natural environment

3

This project will support cultural significance in the sense to allow for easier travel throughout the city

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 5 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

4

Improvement can be connected to the Downtown Master plan Has been identified through public input on the downtown over all look

21C.3 DRP - Phase 2 - 1st Ave E (900 Block)

262


21P.15

Pedestrian Crossing - 8th St E at 1st Ave E Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering $ Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Partial

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

25 Year 2

Year 3+

2,000

Description and rationale: This item facilitates the installation of a regulatory and AODA compliant Pedestrian Crossover at 8th St E and 1st Ave E as part of the identified DRP - Phase 1 project but was deferred to 2021 until after the 10th Street Bridge Replacement was completed and related detours were removed.

23,000

25,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

25,000 January 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

April 1, 2021 November 30, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Grant (Specify) Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

25,000

21P.15 Pedestrian-School Cross Construction 8th St E at 1st Ave E

263


21P.15

Pedestrian Crossing - 8th St E at 1st Ave E Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

3

What is the risk to the health and safety of 5 the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for 3 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

0

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on 3 operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 0 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

This project will facilitate an improved experience for pedestrians walking downtown along the river front. Public safety is at risk for pedestrians crossing 8th Street at 1st Ave E during the festival of northern lights as well as the farmers market. Designated crossings require safe crossing implements to be installed.

This is a new asset.

No significant change will result on operational performance.

There is no cost sharing opportunities.

1

There is no improvement to the natural environment

1

This project will support cultural significance in the sense to encourage pedestrian travel within the downtown core.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

4

Improvement can be connected to the Downtown Master plan Has been identified through public input on the need for a crossing location at this intersection.

21P.15 Pedestrian-School Cross Construction 8th St E at 1st Ave E

264


21C.2

Decorative Streetlight Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering $ Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

50 Year 2

Year 3+

3,000 $

3,000 $

3,000

57,000 $

57,000 $

57,000

60,000 $

60,000 $

60,000

-

$

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: This project continues replacement of Downtown decorative street light fixtures, poles and banner poles on an annual basis for the foreseeable future to upgrade lighting to LED technology and replace deteriorated (corroded) decorative poles with longer lasting materials. The first phase of this replacement was completed on 2nd Ave E - 900 block for the light poles and fixtures only.

-

180,000 February 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

July 1, 2021 October 31, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation

60,000 Streetlight

21C.2 Decorative Streetlight Replacement

265


21C.2

Decorative Streetlight Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

Depending on the replacement location it will help lots of residence or tourists.

What is the risk to the health and safety of Current poles are showing signs of corrosion and have prematurely fallen over posing the public or Staff if the project does not 2 a risk to the public and city staff. proceed? Is the project required for This replacement program is required to continue to be compliant. 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for Streetlights identified in this project have a high probability of failure and are in need replacement in the asset management plan 4 of replacement as well as having a focus on the downtown core. If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on 3 operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 1 are there partnership funds available

This improvement will reduce the energy cost of streetlights since they will be converted to LEDs

This project may be eligible for rebates

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

2

This project will help the natural environment by upgrading old streetlights to be night sky compliant as well as reducing energy costs.

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

2

This project will promote nighttime activities throughout the city.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

2

This project is associated with the Downtown Master plan This project has come up in conversation with the public, in regards to the poor condition and look of the street lights.

21C.2 Decorative Streetlight Replacement

266


21C.4

Street Greening Initiative Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Enhancement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 2

Year 3+

10,000

10,000 $ -

$

$

100,000

-

$

100,000

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

-

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

Description and rationale: In partnership with the DIA Board of Management, an initiative to improve the streetscape of 3rd Avenue East between 8th Street East and 10th Street East is proposed. Supported by urban design standards detailed in the Owen Sound Harbour and Downtown Urban Design/Master Plan Strategy, the plan notes that streetscape improvements for 3rd Avenue East should be a priority, including a "major greening initiative (along the length of the street) and a move to improve the pedestrian character..." This capital would be used to have design completed in accordance with the urban design standards in the master plan for costing and construction in a future year. A presentation to the DIA at the October meeting is linked HERE. The design would be shared with the DIA.

110,000 January 4, 2021

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

December 31, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Donations $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

5,000 DIA

5,000 21C.4 Street Greening Upgrades- 3rd Ave E DIA

267


21C.4

Street Greening Initiative Score 1 - 5

Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety Legislative Compliance Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Environment

Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 0 proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

1

Is the project a high priority for 0 replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on 3 operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available 4 Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating The project would impact a high traffic corridor in the downtown.

This project has not health and safety related aspects. There is no legislative requirement related to this project. New Asset

Some impact to the DIA beautification program in a future year post construction.

The cost of the project is to be shared equally by the City and DIA board of Management

3

Some improvement to the local environment by adding street trees and beautification elements to approximately 450m of 3rd Ave East.

4

6. Promote and enhance Owen Sound's Built Heritage, 7. Encourage and promote participation and active lifestyles, 8. Support community safety and social inclusion

To what degree is the project addressed in 3 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 3 public engagement

The project is identified in the Owen Sound Harbour and Downtown Urban Design/Master Plan Strategy The project has been discussed at the DIA Board of Management in response to feedback received by the Committee.

21C.4 Street Greening Upgrades- 3rd Ave E DIA

268


21C.1

Downtown Wayfinding Signage Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

No Year 1

Impact on Operating Budget $

Year 2

Year 3+

48,000 12,000

60,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

60,000

Design Start Date:

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Brent Fisher

20

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage $ Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

Construction Start Date:

Priority Level:

Description and rationale: Wayfinding signage is an important tool for visitors and residents to identify key landmarks and destinations within a Municipality. The signage also reflects the image of the City to residents and visitors. Section 7.8.3 of the City's Official Plan (Experiencing the City) identifies in detail, the importance of clear wayfinding signage: "7.8.3.7 - The City will employ clear directional signage to inform visitors of the route to reach the main centres of the Downtown, harbour, east side commercial and west side commercial areas and to reach highway linking points. Signage should also identify the routes to other landmark destinations such as major parks, the library and hospital." The City is currently completing the 2020 Wayfinding Signage capital project for key access points and has adopted the RTO7 wayfinding signage guidelines. This project includes 22 locations outside of the downtown. The DIA and City are completing a Marketing, Branding and Action strategy whereby Wayfinding Signage is identified as a key joint initiative. A funding partnership with the Owen Sound DIA will be proposed in the DIA’s 2021 budget deliberations to support the rebranding. Additional funding sources will be explored such as the RT07 Signage funding program as well as possible RED Funding opportunities. If the signs are not replaced in the short term, they will need to be removed altogether.

June 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

September 1, 2021 October 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

60,000 Red

21C.1 DowntownWayfindingSignage

269


21C.1

Downtown Wayfinding Signage Justification for Matrix Values

Score 1 - 5

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

5

Thousands of residents and visitors travel through the downtown on a weekly basis. Current downtown signage is not consistent or reflect the RTO7 model adopted in 2020.

2

No impact on health and safety

3

Current wayfinding signage does not meet MTO or accessibility requirements

1

Project is a new asset and therefore not included in an asset management plan

1

Little effect on operations. Consultation with engineering and DIA Board required.

2

Funded through reserves, however grants (RTO7, RED) as well as a DIA contribution will all be explored.

1

The signs will be more aesthetically pleasing but will not have an impact on the natural environment.

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

3

Proper wayfinding signage is vital to marketing and promoting the Downtown as a destination.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in a Master Plan

3

DIA Action, Marketing and Branding Strategy

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

An upgrade in aesthetics to the current tired wayfinding signage in the downtown was a recurring theme in the public findings of the Downtown Marketing, Branding and 3 Action strategy.

