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Vodafone applies its global motto to one of the continent’s fastest growing telecoms markets, investing US$1.9bn into local network development

METOREX

80 Base metal mining at its best

THE COPY CAT LTD 42 The most connected IT experts in East and Central Africa

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES 102 Rapid expansion of Africa’s largest airline

WP TRANSPORT 116 Freight transporting on the double

AFRICA OUTLOOK ISSUE 23/24 A L S O T H I S I S S U E : A T L A S C O P C O E A S T E R N A F R I C A | E LT E K | U C H U M I S U P E R M A R K E T S


THE BIG FIVE FOR SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTIVITY


W E L C O M E A Positive Outlook

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Africa Outlook is celebrating its two year anniversary with its largest edition to date, bridging every sector and covering every hot topic as we bring some of the continent’s largest companies to the fore. North, south, east and west are all represented to ensure that no stone is left unturned, and leading the way is arguably one of Africa’s biggest international influencers. Vodafone is the true representation of a global company acting locally, and this month we speak to its Ghanaian operation’s CEO, Haris Broumidis about the company’s rapid rise to prominence in the West African country. Much of Vodafone’s work in Ghana has been in enriching the lives of the wider population; an achievement mirrored by the country’s football team in February who fell just short of winning the Africa Cup of Nations in Equatorial Guinea. However, controversy and acrimony has been brewing around the tournament north of this region, and we hone in on what the future holds for Morocco’s federation, and indeed the championship itself. To the east, Ethiopia, Tanzania and Kenya are all represented, courtesy of the continent’s largest airline in terms of fleet size, Ethiopian Airlines; respective food and construction national leaders, Coast Millers and Holtan; and one of East Africa’s largest retail chains in Kenya’s Uchumi Supermarkets. Bridging the east and south, we also take an in-depth look into Atlas Copco’s operations in Africa, speaking to Eastern Africa’s and Zambia’s respective divisions to gauge both general efficiencies and local nuances. Botswana’s Khomeacau Copper Mining, Namibia’s WP Transport and Zambia’s Good Time Steel help to round off our showcasing section as they support the always extensive South African cast; this month including DSM Corridor Group, SJM Flex, Edendale Hospital, Murray & Dickson Construction and a revisit to Eltek’s hybrid vision for the future. Speaking of the future, we round off this month’s bumper issue with a poignant step towards future sustainability on the continent; British inventor, Marc Koska providing insight into his autodisable syringe – an innovation which will save as many as five million lives a year and have an especially significant impact on diseases in Africa. Matthew Staff Editorial Director, Outlook Publishing Enjoy the issue! Vodafone applies its global motto to one of the continent’s fastest growing telecoms markets, investing US$1.9bn into local network development

METOREX

80 Base metal mining at its best

THE COPY CAT LTD 42 The most connected IT experts in East and Central Africa

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES 102 Rapid expansion of Africa’s largest airline

WP TRANSPORT 116 Freight transporting on the double

AFRICA OUTLOOK ISSUE 23/24 A L S O T H I S I S S U E : A T L A S C O P C O E A S T E R N A F R I C A | E LT E K | U C H U M I S U P E R M A R K E T S

EDITORIAL Editorial Director: Matthew Staff matthew.staff@outlookpublishing.com Deputy Editor: Emily Jarvis emily.jarvis@outlookpublishing.com

PRODUCTION Production Manager: Daniel George daniel.george@outlookpublishing.com Art Director: Stephen Giles steve.giles@outlookpublishing.com Advert Designer: Mandy Farnell mandy.farnell@outlookpublishing.com Images: Thinkstock by Getty Images

BUSINESS Sales Director: Nick Norris nick.norris@outlookpublishing.com Operations Director: James Mitchell james.mitchell@outlookpublishing.com Sales Manager: Ben Wigger ben.wigger@outlookpublishing.com Senior Project Managers: Arron Rampling arron.rampling@outlookpublishing.com Donovan Smith donovan.smith@outlookpublishing.com Project Managers: Callum Philp callum.philp@outlookpublishing.com Eddie Clinton eddie.clinton@outlookpublishing.com James Smith james.smith@outlookpublishing.com Josh Hyland josh.hyland@outlookpublishing.com Stuart Irving stuart.irving@outlookpublishing.com Tom Cullum tom.cullum@outlookpublishing.com

ACCOUNTS Finance Director: Suzanne Welsh suzanne.welsh@outlookpublishing.com Office Administrator: Donna Redpath donna.redpath@outlookpublishing.com WEB DESIGN: Hamit Saka IT: James LeMay

OUTLOOK PUBLISHING Managing Director: Ben Weaver ben.weaver@outlookpublishing.com Chairman: Mark Weaver CONTACT Africa Outlook / UK 22 Wensum Street, Norwich, UK, NR3 1HY Sales: +44 (0) 1603 559 145 Editorial: +44 (0) 1603 559 152 Africa Outlook / SA The Colosseum, First Floor, Century Way, Century City, Cape Town, 7441 Tel: +27 (0) 21 5270053 SUBSCRIPTIONS Tel: +44 (0)1603 559 152 Email: matthew.staff@outlookpublishing.com

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SHOWCASING LEADING COMPANIES Tell us your story and we’ll tell the world

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VODAFONE GHANA Ghana Undergoes a Vodafone Transformation

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AFRICELL GROUP Staying Connected in the New Africa

Africell acquired Orange Uganda in 2014 and is continuing to seek expansion opportunities

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US$1.9 billion and counting as the global brand invests in local network growth

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ATLAS COPCO EASTERN AFRICA Global Resources Brought Closer to Local Customers An international company adapting to regional requirements

THE COPY CAT LIMITED The Most Connected IT Experts in East and Central Africa Striving to be the partner of choice in Central and Eastern Africa’s IT industry

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NEWS

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AFRICA CUP OF NATIONS Sometimes it’s Just a Game

ELTEK Saving Energy on a Broadening Scale

High efficiency solutions to all four corners of Africa

All the latest top stories across the month from Africa

A less than desirable preparation to AFCON 2015 ends on a comfortingly more predictable note

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Achieving business growth with the customer in mind

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THE ULTRABROADBAND REVOLUTION Africa’s Ultra-Broadband Revolution

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Michel Combes, CEO of AlcatelLucent presents his vision for Africa and the ultra-broadband revolution coming to the continent

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SECTOR FOCUS Stepping Towards a Sustainable African Future

Marc Koska’s LifeSaver autodisable syringe is set to reduce both costs and loss of life around the world

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ATLAS COPCO ZAMBIA Efficient Solutions in a Challenging Market

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EATON TOWERS Towering Above the Competition

KHOEMACAU COPPER MINING Botswana’s Hills of the People

A mine with people and infrastructure development at its heart

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Working with a selection of Africa’s major mobile operators

METOREX Base Metal Mining at its Best

A well-respected mid-tier mining Group in southern Africa

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SPECTRUM UTILITY MANAGEMENT Locally Developed Products for Truly African Smart Cities

Seeking a smart city solution for Africa’s infrastructural needs


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ZAMBEZI RIVER Harnessing the Power of the Continent’s Fourth Largest River

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Kariba Dam refurbishments help prepare for imminent regional challenges

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UCHUMI SUPERMARKETS Uchumi: Your Home of Value

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GOOD TIME STEEL Spreading the Good Times across Sub-Saharan Africa

Zambia’s second largest steel manufacturer looks set for even further expansion

Striving to be the supermarket of choice in the Eastern African region

F O O D & D R I N K

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COAST MILLERS Bigger Leads to Better Following Tanzanian Expansion

The wheat milling company aims for a minimum 30 percent increase in turnover by 2016

156 L O G I S T I C S

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Top quality food goods from one of the most recognised names in the industry

ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES Rapid Expansion of Africa’s Largest Airline Doubling in size since the beginning of the decade

WP TRANSPORT Freight Transporting, On the Double

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C O N S T R U C T I O N

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The transport specialist prepares for Namibia’s emergence as Southern Africa’s logistics hub

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UNILEVER FOOD SOLUTIONS Catering for the Changing Tastes Around the World

MURRAY & DICKSON CONSTRUCTION ‘Khula Nathi’ (Grow with Us)

G SHANKERDAS & SONS Third Generation Success Promotes Future Sustainability 76 years and counting for the Shankerdas family success story

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CERAMIC INDUSTRIES South Africa’s Innovators in Ceramics

A leading low-cost manufacturer and supplier of ceramic tiles and sanitaryware

A positive future is forecasted despite challenging conditions

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DCG (DSM CORRIDOR GROUP) Committed to Efficiency in Cargo Handling

MA AUTOMOTIVE Steely Determination to Grow Internationally

Manufacturing steel components for some of the biggest names in the automotive industry

A company that goes the extra mile to move your cargo from A to B

H E A L T H C A R E

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EDENDALE HOSPITAL South African Hospital Celebrates 60 Years in Healthcare

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60 years of quality healthcare, and still expanding

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HILLCREST PRIVATE HOSPITAL & GATEWAY PRIVATE HOSPITAL A Gateway to Enhanced Healthcare Adding much needed surgical support to the KwaZulu-Natal region

HOLTAN EA Quality Construction for a Developing Infrastructure A name synonymous with high quality construction in Tanzania

MANUFACTURING

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SJM FLEX Growing its Presence on the World Stage

E V E N T F O C U S

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A flexible coupling manufacturer with a focus on high productivity levels

RETAIL WORLD AFRICA

A platform for thought-leaders and innovators to present their ideas and solutions to Africa’s retail community

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HOLLARD EXTENDS ITS GLOBAL REACH INTO WEST AFRICA IVM Intersurer (“IVM”), which holds a significant investment in Hollard Insurance, has extended its global reach into West Africa following the acquisition of a majority stake in The Metropolitan Insurance Company (Met Insurance) in Ghana. IVM and Hollard will be supporting their with the objectives of optimising Met Insurance’s operations in Ghana and growing market share. With one of the most promising and dynamic insurance industries in the region, Ghana offers exciting prospects for innovation and the development of insurance T E C H N O L O G Y

NIGERIA REQUIRES $325 BILLION MOBILE KICKSTART Nigeria needs a further $325 billion to expand its mobile network infrastructure capacity in line with international standards, it has been revealed. The news comes after the country’s National Integrated Infrastructure Master Plan (NIIMP) was approved by the Federal Executive Council late last year; a plan that requires Nigeria to spend a grand total of $3 trillion over the next 30 years. Job one will be bringing the country’s infrastructure parallel to global expectations, the $325 million figure representing 11 percent of a longterm investment plan which has been designed to provide a blueprint for accelerated infrastructure development over the next three decades.

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S products in both personal and commercial lines. The country also boasts one of the most exciting economies in West Africa and provides a largely predictable business environment.

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TIGO PARTNERSHIP ADDRESSES TANZANIAN MHEALTH REVOLUTION The potential of mobile technology in Tanzania has once again been emphasised, as its role in developing countries gains even more prominence in areas of health awareness and in training healthcare professionals. In July 2008 the UN Foundation and Vodafone technology partnership held a week-long workshop during a Rockefeller Foundation eHealth event, which brought together 25 experts in the use of mobile technology for health care. The three organisations have now combined forces to create

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AGGREKO EXTENDS 200 MW IVORY COAST POWER PROJECT Aggreko has announced a three year contract extension to its 200 MW gasfired power project in Ivory Coast, with an option to extend this by a further two years. The Aggreko plant in the Vridi area of Abidjan provides critical power to Ivory Coast and surrounding countries interconnected to the Ivory Coast grid. With a booming economy and GDP growth of around nine percent, demand for energy has been increasingly steadily in recent years. “Our project in Ivory Coast is a great example of the value Aggreko brings to its utility customers in Africa,” commented Christophe Jacquin, Managing Director, Aggreko North and West Africa. the mHealth for Development programme, which was unveiled at GSM Mobile World Congress. Tigo Tanzania also has a health insurance scheme as part of its many products and just recently doubled the amount of money paid to customers making claims on its ‘Pona na Tigo’ mobile insurance cover.

GO TO WWW.AFRICAOUTLOOKMAG.COM/NEWS FOR ALL OF THE LATEST NEWS FROM AFRICA


T E C H N O L O G Y

SAMSUNG HANDS OVER DIGITAL VILLAGE IN GABON amsung Electronics Africa has officially handed over its revolutionary ‘Digital Village’ to the Gabonese government during a ceremony in Libreville, Gabon The Samsung Digital Village, a cluster of connected health, education and administration facilities, fast-tracks the digital development of underserved communities. The Gabonese government, currently seeking to harness ICTs for socio-economic development across the country, has shown keen interest in the installation. Government officials have reviewed progress during the development of the Digital Village, and numerous

dignitaries attended the official launch. Other stakeholders, including Airtel and Gabon Telecom, were engaged in providing connectivity for the Digital Village. Ntutule Tshenye, Head of Public Affairs and Corporate Citizenship at Samsung Electronics Africa, says the Samsung Digital Village, pioneered in Africa in 2013, comprises a solar power generator, solar powered internet school, health centre, tele-medical centre and administration centre. These facilities meet the most critical

health and education needs of underserved communities, as well as giving communities access to power and internet connectivity; often for the first time. Digital Villages quickly become multipurpose community centres and a hub of communication and development in communities where they are rolled out. The solar powered internet schools revolutionise students’ learning and become community internet centres and e-government access points after school hours; entrepreneurs are able to use the admin facilities to gather information and trade more effectively; the health centres double as clinics and healthcare education hubs; and the solar power generators generate additional power to the Digital Village. In communities where Samsung Digital Villages have been installed, an immediate impact has been felt in terms of access to information and improved healthcare. “Enabling communities’ access to internet connectivity has an immediate transformative impact,” says Tshenye. This is reflected in the United Nations (UN) Council’s report, which states that the internet can play a key role in ‘mobilising the population to call for justice, equality, accountability and better respect for human rights. As such, facilitating access to the internet for all individuals, with as little restriction to online content as possible, should be a priority for all States’. “Gabon’s vision for socio-economic development through ICTs made this the ideal site for a pilot Digital Village in the region,” says Tshenye. Samsung’s Digital Villages are part of the company’s far-reaching African citizenship programme, designed to positively impact the lives of five million people by the end of 2015.

GO TO WWW.AFRICAOUTLOOKMAG.COM/NEWS FOR ALL OF THE LATEST NEWS FROM AFRICA

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GEMALTO AND VODACOM INITIATE ROLLOUT OF PREPAID EMV BANK

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WORLDREMIT AND MTN AGREE MAJOR MOBILE MONEY PARTNERSHIP Online money transfer service WorldRemit and telecoms operator MTN have signed a global partnership that will enable WorldRemit customers to send remittances instantly to MTN’s Mobile Money customers. The agreement extends WorldRemit’s position as the leading provider of remittances to Mobile Money users (also known as mobile wallets) at a time when the technology is experiencing rapid uptake, especially in Africa. MTN Mobile Money is increasingly an important part of MTN’s service offering, and the partnership with WorldRemit further strengthens the operator’s position in cross border remittances. Ismail Ahmed, Founder and CEO of WorldRemit said: “Mobile Money is rapidly displacing cash as a way of receiving money from friends and family abroad. WorldRemit’s partnership with MTN allows our customers around the world to send money instantly to MTN Mobile Money users. “As well as being fast and convenient, MTN Mobile Money is reaching millions of people who don’t have bank accounts, giving them access to a variety of life-enhancing financial services including savings and insurance schemes.”