People

Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment

Cultural Significance

How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

21C.1 DowntownWayfindingSignage

270


APPENDIX G

INVEST, RENEW, MANAGE DETAIL SHEETS owensound.ca

271


CAPITAL BUDGET PROJECTS: INVEST-RENEW-MANAGE RANKING

PROJECT TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

2

Kelso Waterfront Trail Restoration

81.4

150,000

3

East Waterfront Trail Restoration

81.4

150,000

4

Electronic Records Management Application

75.8

325,500

5

Software Transformation Project Needs Assessment

75.2

175,000

7

Zoning By-law Review

74.2

10,000

8

Harrison Park Channel Wall Repair

72.2

25,000

17

Transit Study

58.4

80,000

55.0

15,000

18 20

Harrison Park Bridges Maintenance

53.2

35,000

21

Forestry Gear

52.8

5,000

24

Employee Engagement Survey

51.6

25,000

25

Brooke Basin A-3 Master Plan - Completion

51.0

10,000

26

Harrison Park Campground Playground Replacement

50.6

91,000

27

Duncan McLellan Park Playground Replacement

50.6

45,000

29

Phragmites (invasive Species) Removal

50.2

40,000

33

Salt & Sand Storage Containment

49.0

50,000

34

Citizen Satisfaction Survey

48.8

25,000

35

Harrison Park Pool Filtration System Replacement

48.4

60,000

38

Council Audio Visual

47.0

189,000

39

Greenwood Cemetery Water System Reserve Contribution

46.6

15,000 272


CAPITAL BUDGET PROJECTS: INVEST-RENEW-MANAGE RANKING

PROJECT TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

42

AGW Properties (PGW 2261 9th Ave E)

45.0

350,000

46

Tennis/Pickle Ball Court Renewal

39.8

30,000

49

Sanitary Sewer Relocation - 3rd Ave E & 297 18th St E (Georgian Landing Apartments)

38.4

5,000

50

Paving Around New Fuel System - Public Works

37.6

20,000

53

YMCA New Playground at Julie McArthur Regional Rec Centre

35.2

50,000

55

St. George’s Backstop Replacement

31.2

15,000

57

Interpretive Plaques

27.8

2,500

27.0

10,000

58 59

Auto Body Shop Development - 23rd St E - Contribution for Storm Drainage

26.4

15,000

60

Cemetery Benches Replacement

25.8

15,000

61

Digitize Building Plans for AMANDA

25.4

20,000

273


CAPITAL BUDGET: NEW FLEET 2021 ITEM #

TITLE

PRIORITY SCORE

TOTAL BUDGET ($)

Fleet A

Drop Sander/Material Spreader

53.4

12,000

Fleet B

Building Vehicle Charging Station(s)

21.4

20,000

Fleet C

Building Vehicles

19.2

100,000

274


Kelso Waterfront Trail Restoration Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

21D.30 No

Priority Level:

A - very high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

25 Year 2

Year 3+

10,000 140,000

150,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

Impact on Operating Budget $

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: Due to exceptionally high water levels in 2019 and 2020 the shoreline and storm outflow at Kelso Beach Park have sustained significant damage. In addition, the high water has exacerbated the issue of water at the base of the amphitheatre in front of the stage. Remediation of a large section of shoreline has been completed in 2020 as well as the drainage in the amphitheatre has been addressed. The shoreline failure has caused the waterfront trail to fail (see photo). This capital would be used to complete the shoreline protection work and design and construct the asphalt accessible trail. The Recreation Facilities and Parks Master Plan supports the Trails Master Plan recommendation that maintenance should be prioritized for the Waterfront Trail at Kelso Beach as it is considered a major trail hub within the City.

150,000 February 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

July 2nd 2021 August 2nd 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

150,000 PY Gas Tax

-

21D.30 Kelso Waterfront Trail Restoration

275


Kelso Waterfront Trail Restoration Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

21D.30 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

Priority Level:

A - very high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

5

10,000+

3

Unsafe trail conditions.

4

Occupiers Liability Act

5

Yes

5

A new trail alignment would need to be developed and constructed. Current condition is a detriment to the park and events that rely on the park space and shoreline access east of the amphitheatre stage and pavilion.

2

Grant opportunities are being explored.

Will the project result in an improvement The project will remediate existing shoreline damage and fortify the remaining lands to the natural environment of the 5 reducing sediment in the water and retain valuable waterfront parkland. community? To what degree does the project support 7.1 - Continue to deliver select free City events to residents 3 cultural initiatives 7.2 Continue to facilitate affordable recreation and sport opportunities To what degree is the project addressed in The waterfront trail and beach are supported by recommendations 11 and 12 in the 4 a Master Plan Kelso Beach Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

Shoreline and trail remediation received public input as part of the Kelso Beach 4 Master Plan process, and current conditions have been communicated to the public via media releases and periodic social media reminders.

21D.30 Kelso Waterfront Trail Restoration

276


East Waterfront Trail Restoration Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc. Contingency Total $

21D.45

No

Priority Level:

A - very high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

N/A Year 2

Year 3+

10,000 140,000

150,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

Impact on Operating Budget $

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: Wind driven wave shoreline damage has occurred on the east side of the bay impacting the waterfront trail between the Public Health Unit building and the Harry Lumley Community Centre as well as the Tom Thomson trail, between the Bayshore Community Centre and the north end of the Waste Water Treatment Plant property. This capital would be used to design a trail restoration solution including shoreline protection measures to resist additional wind driven wave action erosion. Staff are pursuing grant opportunities to assist with this project. The Recreation Facilities and Parks Master Plan supports the trails master plan recommendation that the Harbour Walkway and Waterfront trail be prioritized for maintenance as major feeder trails for the rest of the City's trail system. This trail also supports active transportation into Owen Sound via connectivity to trails that meet at the municipal boundary.

150,000 February 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

July 2nd 2021 August 2nd 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Grant (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

150,000 PY Gas Tax

-

21D.45 East Waterfront Trail Restoration

277


21D.45

East Waterfront Trail Restoration Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

A - very high

Justification / Rationale for Rating 10,000+

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed?

Unsafe trail conditions.

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

4

Occupiers Liability Act

5

Yes

5

The trail has completely failed west of the Inn on the Bay. Public access and staff ability to maintain the trail are impacted, and the trail cannot be opened until restoration is complete.

2

Grant opportunities are being explored.

5

The project will remediate existing shoreline damage and fortify the remaining lands reducing sediment in the water and retain valuable waterfront parkland.

3

7.1 - Continue to deliver select free City events to residents 7.2 Continue to facilitate affordable recreation and sport opportunities

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identifed through public engagement

The waterfront trail and beach are supported by recommendations in the Trails Master Plan

Current conditions have been communicated to the public via media releases and 4 periodic social media reminders. Users and nearby businesses have raised concerns about the trail damage with staff.

21D.45 East Waterfront Trail Restoration

278


20A.13

Electronic Records Management Application Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

New Asset

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

No Year 2

Studies $ 325,500 In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ 325,500 $ Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

Year 3+

325,500

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Department: Staff Contact:

Corporate Services Desiree Van Dijk

Description and rationale: All organizations are challenged with managing the explosive growth of electronic records in diverse formats. The City is falling behind acceptable practices in this area. Currently, the City's electronic records are stored on a variety of "directories" typically assigned by department, or operational area. The network directories are quite varied and numerous business records are stored in a very ad-hoc, unstructured basis. This means that many records are unclassified per the City's Records Classification System. As well, some departments often have numerous directories in which they access records for business purposes. The result of this current ad-hoc storage system is excessive time to find records, version accuracy issues, lost records and multiple duplicates. In addition, there is insufficient rigour regarding appropriate retention/destruction scheduling of City records. The benefits of an EDRMS are numerous, including increased sustainability and efficiency of service, increased legislative compliance and better customer service. On November 18, 2019 Council approved awarding the procurement of an EDMS to the highest scoring proponent in a 2019 RFP. The amount over the reserve set aside in previous years is to be funded from the discretionary modernization grant received from the Province in 2019.

December 1, 2019

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

December 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

325,500

20A.13 EDRMS

279


20A.13

Electronic Records Management Application

Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Environment

Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project? 5 What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed?

2

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? 4 Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

EDRMS will significantly impact all staff, Owen Sound Citizens and those that work with the City. Improves and enhances ability to access and distribute Health and safety information and forms to staff. Assure compliancy with Municipal legislative requirements such as Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, ADOA, the City retention Policies. Replacement for current process and hardware.

1

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact Project will significantly improve the ability of staff to work and provides services to on operational performance? 5 the public. Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be This project is recommended to be funded entirely from the Province's modernization leveraged or are there partnership 4 grant which is intended to address service delivery and efficiency. The goals of the funds available grant program mirror the scope of this project. Will the project result in an Significant improvement to City ability to work effective and reduce our carbon foot 5 improvement to the natural print through paper reduction and ability to work remotely. environment of the community? Support for more than three actions by allowing the City to improve ability to Built To what degree does the project 5 our heritage through the Community Development Plan, Promote Safety and Foster support cultural initiatives and develop the ability to Facilitate Recreation and Sport opportunities. To what degree is the project Project relates to the completion of another project identified 1 addressed in a Master Plan Has the project been identified Has been mentioned in unsolicited feedback 1 through public engagement 20A.13 EDRMS

280


Software Transformation Project (Needs Assessment) Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

21A.6

Study Partial

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Department: Staff Contact:

Corporate Services Mark Giberson

N/A

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies $ In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Year 2

Year 3+

175,000

175,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

175,000 Late February, Early March

Construction Start Date:

Description and rationale: The objective is to transform our core software platforms into a flexible, agile integrated system allowing the City to conduct business anywhere, anytime meeting the City Strategic, operation and business goals. This will be done by conducting a needs assessment of current core applications to identify deficiencies and to develop a road map to allow the City to build a solid foundation moving forward. The City has not conducted a review of current software in the last ten years to determine if and how our current software meets our needs, as well as the expectations of Staff, Citizens, Developers and others. Covid-19 has presented a number of challenges that current software has had difficulty meeting. Healthy and robust systems are essential to allow the City to create growth, create efficiencies, meet reporting requirements and allow City to be able to be in a better position to promote the interest of it's Citizens.