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Gemalto, the world leader in digital security, has announced the deployment of prepaid EMV banking cards to complement Vodacom’s m-pesa mobile wallet service in South Africa. The card is certified by the major international payment schemes and accepted at any of the 240,000 EMV-compliant payment terminals and more than 27,000 ATMs throughout the country, which will significantly extend the reach of the leading South African operator’s services. Gemalto’s off-the-shelf solution for Vodacom encompasses design and production of the card, as well as automatic packaging and pointof-sales delivery. The card links seamlessly to m-pesa accounts, and gives users the freedom to make payments for goods and services without the need to carry cash. “Gemalto offered us the convenience of a fully packaged solution,” said Herman Singh, Managing Executive of m-commerce at Vodacom. “By expanding our m-pesa mobile wallet offering with the banking card, we’ve been able to add an entirely new level of functionality which we think is critical to the success of m-pesa in South Africa.”

T E C H N O L O G Y

ORANGE AND ECOBANK LAUNCH MONEY TRANSFER SERVICE Orange and pan-African banking group Ecobank have rolled out a service that will enable Orange Money subscribers who also have bank accounts with Ecobank to transfer money between their respective accounts. The service has already been launched in Mali and will be rolled-out in several other African countries, including Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Niger, Senegal and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, during the first half of 2015. The partnership aims to facilitate money transfers for both Ecobank and Orange customers by offering them the possibility of topping up their Orange Money e-wallet from their bank account, and vice versa. Customers can use their mobile phones to securely transfer money at any time without the need to go to a distribution point or to have physical cash. “This partnership between Orange and Ecobank will further enrich customer experience,” Laurent Paillassot, Deputy Chief Executive Officer of Orange in charge of Customer Experience and Mobile Banking, said.

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R E S O U R C E S

MINEEXPO AFRICA 2015: AFRICA’S LEADING MINING TRADE SHOW MineExpo Africa 2015 will be one of the leading mining and cognate trade shows, showcasing the widest range of innovative technologies in mining and processing of minerals; connecting miners with money and investors with opportunity. The exhibition will provide a singular platform for both local and international exhibitors, professionals, buyers and delegates to exchange ideas, venture into new businesses and form fruitful partnerships. It will be centered on a vigorous programme covering a broad array of issues, challenges and opportunities that are faced in this industry in the current scenario. Mines are the backbone of African economy; as one of the core sectors

A U T O M O T I V E

SAA CARGO SUPPORTS TOYOTA IMPERIAL SOUTH AFRICA TEAM AT THE DAKAR RALLY 2015 South African Airways Cargo (SAA Cargo) was once again appointed the proud partner of the Toyota Imperial South Africa team for the 2015 Dakar Rally, the toughest and longest motor race in the world. The 37th edition of the Dakar Rally started in Buenos Aires in Argentina on January 4, 2015 and took place over a period of 14 days and 13 racing stages. The 450 cars, trucks, motorcycles and quads covered a total distance of some 9,500 kilometres of which 5,000 are against the clock, before ending in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The shipment consisted of three

that drive growth on the African continent in terms of infrastructure. Not only does it contribute to GDP, but it acts as a catalyst for the magnification in other industries such as construction, power & energy, and industrialisation. The future of the mining sector in Africa depends on skillful extraction and processing. The most consequential thing will be to disperse awareness among the people involved. The study of the latest technologies

is crucial and employing the most efficient machinery is a must. Attending MineExpo Africa will empower you with the knowledge about the latest state-of-the-art technology and techniques, safety procedures, and required skills. And at the same time you will have the chance to associate with other companies and business visitors; all leading to definite growth in your business. Today’s information is power and we will counsel that to you!

vehicles and spares amounting to around 7,941 kilograms in weight, and took 16 hours to reach its destination after 11 hours spent on the aircraft. “It takes a lot planning to ensure that the shipment arrives safe at its final destination and this cannot be achieved without the hard work of the competent SAA Cargo team that works closely with the Toyota Imperial shipping agent to ensure that the entire process is carried out meticulously,” said Tleli Makhetha,

SAA Cargo’s General Manager. “We are happy with the partnership as it does not only demonstrate our commitment to promoting our country through sport but also promote our cargo services during this global event,” Makhetha added. At the event, team SAA was represented by Giniel de Villiers, Dirk von Zitzewitz, Leeroy Poulter and Rob Howie. Just 51 percent of the 420 competitors that started in Buenos Aires on January 4 managed to finish the two-week race. Heavy rains shortened the 13th and final stage, won by Ivan Jakes (motorcycle) and Robby Gordon (car), respectively. In the overall rankings, Marc Coma earned his fifth victory and Nasser Al-Attiyah claimed his second four-wheel win.

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Just a GAME

Ivory Coast have picked up where Nigeria left off in 2013 as a less than desirable preparation to the tournament ends on a comfortingly more predictable note Writer: Matthew Staff

Ivory Coast celebrate their 2015 victory

hen Yaya Toure lifted the Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON) trophy on February 8, it represented not only the Ivory Coast’s second success at the tournament – coming a long 23 years after the country’s initial success – but also the end of one of the most controversial and complicated championships in the history of the event. Finally securing the title on penalties against fellow pre-tournament favourites Ghana in the final, the main event may mean the world to the numerous household names currently returning to their European clubs, but the main headline maker throughout the tournament’s entire 2015 cycle has been everything but football. Morocco’s late withdrawal – or misunderstood postponement – as host nation is an ongoing saga which the country’s football federation continues to clear its name from, but sits sensitively upon a wider regional issue which nobody would argue top trumps the less significant matter of football matches. The government of Morocco’s request for postponement due to the ongoing Ebola crisis in West Africa was rejected, while the subsequent confusion around

appeals, compromise or acceptance eventually led to the Confederation of African Football (CAF) relinquishing the country of the honour to host the tournament at all, as well as disqualifying them from the next two competitions. The melee that has followed has seemingly lost sight of both the horrendous threat that the epidemic still has on the continent, and the successful football tournament that finally occurred over the course of January and February in the West African nation of Equatorial Guinea.

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Overachievers Congo & Equatorial Guinea: The two qualifiers from Group A upended the form book, dumping Burkina Faso and Gabon out of the competition in the process, and setting up arguably the two most entertaining matches of the entire championship in the QuarterFinals. Guinea: Despite being comprehensively beaten in the Quarter-Finals by Ghana, Guinea gained respectable draws against Mali, Cameroon and Ivory Coast to achieve the unusual feat of advancing to the knockout stages without winning a game.

Underachievers Burkina Faso: Many people’s educated guess for this year’s championship, Burkina Faso fell well short of expectations, gaining just a solitary point on their way to an early exit, finishing bottom of Group A. Zambia: Succumbing to a similar fate to Burkina Faso, the 2012 winners failed to pick up a single win as they propped up Tunisia, the DRC, and valiant newcomers Cape Verde in Group B. South Africa: While being handed the unpleasant challenge of being placed in the ‘Group of Death’ alongside Senegal, Ghana and Algeria was never going to be easy, South Africa failed once again to provide any sort of evidence of legacy from the 2010 World Cup, or even their defeat of Nigeria to get them to the tournament in the first place.

Port of Malabo, Equatorial Guinea

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Step forward, Equatorial Guinea

With the substitute in place however, the continent’s premiere footballing occasion did finally get underway; the new host welcoming 16 nations across four cities, with 32 matches taking place over the course of 22 days. With screening for Ebola provided for every member team, Malabo, Bata, Mongomo and Ebebiyín provided a much more than satisfactory setting for the tournament to go ahead as planned, leaving it to the region’s elite to fight it out for top honours. The leading names failing to qualify for this year’s championship included Nigeria and Egypt; the former losing out in their playoff with South Africa, and the latter turning down the opportunity to host the tournament following Morocco’s disqualification.

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The leading names failing to qualify for this year’s championship included Nigeria and Egypt; the former losing out in their playoff with South Africa, and the latter turning down the opportunity to host the tournament following Morocco’s disqualification


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relished the prospect of their first ever AFCON championship. In true wildcard fashion though, the people’s champions for this year’s tournament were Equatorial Guinea themselves, whose late inclusion came only as a result of their role as host but with the knowledge that, in this tournament, the title of ‘rank outsider’ is largely redundant.

AFCON 2015, as it unfolded

LEADING GOALSCORERS (3): Thievy Bifouma, Congo Dieumerci Mbokani, DRC Javier Balboa, Equatorial Guinea Andre Ayew, Ghana Ahmed Akaïchi, Tunisia

Remaining unbeaten throughout the group stages and delighting the home fans with a 2-0 win against Gabon to secure a place in the Quarter-Finals, Equatorial Guinea’s subsequent extra time winner against former winners, Tunisia lit up the entire tournament and no doubt provided the CAF with much needed justification for its decision to hand the championship to the nation. Their eventual Semi-Final elimination at the hands of Ghana, and unfortunate penalty defeat to the DRC in their Third-Place Playoff in no way tarnished what was arguably the success story of this years’ AFCON. This isn’t to say that there wasn’t a This left the eventual finalists, Ivory Coast and Ghana as the pretournament favourites in what is traditionally an unpredictable championship. Algeria’s impressive World Cup performance also put them in the reckoning with many bookmakers while Burkina Faso and 2012 winners, Zambia were thought of as strong dark horses. However, while the amount of Cinderella stories to be told within the tournament itself were limited compared to previous years, there were still small successes for the neutral to pull upon. South Sudan’s first ever involvement in the qualification process, as one of the 51 countries vying for a Finals spot, was a significant sporting step for them, while Cape Verde went one better and

Andre Ayew, Ghana

Morocco may be disqualified from AFCON until 2021

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Ghana’s fans saw their team reach the final

fair share of drama elsewhere though, as giants toppled, closely fought draws reigned supreme and rivalries were renewed; the DRC and Congo’s Quarter-Final proving especially popular among neutrals. Historically, the expectation on countries comprising European-based multimillionaire footballers has not always correlated with victories, but the two finalists this year had clearly read the script and stuck to it as they largely coasted to the main event. The rather dull stalemate that followed perhaps didn’t do the gravitas of the spectacle much justice, but a 9-8 penalty shootout contributed a vast portion of the drama that had been lacking for the previous 120 minutes. And so it transpired that, after nearly 50 hours of football, Ivory Coast’s talismanic and experienced captain, Yaya Toure lifted the coveted trophy, putting the country in the same bracket as the DRC, Nigeria, Cameroon, Ghana and Egypt as multiple winners.

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Historically, the expectation on countries comprising European-based multimillionaire footballers has not always correlated with victories, but the two finalists this year had clearly read the script

Back to the problem at hand

Now that the dust has settled and the likes of Toure have gone back to steamrolling European defences every weekend, attentions have rightly turned back to the major problem

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at hand, and the wider uncertainty surrounding the future of the competition. Being a biannual tournament rather than an annual one has alleviated some of the current pressure, with a host for 2017’s tournament yet to be announced, but with one of the leading federations in Morocco set not to be involved in the next two competitions, and the CAF under scrutiny for its handling of the sensitive situation, tensions are expected to get worse before they get better. A US$1 million fine being compounded by a further demand for US$9 million in compensation from Morocco has been met with disdain by the country’s Sports Minister, Mohamed Ouzzine who argues that CAF falsely accused the country of refusing to host the tournament in light of it trying to protect its citizens in line with World Health Organisation protocol. Expected to rumble on for the foreseeable future, AFCON 2017’s success is already under threat on the face of it, but the competition can take comfort from a number of key factors expected to offset these external distractions for the good of the sport in Africa: SPONSORSHIP: Being supported by the likes of Orange S.A. – the title sponsor – as well as Pepsi, Doritos, Nissan, Samsung, Standard Bank, IFD Kapital Group and Pan Atlantic Exploration confirms the championship as a globally attractive corporate event. MEDIA INTEREST: The globalisation of the AFCON continues to expand, with all continents represented among the broadcasting partners. From Saudi Arabia, to Australia, to Japan, the UK, Brazil and the US; the popularity within the global footballing community is also growing thanks to the notoriety of the players reaching world-class status. PERSONALITIES: The likes of George Weah, Samuel Eto’o, Alex


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PLAYED WON DRAWN LOST GOALS F GOALS A

GOAL DIFF’

POINTS

Performance Table 1

Ivor y Coast

6 3 3 0 9 4

+5

12

2

Ghana

6 4 1 1 10 3

+7

13

Runner-up

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DR Congo

6 1 4 1 7 7

0

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Third Place

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Equatorial Guinea (H)

6 2 3 1 5 5

0

9

Fourth Place

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Congo

4 2 1 1 6 6

0

7

6

Algeria

4 2 0 2 6 5

+1

6 5

7

Tunisia

4 1 2 1 5 5

0

8

Guinea

4 0 3 1 3 6

-3

3

9

Senegal

3 1 1 1 3 4

-1

4

10

Mali

3 0 3 0 3 3

0

3

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Cape Verde

3 0 3 0 1 1

0

3

12

Gabon

3 1 0 2 2 3

-1

3

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Cameroon

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South Africa

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Burkina Faso

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Champions

Eliminated in Quarter-Finals

Eliminated in Group Stage

Song, Kolo Toure and Didier Drogba may be names for the wall of fame now, but there is a new breed of players gaining notoriety on an international level. This year’s player of the tournament, Ghanaian, Christian Atsu already plies his trade in the

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English Premier League, while, on the managerial side, Ghana’s manager Avram Grant was a Champions League runner-up years before this February’s equally painful defeat to opposing head coach, Herve Renard. The latter himself has now written himself into the history books after becoming the first coach to win the competition with two different countries; the first coming with Zambia – ironically against Ivory Coast – three years earlier. The significance of battling to become the best football nation in Africa is reason enough to try and overcome – without ignoring - the messy surroundings that embroiled this year’s tournament. With Ghana and Algeria both making waves in World Cups in recent years, the gulf between Africa and the world’s elite is diminishing by the year, making AFCON every bit as competitive as its counterparts in South America and Europe. For now at least though, the global football community can only pray and hope that the reason for 2015’s acrimony no longer exists two years from now, allowing the continent’s superstars to make their own headlines in 2017.