(insert photo here)

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

August 31, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Grant (Specify) Carry Forward Water Rates Select from List Select from List Taxation

$ $ $

$

130,000 Modernization 15,000 30,000

21A.6 Software Transformation Project (Needs Assessment)

281


Software Transformation Project (Needs Assessment) Justification for Matrix Values People

21A.6 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted 5 by the project?

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

Affects all staff, Council and Citizens by identifying the direction that the City takes.

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed?

The project will aim to identify a solution for the City's Human Resources Information system including health and safety training and resources. Having this information 3 readily available will ensure that staff are trained adequately to do their jobs resulting in fewer injuries.

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

3

Asset Management

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

This project will address the optimal system to house the City's asset management 5 data ensuring that investments are made at the right time in the right place. Failure to recognize the highest priorities will result in asset failure.

Operational Performance

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

5

Needs Assessment will identify operational efficiencies and inefficiencies and allow City to address.

Financing

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

5

This project is recommended to be funded entirely from the Province's modernization grant which is intended to address service delivery and efficiency. The goals of the grant program mirror the scope of this project.

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

Health and Safety

Legislation

Cultural Significance Master Plan

Public Input

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

2 2 2

4

Helps to identify legislative deficiencies in current systems.

Implementing this project will not be a detriment to the environment and in many ways will help the City improve the environment through sound data management, reduced paper and staff time and improved interaction with our ratepayers. By facilitating more online interaction with ratepayers and participants, the process review will improve access to recreational programming. Assessment will allow City to be able to be in a better position to promote growth and interest with it's Citizens. The ability to interact with the City in more ways electronically and virtually has been requested by public on many circumstances. The ability to provide our services more efficiently and with faster access to information is often the root of an issue brought forward by the public.

21A.6 Software Transformation Project (Needs Assessment)

282


21E.1

Zoning By-law Review Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Study

Cash Flow Projection: Studies $ In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 1

Year 2

10,000

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

A - Very High

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Amy Cann

Description and rationale: In accordance with the Planning Act, an Official Plan is to be updated not less than every 5 years. The City will complete the Official Plan update in 2021. A municipality is legislatively mandated to update its zoning by-law no less than three years after the approval of an Official Plan under Planning Act Sec. 26(9). The City's Zoning By-law came into force in 2010 and will require review and update upon completion of the City's Official Plan. It is staff's objective, if time and capacity exists, to complete the review internally and have the document peer reviewed. If constraints necessitate, Staff will craft the new Zoning By-law in partnership with the consultant.

Year 3+

10,000

Priority Level:

$

-

$

-

10,000 Summer 2021

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Spring 2022

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation

10,000 21E.1_ZBL Review

283


21E.1

Zoning By-law Review Score 1 - 5

Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance Environment

Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

A - Very High

Justification / Rationale for Rating City-wide

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of Regulates building within areas prone to flooding and slope instability; ensure equity the public or Staff if the project does not 2 in land use and prevents encroachment onto neighbouring properties. proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

5

Yes, Planning Act. Implements the Official Plan.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

3

Update legislated

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Dated By-law is triggering an increased amount of developer/owner driven 5 amendments, which is onerous on developer/owner and unnecessarily consumes City resources.

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 1 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the 4 community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

5

To what degree is the project addressed in 5 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 4 public engagement

Not likely. Protection of the natural environment by directing development away from hazard lands and open space. Upholds strategic directions concerning the built environment and regulates all land uses in the City. Zoning is the primary implementing document of the Official Plan. Zoning By-law is required under the Planning Act and must be devised/reviewed through public consultation.

21E.1_ZBL Review

284


21D.20

HP Channel Wall Repair Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Maintenance

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

No

Priority Level:

A - very high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services A. Parsons

25 Year 2

Year 3+

5,000 20,000

25,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: The stacked stone retaining wall along the west/south side of the river is exhibiting signs of significant stone and mortar loss in localized areas. Additional deterioration of the wall could allow granular material loss below the roadway and parking lot surface resulting in failure of the roadway. This capital would be used to contract a consulting engineer to design a typical channel wall section, to be used to support repairs in 2021 and future maintenance repairs of the original 1922 structure. The stacked stone wall is part of the designated cultural heritage landscape of Harrison Park.

25,000 Jan 1 2021

(insert photo here)

March 25, 2021 April 30, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

25,000

21D.20 HP Channel Wall Repairs

285


21D.20

HP Channel Wall Repair

Score 1 - 5

Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

5

Priority Level:

A - very high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

Harrison Park is the most visited location in Owen Sound by visitors and residents.

What is the risk to the health and safety of Identified by a consulting engineer in the Bridges and retaining walls bi-annual report the public or Staff if the project does not 5 (completed in 2020) as a high probability of failure. proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

4

Required to continue to be compliant with the Occupiers Liability Act.

Parks assets are not included as a core asset as defined by the Province. Most parks assets are not included in the current Asset Management Plan. Identified by a 5 consulting engineer in the Bridges and retaining walls bi-annual report (completed in 2020) as a high probability of failure. Failure of the 1922 structure will result in the collapse of the main vehicular exit from the central area of Harrison Park. Traffic disruptions would cause major operational 4 delays. All parks operations would be forced to exit the park via a controlled traffic point alternating entering and exiting the park via a single lane. 0

No current funding partnerships are available for non-core assets (as defined by the Province).

4

Should the wall section fail, pending time of year, silt may flow into the main river channel impacting fish habitat and reproductive success.

1

Harrison Park is a designated heritage landscape - promote and enhance Owen Sound's built heritage.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

Specifically identified in the City's bi-annual bridges and retaining wall report prepared by GM Blueplan engineering.

0

21D.20 HP Channel Wall Repairs

Has not been identified by the public.

286


21R.1

Transit Study Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Study

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Yes

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Public Works and Engineering Cassandra Cesco

5 - 10 Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

80,000

80,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: This item facilitates an experienced Transit Consultant to put together an RFP for the next City Transit contract. The importance of completing a Transit Study is largely based off the growth the City is expected to have within the next 5-10 years and how the City will need to adjust to incorporating new or existing transit service areas to be accommodated in the new transit network. Incorporating multiple service delivery models, implementation of a suggested bus route system specific to the City of Owen Sound's particular needs, how to reduce imperfections in the current transit system and make the most of our next City transit contract will have options presented in the RFP.

80,000 November, 2020

(insert photo here)

January, 2021 April, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

80,000 PY Gas Tax

21R.1 Transit Study

287


21R.1

Transit Study Justification for Matrix Values

People

Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment

Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

4

Priority Level:

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

Depending on the City's growth in the coming years, the study could impact a significant number of visitors and residents

What is the risk to the health and safety of No impact on health and safety 0 the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for 5 To ensure we maintain AODA compliance, we will need to factor in bus stop locations legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

1

Enhancement to an existing asset

5

Operationally we would see an improved transit system in the City. Impacts on budget may increase, including staff time

2

Funded through reserves

3

This project will improve transportation with the City.

4

It would have a positive impact on cultural initiatives as it would create an increased community setting to allow more residents to travel within the City

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 5 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

Would be a positive initiative to the Transportation Master Plan 2010

1

21R.1 Transit Study

Has been mentioned in unsolicited feedback

288


21S.2

Genoe Flush and Camera Work Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Maintenance

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Public Works and Engineering Cassandra Cesco

5 Year 2

Year 3+

15,000

15,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Description and rationale: Genoe Landfill Site (Genoe) has a leachate collection system comprised of 16 manholes connected by 200 mm (8 inch) PVC and HDPE perforated pipe. This requires a combination vacuum flushing truck, ideally with a CCTV explosion proof camera system due to the nature of methane exposure. A condition of the Genoe Landfill Closure Plan requires the City have a contractor conduct a camera inspection of the leachate collection system be scheduled to occur every 5 years. As this was last done in 2016, the camera work is due again for 2021.

15,000

Design Start Date:

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date:

June, 2021

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

July, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000 Landfill

21S.2 Genoe Flush and Camera Work

289


21S.2

Genoe Flush and Camera Work Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating Not applicable

0

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 4 proceed? Is the project required for 5 legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

Possibility of high methane levels causing an explosion Yes, as per O. Reg. 232/98 Landfill Sites and as per the Genoe Landfill Closure Plan

Is the project a high priority for Last maintenance occurred July, 2021. Prior to that was 2016, then 2014. Waiting too 5 replacement in the asset management long of a time could incur negative impacts plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on Increased maintenance for the following year since, leading to increased costs 4 operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or Funded through reserves are there partnership funds available 2 Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

1

Improvements to removal of excess and stagnant waste water

0

Little or no relationship to cultural strategic objectives

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

0

21S.2 Genoe Flush and Camera Work

Has not been identified in a master plan Has not been identified by the public

290


20D.13

Harrison Park Bridges Maintenance Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Maintenance

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 2

Year 3+

10,000 25,000

35,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

Description and rationale: The City's Bridges and Culvert inspection report by GM BluePlan, completed in 2020 , identified maintenance items for 3 bridges at Harrison Park. 1) The Ski Hill Bridge; 2) The South Mile Drive Bridge; 3) A steel Pedestrian Bridge to the Island Playground. The report pages referencing these projects with recommendations are attached. Completion of this work will be done by contractors. This maintenance work will extend the life of the asset.