Top Matches of AFCON 2015 3

FINAL

Ivory Coast........................................... 0 (9) Ghana.................................................... 0 (8) A dreary affair was salvaged by a nail biting penalty shootout in which unlikely hero, Boubacar Barry went from second string goalkeeper prior to the tournament, to final hero. 2

QUARTER-FINAL

Tunisia.......................................................... 1 Equatorial Guinea........................... 2 (aet) The host nation were sent into raptures as they overcame a very strong Tunisia side, scoring the all-important winner in extra time to set up a Semi-Final appearance in their first ever AFCON. 1

QUARTER-FINAL

Congo.......................................................... 2 DRC............................................................... 4 Undoubtedly the game of the tournament, the rivalry surrounding the two countries culminated in a game that will go down in AFCON history, the underdog DRC contingent coming from two goals down to reach the Semi Finals for the first time in 17 years. Wilfried Bony, Ivory Coast

Ivory Coast celebrate their victory following the final match of AFCON 2015

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A F R I C A’ S

U L T R A - B R O A D B A N D

R E V O L U T I O N

Ultra-

Michel Combes, CEO, Alcatel-Lucent

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-Broadband Revolution AFRICA’S

Michel Combes, CEO of Alcatel Lucent presents his vision for Africa and the ultra broadband revolution coming to the continent or me Africa is at the heart of tomorrow, it is an important region in the world, it is definitely a growing region and a clear focus market for us. In the big picture, Africa is among AlcatelLucent’s most promising markets with ultra-broadband access and IP networking becoming even more important for the development of the continent. These technologies are what the African market needs in the years to come and also what service providers and operators in Africa are already requesting from us. Our global “shift plan” strategy perfectly focuses on those technologies that meet the connectivity challenges of the African continent. We see that the continent has various connectivity needs, crucial for its social and economic development. Increasing the availability of ultrabroadband services is essential for Africa’s future development. Becoming digital is an important catalyst for change, for development

and innovation. The content’s infrastructure will need greater capacity to deliver high-quality ultrabroadband connectivity to support added-value services for end users in both urban and remote areas.

Universal access for all

In today’s world, innovation has no borders and as a result, African countries cannot remain locked out. The globalisation of the economy and the growth of the digital world have enhanced worldwide communications. In Africa and around the world, AlcatelLucent collaborates with governments, regulators, operators, but also with investors to promote investment in the telecommunications sector and in particular for the development of the Internet and ultra-broadband technologies. This collaborative work allows us to identify different models of implementation of national plans, putting in place public-private projects

Thanks to the investments over the last years and also thanks to AlcatelLucent’s submarine technology, Africa is now connected to the rest Marine of the world through thousands of Survey kilometres of submarine networks systems (indeed, most of them Support & deployed by Alcatel-Lucent). Permits Maintain Many African countries are connected to the terrestrial backbones and to the regional hubs, but still rural INTEGRATED TURNKEY areas lack connectivity. The SUPPLIER Install & focus of development and Design Commission Alcatel-Lucent’s strategy for Africa will continue to be the accelerated development of ultra-broadband access networks in Africa, bringing connectivity to Marine Lay Manufacture users with technologies including LTE, DSL, GPON, small cells and Wi-Fi.

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A F R I C A’ S

U L T R A - B R O A D B A N D

R E V O L U T I O N

Alcatel-Lucent design, build and maintain reliable, highspeed submarine networks that provide the essential infrastructure for global communications

I strongly believe that universal access for all will break network barriers to improve the end user mobile broadband experience

and sharing our leadership, experience and best practices from around the world. We believe that the mobilisation of a strong eco system of public and private stakeholders is essential for the success of both the implementation and the execution of a government’s broadband strategy. Broadband for all is not only a nice marketing motto but every network has its success is the reality. I strongly believe that universal access for all will break network barriers to improve the end user mobile broadband experience and that is the only economical way to meet the increasing demand for mobile broadband. Industry and service providers are changing and they need more than a traditional technology vendor but an innovative partner who will accompany them in the race of shaping the future - going forward from breakthrough innovation to proven and excellent operational capabilities in order to meet network requirements.

Growth trends in Africa

of Africa. And Africa’s success and prosperity relies on its people. At Alcatel-Lucent in the past year, we have seen tremendous growth in FTTX, VDSL, IP, DWDM technologies as well as several LTE networks with established mobile and fixed wireless broadband operators. LTE is becoming increasingly popular in Africa as this technology offers an excellent alternative to fixed broadband (which is not widely available in this region, overall, with some exceptions). Service providers in Africa are eager to tap into the newest generation of technologies like 4G LTE to begin to reap the benefits of today’s ultrabroadband networks. In Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda and Nigeria - they have chosen AlcatelLucent as their partner for rolling out their LTE networks and some of them also have asked us to manage their entire networks in a managed services contract.

Increased responsibility

Managed services are an important What makes Africa very special for part of our business in Africa. More me is that this region is very rich in and more customers ask us not only to history, its diversity, different cultures build the networks for them, but also and environments, many strong to take responsibility for the network developments in so many countries, operations, on their behalf - for all not at the same speed, a lot of example in Nigeria, Ghana and in South creativity and innovation, but at the Africa. Our managed services solution same time still plenty of challenges and is a combination of the advantages local issues but with one strong asset of our local presence and the use of who are full of energy: the people global standardised best practices and

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“Across the African continent we have strong teams with excellent local knowledge specialised in a wide array of technologies for both fixed and mobile communications”

tools; relying on our global Network Operations Centres, combined with our team’s experience on the ground. Professional services are also in high demand by service providers in Africa. Alcatel-Lucent is not just selling and installing networks for our customers, in many cases we also work closely on business cases together, through our Bell Labs consulting team, which uniquely combines technical and commercial expertise. We see Africa as a tremendous market in the next years and beyond. Currently transport networks and ultra-broadband access networks are being deployed. In the next two years we expect even more LTE/4G projects as well as IMS and IP core transformation projects.

“Alcatel-Lucent’s history in Africa is also about people”

Across the African continent we have strong teams with excellent local knowledge specialised in a wide array of technologies for both fixed and mobile communications, including fixed and wireless ultra-broadband access, optics and IP technologies as well as services, including deployment services as well as professional and managed services. Our experts on the ground are working with the African ecosystem to introduce new technologies and solutions that will help in developing and creating social and economic value. The network is the foundation of our ultra-connected world. But it

can become so much more. Leveraging our expertise in IP networking, ultra-broadband access and cloud technologies, our aim is to work with operators in Africa, give them support and be their partners to invent and deliver tomorrow’s trusted networks, enabling them to achieve their potential and unleash their value. This enables us to create networks at scale that adapt to our customers’ needs, to earn our customers’ trust by delivering networks and services that anticipate their demands, remove constraints, and create new business solutions while sustainably growing their value. We also innovate for our customers, inventing the future through open collaboration that pushes the limits of communications and shapes the digital world. AlcatelLucent is a major player in Africa, and we have been heavily growing in Africa over the last years, and this is a very important market for us. Now is the time to bring this broadband revolution closer to the people. There is a very strong demand for both wireless and fixed ultra-broadband. We are here, committed and delighted to be part of this big project and working with local, regional and international players, we will literally help ‘connect’ the African people.

http://www.alcatel-lucent.com

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S E C T O R

F O C U S

STEPPING TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE

African

Future The introduction of Marc Koska’s LifeSaver auto-disable syringe is set to have significant ramifications on the global healthcare industry, and no more so than in Africa where both costs and loss of life are set to be dramatically reduced Writer: Matthew Staff

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arc Koska OBE is on the verge of realising an ambition that has been the focus of his efforts for more than 20 years, introducing his LifeSaver auto-disable (AD) syringe to save as many as five million lives around the world every year. Usable only once, reducing the reuse of syringes will have a significant impact on the spread of diseases, especially in less developed countries, and following years of development, Koska is now putting pressure on traditional manufacturers to stop resisting and to aid him in his plight. Having successfully introduced his K1 and K3 syringe to the global consciousness alongside the World Health Organisation (WHO) in Geneva, the British inventor is now planning to capitalise on the global recognition that his brainchild is receiving, and the reformative initiative that is now in place, to address some of the most long-standing and serious healthcare issues in Africa. Africa Outlook caught up with the man himself on the eve of his

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battle with conglomerate syringe manufacturers and the trip that could kickstart a healthcare revolution on the continent. Africa Outlook (AfO): Could you firstly introduce yourself, your background within the healthcare industry and your key roles within the sector at present? Marc Koska (MC): I am an inventor of auto-disable medical devices, and have spent 20 years campaigning against the re-use of syringes globally –the ninth biggest cause of death every year. This week, finally, the World Health Organisation agreed to launch a global policy that will change all curative needles to auto-disable by 2020. AfO: Could you talk me through your role as ambassador with the WHO? MC: I’m not officially an ambassador – more of a large flea in their ear. By their nature, the centralised bureaucratic structures that lead policy on global health are not the most agile or fast moving animals, and they can seem frustratingly stolid and resistant to change. This is because they have to


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answer to an enormously complex constituency, and so I don’t actually want to knock them. After all, they’ve just launched a watershed policy – their third in 67 years - that will make it very difficult indeed for any UN agency to fund a health system in the world that hasn’t almost totally switched to auto-disable syringes by 2020. What the WHO can’t do is get immersed in commerce, for understandable reasons avoiding

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accusations of corruption. So this is where my 20 years of commercial activity, persuading manufacturers to switch their capacity to auto-disable products, can be invaluable. The private sector can be so much more agile and innovative, but together with the policy makers of central office, there is a very, very powerful lever. Industry couldn’t solve the problem without WHO policy creating or reshaping the market.

Once we have set the manufacturers on a course of fulfilling the future capacity needs, I will turn my attention to helping build a modern global public safety campaign, to educate both healthcare workers and patients. We’re going to call this our LifeSaver campaign. AfO: What is the technology and ideology behind the K1 syringe? MC: The most important aspect of the K1 is that it can be made for the

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S E C T O R

F O C U S

Five million lives around the world could be saved by the invention

same cost as a re-useable syringe, and on the same machinery – to give it the broadest possible market. Other more expensive AD patents are available, but they can’t be afforded by national health systems that will deliver most benefit. The technology is quite simple in essence; an annular bezel ring within the barrel that stops the plunger being drawn back once the injection has been made – breaking the plunger off. The WHO policy also pertains to needlestick prevention devices, and again my K-3 design is a simple design – to allow the most cost-effective and therefore broadest procurement and use. AfO: What are the main benefits of your auto-disable syringes? MC: Syringes are the loss-leader of global medical procurement. As the lowest profit margin and most

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Marc Koska OBE • A British inventor of the LifeSaver syringe, an invention that will save five million lives every year • Marc is forgoing his product royalties and gifting it to the world’s syringe makers • Recently announced as a WHO ambassador • The LifeSaver syringe is only the third ever Global Health Initiative (following polio and hand cleansing) • One of the main consultants on the recent Ebola crisis • Has spoken at TEDMED, Geneva (alongside Bill Gates) and Davos to promote the syringe • The IKEA Foundation, GAVI, The Gates Foundation and Google are all supporting the initiative

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common medical protocol, ministries of health are used to receiving vast discounts on their syringes, if they then buy a manufacturer’s other products. Because the K1 and K3 together will be the most affordable solution to achieving switchover, we foresee benefits to patients across the world. And because the WHO costeffectiveness study states for every dollar spent on AD products, a health system will save on average $14.57, the health systems themselves will benefit massively, becoming robust and sustainable. AfO: At what stage are you currently in presenting this to the mainstream healthcare sector and how do you hope/expect to see the development of this product manifest over the course of 2015? MC: The world’s manufacturers have just had a two day meeting with


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the WHO in Geneva, so the starting gun has just fired for the 60 month challenge to switchover 18 billion syringes a year from reusable to autodisable. Our task now is to create momentum behind our LifeSaver campaign - a generic campaign for any Auto-Disable syringe - and catalyse that manufacture process. Once capacity is on course, we must start a global education process for both healthcare workers and patients alike.

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AfO: What is your strategy in terms of unveiling your K1 syringe during your imminent trip to Africa? MC: Considering AD syringe use has been shown to reduce the average hospital stay from seven days to three days in Africa, this is a revolutionary moment in African healthcare. The key is capacity. We have plans afoot to achieve both sustainable manufacture capacity and education; the last two key elements of achieving universal safe syringe use. If significant African manufacturing capacity exists twinned with modern distribution hubs, we can reduce the logistic supply chain difficulties that have dogged much healthcare delivery in the developing world. We will be announcing a raft of new manufacturing projects in 2015 across

the continent, to create a steady capacity of LifeSaver K1 and K3. The cost benefit to African healthcare is estimated to be more than $1 billion a year in downstream healthcare costs. AfO: Looking to the future, what do you hope to be able to report back in terms of the success of your invention and the impact that it has on the African healthcare industry? MC: If infection control is reintroduced as a bedrock of a national health system, health delivery and demographic health improves existentially. For instance, 20 percent of Egyptians were infected with Hepatitis C by their doctors! Imagine if that hadn’t happened! A healthy population is a more productive population – this is another step to a sustainable African future.

Marc Koska’s global campaign is gathering momentum

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is a leading business-to-business publication promoting and showcasing the leading companies across an array of sectors on the continent. Appearing in both digital and print, the publication is aimed at boardroom members and hands-on decision makers, reaching more than 165,000 business executives every month. Each month we feature leading companies and business executives by profiling their operations and success stories. Covering areas of best practice, capital investments, the supply chain, innovation and continuous improvement, we aim to promote all that is good about the industry and the region, with your company taking centre stage throughout it all. Producing business profiles across the full range of sectors and every corner of the continent, Africa Outlook is the platform to promote your business success.

Read on for this month’s profiles. Emily Jarvis, Deputy Editor emily.jarvis@outlookpublishing.com


If you want to enjoy the exposure and coverage we can offer, please feel free to contact us to discuss the opportunity further. Tell us your story and we’ll tell the world. Matthew Staff, Editorial Director Tel: +44 (0) 1603 559152 matthew.staff@outlookpublishing.com


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VODAFONE Transformation Vodafone Ghana has only been operational for six years but is already making an impact as it continues to innovate, expand and advance the telecoms industry within the country Writer: Matthew Staff • Project Manager: Donovan Smith

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odafone is replicating its globally-renowned, industry leading telecommunication services in Ghana as it looks to capitalise on a nationwide market ready to embrace the latest technological advancements. After acquiring a 70 percent stake six years ago in Ghana Telecom, the previous fixed and mobile incumbent in the country, Vodafone Ghana put into motion a long term strategy to revolutionise the infrastructure of both telecom facets; a development plan which is now seeing the fruits of the company’s hard work and investments. “Since the acquisition, Vodafone Ghana has invested around $1 billion in improving the infrastructure in the country,” says the company’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Haris Broumidis. “This takes our total investments up to $1.9 billion, including the $900 million acquisition price of Ghana Telecom.” Back in 2008, at the time of Vodafone Ghana’s inception, there were only 400 sites across the country, a figure which needed dramatically increasing if the business was to implement its acclaimed array of network services. Six years on and that increase has culminated in more than 2,000 sites being developed – and counting – signifying the success of a transformation period which has already dramatically improved the levels of coverage and quality within the country.

Four pillars of expansion

Haris Broumidis, CEO, Vodafone Ghana

The target of Vodafone Ghana’s investments have not just been on mobile adoption, but also on more traditional fixed networks, which the company has modernised and transformed just as effectively. “We have invested in modernising the infrastructure as well as developing a backbone of fibre across the entire

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country. This is not only serving the needs of the company, but also the wider industry and other players in the market who want access to that connectivity,” explains Broumidis. “The process has been a journey of transformation, and still remains an ongoing agenda It is our responsibility to ensure that every corner of Ghana reaps the benefits of the Vodafone offering in their lives.” To complement Vodafone’s fixed and mobile network penetration, the company has a structure in place to ensure its internal IT systems and processes are advanced enough to embrace the rapid competitive Ghanaian telecommunication landscape. “Last but not least we’ve had to invest in people, skills and capabilities through extensive capacity development programmes,” Broumidis continues. “At the inception of Vodafone Ghana’s operations here, there were a number of expatriates in the business. Today, as we speak, Vodafone Ghana is almost fully managed by Ghanaians. I am the only expatriate within the management structure and that has been a result of the transformational capabilities in the company.”

Global company acting locally

Vodafone Ghana’s people and skills strategy maintains a very local focus, despite the international lure associated with a brand as strong and pervasive as Vodafone. The ability to operate as an international company while successfully acting locally is one that the business prides itself on and Broumidis believes that this ethos has had a direct influence on the first six years of growth. “We have an organisation that people believe they can grow within, and we make sure that we have as many Ghanaians on board as possible, because no one can understand the

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CELFOCUS

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elfocus is a fast growing, global high tech consulting company with a reputation for developing and implementing successful projects for the telecommunications industry. For more than a decade, Celfocus has been working with businesses across Africa. We are focused on leveraging technology that is designed to help our clients drive revenue growth and improve their profit margins.

In aiming for gender diversity, the company’s 10 executive team now includes six women

market and culture of the country better than them, and they can also help to better engage with customers, partners, suppliers and even policy makers,” he says. “In addition to our local focus, we also aim for diversity within our workforce, and especially when it comes to gender. If you take my executive team for example, of the 10 executives, six are female and this is something we drive in terms of balance and diversity. It’s a real success story for Vodafone and within Ghana.” The business’s philosophy regarding employee satisfaction is especially significant given the challenging conditions in the region where demand for skills is high and the talent pools often limited. However, being able to monitor and adapt to regional and industry trends has long been a trademark of the general Vodafone Group success story, and this subsequently filters through to all operating regions. Broumidis continues: “Vodafone has a global strategy in terms of how we operate across different countries

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In addition to our local focus, we also aim for diversity within our workforce, and especially when it comes to gender

and we need to work within that framework. But when it comes to execution, it’s pretty much a local issue that takes into account competitive dynamics, market maturity, and our market positioning.”

Voice and data

This market positioning is directly influenced not only by the company’s continuously increasing presence in

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Implementing IT solutions for the telecommunications industry requires more than just technical know-how. It requires a deep understanding of industry specific business processes in order to support a company’s business objectives. Often seen as the technology behind business critical systems, Celfocus uses a unique Business Design process to create solutions for clients using bespoke systems or proven technology from leading global partners that solve their most pressing business challenges. Our teams are made up of highly trained Systems Architects, Business Analysts and Consultants, with extensive hands-on experience. Our business focus is on technology, enterprise, customers, business critical systems and new services, which gives us the ability to achieve our ambition to contribute to regional development while continuing to grow our business at the same time. Find out more by contacting our team at sales@celfocus.com.

www.celfocus.com


POWERING INNOVATION BY SIMPLIFYING IT FOR THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY

www.celfocus.com

Focused Intelligence


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BLOOM INTERACTIVE Your agency is large, slow and tired. See, the thing about large fancy agencies, is they’re stretched between so many different clients, briefs, new business pitches, internal politicking, logo resizes and missed deadlines that their teams never have enough time to focus on just you. So things get stale. You get formulaic “360-degree” campaigns and wonder why they don’t work.

the country as a result of its network investments, but it also goes back to the basic dynamics of competitiveness with regard to the physical products and services being offered by Vodafone Ghana. Not a stranger to the technological battleground, the company is confident that it can conquer this market place in time too, and is subsequently working on differentiating itself within the sector. “We have expanded both in terms of geographical growth and capacity. Every year we have had to accommodate the increasing traffic for both voice and data usage,” explains

Broumidis. “We have progressively developed our 3G network this year; not only with regard to our radio network but on our core network as well to make our infrastructure more resilient. As we speak, in terms of our core network and the quality of our major data and voice KPIs, we are the best in Ghana, based on independent external audits.” Additionally, the company is also ensuring that it distributes these market leading services to as wide a population as possible, as Broumidis adds: “We’re not just covering the main cities, but semi-urban and rural areas too. It’s about covering

Being a large agency is cliché. Smaller creative shops scare the Ray Bans off big fancy agency execs, because our passion, energy and hunger are still so pure that it nurtures untamed thinking. Result? Freshness. Who we are is a team that devotes unusually intimate time to your business. What we do is to solve the problems that keep you up at night. Our method is shaped by experience building multinational brands across Central and Western Africa. Our dexterity is born out of memories of working in large, slow agencies. If you really need some innovation around your business or just need to sleep better, call us… if there aren’t any awesome boutique independent agencies within a mile’s radius of you. Let our work speak. We’re Better value. We’re Bloom.

3G Network

The quality of our major data and voice KPIs are the best in Ghana

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T +233 209 604 618 | +233 200 527 577 E obii@bloom-interactive.com emmanuel@bloom-interactive.com

www.bloom-interactive.com


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USHACOMM

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shacomm is a leading provider of advanced Business Support Systems, Consulting and Services for the Telecom industry for more than two decades. We offer end-to-end solutions and services in the areas of Retail and Interconnect Billing, CRM, MNP, Self-Care, Mediation, Provisioning, Roaming, Tower Billing and BI / Data Warehousing. We have delivered our solutions and services to 65+ Telecom operators globally, addressing business challenges ranging from rapid business launch, to convergence and consolidation. Our convergent solutions suite covers diverse technologies like Wire-line, Wireless, Cable-TV, IP, WiMax, LTE, VOIP & Wi-Fi.

Vodafone Ghana headquarters, Accra, Ghana

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the entire territory and today, for instance, we have launched 3G in all district capitals of Ghana. We had to expand the network; the customers are there and want access to mobile telecommunications, so we have had to increase our capacity in line with voice and data demands.”

www.ushacomm.com

E-VOLUTION INTERNATIONAL

Market differentiators

Given Vodafone’s comparatively late entry into Ghana’s telecoms space in 2008, the company has not necessarily been the first to the punch with all of its offerings, making it even more vital that the business establishes differentiators in other ways. A large part of this development can be attributed to building strong partnerships with established IT service companies already operating within the country. GDS Africa is one example of this, using its ability to combine the best of products and technologies, with local market industry knowledge, to develop a worldleading OEM like Vodafone’s infrastructure within a new country. These mutually beneficial relationships successfully work hand-in-hand with the leveraging of Vodafone’s own reputable brand and capabilities to optimise the marketing of its products. “If you take mobile money for example, we are launching this platform in 2015 following other operators that have already done so in the

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E Mobile Money Platform launching in 2015

stablished in 2010 in Ghana, E-volution International has grown from a small creative boutique into a leading international marketing communications and advertising agency. We strive to provide clients with services including live production, event management, brand activations, experiential marketing and advertising that combine consultation, research, writing, graphic design and execution. Our combined experience assures our clients of industry-leading marketing and design, focused on precision, talents and creativity for all businesses. As a dedicated team of professionals, we ensure that our collaborative skill set is invested into every client project. T +233 544 357 800 E info@e-volutionint.net

www.e-volutionint.com


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GDS AFRICA

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ounded in June 2005, GDS Africa has grown to over 100 employees serving the West and East African regions. GDS was created specifically to address the IT needs for all sectors in the region and we combine the best products & technology with local market industry knowledge and expertise to successfully address our customers’ strategic business challenges. In partnership with world-leading OEMs, GDS offers immediate and specialised response, prompt delivery and enterprise technical expertise, which are among the most important reasons for the company’s successful and ongoing growth. T +233 302 232116 E info@gdsafrica.com

Broumidis is confident that mobile money will be a game changing product for Vodafone Ghana

market,” notes the CEO. “We are, however, confident that ours will be a game changer in the country. We have a track record as a global company with this service, having introduced the concept to great success in countries like Kenya and Tanzania with M-Pesa. “By launching mobile money in 2015, we believe we can differentiate our service from existing ones; not because it’s a different concept but because the Vodafone mobile money product offers a different experience for the customer.” From a marketing perspective, Vodafone equally realises that it is imperative to make a connection between provider and consumer, incorporating areas of advertising, promotion, and also education. In delivering any product, Vodafone painstakingly monitors market trends, then conducts comprehensive research to ensure the design fits in with demand before eventually

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www.gdsafrica.com

LEASAFRIC

By launching mobile money in 2015, we believe we can differentiate our service from existing ones; not because it’s a different concept but because the Vodafone mobile money product offers a different experience for the customer

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easafric Ghana Limited is the leading leasing company in Ghana with over twenty years’ of corporate experience. It has provided its clients with well-structured leases and ancillary solutions that have met their unique needs. The company’s products amongst others are: • Operating lease/Fleet management • Vehicle rental services • Finance leases Leasafric acquired the franchise for the World’s # 1 car rental company – HERTZ. This partnership offers corporate Ghana total transportation and logistics solutions, deploying over 520 vehicles – including 120+ units to Vodafone Ghana. Additional information and contact details can be found at

www.leasafric.com


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introducing and marketing the product. “For us, customer research is key in how we proceed,” Broumidis emphasises. “So we ask our customers about how we should modify our products and services to fulfil their emerging needs. “For example, with a service that hasn’t existed before, we will design it internally, and carry out a series of studies with customers to fine tune it ahead of the launch. We make sure, through communication, that people understand what the service is about and why they should adopt it. This makes our propositions widely adopted and loved by our customers.”

Customer experience

The focus on customer satisfaction has arguably been Broumidis’ most sustained development strategy since he joined the company in July,

For example, with a service that hasn’t existed before, we will design it internally, and carry out a series of studies with customers to fine tune it ahead of the launch

MAGNA TRANSPORT

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agna International Transport Company Limited is committed to being the best vehicle rental and leasing service provider in the sub region to most corporate organisations. Our customers are ensured of a great vehicle rental and leasing service at a very competitive price. Whether you need a car or a truck, Magna is there to support your mobility needs for whatever they may be. We have a variety of vehicles in our fleet ranging from four wheel drives, saloons, pickups and trucks for customers needs. Our service aims at enabling our clients to focus on their core business and not to worry about risk and cost of fleet management. T 0302 - 255748 E info@magnatransport.com

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PREMIUM TECHNOLOGIES

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remium Technologies delivers unmatched business value to customers through a combination of process excellence, quality frameworks and service delivery innovation. With an experienced team of professionals, Premium Technologies serve customers from diverse industries and business fields in the extended regions of Africa. Our mission is to be the leading company providing total system solutions, through state-of-theart technology and innovation, keeping on top of today’s and tomorrow’s technology, no matter how fast it moves. SERVICES PABX Call Accounting System Interactive Voice Response (IVR) Solutions Smart Card Application Information Communication Technology (ICT) Consulting Wireless Turn-key Solutions Video Conferencing Solutions

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MAGNA TRANSPORT

Magna International Transport is an experienced, professional and World-Class fleet management & vehicle hiring company in Ghana.

Where do you want to go today? Magna International Transport will take you there

Tel: 0302 - 255748 Email: info@magnatransport.com Website: www.magnatransport.com

Redefining System Integration

in Africa and Beyond

Premium Technologies is a global systems integrator, delivering technology-driven business solutions that meets the strategic objectives of our clients within the Telecommunication and Engineering industry in Africa and Beyond. Premium has over 31 Tier 1 principal companies and equipment manufacturers who assist in creating solutions around specific needs of industries. We succeed in meeting our customers’ requirements with a practical, pragmatic approach in their products and customized applications. Some specialities are, Managed Services, Video Conferencing, Network Security, Secured Wifi Solutions etc...

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V O D A F O N E

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2013, identifying this early on as an opportunity to be differentiated from market competitors. “When it comes to customers it is a journey of providing more value,” he says. “Since 2008, Vodafone has brought a lot of innovation and value by providing different value propositions to different segments, including both consumers and enterprises. “These value bundles have resulted in an acceleration of both voice and data usage with an exponential increase in the adoption of these propositions. This is observable over the past five years, during which we have pioneered many innovations in the market place.” Across both the country and industry, if there is one area of vast improvement that Broumidis acknowledges as being most critical, it has been the provision of a good customer experience, leading to the introduction of a three-pronged “journey” embarked upon 18 months

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Good customer experience The area of improvement acknowledged as being the most critical to the business


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ENGINEERING SERVICES (GH) LTD

Telecoms & Utility Infrastructure Providers

RPS Engineering Services Ltd is a wholly Ghanaian owned professional company supporting Cellular, Telecommunications, Broadcast and similar operations with infrastructure implementation and maintenance services of the highest international standards. RPS Engineering currently offers end-to-end turnkey cellular network infrastructure solutions to leading Telecom operators and infrastructure support companies in Ghana and other West African countries. RPS Eng. is an OHSAS 18001:2007 certified company.

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ago to meet these needs. Firstly, this involved redefining the internal work culture of the people and the organisation as a whole, to ensure that the feel-good factor was being spread from the inside out. The second facet comprised the simplification of processes, making the adoption of new technologies easier for customers. Finally, Vodafone Ghana transformed its IT systems in order to deliver this new level of customer experience as efficiently as possible. “We have embarked on this journey since 2013 and will work on these three areas in order to be able to deliver the customer experience we aspire to, and for it to be a sustainable and differentiating pillar for the company in the future,” Broumidis explains. “Ghanaians love our brand, and we have been awarded many times for the perception of our brand strength and valuation. We now need to make sure we keep a step ahead and provide the

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kind of customer experience that will make the whole admiration of our brand even stronger.”

Launching the Vodafone Ghana Foundation in 2009, the principle was simple; to make an impact in the environment and society where the company’s people, customers, partners and suppliers live and work

Sustainable future

This admiration is further strengthened by another strategy all too familiar with the Vodafone brand. Corporate social responsibility within Africa has long been a trademark of the Group’s activities on the continent, and this is no different in Ghana where the Vodafone Foundation is as influential as ever. Launching the Vodafone Ghana Foundation in 2009, the principle was simple; to make an impact in the environment and society where the company’s people, customers, partners and suppliers live and work. Focusing primarily on areas of health and education, Vodafone Ghana is proud of what it has achieved over the past five years, as Broumidis notes: “We have launched


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a number of initiatives, including Healthline, which is the very first medical call centre in Africa to which people can call to receive accurate medical advice. “This medical centre has been very helpful recently in fighting the Ebola scare for instance, where we have had more and more people calling every day, asking health-related questions and receiving expert advice. We are very proud of this.” Complementing this is an array of programmes profiling free quality healthcare across numerous communities, while the company has also encouraged further collaborative social input through its Mobile for Good campaign. “The concept was for NGOs and other organisations to come to us with ideas on how our technology can make a social impact in the communities. We have since funded eight of the applications with high potential and

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Healthfest is among an array of programmes profiling free quality healthcare across numerous communities

are currently working with them to use the initiatives to change lives” Broumidis concludes: “We do this because our fundamental belief is that while we are a profit making organisation, we cannot have a sustainable business future if we don’t

make a real social impact on the world around us. “The more the economy progresses and the better prospects Ghanaian companies and people have, the better the conditions will be for Vodafone to grow its operations within Ghana.”