35,000 Jan 1 2021

Construction Start Date:

May 1, 2021

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

July 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

35,000

20D.13 Harrison Park Bridges Maintenance

291


20D.13

Harrison Park Bridges Maintenance Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating 10,000+

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of Maintenance is required to ensure the ongoing serviceability of bridges in Harrison the public or Staff if the project does not 5 Park. Should the project not proceed it will result in future risk to the public and users proceed? in the heavily used park. Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

5

Occupiers Liability Act

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

5

Yes

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

1

Maintenance will allow operations to continue unchanged.

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 0 are there partnership funds available

No partnerships are available

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

Little or no environmental gains will be made by completing this project.

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

5

Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities. Supports activities for the aging. Maintains inclusive public space.

Master Plan Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in Identified in the Harrison Park Master Plan 3 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through This has not been identified by the public. The project is driven by regular engineering 0 public engagement reviews of the City's bridges and retaining walls by a consulting engineer. 20D.13 Harrison Park Bridges Maintenance

292


21D.36

Forestry Gear Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Enhancement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc $ Contingency Total $

No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

2-10 years Year 2

Year 3+

5,000 5,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: The City's forestry team, comprised of 3 International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Arborists, 2 Arborists dedicated primarily to forestry duties, and a Horticulturalist who holds an ISA certification. Staff are supported by a fleet that includes a 65' bucket truck and chipper combination, and an assortment of small equipment and trade specific tools. This capital would be used to purchase replacement and new tools that will enhance the teams ability to respond to a wider variety of calls, and increase the degree of safety of the work they perform. Tools and equipment included in this request are a high elevation self rescue kit, dielectric ladder, various pulleys and rigging hardware, PPE and specialty saws sized for working at high angles with challenging access. Ropes and lines may last 2 seasons, durable goods are expected to have a 10 year lifecycle.

5,000 Jan 4 2021 January 10, 2021 Feb 1 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

5,000 21D.36 Forestry Gear

293


21D.36

Forestry Gear Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment

Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating 2,500-4,999

3

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

Proactive maintenance efficiency will be improved reducing the risk to public and staff. Ontario Health and Safety Act and Regulations

0

Project is a new asset and therefore not included in an Asset Management Plan.

4

Improved safety efficiency and effectiveness for staff in the line of duty, supporting staff in the provision of timely responses to inquires.

0

No partnerships are available

Slight improvement in the natural environment by supporting the health of the City's urban tree canopy by tending to and supporting the health of mature trees throughout the City. While not specifically identified by the strategic plan in the category of society and culture, maintaining the urban tree canopy on City properties supports Owen 1 Sound's natural cultural heritage 2

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identifed through public engagement

5

This project has not been identified by a Master Plan. Forestry related inquiries account for 180-200 calls for service annually.

21D.36 Forestry Gear

294


21B.1

Employee Engagement Survey Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Study

Cash Flow Projection:

No Year 1

Studies $ In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

Year 2

Year 3+

25,000

25,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Michelle Palmer

Description and rationale: Research shows increasing employee engagement leads to improved service to the public and increases citizens’ trust and confidence in government. Highly engaged employees not only provide better service to customers but their general performance was better than others, had better attendance and were less likely to leave. The survey will measure employee engagement and identify specific drivers of employee engagement at the City of Owen Sound, provide flexibility for the reporting of results through multiple team lenses, provide actionable results and supporting tools to foster an environment that empowers leaders and employees to be responsive and engaged in results to build a place where we want to work.

25,000 January 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Current Year Funding Sources: Grant (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

25,000 Modernization

-

21B.1 Employee Engagement Survey

295


21B.1

Employee Engagement Survey Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

1

Priority Level:

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

Employee engagement leads to improved service to the public and increases citizens’ trust and confidence in government

What is the risk to the health and safety Lack of employee engagement leads to decreased attendance and may lead to staff of the public or Staff if the project does 2 mental health not proceed? Is the project required for Employers are required to provide a safe work place 3 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management 0 plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on 5 any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available 5 Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

N/A

Highly engaged employees not only provide better service to customers, but their general performance was better than others

This project is recommended to be funded entirely from the Province's modernization grant which is intended to address service delivery and efficiency.

1

Project has a neutral impact on the environment

0

Little or no relationship to cultural strategic objectives

0

Has not been identified in a master plan

0

Has not been identified by the public

21B.1 Employee Engagement Survey

296


17P.5

Brook Basin A-3 Master Plan - Completion Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Enhancement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering $ Design or Engineering $ Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No

Priority Level:

B - High

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

50 Year 2

Year 3+

1,000 9,000

10,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: Completion of the Brooke Area Storm Drainage Basin A3 Master Plan and Study that commenced in 2017. The project completion was placed "on hold" in 2020 just before the final public consultation phase (public meeting/information centre and notification of project completion) due to the Coronavirus Pandemic and restrictions on public gatherings. The Brooke Basin A3 Master Plan will identify priorities within Brooke Basin A3 for future years. Projects include: 6th Ave W - 2100 block culvert/storm sewer replacement and road municipal services reconstruction, 19th St W Storm Sewer Replacement and 19th St W Culvert/Storm Sewer Inlet. This is similar to the planning process that has been implemented for the Kenny Drain System.

10,000 February 1, 2018

(insert photo here)

N/A December 31, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

10,000 17P.5 Brooke Basin A-3 Master Plan - Completion

297


17P.5

Brook Basin A-3 Master Plan - Completion Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment

Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted 1 by the project?

Priority Level:

B - High

Justification / Rationale for Rating

This Project will affect the property owners all along the Brooke Basin drainage catchment

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed?

1

Little heath and safety risks would be associated with this project

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

3

This replacement program is required to continue to be compliant.

Is the project a high priority for replacement This project has been identified in the City's asset management plan for replacement in the asset management plan 4 and improvements If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

4

This improvement will have a significant improvement to operational performance in terms to PW call out and liability claims

0

This project is not eligible for any grant funding

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? 4 To what degree does the project support 1 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in a 3 Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

4

This project will help address the flooding and erosion problems with the under designed creek system This project will have very little if any cultural significance This project can be associated with growth within the city as well as completing a portion of the Storm water study Public residents who back upon the creek have been working with the city to get this issue addressed.

17P.5 Brooke Basin A-3 Master Plan - Completion

298


Harrison Park Campground Playground Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc. Contingency Total $

21D.70 No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

25-50 Year 2

Description and rationale: Lifecycle Replacement of the Playground Structure at the Harrison Park Campground. The aging play structure is deteriorating and has surpassed its projected lifecycle. New equipment will refresh the park and create a play space that meets current CSA play structure code requirements. The replacement of this structure supports the campground operation providing an amenity for children within the campground. Staff have submitted an application to the Enabling Accessibility Fund to support the project. The new equipment would be specified to have a natural theme in keeping with the location.

Year 3+

91,000

91,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

91,000 February 1, 2021

Construction Start Date:

September 15, 2021

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

September 30, 2021

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Grant (Specify) $ Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

73,000 Accessibility 18,000 Capital

21D.70 Harrison Park Campground Playground Replacement

299


Harrison Park Campground Playground Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

21D.70 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

Justification / Rationale for Rating 2,500-5,000

3

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for 5 legislative/regulatory compliance?

Injuries may result if the structure is not replaced or removed. CSA Z614-14 Design of Children's Play Structures, Occupiers Liability Act

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan 5 If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on 2 operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available 2 Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the 1 community? To what degree does the project support 3 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

3

B - high

Yes

The cost of maintenance and replacement components is equal to or more than replacement.

Facility booking reserve and Parkland reserve.

Little or no impact positively or negatively on the surrounding environment 7.2 Continue to facilitate affordable recreation and sport opportunities This item is not identified specifically in a master plan, it supports goals of the Recreation, Parks and Facilities Master Plan. Public feedback has been received supporting replacement of the structure.

21D.70 Harrison Park Campground Playground Replacement

300


Duncan McLellan Park Playground Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

21D.71

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

25-50 Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc. Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Year 2

Year 3+

45,000

45,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

Description and rationale: Lifecycle Replacement of the Playground Structure at Duncan McLellan Park is required. The aging play structure is deteriorating and has surpassed its projected lifecycle. New equipment will refresh the park and create a play space that meets current CSA play structure code requirements. The replacement of this structure is supported by the Parks Recreation and Facilities master plan objective to provide a play structure within 500m of every residence. The fence that protects the playground from 19th St East is in poor condition and will be replaced/repaired as part of the project. Removal and replacement of this item is included in the project scope.