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T H E C O P Y C AT LT D

IT Experts

The Most Connected

n narrowing its focus to cater specifically for IT system integration, The Copy Cat Limited has been able to gain a competitive advantage in East Africa’s tech industry. Through partnerships with the likes of Oracle, Cisco, HP, IBM, Hitachi and Symantec, the company has become known as one of the leading information technology system integration companies in East and Central Africa. Celebrating its 30th year of incorporation this year, The Copy Cat has been an instrumental part of the IT sector thanks to its exemplary skill set, client focus and determination in delivering a functional and quality product to the customer. A particularly proud moment for the company was attaining an ISO 9001:2008 certification in 2014, owing to the successful adherence to quality management systems. The Copy Cat has had a presence in the region since 1985, when the initial focus of the business was to sell office equipment. The company quickly branched out and increased its offering into further IT and office automation services, expanding across Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Burundi, and now enjoys an annual group turnover of more than US$100 million and has more than 700 employees regionally.

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in East and Central Africa The Copy Cat has been an instrumental part of the African IT sector over the last 30 years thanks to its fully qualified staff upholding the company reputation and through its delivery of a functional and quality product

The Copy Cat staff birthday party

Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Nick Norris

Gaining a competitive edge

Customers recognise The Copy Cat as a reputable name in the IT sector, however Director Krishna Kumar hopes to increase partner and customer relationships significantly moving forward. By focusing on the needs of the market, The Copy Cat has become known for its problem solving skills, providing a bespoke solution to counter the problems with existing or disparate systems. “We have honed in on specific challenges our customers face and have put in place the right

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Krishna Kumar, Director, The Copy Cat Group


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solutions to resolve these problems, positioning ourselves as a true solution provider,” Kumar comments. Through a results-driven approach, The Copy Cat has created a series of software, hardware and network systems that deliver functionality and are easy to use. Similarly, the company analyses its performance to ensure continual improvement of its product and service offering. “Our customers speak very highly of us. We have repackaged our services to offer a set of turnkey solutions that add to our quality of service,” Kumar adds. In line with this, The Copy Cat has invested in a CRM (Customer Relationship Management) process

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Copy Cat management trainee graduation day

and hopes this initiative will serve as a direct platform for feedback. “We have created a single, consolidated platform that helps us maintain and track all our customer interactions.

Moreover, our Net Help Desk provides ITIL standards based technical support to our customers to address, respond & resolve technical issues as per the SLAs,” Kumar highlights. In order to secure a constant supply of skilled workers in the IT industry, The Copy Cat are looking to partner with Samsung, the University of Nairobi and Kenyatta Universities to develop a curriculum that is in line with the changing requirements of the industry.

Partnering with the best

As one of the leading systems integrators in East Africa, The Copy Cat has a large scope of solutions

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The Copy Cat’s end-to-end solutions • Structure cabling systems • Building data centres to industry standard • Building DR solutions to support Business Continuity Planning (BCP) • Routing, switching, wireless • Collaboration solutions including telepresence/video solutions • Emerging technologies like IOE/IOT solutions, application load balancing, SDN solutions like application centric infrastructure solutions • Network security solutions • Engineered systems from Oracle • Support contracts for Oracle e-business suite • Virtualisation, storage, security • X86 blade systems • High speed data switching with 10G and above

and services available. “We offer solutions in design and consultancy, office automation, business continuity planning, virtualisation, networking, enterprise computing, storage and collaboration solutions. We also offer managed services in IT and managed print services,” explains Kumar. Supported by some of the biggest names in the IT industry, The Copy Cat has a large customer base including the private sector, public sector, NGO’s and institutions. “In order to provide top notch solutions to the market, we have partnerships with leading global vendors including; Cisco gold partner, HP gold partner, Oracle platinum partner, IBM sales and support partner, Hitachi GOLD partner, Symantec gold partner; Microsoft silver partner and EMC2 partner to a name a few. “This has built our

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The Copy Cat networking equipment handover

The Copy Cat Partner Information Forum

credibility and enabled us to gain further clients. It has also given us a chance to have both the best skilled personnel in the market and training for global names in the industry,” says Kumar.

Credible IT partnerships

These partnerships cement The Copy Cat’s position in Central and Eastern Africa as a professional name you can trust. There are several examples of a successful partnership and Kumar highlighted a few via The Copy Cat’s partnership with Cisco: “We provided

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We have partnerships with leading global vendors including; Cisco gold partner, HP gold partner, Oracle platinum partner, IBM sales and support partner, Hitachi GOLD partner, Symantec gold partner, Microsoft silver partner and EMC2 partner to a name a few


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a HD video conference system (telepresence) for the East African Community (EAC) headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania and to the EAC Ministries at the capitals of EAC partner states, namely Dar-es-Salaam, Nairobi, Kigali, Bujumbura and Kampala. This was based on Cisco’s latest Telepresence TX9000 system and has made conferences much more efficient for EAC,” emphasises Kumar. Alongside a service provider involved in TeleAfya, The Copy Cat and Cisco are working on a project to provide affordable health care to common wananchi using Cisco health presence solutions. Moreover, the company is also involved in supplying Cisco NGN to Safaricom for its core MPLS network.

The Copy Cat choir

We are committed to being active in the environment in which we function across the region of East Africa, and play a leadership role in helping others help themselves “We are always at the forefront of the technology curve to bring in the best in class solutions first in East Africa. We are investing heavily on software defined networking through Cisco application-centric infrastructure, internet of things (IoT) with location based analytics, connecting the unconnected through the use of advanced sensors and energy management to provide customers with better energy savings. There is no limit to our solutions in these areas,” says Kumar.

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The Copy Cat awards collection

The Copy Cat is currently implementing a complete overhaul of Liquid Telecom’s Nairobi Metro Ethernet network, a contract that it won based on its skills, local presence and support capabilities. The project covers 22 aggregation sites with Cisco ASR 9000 and 1000+ Metro Ethernet switches based on Cisco ME36xx switches with Cisco prime network management system. Additionally, The Copy Cat Limited has been awarded a contract by the National Transport and Safety

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Authority (NTSA) and ICT Authority to implement Transport Integrated Management System (TIMS) in Kenya. The TIMS system will help NTSA offer efficient delivery of host of services to citizens through Internet and mobile technology as well as provide an effective monitoring system for transport officials. “This project once again reiterates our commitment to help the government sector deliver services to citizens effectively and efficiently by deploying world-class technology,” Kumar comments.


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For a number of years, The Copy Cat has been making positive contributions to the local communities through value added services and financial support for community projects. “We are committed to being active in the environment in which we function across the region of East Africa, and play a leadership role in helping others help themselves. We manage our business processes to positively impact local society,” highlights Kumar. From playing a key part in installing a fully functional computer lab, IP telephony and video conference facility for the under-privileged children at the AMREF Dagoreti Children’s Centre to sponsoring the 6th Mwea Classic Marathon, The Copy Cat play a vital role in local economic empowerment initiatives.

“Additionally, we sponsored the Gertrude’s Hospital Foundation charity golf tournament at the Muthaiga Golf Club on September 20 2013. Every year a particular aspect of the foundation’s charity work donates the money raised through the golf tournament to go towards the treatment and support of children living with disabilities. The CFC-Stanbic Bank also supported the cause and represented Copy Cat during the golf tournament,” Kumar adds. Armed with a 10 year vision to be a fully-fledged services company by 2022 with hopes to become a half a billion US dollar turnover group in East and Central Africa, The Copy Cat look to increase its geographical footprint and expand in size to offer tailored solutions, services and products to Africa’s burgeoning IT sector.

Safaricom Foundation donation

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Energy SAVING

Scale

ON A BROADENING Eltek has branched out even further in 2014 as it leverages key business partnerships and widening regional knowledge to unveil its hybrid solutions in new markets Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: Donovan Smith

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operators in the sector. “The biggest opportunity we saw this time last year was for hybrid solutions for mobile network operators,” he says. “The telecom and mobile network operators were looking to reduce diesel consumption, and so as a part of that, we have been very successful in introducing our hybrid solution and selling that product further into Africa. “As a result, we have won a lot of large projects in Africa supplying either

our hybrid or CDC (charge/discharge) solutions.” This notable increase in the uptake of high efficiency products has been epitomised by two such modules which are identical other than their rating efficiencies. Hurley continues: “We sell two modules which are identical in size and fitting, but they differ in the efficiencies they provide. In 2013, there was an 80-20 percent ratio of sales in favour of the standard module, and that figure swung to 60-40, the other way in 2014. The high efficiency solution is more and more becoming the standard choice now.”

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E L T E K

Geographic growth

Despite competition within the industry growing over the past year, Eltek’s deployment of such products has risen significantly with in excess of one million high efficiency rectifiers now having been sold. This, as a success story, has had a direct knock-on effect on surrounding countries wanting to benefit from the company’s solutions. “We’re now growing in other countries in Africa who have seen our products working in countries growing similarly to theirs, and who now want to see those same results,” Hurley explains. Eltek has subsequently branched out into three regions: In North Africa, including Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Egypt; in the western countries of Senegal, Ivory Coast and Cameroon; and across Kenya, Somalia, Tanzania and Uganda in the east of the continent. Add the southwest nation of Angola into the fold, and Hurley has every

C&D TECHNOLOGIES LTD

We now have a presence in a good mix of countries where we’ve managed to deploy both our standard and hybrid solutions

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storage and conversion systems on the planet. But this is something our customers already know. That’s why telecommunications giants turn to C&D Technologies for dependable power systems. C&D TECHNOLOGIES is also highly

right to be enthusiastic about the geographical footprint that Eltek now enjoys. “We now have a presence in a good mix of countries where we’ve managed to deploy both our standard and hybrid solutions,” he notes. “This has meant a reduction in diesel consumption as well as, most importantly for Africa, a significant reduction in CO2 emissions.”

focused on power system integration. By offering products that can monitor and rectify AC-to-DC current to power the switches and other equipment, as well as provide backup battery power, we can give customers of any size — particularly in the telecommunications industry — a total power package. Because many of our clients are in the telecom business, the explosive growth of the industry has helped us become

At the beginning of 2014, Eltek had set its sights on taking its hybrid systems, especially, into a wider array of mainstream markets.

bigger and better. We are a registered ISO 9001 producer at our five factories across the world and three of our R&D facilities. Three of our factories are also registered to TL 9000. We won’t stop there. We’ll continue to develop new technologies and create more products that will be benchmarks in electrical power storage and conversion. They’ll help you become more successful at what you do. Because we build business power.

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E L T E K

Globally, Eltek’s products have saved 1,740 megawatt hours in energy since the launch of the high efficiency rectifier modules in 2008. From a CO2 perspective, the company has also saved as much as 12.5 million tonnes of emissions through its high efficiency and hybrid offerings.

Partnership model

To coincide with Eltek’s geographical growth, the company has established a key business partnership model to ensure the smooth entrance into new markets and to help maintain the trust that the business has often already built with multinational clients in other countries. This model is built up of two working strategies, as Hurley explains: “We look to interface with the end user where, if they buy our product, we are then either training their local staff to install, maintain, commission and service the product, or we introduce a local partner to carry out those services for them. “We interface with their teams to make sure they’re fully conversant and know the product, its benefits, and how to use its energy efficiency saving modes of which there are a number. “Alternately, in Angola for example, we’re currently rolling out hybrid solutions to a customer. The operator has decided to have local support

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Globally, Eltek’s products have saved 1,740 megawatt hours in energy since the launch of the high efficiency rectifier modules in 2008

Eltek is also currently setting up, with a partner, to service and repair faulty modules in two service centres; one in Nigeria and one in Kenya

in this case, so we have engaged a local partner who is now part of the relationship between Eltek and the operator in offering all maintenance and services, as well as utilising the local workforce to save the operator investing in a maintenance team themselves. “Eltek is also currently setting up, with a partner, to service and repair faulty modules in two service centres; one in Nigeria and one in Kenya.” Despite having a number of proven network solutions out across a vast footprint of markets – all of which demonstrating good efficiencies and cost savings – there is still pressure on Eltek to prove itself in each new operating region; something which frustrates Hurley but a challenge that the company has risen to time and time again. “We could work with a large network provider in 15 countries, but as we begin to work with them


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in the 16th, they may still want a trial period despite understanding the technologies and what they’re capable of,” Hurley states. The ongoing expansion of the business provides proof that Eltek has risen to these demands in each case though, and it is even encouraging fellow European companies to make the same international migration and partner with the business in Africa.

One Eltek

Moving closer to its customers has also been a concerted effort of Eltek’s over the past 12 months, not only to aid its own internal efficiencies but to ensure corporate social responsibility (CSR) standards are being adhered to. “We are culturally sensitive and close to our customers and markets,” Hurley says. “In countries where we get significant sales and customer interest – like Nigeria, Kenya, Egypt and potentially Morocco soon too - we open an office there. “All of those offices mean that we have local people on the ground, and using local staff is very important to Eltek. Local people understand the geography and politics of the country, so it’s very important for us to invest in local skills.” The desire of the company to continue growing its market share in Africa is also matched by the Group’s

Using local staff is very important to Eltek. Local people understand the geography and politics of the country, so it’s very important for us to invest in local skills Bob Hurley, EMEA Vice President

wider philosophy regarding continuous improvement and enhancing efficiencies throughout the value chain through its One Eltek strategic improvement programme. The largest business transformation initiative ever undertaken by the company, it has been implemented from Eltek’s headquarters in Norway across all of its operating markets, addressing the business’s long term commitment to invest time and resources in order to ensure success. “The whole management team stands firmly behind the programme and we have established a dedicated programme team to drive the implementation,” CEO, Colin Howe says on the company website. “Running through 2014-2017, the programme focuses on harmonisation of processes and smarter configuration of products. “The main objectives are to improve the quality of product and services, speed up delivery, and align core and support processes to improve resource utilisation and efficiency across the value chain.” Procurement, engineering, logistics, manufacturing, sales and IT are all covered under the One Eltek umbrella as the business targets a replication of its current international success across an even wider area of Africa in the future.

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Towering Above the Competition

to the rapid increase in users of the internet. “The internet boom is one of the key drivers - more people are getting online as smartphone prices fall and telecom operators improve their networks. Mobile operators are building new base stations for two reasons; one is obviously coverage, and there is still some coverage expansion going on, but increasingly Writer: Emily Jarvis it is for adding capacity to the Project Manager: Ben Weaver networks,” said Alan Harper, Eaton Towers’ Co-founder and CEO. Founded in 2008 by Sanjiv Ahuja (ex CEO Orange), Alan Harper (ex frican telecoms Vodafone UK MD) and Terry Rhodes infrastructure firm, (ex Celtel co-founder), Eaton Towers Eaton Towers is continuing to expand its acquires, builds and manages shared mobile operations and is telecom infrastructure, leasing it one of a number of specialist players to to mobile operators. The company is focussed exclusively on Africa launch services in Africa in recent with thousands of towers in seven years. countries. Since 2010 the company has gone In November 2014, Mr Ahuja stepped from strength to strength, signing tower management contracts with the down as Chairman and was succeeded likes of Airtel, Vodafone, Telkom, MTN by Jimmy Eisenstein, the Co-Founder of American Tower Corporation, the and Orange to name a few. When we world’s most valuable listed tower last spoke to Eaton Towers, they had plans to build 250 transmitter towers in company today. It is a known fact that Africa is the 2013, increasing their African portfolio world’s fastest growing telecoms by a sixth. They put this growth down

Eaton Towers is a leading, independent, telecom tower company in Africa with one of the most diversified geographical tower portfolios in Africa

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market and has been for at least the past decade. Mobile phone usage amongst the growing middle class is on the rise and the African market is increasingly attracting attention as a profitable business environment in a country where the GDP per capita is due to grow at a rate of more than 4.6 percent a year over the next five years. Consequently, tower sharing in Africa is rapidly increasing, with the proportion of towers in independent companies increasing from 10 percent to more than 30 percent in the past two years. Yet Africa still requires at least 50,000 additional towers in the next five years, equating to some $7.5 billion of capex spending.

A lack of extensive fixedline infrastructure in most African countries means mobile networks provide the main means for people to access the internet

The importance of a mobile data service

“A lack of extensive fixed-line infrastructure in most African countries means mobile networks provide the main means for people to access the internet,” Harper added. “With fixed-line penetration being so low in so many countries most of the data usage is on the mobile networks and therefore whether it is 3G, 4G or other LTE developments in some markets, new base stations are needed to meet that capacity growth. That is benefiting Eaton because that is adding to new

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base station installations on both our existing towers and it is one of the driving forces for the new tower construction as well.” Internet use in Sub-Saharan Africa will rise to 24.7 percent of the population by 2020 from 10.5 percent in 2010, according to Euromonitor International, which Eaton Towers aims to capitalise on. “Firstly, building and maintaining mobile towers in Africa is typically more expensive than in other regions because of high security costs and a shortage of electricity and infrastructure, which are known to be Africa’s main challenges. It adds to the complexity and expense,” said Harper. “Secondly, many operators are increasingly looking at splitting costs, which they can do via towersharing deals. We offer that and so it is increasingly popular to have specialist firms such as Eaton build the towers, which can then host multiple operators

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at the same site. We’re certainly looking to expand our tower-sharing business.” Eaton Towers is benefiting from operator plans to roll out LTE and Harper says further expansion is on the cards: “Historically we operate in those countries so we have towers already. So, we are working with existing customers in existing markets. We are building towers and selling space on those towers in countries like Ghana, Uganda and South Africa where we’ll be putting in the new towers as an expansion to our established business in those markets. And it’ll be with existing customers, those we already have signed up on other towers. It is really a growth and consolidation in the markets we are already focused in. “That’s not to say we don’t eye new territory and as we expand into other markets over time we will be building in new countries as well, obviously. But it doesn’t really make sense to


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T: +27 11 626-1060 E: admin@anzac.co.za URL: www.anzac.co.za

Manufacturers: Aircraft Warning Lights Intelligent Management Controlers AWL Solar Solutions Tower Conversion Systems (220VAC-48VDC)

Internet use in Sub-Saharan Africa will rise to 24.7 percent by 2020

build just a handful of towers in new countries. You really look to try to build on top of a portfolio of existing towers in an established market.” In line with this, Eaton Towers is looking to expand into new African nations as Harper explained: “We are always looking at opportunities in East and West Africa – in the West there are three or four countries that we are working on. “There are opportunities too in North Africa. Up until now, most of the tower activity has been Sub-Saharan Africa but there are new opportunities emerging all over. We have a pipeline we are working on that is pan-Africa.” Capital International Private Equity Funds (CIPEF) is Eaton’s majority shareholder, while London-based private equity group, Development Partners International and Eaton’s management team also owns stakes. The business is well funded and wellplaced to expand.

A company with no distractions

Eaton Towers has built up an organisation with a very experienced group of people that have been in the mobile business industry in Africa for many years. “We know the countries, the people, the organisations and we know how business gets done in those markets,” Harper concluded. “Importantly, we are well funded and that is significant because this is a very capital intensive game, there is a lot of money that needs to go into it. “We have the required equity and debt funding already in place so that when we see opportunities for expansion either in existing or new markets we are able to go into those new opportunities. We don’t have to go out and raise funds for a new idea or opportunity.” To learn more about Eaton Towers and its expansion visit: www.eatontowers.com

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Africa ince acquiring Orange Uganda in November 2014, Africell is actively seeking the right opportunities for expansion in the African continent. As a 100 percent African company recording US$180 million revenue in 2014, the company is keen to develop products and services that better serve the average African in order to offer the best communication platform on the market. Chief Operating Officer (COO), Elias Arwadi identified Uganda as a country that will fit well with the Africell brand: “The Uganda acquisition fulfilled all the criteria we look for in our expansions. The country size is substantial, there is sufficient infrastructure in place and we believe there is room for an aggressive challenger.” Started in 2001 by entrepreneur Ziad Dalloul, Chairman and CEO of Africell, the company began operations in Gambia. Since then the company has expanded operations into Sierra Leone, DRC, and Uganda, where infrastructures are markedly improving, allowing for better quality telecommunications and increased access to 2G, 3G and even 4G data platforms.

With a strong end to 2014 and 12 million active subscribers, Africell is an integral part of Africa telecoms moving forward and the company certainly want to remain a key part of the ‘new emerging Africa’.

“Born and bred in Africa”

Considered as one of the pioneering companies that see telecoms as more than just a product, Africell strives to fulfil the basic human need to communicate with each other, urging people to take advantage of the inclusive services that accompany this. “Telecom is a need first and foremost, and a product second. We are answering a basic human need to have access to communication and this need has to be adapted to best suit a particular African country or society,” says Arwadi. One of the key factors that make Africell stand out is its “born and bred in Africa” status. Unlike many other industry players, Africell’s brand is one designed specifically for African people right from the beginning. “These international players had to adapt their brands and values when entering new countries. However, Africell was born and bred in Africa.

COO Elias Arwadi believes that Africell will play a key part in the development of Africa’s telecoms sector, helping the continent to emerge at the forefront of the world economy Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Donovan Smith

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Therefore the spirit and the intrinsic attributes of the brand have been directly shaped by the needs of African people,” emphasises Arwadi. “We have seen telecoms differently, treating the industry as a fast moving commodity that adapts to the needs of the customer, at the right price and should be available anywhere.”

Meeting the demand for data

The majority of countries in Africa saw the cell phone outpace any rise in landline telephone. Between 1998 and 2008, Africa added just 2.4 million landlines but in the same time cell phone use has skyrocketed. “Africa did not go through the fixed line phase and in the same vein, growth in the demand for data saw a significant increase. African customers rapidly moved from voice communication to data and the demand for this is higher than many parts of Europe,” comments Arwadi. Being able to offer data, whether

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it is 2G, 3G or 4G, is a challenge in developing countries as there is a very costly backbone that has to be put in place, “and there is an extraordinary need for this”, highlights Arwadi. As such, Africell’s marketing strategy includes the provision of 2G and 3G data in its countries of operation as Arwadi confirms: “3G in particular still has a lot of potential. We do have some plans for 4G soon, but our focus is on ensuring our product is kept simple, is available anywhere, at an affordable price and adaptable to your needs.

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“As a fast moving consumer product, data has to be marketed 365 days a year and has to meet the changing demands of each individual country that we operate in.”

Answering a basic need

Across all four countries of operation, it is clear that an aggressive transition to data services is occurring. “Customers want this to be a reliable and fast experience and we are working with other vendors in order to change the telecom experience forever,” the COO continues. “Not

As a fast moving consumer product, data has to be marketed 365 days a year and has to meet the changing demands of each individual country that we operate in


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only are we answering a basic need for access to information, but we ensure that no matter where you are you are given the same advantages. “For example, anyone can now set up a business from a mobile phone, even if you are in a remote part of the DRC. It is through this inclusive list of services that Africell feels participating in the world economy is nearer than you think. “Along with the wellreceived mobile money applications across Africa, Mica Mobile Insurance is another example of a service provider that will help change the face of telecoms from simply being viewed as a product. Customers can pay for their health insurance, taxes and so on via mobile applications; even start their own business all through the power of the cell phone,” explains Arwadi.

I feel strongly that by offering data, we are answering a whole host of basic needs and education is by far the most important need we are answering

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AVIAT SMARTER PERFORMANCE MADE SIMPLE

Furthermore, access to the internet means access to information which not only connects Africa to the rest of the world, but it is a source for education. “I feel strongly that by offering data, we are answering a whole host of basic needs and education is by far the most important need we are answering. For example, people can look up symptoms of an illness, conduct research into an area of special interest or learn what is making the global news,” says Arwadi. CSR is a major characteristic of Africell’s operations and the company is very active in local communities in each country of operation. “You name the area and we will have contributed; clinics, schools, education, sports, music artists and so on. We do not underestimate the African value of giving back to the community,” says Arwadi. Building relationships with key vendors like Ericsson and Huawei has also helped Africell to strategically position itself as a well reputed company in Africa.

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Through its contribution to society and its services, the brand name represents years of harnessing changes to the telecoms sector in order to better serve the customer and make a difference locally.

Spotting the right future opportunities

Africell is looking to continue to organically expand to new countries and will rely on spotting the right opportunities going forward. Rolling out its services across a variety of nations, all with varying infrastructure differences and population sizes demonstrates just how diverse the company’s appetite to expand is. Arwadi puts this down to the company’s desire to be an intrinsic player in the future of what he calls ‘the new emerging Africa’: “As the continent continues to demonstrate positive development, I believe that Africell will play a key part in its


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communications sector. Africa is still young and still growing. As a result I believe it will emerge at the forefront of the world economy. “Africa does not represent hunger, it is an area of opportunity that is rising by itself. With ‘born and bred’ African companies such as Africell driving indigenous growth by providing access to fast data and related services, we represent a genuine desire to empower people and help African businesses to succeed. “Africell believes in the phrase that out of nothing, we can become something.” “Therefore the spirit and the intrinsic attributes of the brand have been directly shaped by the needs of African people,” concludes Arwadi. “We have seen telecoms differently, treating the industry as a fast moving commodity that adapts to the needs of the customer, at the right price and should be available anywhere.”

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LOCAL Customers BROUGHT CLOSER TO

Atlas Copco’s global influence has been complemented successfully by a strong local emphasis that incorporates activities in all 14 East African nations Written by Matthew Staff · Project Manager: Arron Rampling

tlas Copco’s influence in Africa’s mining and construction industry is deeply rooted across all four corners of the continent, and none more so than in the eastern region as it continues to adapt, innovate and expand its offering to 14 countries. Having opened its doors to the region in 1936 in Kenya, the subsidiary of the internationally renowned Atlas Copco Group has built a strong presence through its ability to diversify its products and services in line with different market and national requirements, to ensure that it remains as relevant and customer-focussed as possible.

The company’s longevity is now a major differentiator and selling point in garnering new business streams and attracting the best skills in the sector as it now looks to the next stage of its ongoing development and a concerted focus on optimising areas of human resources. “We don’t have big problems retaining people, because of our age and our reputation as being part of the Atlas Copco Group,” says Country Manager, Lina Jorheden. “We may not be able to pay the highest salaries but we thrive in areas of safety and stability, while providing the opportunity for people to grow within the company thanks to the training and investment into people that we provide.”

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International company, acting locally

This ongoing dedication to internal sustainability and personnel development is replicated across its 14 countries of operation falling under the Eastern Africa umbrella; Kenya, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Uganda, Rwanda, Somalia, DRC, Sudan, South Sudan, Madagascar, Djibouti, Mauritius and Burundi. In each of these nations, operations are tailored to specific industry trends and market requirements, covering an array of products and services including works in importation, distribution sales and aftermarket support for its extensive product range: industrial and portable compressors; generators; surface and underground mining equipment; drilling equipment for rocks, water wells and geotechnical functions; construction tools, equipment and rentals; and other industrial tools. The success of Atlas Copco has not simply been in unveiling high levels of service across all these functions, however, but more in identifying where each product and service is most applicable, and at what specific times, and in line with country-specific regulations. “For example, social, political and economic upheavals of the early ‘90s led to radical changes in fiscal policies and market liberalisation across the region,” Jorheden explains. “For

Country Manager, Lina Jorheden

It’s important for us to work closely with our distributors in order to get close to our customers, so we can support them with our core Atlas Copco products

Kenya, it was a decade of economic stagnation, while surrounding economies flourished. “Atlas Copco Kenya Ltd recognised the potential for growth and reentered markets in the wider Eastern Africa region; Ethiopia, Djibouti, Tanzania, Uganda, Sudan, Mauritius and Madagascar through direct contact as well as a comprehensive distributor network.” Being an international company with the ability to act locally is imperative across such a vast and diverse regional footprint and has subsequently aided in bringing the organisation closer to customers; both in proximity and in understanding of what clients need. This isn’t to say though that the same specialist Atlas Copco offering can’t be used across the board when suitable, as Jorheden adds: “We are able to share our resources and learn from their success in other countries to then use in new markets. We replicate the structure of our offering well into the region, including onsite support services, but of course there are different segments where we need to be a bit more specialised too. “It’s also really important for us to work closely with our distributors in order to get close to our customers, so we can support them with our core Atlas Copco products, whether we have a local facility in that country or not.”

HR and training

With the Atlas Copco brand engrained into the mining and construction fabric of Africa, and the company’s products and services recognised as being some of the leading industry offerings, the necessity to find a differentiator elsewhere has most recently led to a focus on human resources. “The main investments we’ve made over the past year or more has been in HR and training,” confirms Jorheden. “We have of course upgraded our

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THE BIG FIVE FOR SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTIVITY


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facilities as well, but this is not what’s making the difference. “We have been working a lot with distributors on producing different workshops and finding more ways to get closer to customers, and we believe to ensure this, we need to have the right people and the right training in place.” This strategy has incorporated pulling training programmes and business initiatives from the global Atlas Copco portfolio, and has provided a massive competitive advantage in East Africa. Jorheden continues: “The way the market has developed, not everybody is able to achieve the necessary levels of good human resources, so we make sure that everyone within Atlas Copco is given responsibility and ownership over their own development, and this goes from technicians up to management level. “Everyone receives a mission, and while they get all the support they need to complete the mission, it is important that we try to build their capabilities so they can take initiative and make decisions themselves. “ Skills development is further

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enhanced through leveraging the footprint that Atlas Copco Eastern Africa covers, transferring people across the different countries of operation; subsequently maintaining an all-important local impetus within the workforce while exposing them to different regional challenges and country-specific trends.