45,000 February 1, 2021

Construction Start Date:

June 1, 2021

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

June 30, 2021

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

10,000 Facility Booking 25,000 Parkland

10,000

21D.71 Duncan McLellan Park Playground Replacement

301


Duncan McLellan Park Playground Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

21D.71

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

3

2,500-5,000

3

Injuries may result if the structure is not replaced or removed.

5

CSA Z614-14 Design of Children's Play Structures, Occupiers Liability Act

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on 2 operating costs, staff time and maintenance 2

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? 1 To what degree does the project support 3 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in a 0 Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan 5

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

Priority Level:

3

Yes

The cost of maintenance and replacement components is equal to or more than replacement.

Facility Booking Reserve and Parkland Reserve. Little or no impact positively or negatively on the surrounding environment 7.2 Continue to facilitate affordable recreation and sport opportunities This item is not identified specifically in a Master Plan, it supports goals of the Recreation, Parks and Facilities Master Plan. Public feedback has been received supporting replacement of the structure.

21D.71 Duncan McLellan Park Playground Replacement

302


21D.31

Phragmites Removal Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Maintenance

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

N/A Year 2

Year 3+

40,000

40,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

40,000

Design Start Date:

January 1, 2021

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

August 10, 2021

Description and rationale: The control of the invasive phragmities was identified as a high priority in the Kelso Beach Master Plan in 2010. The Parks and Open Space Division has worked over several years to successfully reduce invasive phragmites reed grass along the shore at Kelso Beach Park in areas that could be reached from land or shallow waters. The work has had a positive impact on the environment and on the usability of the space. In 2019, the program included a trial with the Invasive Phragmites Control Centre (IPCC). Staff from the IPCC worked at Kelso Beach in 2019 with amphibious equipment, along side City staff to reduce or eliminate phragmites in stands that have been previously inaccessible. Staff from the IPCC anticipate an 80% to 100% reduction in density within the trial area. Given the success of the 2019 trial and the 2020 operation, this capital will be used to complete the program west of the 4th Ave W bridge towards the City's boundary to remove an estimated 100 tons of biomass from the riverbanks. This capital includes contractor costs for cutting, removal from site and disposal. Completion of this work will be done by contractors in August to achieve the highest degree of effectiveness.

(insert photo here)

August 20, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

40,000 Capital

21D.31 Phragmites Removal

303


21D.31

Phragmites Removal Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating 10,000+

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed? Is the project required for 1 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

Priority Level:

low risk to public safety The project is not related to legislative compliance

1

The project is an enhancement to an existing asset

3

The project will have a net increase in demand on operational demand in future years as parks staff will maintain the 0-20% regrowth that is expected to occur in subsequent years.

1 No partnership is available at time of budget, staff are exploring grant opportunities. Phragmites removal has a overwhelming positive impact on the surrounding 5 environment by restoring natural riaprian and fish habitat in the Pottowotomi river and the near shore environment at Kelso Beach Park. Maintains inclusive public spaces

2

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 3 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

2

The project is specifically identified in the Kelso Beach Master Plan Identified through public engagement during the Kelso Beach Master Plan process, and subsequently via direct unsolicited inquiries in the interim.

21D.31 Phragmites Removal

304


20M.10

Salt & Sand Storage Containment Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 2

Year 3+

50,000

50,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Public Works and Engineering Jeff Follis

Description and rationale: This project is to replace the two existing sand and salt domes at Public Works, which are at the end of their service life, with one new partitioned structure. The MOECP recommends that "road salt or sand/salt stockpiles should always be protected from precipitation or surface runoff. Further, the storage facility shall be underlain with an impervious apron (preferably asphalt) and dyed to prevent the seepage of salt leachate from the storage area to a nearby watercourse or to ground water aquifers." It is proposed to undertake Engineering in 2020, including demolition specs for the existing domes as well as base prep considerations. The existing two domes will remain in service until the new facility is completed. This will be possible because the new facility (similar to right photo below) will be located in a different location at the PW site than the existing one (left photo below).

50,000

Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

December 31, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

50,000

20M.10 Sand & Salt Facility

305


20M.10

Salt & Sand Storage Containment Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating Winter Control efficiencies affect the entire City

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of The existing dome is at the end its useful life. Loading and unloading of salt and sand the public or Staff if the project does not 2 occur outside, which is not the MOECP best practice in winter conditions proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

5

Will result in full regulatory compliance with respect to salt storage.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

3

Is a priority for replacement of existing structure

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

3

Operational performance will improve. Current domes are undersized for undercover activity (mixing, loading)

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 0 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

3

To what degree does the project support 0 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding Consistent with MOECP and Federal requirements for environmental salt management. Little or no relationship to cultural strategic objectives

20M.10 Sand & Salt Facility

Has not been identified in a master plan Has not been identified by the public

306


21B.2

Citizen Satisfaction Survey Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Study

Cash Flow Projection: Studies $ In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 1

Year 2

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Michelle Palmer

Description and rationale: The City values the feedback and opinions of it's residents. Public engagement through statistically significant surveys and focus groups offers an opportunity to hear from citizens and stakeholders about their top-of-mind issues of concern and satisfaction with City services and builds stronger relationships with the public. Conducting citizen satisfaction surveys is also an effective way to examine the City’s performance in comparison to the national norm and see how Owen Sound’s service offerings and delivery measures up to other municipalities.

Year 3+

25,000

25,000 $

Priority Level:

25,000 January 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Current Year Funding Sources: Grant (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

25,000 Modernization

-

21B.2 Citizen Satisfaction Survey

307


21B.2

Citizen Satisfaction Survey Score 1 - 5

Justification for Matrix Values

People

Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan

Public Input

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

The City values the feedback and opinions of it's residents. Surveys are an important How many people will be positively impacted source of statistically valid, reliable and relevant feedback from citizens. Gathering 5 by the project? opinions on a number of key questions helps to inform strategic decisions by ensuring that organizational priorities are aligned with citizen needs What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 0 proceed? Is the project required for 1 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement 0 in the asset management plan

Not Applicable No known legislative/regulatory compliance requirement Not Applicable

Conducting citizen satisfaction surveys is also an effective way to examine the City’s If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), performance in comparison to the national norm and see how Owen Sound’s service what will be the impact on operational offerings and delivery measures up to other municipalities. Public input is a key 5 performance? Comment on any impact on driver for decision-making, and informs policy decisions, budgetary spending and operating costs, staff time and maintenance continuous improvement. Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

5

This project is recommended to be funded entirely from the Province's modernization grant which is intended to address service delivery and efficiency.

Will the project result in an improvement to 1 the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Neutral impact to the environment

0

Not Applicable

To what degree is the project addressed in a 0 Master Plan

Not Applicable

Has the project been identified through public engagement

The City engages with citizens in a variety of methods on various projects, but has never undertaken a statistically reliable citizen satisfaction survey. The ability to 3 interact with the City in more ways electronically and virtually has been requested by public on many circumstances.

21B.2 Citizen Satisfaction Survey

308


HARRISON PARK POOL Filtration System Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

21D.5

Replacement No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kristan Shrider

25 years Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

60,000

60,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

60,000

Design Start Date:

TBD

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: The City has invested in an upgrade and accessible features for the Harrison Park pool in 2019 and 2020 including pool, deck and changehouse. At that time, upgrades to the pool mechanical and filtration system were not within the scope of work. Mechanical and filtration function is the heart of the system and failure to maintain the components will result in failure and risk of not opening the pool. The filtration infrastructure is very old with minor repairs and additions being implemented over the years. The replacement will include but not limited to: removal of existing equipment and piping, installation of new filter(s), piping, pump, valves and gauges. The new equipment will be energy efficient and inline with today's technology of pool operating systems. Completion of this work will be done by a contractor.

(insert photo here)

May 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

60,000 Facility Booking

-

21D.5 HARRISON PARK POOL Filteration System Replacement

309


HARRISON PARK POOL Filtration System Replacement

Score 1 - 5

Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety

Legislation

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing Environment

Cultural Significance

21D.5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

5

Harrison Park has thousands of people visit the campground annually. A large attraction to the park is the pool and amenities.

2

The existing equipment has health and safety concerns (guards missing, pinch points etc.) and the replacement will ensure that all equipment is safe and in acceptable operating condition.

4

The safe operation of a pool is legislated by TSSA and Public Health compliance. The City is required to maintain it's property to ensure the safety of the public and staff.