80 years and counting

Finding the right balance between addressing regional considerations and acting as locally as possible, with infiltrating as much of the globally successful Atlas Copco brand into Eastern Africa as possible, is one that nearly 80 years of honing has helped greatly in achieving. In regards to the latter, Atlas Copco Eastern Africa is currently complementing its wider human resources investments with a push into optimising sustainability and health and safety; both as part of a wider Group philosophy in recent years. Being ISO certified for a number of years now, the subsidiary now takes these key areas into consideration with every new product, or every new negotiation with customers; knowing

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Health and safety is paramount


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We’re sustainable in the region having been here for so many years, so while the market has changed a lot during that time, we’ve adapted our portfolio in line with that for the sake of our customers

that the same importance on these issues is placed throughout the value chain. Again, this commitment is flexible, in line with varying customer requirements, as Jorheden notes: “With health & safety and sustainability, there are different levels depending on different clients. “Some of the larger mining companies, for instance, are well aware of the regulations that machines and personnel need to adhere to, so we work with them to make sure they have the right innovations in place to meet these expectations. “Then on the other side, you might have smaller contractors who are not working in such a safe way and we then need to educate and explain how we can help raise these levels through our services.” The ability to remain flexible and entrepreneurial is of paramount importance for reasons like these, across 14 different domains, but with

so many decades of experience behind the company, everything is in place for the next 80 years of success in the dynamic region. “Atlas Copco has such a broad portfolio and we have our combination of local emphasis with global resources that gives us a big competitive advantage,” Jorheden concludes. “We’re sustainable in the region having been here for so many years, so while the market has changed a lot during that time, we’ve adapted our portfolio in line with that for the sake of our customers. ”For us, the main goal is to be close to our customers and to make sure that when it comes to new markets, we are already close enough to provide our main strength which is in aftermarket services. And, because the aftermarket is more stable and profitable than capital equipment sales, we know if we’re achieving that, then both Atlas Copco and our customers will be reaching their goals.”

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Atlas Copco has differentiated itself in a saturated market in Zambia through its ability to maintain an entrepreneurial flair and establishing efficient solutions amid sector slowdowns Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: Eddie Clinton

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tlas Copco is an internationallyrenowned industrial and mining equipment producer, but is staying true to its Group ethos of acting in a locally sustainable and responsible manner. Having been active in Zambia for more than 60 years, offering its vast range of drilling consumables, mining & rock excavation equipment, compressors and related after market support & services to an array of longstanding customers, the company’s influence in the country is a deep-

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rooted one. However, with economic, industry and regional challenges always a consideration, the need to remain entrepreneurial and quick to react is as pivotal as ever, as Atlas Copco Zambia’s Regional General Manager (GM), Daniel Banister explains: “Back in 2014 we had to address our internal inefficiencies to adapt to the current levels of business in the region. “There was a significant drop over the past two years in Zambia in regards to customers purchasing equipment, but a strong focus on the aftermarket services side. We therefore looked at


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our organisation and how it needed to adapt to fit this level of business.” By the end of 2014, Banister and his team had achieved this diversification, and the same flexible emphasis is now being placed on further business progression in 2015. “There are similar challenges in 2015 to those we saw last year, but we are continuing to strive to be a more efficient organisation and to build on an existing strong company culture within the Group as a whole,” Banister continues. “We are very much results driven and committed to that culture, making sure we not only tackle our

own inefficiencies but work with our customers; providing them with solutions to make the whole supply chain more cost effective in times like this.”

Company upgrades

This collaborative effort between service provider and customer is one that has been significant to Atlas Copco’s development in Zambia over the years, ensuring that the company’s core value of interaction, commitment & innovation serves the diverse needs of its customers to come up with new and improved solutions on a continual

Atlas Copco Zambia’s Regional General Manager, Daniel Banister

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KAL TIRE

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Banister adds. “For example, our new SmartROC D65 addition to our drilling fleet has been trialled with one of our customers at their mining site, using a higher level of automation to enable safer and more cost efficient operations, and this has been extremely well received.”

SmartROC D65

basis. The need to find these differentiators is even more prominent given the saturation of the market in a copper-reliant country like Zambia. “To differentiate ourselves, we have put a strong emphasis over the past four years into our service organisation, while we have also recently upgraded our facilities here in Chingola to provide a better training centre,” says Banister. This training centre incorporates specific simulators for underground drilling while new component testing equipment has also been introduced at the start of 2015. Again, all of these investments are made with the end customer in mind. “Atlas Copco strives as a company to provide environmentally safe and reliable equipment to our customers,”

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Health and safety

Atlas Copco strives as a company to provide environmentally safe and reliable equipment to our customers

Health and safety is a core facet of Atlas Copco’s continuous improvement strategy being embedded in all new initiatives and products, with it consequently being a major selling point in attaining new business. Similar to its SmartROC D65 surface drill, all of the company’s equipment is designed and manufactured with the highest levels of safety in mind, and this philosophy begins within the production process itself and engrained in its workforce. “For our customers it’s about highlighting the safety points and potential hazard areas to minimise


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Local skills development is key

the risks, but these safety talks occur internally too which are key to embedding a ‘safety aware’ culture,” Banister comments. Daily reviews of previous incidents and accidents culminate in action plans being drawn up to improve the working conditions moving forward, again epitomising the vigilance of the business when it comes to maintaining best practices across the board; including the same commitment to areas of corporate responsibility. Banister continues: “We aim to offer a very safe and healthy working en here in Zambia. That goes throughout Atlas Copco where we measure the number of incidents and accidents as a Group and actively seek to ensure that these numbers are reduced over time. “In order to improve the health of our employees we have a number of initiatives like our SWHAP (Swedish Workplace HIV/AIDS Programme) which contributes to the response

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For our customers it’s about highlighting the safety points and potential hazard areas to minimise the risks... which are key to embedding a ‘safety aware’ culture

of the two diseases. We also offer employees training in safety and first aid practices locally.” All efforts in this area are compounded by a series of integrated ISO quality management systems put in place to signify and confirm the business as a reputable and reliable business partner across the country.

Efficient solutions

From an internal perspective, Atlas Copco Zambia has struck a healthy balance between instilling a local emphasis into its workforce, while leveraging a supply chain of international repute. Throughout it all though, the business maintains its typically Atlas Copco-like entrepreneurialism; most recently restructuring its workforce to redistribute personnel who would be better suited within its supply chain rather than directly working for the company itself. Not only has this


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strategy kept important personnel in employment but it has also spread the Atlas Copco ethos directly into the value chain. “We’re fortunate with the skills available to us here in Zambia,” notes Banister. “We are a comparatively small organisation compared to some of our neighbouring countries but we have a good pool of people and it’s important to build a diverse mix within the company to bring different aspects of expertise to our customer base. “With that also brings different skills and knowledge that can be passed on to future local employees too.” Moving forward, Banister would like to see a continuation of the steady, significant progress that has been made in line with market demands over the past 12 months, while still following the wider centralised Atlas Copco Group blueprint. The GM concludes: “If we can retain a reliable supply chain and continue

The ultimate solution to all your needs

offering our customers sustainable solutions in volatile times, then that’s the most important thing. Stability in these times is definitely key. “We have to be an agile organisation and have the ability to adapt in times of market downturns with a long term plan to be adaptable to upturns in the market as well. “Atlas Copco is a Group committed to our customers’ businesses. Lasting relationships are what we strongly believe in, with the belief that there are better ways of doing things; not only internally but in providing more efficient solutions for our customers.”

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M I N I N G

BOT SWANA’S

Hills of the Johannes Tsimako, Regional Manager of Khoemacau Copper Mining (Pty) Ltd is confident that the company’s work in Botswana will enhance infrastructures in the northwest of the country Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Arron Rampling

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hoemacau Copper Mining (Pty) Ltd (Khoemacau) has successfully completed 70,000 metres of infill drilling at its northeast Fold and Zone 5 early in 2014. Drilling continued at Zone 5 for the remainder of the year. Khoemacau then completed a feasibility study in July and subsequently applied for a mining licence in September 2014. With the hope to receive its mining licence any day now, the company is excited to begin the construction phase of its ventures in Botswana.


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PEOPLE Known for its conducive work environment and huge deposits of copper along the Kalahari Copperbelt, Botswana is the highest-ranked jurisdiction on the African continent when it comes to mining and exploration projects. Ranking 17th in a global survey in 2014, the country was commended for its attitude to work, reasonable approvals process and firm grasp of regulations. Johannes Tsimako, Regional Manager of Khoemacau believes Botswana operates a pro-mining culture that recognises the infrastructural benefits

that the industry can bring to the country’s economy. “There aren’t a lot of mines in the northwest region of Botswana, which makes Khoemacau a crucial component in the development of the region. The benefits to the local communities stretch from power and communications infrastructure to skills development. This is part of our parent company’s philosophy,” he says.

Cupric Canyon subsidiary

Previously known as Hana Ghanzi Copper Pty Ltd, Khoemacau is a

subsidiary of Cupric Canyon Capital (Cupric) a group whose primary source of equity capital is Barclays’ Natural Resource Investments, a division of Barclays Bank. The Group is focused on assisting in the advancement of mining projects in underdeveloped areas, working alongside teams throughout the development, construction and operation stages. The parent company brings decades of experience to the Kalahari Copperbelt in order to establish world-class copper assets. The project was given a locally-themed name in March 2013, when Khoemacau

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undertook a full feasibility study which was followed by a submission for a mining license in September of last year. This name was earned from the school children of Kuke Primary School, who dubbed the mine “Khoemacau”, meaning “the hills of the people”. The name encompasses the physical features of both the Ghanzi and Ngamiland Districts and in essence, means that the mine will improve peoples’ lives by creating employment opportunities, businesses and bring development to the nearby villages and the country at large. “It was a great honour to have the local children provide the name of our project, as they will be the generation that benefit over the course of the mine’s life,” says Tsimako. Cupric brings a wealth of mining experience and technical competence, and is a well-trusted and reputable name in the business. As a privately owned company not listed on the stock exchange, Cupric work on many other developments along the copperbelt and take part in several joint ventures including Eiseb, a project in the exploration phase, in Namibia.

Khoemacau project details

With initial operations to be focussed underground, it is predicted that Khoemacau will yield at least 50,000 tonnes of contained copper per annum which will be primarily exported to other countries as a copper/silver concentrate.

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Key Facts 2015 Up to 25 drilling rigs on site 70,000m drilling this year in Zone 5 Construction phase throughout 2016 and 2017

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Commission the mine by Q3 2017

“After construction of the mine and facilities has taken place throughout 2016 and 2017, we hope to be in commission by the third quarter of 2017. As such, our intention is to assure ramp-up of our production rate with only world class contractors at our side from the start,” says Tsimako. After drilling to a depth of 1,200 metres, there is plenty of potential for further exploration as Tsimako confirms: “At present, we have identified that the mine has an estimated lifespan of 20 years, however other deposits on our prospecting licence areas have huge potential to develop further in the future as it seems we have only scratched the surface.” For 2015, drilling will continue on the prospecting licence areas, with the focus still being on Zone 5. It is anticipated that there could be up to 25 drilling rigs on the Khoemacau sites for the year. Progress does not come without challenge for Khoemacau as operating in the northwest region of Botswana presents the issue of a lack of reliable source of power. “A mine needs a steady supply of power and water in order to function, both in terms of production and health and safety reasons. Careful planning in this area is being undertaken to ensure that we have the right funds set aside to tackle this,” says Tsimako.

Recruitment drive

Once in operation the mine will be looking to hire more people on a permanent basis in the region via a three-pronged recruitment drive as Tsimako explains: “We look for the right staff on a regional, national and international basis in order to achieve an appropriate balance of both upskilling local people and bringing in the right competencies from overseas to complement this. “By bringing expats to work underground, we intend to address the local skills gap in Botswana.”


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In terms of regional recruitment, Khoemacau has taken on the task of registering how many job seekers there are per village in order to gauge just how big the impact will be on local employment. “We have registered job seekers in the North West and Ghanzi districts through our newly established HR department to ensure we have all the correct policies and procedures in place,” explains Tsimako. In terms of underground mining skills, expatriates will provide training to personnel using rapid training techniques such as simulators and other facilities with the aim of a full operating skills transfer within six to eight years. In addition to its strategic recruitment drive, Khoemacau is a proud member of the Botswana Chamber of Mines, which provides the project with the backing to develop a safe and efficient mine.

T: +267 73 120 786 E: saeedpretorius@gmail.com

Changing lives in Botswana

The Chamber of Mines bridges the gap from the government to the industry, allowing us to operate in line with, and keep abreast of industry regulations “The Chamber of Mines bridges the gap from the government to the industry, allowing us to operate in line with, and keep abreast of industry regulations,” adds Tsimako. Moreover, the mine demonstrates a clear understanding on the importance of a comprehensive health and safety policy. Even before construction begins later this year, the site already has a risk manager, its own doctor and two nurses.

First and foremost, Khoemacau seek to change the livelihood of the people of Botswana via its mining activities, and Tsimako is fully invested in this idea, taking part in ongoing corporate social investment projects and identifying how best to take part in local activities. Providing water to nearby villages, working with the district councils to discover the needs of local people, donating prizes to local schools and investing in the education of Batswana citizens are just some of the key areas the organisation provides support in. “Cupric has helped us to achieve our long term vision and focus for the mine. With a good team behind us and a mutual understanding of where we want to take the project, we are confident that our positive impact on the economy and local infrastructures will be fruitful for everyone,” Tsimako concludes.

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Base Metal Mining Metorex’s growth strategy is being realised through the construction and development of the Kinsenda Project and the future development of the Musonoi and Lubembe deposits in the DRC Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Arron Rampling

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etorex is a well established and respected mid-tier mining Group, uniquely positioned in the southern Africa base metals mining industry as a pure copper and cobalt investment. As a wholly owned subsidiary of the Jinchuan Group since January 2012, Metorex has expanded its presence in Africa’s base metal mining industry over the past three years. This Chinese state-owned mining company based in the Gansu province of China produces a wide variety of metals including cobalt and copper.

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With a mission to grow a sustainable African-focussed mining company that offers opportunity for the development of both employees and communities, Metorex works hard to reach shareholder expectations and is actively contributing to the development of the continent. At present, the subsidiary is working to optimise its existing mines in order to ensure that when a new mining opportunity arises, Metorex is more than ready to lend a hand. Through the appropriate application of capital and technologies, the company is able to supply a quality base metal to the agreed specifications, while running a


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at its Best zero harm health and safety policy. Akin to this is Metorex’s new human capital brand, which functions to educate employees in the ways the company conducts its business, including abiding by the laws of each company they operate in and providing staff with the key skills required in

Copper Ore

doing so. The idea is to align the entire team with Metorex’s strategies, vision and mission. “We are process champions who are aligned to the business, proactively involved, led by example and act with integrity. Our strategy involves working closely with our business partners and always working to be even better at what we do,” the company states. Metorex’s growth strategy is being realised through the construction and development of the Kinsenda Project and the future development of the Musonoi and Lubembe deposits, in addition to the Chibuluma and Ruashi

Mining projects already underway. When it comes to managing its staff, Metorex has adopted the ‘employee life cycle’. The model identifies the various stages in a staff member’s career to help guide their management and optimise associated processes. It is the framework for evaluating the entire employee experience, providing a holistic overview of their journey with the company.