Is the project a high priority for replacement There is risk of failure of the existing equipment which will prevent the pool from in the asset management plan 4 operating. Poorly operating equipment may cause the pool to be unbalanced and not safe to swim in. If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), An updated system will allow for easier operating needs and equipment function. A what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on 3 well maintained system will ensure proper chemical application to the pool and more efficient operations. operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 0 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? 1 To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

5

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in a 2 Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

0

No opportunity for partnership or grant funding Little or no improvement as a result of the project Promotes Heritage Delivery of free events. Facilitates recreation and sports opportunities. Maintains inclusive public spaces. Supports activities for the aging. Harrison Park Master Plan. Has not been identified by the public

21D.5 HARRISON PARK POOL Filteration System Replacement

310


20A.99

Council Audio Visual Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Enhancement

Cash Flow Projection:

Partial

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Corporate Services Mark Giberson

10 Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc $ Contingency Total $

Year 2

Year 3+

189,000 189,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

Impact on Operating Budget $

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

189,000

Design Start Date:

TBD

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: From the beginning of the COVID pandemic in March, Staff in Corporate Services and Facilities have worked exceptionally hard to maintain the City’s on-line electronic Council and Committee meetings through WebEx and iCompass using the existing Audio/Visual infrastructure in the Council Chamber. Although some lighting and audio components of this infrastructure have been addressed over the past four years, the solutions were to stabilize and extend the current usability of the entire A/V system. The equipment used to broadcast and conduct the meetings has now extended well beyond its current lifecycle and must be replaced with a complete solution to continue with on-line broadcasts and broadcasting on the Rogers Cable network. More than 30 issues are identified by a Consultant.

(insert photo here)

March 31st 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

69,000 IT Equip./Capital 120,000

-

20A.99 Council Chambers Audio Visual Project

311


20A.99

Council Audio Visual

Score 1 - 5

Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment

Cultural Significance

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating All Citizen and Staff

5

What is the risk to the health and safety of Minor injuries not requiring medical attention may result 1 the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for Moves the City Closer to addressing ombudsman comments in regards to records of 3 legislative/regulatory compliance? Closed sessions. Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan 1 If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on 4 operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 2 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Significant improvement to function of Council Chambers

Significant impact on ability for staff to support Council and Committee Meetings

Funded through reserves

2

Slight improvement as a result of the project

0

Little or no relationship to cultural strategic objectives

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

Strengthening our community through sound leadership

0

20A.99 Council Chambers Audio Visual Project

Has not been identified by the public

312


Greenwood Cemetery Water System Reserve Contribution Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc. $ Contingency Total $

No

17D.55

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

75-80 Year 2

Year 3+

15,000 $

15,000 $

15,000

15,000 $

15,000 $

15,000

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

$

Description and rationale: The existing water system throughout Greenwood Cemetery is aged and beginning to show signs of failure. There has been sections of the water system that has been isolated and taken out of service. Funds were allocated in 2017 for repairs of the system ($15,000), however further investigation revealed the entire system was beyond end of life, and repairs were not feasible. A matching contribution was made in 2020 of $15,000. Replacement of the entire system will be completed when the reserve balance reaches the $150,000 project value. Staff recommend an annual contribution towards a reserve fund for three to five years to attain the required funding amount.

-

45,000 January 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Jan 1 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000

17D.55 Greenwood Cemetery Water System Reserve Contribution

313


Greenwood Cemetery Water System Reserve Contribution Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

17D.55

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

1

Visitors to the Cemetery

1

Minor health and safety risk related to underground water system leaks and potability.

5

Water system standards, Occupiers Liability Act

5

The system has failed in sections. As sections fail they are taken offline as repairs are not feasible on the existing infrastructure.

3

Reduced calls for service to the water distribution team less demand on Cemetery staff addressing leaks when they occur.

0

The cost of project implementation is to be borne by the Cemetery reserve when contributions are sufficient to support the project scope and budget.

3

Some positive impact by reducing occurrences of potable water leaks.

2

Maintains inclusive public spaces

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

Indirectly supports the Greenwood Cemetery Master Plan objectives

Cemetery staff often field questions about the status of the water system at 3 Greenwood Cemetery for the provision of water for the public to maintain interment plots of loved ones.

17D.55 Greenwood Cemetery Water System Reserve Contribution

314


20P.30

AGW Properties (PGW 2261 9th Ave E) Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

New Asset Yes

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

80

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total

Priority Level:

Year 1

Year 2

$

2,000

$

30,000

$

293,000

$ $

Impact on Operating Budget $

Year 3+

Description and rationale: This project is required to extend the waste water and storm sewers from 21st St E northerly to the south-west corner of private property to accommodate proposed new residential development at that property known as 2261 9th Avenue East. The amount shown will be included as part of a Servicing Agreement between the City and developer and recovered, in part, through the Capital Infrastructure Charges levied by the City to the developer of this property.

25,000 350,000 $

-

$

-

-

-

$

-

$

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

350,000 January 1, 2020

(insert photo here)

April 1, 2020 November 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Waste Water Rates $ Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation

175,000 175,000

20P.30 AGW Properties (PGW 2261 9th Ave E)

315


20P.30

AGW Properties (PGW 2261 9th Ave E) Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

1

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating This development is required for new housing development. Little risk to public or city staff health and safety if this does not go ahead.

5

If development continues this project will be required to service the new buildings.

0

This project is a new asset therefore not identified in the Asset Management Plan.

2

This Improvement will have a slight improvement to operational performance due to increased flow characteristics.

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 5 are there partnership funds available

This project will be funded by waste water rates and taxation.

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

3

This project will improve the environment due to sanitary and storm infrastructure being installed

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

0

There is no cultural significance associated with this project.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 1 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

4

This project will help growth within the city. This project has not been identified through public engagement.

20P.30 AGW Properties (PGW 2261 9th Ave E)

316


Tennis/ Pickle Ball Court Renewal Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Rehabilitation

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $

21D.21

No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

10 Years Year 2

Year 3+

30,000

30,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: The Harrison Park Tennis and Pickle Ball courts are a popular and no cost outdoor recreation attraction. Over time the surface has been worn smooth from use. Adjustable nets installed for the purpose of having a flexible facility for both tennis and pickle ball are also in need of replacement. This capital would be used to have a qualified contractor remove the existing worn sport coating, and apply a new coating and lines, for both tennis and pickle ball. The expected useful life is 10 years. A recommendation in the Recreation Parks and Facilities Master Plan notes that improvements to the tennis/pickle ball courts at Harrison Park should be considered.

30,000 January 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

June 1,2021 June 15, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

30,000

21D.21 HP Tennis and Pickle Ball Court Renewal

317


21D.21

Tennis/ Pickle Ball Court Renewal Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating 2,500-4,999

3

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 3 proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

Slip, trip and fall

4

Occupiers Liability Act

4

no

1

Little to no impact on operational performance

0

Partnership funding is not available

1

No improvement or detriment will be realized by the completion of this project.

2

7.2 Continue to facilitate affordable recreation and sport activities

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

Not specifically identified, but achieves a goal of the Harrison Park Master Plan.

A Pickle ball facility was identified as an important inclusion in parks amenities via the Recreation Parks and Facilities Master Plan. Several in person, email and 4 telephone requests have been received from users supporting renewal of the facility.

21D.21 HP Tennis and Pickle Ball Court Renewal

318


3rd Ave E Sanitary Sewer Relocation - 1800 Block Georgian Landing Apartments - 297 18th St E Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

19P.20

No

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

100 Year 2

Year 3+

Description and rationale: This is the City's share of the construction cost to relocate an existing sanitary sewer to facilitate the construction of a new apartment building at 297 18th Street East. It is part of a Servicing Agreement with the developer.

5,000

5,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

5,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

N/A

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

(insert photo here)

December 31, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Waste Water Rates $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

5,000

19P.20 3rd Ave E - Sanitary Sewer Relocation

319


3rd Ave E Sanitary Sewer Relocation - 1800 Block Georgian Landing Apartments - 297 18th St E Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

19P.20

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

1

What is the risk to the health and safety of 1 the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating This project was required to facilitate a 41 unit apartment complex Little health and safety risks would be associated with this project This replacement program is required to continue to be compliant.

4

Sewers identified would not meet the requirements for this development

3

The new sewer would improve operational performance due to new construction materials implemented in the development. The budget amount has been carried forward into 2021 due to the project completion delay.

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 1 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement 2 to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support 0 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 1 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

Priority Level:

0

This project may be eligible for rebates This project would improve the natural environment in terms of having a proper discharge for sanitary waste. This project will not have any cultural significance This project can be associated with growth within the city No public input was identified for this project

19P.20 3rd Ave E - Sanitary Sewer Relocation

320


20M.12

Paving around New Fuel System Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 2

Year 3+

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Public Works and Engineering Jeff Follis

Description and rationale: The new fuel system was installed in 2018. In order to ensure proper drainage and containment of the area around the four fuel pumps, final paving needs to be completed.

20,000

20,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

20,000 January 1, 2020

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

December 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

20,000

20M.12 Paving around Fuel Pumps

321


20M.12

Paving around New Fuel System Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

1

Primarily staff, however improvement for spill containment could be perceived as benefitting entire city.

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 2 proceed?

The existing gravelled area represents a fuel infiltration and runoff risk but also a hazard in the winter.

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

3

Spill containment is a requirement which currently is not met.

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

3

Failure could mean impact on stormwater system and receiving water bodies

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

2 Slight improvement with respect to ponding, erosion, and winter control in that area.

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 1 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Gas Tax

3

Spill containment is an environmental benefit

0

Little or no relationship to cultural strategic objectives

To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement

20M.12 Paving around Fuel Pumps

Has not been identified in a master plan Has not been identified by the public

322


19D.21

YMCA Playground Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

New Asset

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc. Contingency Total $

No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

50 Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

50,000

50,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: The Victoria Park Master Plan provides for the development of recreation space north and west of the rear parking lot for the JMRRC. The parking area and landscape grading was completed in 2018. This capital would be used to build a picnic shelter and add a play structure in the space identified in the 2018 plan. 100% of the funding for this project is to be funded by a private donation through the YMCA. An agreement and approval of plans will be done through Committee.

50,000 January 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

September 1, 2021 October 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Donations $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

50,000 YMCA

-

19D.21 YMCA Playground

323


19D.21

YMCA Playground Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

4

5000-9,999

0

New Asset, no impact on health and safety

1

New asset to be constructed in compliance with CSAZ614-14 Design of Children's Playspaces

0

Project is a new asset and therefore not included in an asset management plan

2

Minor operational impact via additional inspections and maintenance added to the existing complement of 22 play structures.

5

The project is to be 100% funded by the YMCA via a donation

1

No impact on the surrounding environment

2

Continue to facilitate affordable recreation and sport opportunities.

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 4 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

The project is identified in the Victoria Park Master Plan

Identified via the Victoria Park Master Plan process and subsequent inquiries as the 2 north portion of the park has been developed in conjunction with the Julie McArthur Regional Recreation Centre

19D.21 YMCA Playground

324


St. George's Backstop Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Maintenance

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc. Contingency Total $

21D.38

No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

25 Year 2

Year 3+

15,000

15,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

Description and rationale: St. George's Ball Diamond is a heavily used Class A diamond. The backstop at this facility has reached the end of it's useful life and requires replacement. This capital would be used to repair the backstop framing, remove the existing chain link and install new chain link fence fabric in order to continue to provide an adequate facility for safe play.

15,000 February 1, 2021

Construction Start Date:

April 1, 2021

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

May 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000

21D.38 St. George's Backstop Replacement

325


St. George's Backstop Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

21D.38

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project? What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed? Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

2

1,000-2,499

2

The project is required as a preventative maintenance measure in an effort to avoid the backstop becoming a health and safety risk.

4

Occupiers Liability Act

3

Moderate probability of failure, low consequence.

1

Minor impact on operational performance by reducing the number and frequency of repairs required.

Financing

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

0

No partnership is available

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

Little or no impact on the surrounding environment

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

3

7.2 Continue to facilitate affordable recreation and sport opportunities

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

1

The project is a maintenance item and is not included Park users have provided input that the project is supported

21D.38 St. George's Backstop Replacement

326


Interpretive Plaques Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

18E.2

New Asset

Cash Flow Projection: Studies $ In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

2,500

2,500 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Amy Cann

Description and rationale: Interpretive plaques help to promote Owen Sound's cultural heritage and tell the story of interesting places, people and events. There will be carry over from previous years. Budget may be used to research and prepare plaque text, purchase images for new plaques, or to repair or replace plaques in poor condition. Ideas for new plaques material or locations may include: revitalized Market and DRP; the Manitoba; parks; select private properties.

2,500 January 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

Summer 2021 Fall 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

2,500

18E.2_Interpretive Plaques

327


Interpretive Plaques Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

18E.2 Score 1 - 5

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

3

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

Plaques benefit pedestrians and users of the sidewalks and trails in the City, primarily in the Downtown and Harbour areas.

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed?

Minor injuries not requiring medical attention may result

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

1

No known legislative/regulatory compliance requirement

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

2

Adding additional plaques to the existing inventory will contribute to the heritage program in the City

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

1

Low

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 1 are there partnership funds available

Occasional funding may be available from the Government

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

Low, unless the plaque addresses natural heritage

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

3

Plaques uphold a number of strategic actions (tourism, heritage)

Master Plan Public Input

The Official Plan Sec. 7.2.3 calls for interpretive plaques to implement the heritage To what degree is the project addressed in 4 conservation and interpretation plan a Master Plan OS residents often contact the Planning & Heritage Division to pitch ideas and request Has the project been identified through 2 new plaques public engagement

18E.2_Interpretive Plaques

328


Artificial Athletic Turf Field Business Case Project Type: Addition No

Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Cash Flow Projection:

21D.40

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

N/A Year 1

Studies $ In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc. Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

Year 2

Description and rationale: The City's Recreation Parks and Facilities Master Plan (RPFMP) identified a community desire for an all season artificial turf field in the community. Owen Sound Minor Soccer has approached the City to partner on undertaking a business case to study the potential for this facility. The RPFMP notes that the City should evaluate it's involvement in a turf facility based on a business plan, financing strategy and feasibility study prepared by an interested party.

Year 3+

10,000

10,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

10,000 January 1, 2021

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Jan 1 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Donations $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

5,000

OSMSA to Match

5,000

21D.40 Artificial Athletic Field Reserve Contribution

329


Artificial Athletic Turf Field Business Case Justification for Matrix Values People

Health and Safety

Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment

21D.40

Score 1 - 5

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

2

1,000- 2,499

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not proceed?

0

Reserve contribution , no impact to health and safety

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

1

No known legislative/regulatory compliance requirement

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan 0

Reserve contribution has no impact on existing asset management

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational Reserve contribution has little impact on current operational performance performance? Comment on any impact on 1 operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or A fund matching program has been proposed by Owen Sound Minor Soccer for the are there partnership funds available 4 purpose of bringing an artificial turf field to Owen Sound Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the 1 community?

Little impact on the surrounding environment

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

2

Continue to facilitate affordable recreation and sport opportunities

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in a Master Plan

4

The reserve contribution supports a major aspect of the Recreation Parks and Facilities Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identifed through public engagement

4

Significant public input was received supporting this project via surveys and public workshops during the Master Plan process in 2018.

Cultural Significance

21D.40 Artificial Athletic Field Reserve Contribution

330


Auto Body shop Development -23rd St E - City Contribution for Storm Drainage Channel Construction Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Enhancement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor $ Materials Equipment/Misc Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

19P.21

Partial

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

City Manager Chris Webb

50 Year 2

Year 3+

15,000

15,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

15,000

Design Start Date:

N/A

Construction Start Date:

N/A

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

Description and rationale: The City owned property on 23rd Street East that was sold to an auto body repair business required a storm water drainage channel/ditch along its eastern side to provide a positive drainage outlet for properties to the east of the subject property that front on 20th Avenue East. This capital item is the City's share of constructing drainage works that are necessary as part of this new site development and to support existing development. The project is nearing completion but the City's share is not expected to be paid until 2021. Note - photo is of pre-development condition.

(insert photo here)

December 31, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Carry Forward $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000

19P.21 Auto Body Shop Development - 23rd St E

331


Auto Body shop Development -23rd St E - City Contribution for Storm Drainage Channel Construction

Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

19P.21

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

1

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating This project will improve the storm drainage for this property Little heath and safety risks would be associated with this project This replacement program is required to continue to be compliant.

Is the project a high priority for If the development of this drainage ditch is not completed this development will not 4 replacement in the asset management be able to go forward plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on This new ditch will have very little impact on operation performance 1 operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or This project may be eligible for rebates 1 are there partnership funds available

Environment

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

1

This project would improve the natural environment in terms of having a proper discharge of the sites storm water.

Cultural Significance

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

1

This project will have very little if any cultural significance

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 1 a Master Plan

This project can be associated with growth within the city

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

0

No public input was identified for this project

19P.21 Auto Body Shop Development - 23rd St E

332


Cemetery Benches Replacement Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

Replacement

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials $ Equipment/Misc. Contingency Total $

21D.60

No

Priority Level:

C - moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

25 Year 2

Year 3+

Description and rationale: Many benches at Greenwood Cemetery are aging, deteriorating or missing. This capital would be used to replace benches that are no longer suitable for service with new accessible benches, completing the replacement program initiated in 2020. The funding amount represents replacing 10 benches at the Cemetery. Completion of the installation will be done by city staff.

15,000

15,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date: Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

15,000 January 1, 2021

(insert photo here)

Feb 1 2021 August 1, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

15,000

21D.60 Cemetery Benches Replacement

333


Cemetery Benches Replacement Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

21D.60

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

1,000 Minor risk of strain related injuries if accessible rest areas are not provided AODA

3

There is a moderate probability of failure with low consequence.

1

Little or no impact on operational performance

0

No opportunity for grant funding or partnerships

1

Little or no impact on the surrounding environment

3

To what degree is the project addressed in a Master Plan 2 Has the project been identified through public engagement

C - moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

1

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed? Is the project required for 4 legislative/regulatory compliance?

Priority Level:

6. Promote and enhance Owen Sound's built heritage 7. Encourage and promote participation in cultural activities and active lifestyles. The Greenwood Cemetery Master Plan addresses accessibility and accessible customer service options. Although benches are not specifically identified in the plan, they support the provision of an accessible space for visitors.

0

21D.60 Cemetery Benches Replacement

Has not received any public input.

334


Digitize Building Plans for AMANDA Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

19E.1

New Asset

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc $ Contingency Total $ Impact on Operating Budget $

No Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

20,000 20,000 $ -

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

C - Moderate

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Amy Cann

Description and rationale: With the City's goal to reduce the amount of paper storage and the conversion to electronic storage, the Building Division is requesting money to convert the stored paper rolls and boxes of folded drawings to be digitized and loaded into the AMANDA Property Management System. This will allow a Building Inspector to view the drawings on site from their tablet and also allow transmission of these documents to interested parties. All new large projects since June 2018 have had electronic versions of the plans stored electronically.

20,000

Design Start Date: Construction Start Date:

Priority Level:

(insert photo here) Winter/Spring 2021 TBD

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

Building 20,000 Inspection

19E.1 Digitize current building plans for AMANDA

335


Digitize Building Plans for AMANDA Justification for Matrix Values People

Health & Safety

Legislative Compliance

Asset Management

Operations Performance

Finance

Environment

Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

19E.1

Priority Level:

Score 1 - 5 How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

1

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 0 proceed?

C - Moderate

Justification / Rationale for Rating

Staff will be able to search documents easier and clients can submit PDF copies of plans for storage Accumulated paper storage presents a risk of fire

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

0

There is no legislative requirement for this

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan

1

Enhancement to an existing asset

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance

3

Staff will be able to search documents easier and clients can submit PDF copies of plans for storage

Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 2 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the 1 community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

1

To what degree is the project addressed in 0 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through 0 public engagement

Building reserves to be used to fund this project

Little or no improvement as a result of the project

Supports a Cultural Objective not identified in the Strategic Plan Has not been identified in a master plan Has not been identified by the public

19E.1 Digitize current building plans for AMANDA

336


Drop Sander/Material Spreader Project Type: Growth Related? Estimated Useful Life (years)

21T.1

New Asset No

Priority Level:

B - high

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Adam Parsons

10

Cash Flow Projection:

Year 1

Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc $ Contingency Total $

Year 2

Year 3+

12,000 12,000 $

Impact on Operating Budget $

-

$

-

$

-

-

$

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule: Design Start Date:

Description and rationale: A truck mounted drop sander/material spreader is required to enhance the Parks and Open Space division's ability to deliver efficient and timely winter control at Harrison Park, Greenwood Cemetery and other parks areas maintained for recreation and emergency access in winter months. Staff expect parks areas to see continued increased traffic in the winter months over previous years, as people remain close to home due to the pandemic. The unit would be mounted on an existing parks vehicle with an appropriate gross vehicle weight rating. This equipment will create an operational efficiency within the existing parks and open space winter control program.

12,000 January 4 2021

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

February 28, 2021

Current Year Funding Sources: Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation $

12,000 Fleet- Drop Sander-Material Spreader

337


Drop Sander/Material Spreader Justification for Matrix Values

People

21T.1

Score 1 - 5

Priority Level:

B - high

Justification / Rationale for Rating

How manay people will be positively 5 impacted by the project?

10,000+

Health and Safety

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the

3

Legislation

Is the project required for legislative/regulatory compliance?

The project will reduce the risk of health and safety related incidents for the public, and create operational efficiencies for staff, reducing hazards related to perfoming winter control measures

5

Occupiers Liability Act

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset

0

new asset

Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on The equipment will introduce an efficiency within the existing parks and open space 4 operational performance? winter maintenance program Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and Can the cost of investment be no opportunity for partnership 0 leveraged or are there partnership Will the project result in an improvement to the natural

1

little or no impact on the surrounding environment

To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

2

7.2 Continue to faciliate affordable recreation and sport opportunities

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in a Master Plan

0

not identified in a master plan

Public Input

Has the project been identifed through public engagement

3

Parks staff receive unsolicited public inquries about winter maintenance, particularly at Harrison Park, throughout the winter control season.

Environment Cultural Significance

Fleet- Drop Sander-Material Spreader

338


Building Vehicle Charging Station(s)

21E.3

New Asset

Project Type:

No

Growth Related?

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc $ Internal Staff Time/Equipment Contingency Total $

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

Priority Level:

D - low

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kevin Linthorne

Description and rationale: In relation to the PHEV purchase by the Building Department, new charging stations are required to be purchased and installed in the parking lot of City Hall. Staff are currently investigating partnerships and grants for the installation of these charging stations as they will also be made available to the public.

20,000

20,000 $

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

$

-

20,000

Design Start Date:

TBD

Construction Start Date:

TBD

Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

(insert photo here)

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation

20,000

Bldg Inspection

21E.3 11082020_ChargeStations

339


Building Vehicle Charging Station(s)

21E.3 Score 1 - 5

Justification for Matrix Values People Health and Safety Legislation Asset Management

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance Master Plan Public Input

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community?

Justification / Rationale for Rating

No Risk No

0

New Asset

1

No Impact

2

Potential for partnerships and grants exist

2

Yes eliminating fossil fueled vehicles

To what degree does the project support 0 cultural initiatives To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan Has the project been identified through public engagement

D - low

Any person that drives an EV

4

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 0 proceed? Is the project required for 0 legislative/regulatory compliance? Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on operating costs, staff time and maintenance" Can the cost of investment be leveraged or are there partnership funds available

Priority Level:

None Section 13 of the City's Strategic Plan is to 'Improve Energy Conservation and Efficiency and Address Climate Change'

0

21E.3 11082020_ChargeStations

No

340


Building Vehicle(s)

21E.2

New Asset

Project Type:

No

Growth Related?

Cash Flow Projection: Studies In House Engineering Design or Engineering Communication/Signage Construction / Contractor Materials Equipment/Misc $ Internal Staff Time/Equipment Contingency Total $

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3+

100,000

100,000 $

-

Total Project Budget: $ Schedule:

$

-

100,000

Priority Level:

D - low

Department: Staff Contact:

Community Services Kevin Linthorne

Description and rationale: A survey of 24 Building Departments in the local chapter of the OBOA was recently undertaken and it was determined that only Owen Sound and 2 other municipalities require the Building Officials to use their personal vehicles. The Building Division proposes to acquire two (2) PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicles) SUV vehicles for use in carrying out duties under the Building Code Act of Ontario including site inspections, site meetings, meetings and conferences. SUV's are required due to the topography of the City, the needed ability to get to sites in inclement weather and condition of job sites. The acquisition of PHEV vehicles will require the installation of charging stations at City Hall and will help with the 'Greening' of Owen Sound and specifically add charging stations in the downtown. This project is to be financed from Building Department Reserves, the reserves in this area can only be used for Building Department needs. If a municipalities Building Reserves are too high the Province may dictate that the municipality reduce its Building Permit Fee.

Design Start Date:

(insert photo here)

Construction Start Date: Substantial Completion or purchase date:

TBD

Current Year Funding Sources: Reserves (Specify) $ Select from List Select from List Select from List Select from List Taxation

100,000 Bldg Inspection

21E.2 11082020_Vehicle

341


Building Vehicle(s) Score 1 - 5

Justification for Matrix Values People

21E.2

How many people will be positively impacted by the project?

1

Legislation

What is the risk to the health and safety of the public or Staff if the project does not 1 proceed? Is the project required for 0 legislative/regulatory compliance?

Asset Management

Is the project a high priority for replacement in the asset management plan 0

Health and Safety

Operational Performance

Financing

Environment Cultural Significance

D - low

Justification / Rationale for Rating

2 vehicles will allow inspectors to not have to use personal vehicles for inspections More liability on staff to carry additional insurance for using personal vehicle for employment purposes No

No, this will add new asset

If the project proceeds (or fails to proceed), what will be the impact on operational performance? Comment on any impact on 0 operating costs, staff time and maintenance" Can the cost of investment be leveraged or 2 are there partnership funds available Will the project result in an improvement to the natural environment of the community? To what degree does the project support cultural initiatives

Priority Level:

Nothing operationally will change

Anticipate a partnership with the charging stations

3

This project will improve the 'Greening' of Owen Sound with the PHEV and reduce the fleet reliance on fossil fuels

0

None

Master Plan

To what degree is the project addressed in 2 a Master Plan

Public Input

Has the project been identified through public engagement

Section 13 of the City's Strategic Plan is to 'Improve Energy Conservation and Efficiency and Address Climate Change'

0

21E.2 11082020_Vehicle

No

342


Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.