Kinsenda Project

Kinsenda is situated within the Democratic Republic of Congo, near the border town of Kasumbalesa. The border town has easy access to

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General Construction Bricks Manufacturing Sandstone Quarries Chemical Manufacturing Antenna Construction Concrete Supply Contact Ivan Iseboot: +243 99.82.43.500 Email: iy@safricas.com


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infrastructure, with a sealed single-lane road that connects the mine to the regional highway, just 20 kilometres to the west of Kinsenda. Currently ranked as one of the world’s highest grade copper deposits, the Kinsenda Project has declared mineral resources of 20.7 million tonnes at a grade of 5.6 percent copper, and is expected to produce an average of 20,000 tonnes of copper in concentrate per annum. Kinsenda employs local residents from the nearby settlements of Meleke, Twibombele and Kinsenda and accommodation for workers is readily available within these areas. A Bankable Feasibility Study (BFS) on the project was successfully completed in 2012 and the project was approved by the board in March 2013. Construction work at the site commenced in July 2013 and included the development of site infrastructure, underground access points and the ore processing plant. Metorex aims to have the mine in operation during late 2015. The feasibility study has only taken into consideration the mineral resources that have been discovered in the western portion of the land. Through a drilling programme undertaken in 2012, a significant volume of inferred mineral resources lying to the east of the main project area were identified. The area has been

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The Kinsenda Project currently ranks as one of the world’s highest grade copper deposits with declared mineral resources of 20.7 million tonnes at a grade of 5.6% copper

MUSONOI MINE

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DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

Musonoi Mine

Metatorbernite, a copper uranyl phosphate


Safricas E

stablished in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1923, Safricas has grown over the years to be a national and market leader. Acquired by Belgian company, CFE – a Vinci subsidiary – in 2000, the business has consolidated its previous advantageous position this century, complemented by a plethora of new personnel, equipment, capabilities and equipment to modernise the organisation. Within Safricas at present exists several divisions, all combining to carry out core areas of construction, civil engineering and rehabilitation across numerous sectors. The current list of departments within the business comprise: Public Works and Civil Engineering incorporating thousands of miles paved roads over the years; Building of numerous embassies, villas and departments; Equipment, including various machines, workshops and trucks; Carriers installed for the supply of its sites, with production estimated at around 30,000 tons a month, per site; an Asphalt Plant with a capacity of around 8,000 tons a month; Central Concrete with a further 3,000 metres a month of varying specifications; a River Transport fleet; Equipment Rental leased to third parties; and a Civil Engineering Laboratory equipped with modern equipment to perform all necessary quality checks. Through these departments Safricas is able to produce a vast array of essential construction materials including concretes, cements, steel and pipes; all to varying degrees and specifications.

To optimise this offering, the company has stayed true to its core continuous improvement strategy, which has involved partnering with some of the biggest names known to construction, to locating itself in some of the key business hubs of the DRC. In regards to its equipment, the likes of CATERPILLAR aid in providing earthmovers, as well as maintenance, while Safricas also has its own port infrastructure at Port Kinkole, less than 40 kilometres from Kinshasa. Complementing this supply chain advantage is its asphalt plant situated even nearer to Kinshasa, and two sandstone quarries which supply building sites and public works, again located around the capital. Safricas has played a pivotal role in developing the infrastructure of the country over the past century and it continues to modernise and upgrade to keep it relevant in today’s construction sector too. Diversifying into areas of telecommunications, entrepreneurship and health & safety optimisation, the company is also striving for unparalleled levels of efficiency and sustainability through its concrete plants, which benefit not only its own sites, but the wider construction community also.

T +243 99.82.43.500 E iy@safricas.com


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explored over the past two years as a result, and Metorex anticipate that the discovery of this eastern mine could add a further six to eight years onto the life of mine.

Musonoi Project

Also located in the DRC is the Musonoi Project, which is on the outskirts of the mining town of Kolwezi. The project area contains at least two known mineralised zones, one of which known as Dilala East - was discovered as a blind, high grade copper and cobalt deposit in 2007. Following the initial discovery of the high grade mineralised zone, the property has been extensively drilled, declaring a mineral resource of 31.7 million tonnes at a grade of 2.8 percent copper and 0.9 percent cobalt. The mineral resource has been defined to a depth of 600 metres below the surface and indications are that the ore body is open to approximately 1,000 metres below the surface. A Bankable Feasibility Study (BFS) on the project in 2014 concluded that

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Musonoi is expected to produce 31,000 tonnes of copper cathode and 10,000 tonnes of cobalt contained in hydroxide per annum

Musonoi has excellent access to the infrastructure needed for mining projects

an underground mine, producing 1,000 kilo-tonnes per annum run-of-mine (ROM) ore with a life of more than 20 years could be established on the land. Musonoi is expected to produce 31,000 tonnes of copper cathode and 10,000 tonnes of cobalt contained in hydroxide per annum. Being located within the heart of the Kolwezi mining hub, between ENRC’s Roan Tailing Project and Katanga Copper Company’s Kamoto operations, the project has excellent access to the infrastructure needed for mining projects.


Scamont S

camont Engineering (Pty) Ltd (Scamont) is a market leading manufacturer of a range of positive displacement slurry pumps, multi-stage clear water pumps and pneumatic rock drill machines that are typically used in applications in a number of global mining regions including the African continent, North and South America, South East Asia and Australia. Established as a small jobbing firm in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1978, Scamont has re-invented itself as an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) and preferred supplier of positive displacement pumps and rock drill machines to many Blue Chip Global Mining Companies. The success and sustainability of the company was further entrenched by a generational transition to the current Executive Management Team in 2007. Under the new leadership a more modern approach to manufacturing and product design underpinned by the Founders’ commitment to the highest quality standards has seen Scamont evolve and grow into a significant Group. The acquisition of the Grifo Group in early 2013 signalled Scamont’ s entry into the highly competitive world of multi-stage clear water pumps. The Grifo range of pumps is manufactured by Scamont in Germiston, east of Johannesburg. The division boasts a modern manufacturing facility complimented by its own foundry. The positive displacement slurry pumps and pneumatic rockdrill machines are manufactured at the Company’s modern

manufacturing plant in Stormill a few kilometres west of Johannesburg. Scamont is ISO9001:2008 certified. By virtue of the manufacturing resources across both divisions, Scamont boasts the ability to manufacture all of its products in-house whilst outsourcing a few speciality value-add elements like heat treatment and special coatings. This gives Scamont the ability to respond very quickly to customer needs and this is further backed by significant inventory levels in excess of US$4 million. The Group believes in regional partnerships when dealing with clients outside of RSA. This has seen the establishment of SKMS in Zambia and Scamont Australia. Through these entities international clients are able to access product and technical support in close proximity to their operations. One such Client is the Metorex group which has been a longstanding client of both Scamont and Grifo and in the recent past has enjoyed the benefit of being able to procure both ranges of pump products from Scamont. The Kinsenda Mine in the DRC has a number of Grifo SRB53-29 pumps in operation and is about to take delivery of two more units complete with motors for a new dewatering pump station. This is a project Scamont is very proud to be associated with. For more information about our comprehensive range of pump products and exciting new developments on a new range of rock drill technologies please visit our website at www.scamont.co.za


To date, the mines around the town of Kolwezi have produced more than 400,000 tonnes of copper per annum, therefore labour is readily available in the area all with the necessary mining, processing and acquired technical skills that are required to operate the underground mine.

Lubembe

In early 2012, a scoping study was completed which confirmed the potential to mine and process mixed sulphide and oxide ores at Lubembe. With the hopes to excavate 93 million tonnes of copper at 1.9 percent grade at a rate of 3.6 mega tonnes per annum via an open pit mine, Metorex conducted a pre-feasibility study in the middle of last year to determine the optimal processing option, to carry out detailed metallurgical testing and to commence baseline environmental fieldwork in the areas identified for waste rock dumping and tailings storage.

Chibuluma Mine

Located to the south of Chbuluma in Zambia, the Chibuluma mine has been producing copper since 1955. With a current equivalent annual production capacity of approximately 19,000 tonnes of copper in the form of concentrate, Chibuluma continues to be described as Zambia’s model mine.

Ruashi is a copper and cobalt mine in Katanga province, located within the Democratic Republic of Congo

Ruashi Mine

In early 2012, a scoping study was completed which confirmed the potential to mine and process mixed sulphide and oxide ores at Lubembe

Ruashi is a copper and cobalt mine in Katanga province, located within the Democratic Republic of Congo. This mine is made up of three open pits, along with a modern solvent extraction electrowinning processing plant. Production at Ruashi began in 1911 and is one of the oldest mines Metorex manage. Ruashi Mining currently produces 38,000 tonnes of copper and 4,400 tonnes of cobalt per annum.

For further information on Metorex and its mining operations, visit: www.metorexgroup.com

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Truly Smart African Cities By optimising energy, water and even broadband efficiencies, SUM strives to define the future of smart cities in Africa Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Tom Cullum

outh Africa is a country where rapid urbanisation and the merging of first and third world lifestyles meet, which places significant pressure on the supply of utilities such as power, water and other growing infrastructural needs such as broadband, which are increasingly important components in everyday life. Subsequently, this places emphasis on finding the most intelligent ways to manage and distribute these utilities to the public and private sectors. This is where the concept of smart cities comes in.

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Companies such as DMB Holdings’ subsidiary SUM (Spectrum Utility Management) seek to create an economically viable and sustainable environment in not just South Africa, but with the eventual plan of aiding the entire continent in smart city solutions that will reduce energy and water wastage. Today, SUM adds a string to DMB Holdings’ bow as it manufactures devices that make infrastructure behave in a smarter way. With roots back to 1989, DMB Holdings has progressed from a software

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Dewald Pretorius, Managing Director of DMB Holdings. Spectrum Utility Management (SUM) is a key subsidiary of the holding company


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development house with an extensive background in ICT infrastructure, expanding into consulting and then into a fully fledged utility management via its subsidiary SUM, which was created in 2010. “The provision of technology has evolved so much since the 1980s and the SUM business reflects this change via the creation of dynamic smart cities, which bring together all the technological societal changes from the past three and a half decades; we created the company to look at ways we could integrate everything in one place,” explains Dewald Pretorius, Managing Director of DMB Holdings.

Smart solutions

As a proudly African company that develops solutions for African utilities, Pretorius says that SUM has a primary focus on developing smart city solutions for South Africa’s public sector. By working alongside the country’s various municipalities and gated communities nationally, SUM provides energy efficiency through anything from locally manufactured public lighting, measuring and managing both electricity and water, to broadband deployment; managing each project throughout its lifetime. “Our vision is to become the

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leading company and brand which deploys and establishes progressive dynamic cities on the African continent,” says Pretorius. Accompanying its latest innovations, SUM has invested 65 million rand in R&D in order to stay ahead of the industry curve. “We are always evolving and we want to pass this improvement and cost saving onto the African people. Integration is important to our business. By removing any chance of duplicating energy data, this reduces all-round costs, making a ‘smarter’ solution to energy efficiency,” says Pretorius. Through the innovative automated meter infrastructure, SUM is able to determine losses on any network electronically and provide guidance on a smarter use of electricity and water. Furthermore, the company promises to manage its products through their life and complement this with a maintenance service. “Our broadband solution integrates itself nicely into this model; we consider it as a utility. The cabling for broadband is fixed to the high mast infrastructure and smart streetlight solutions already in place, which is a logical use of space,” says Pretorius.

Integrated systems

It is one thing to have smart solutions, but another to effectively manage it. That is why SUM is also heavily

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UKWABELANA ELECTRICAL

U AS A HOLDING COMPANY DMB actively supports its seven subsidiaries, which service various industries across Africa including: Market Demand: financial company that focusses on evaluating fixed asset audits, providing a conditional assessment IZinga Valuers: real estate company that focusses on property valuations for the municipal and private sectors Confirm Direct: public and private debt collection Involve: chartered accountancy company that focusses on financial audits in both the public and private sectors Express Broadband Technologies: delivery of broadband infrastructure to underdeveloped areas Inovat: focusses on human capital development in South Africa’s public and private sectors SUM (Spectrum Utility Management): a subsidiary designed to assist municipalities and utility companies in their management of lighting, energy, water and broadband in order to establish a SMART city

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kwabelana Electrical CC was established in 2008, and we are able to offer comprehensive service with qualified electricians, specialising in LV and HV cable jointing; from 11kv to 22kv, XLPE and PECTC aluminium and copper cables, as well as reticulation of streetlights and high mast operations and repairs throughout the Eastern Cape area. We also specialise in the installation and commissioning of substations and switchgears. Our transparent management style of choosing to be open, honest and proactive with our clients has resulted in a level of service and expertise which is difficult for our competitors to match. Through more than 30 years combined experience, Ukwabelana Electrical management strongly believes in combining technology and the use of strong on site management, giving our clients the benefit of “management presence” at all times. T 083 953 7611 071 678 7678 F 086 733 1351 E ukshare@hotmail.co.za


Specialising in

domestic, industrial and commercial LV and HV cable jointing. Ukwabelana Electrical CC provides the following services: > Installation of Mini Substations > Installation of Switch Apparatus > Commissioning of all Substations > PECTC Insulated Lead Cables > XLPE Cables > (ABC) and Overhead Lines > Optic Fibre Cables > Streetlight (LED) > Solar panels

UKWABELANA ELECTRICAL

Email: ukshare@hotmail.co.za Fax 2 Email: 086 733 1351 Mrs JL Share – 083 953 7611 Mr D Share – 071 678 7678


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i-CHAiN i-Chain Asset Management Having specialised in fixed asset management for 15 years, i-Chain have consistently proven to be leaders in providing asset management solutions to meet all public and private sector requirements. These include verifications, reconciliations, fair market valuations and all other best practice regulations for assets.

involved in data integrity management, offering both pre-paid and post-paid solutions on all its utility management options. “This is what makes us unique. We manage all utilities in one integrated system called a network operating sensor,” he adds. As a result of a clear strategic plan in terms of individual municipality infrastructural needs, SUM picked up the award for one of the Best Energy Efficient Projects in the World (EDF Pulse award 2014) for its work in Nelson Mandela Bay, Port Elizabeth. The company also fared well in the Eskom eta 2014 Awards, coming as runner up in the residential category. With the continent as a whole in

Africa is an attractive market for smart technologies; it encapsulates both a first and third world environment. Our versatile offering means that we can offer something for both ends of this scale

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WHAT IS A SMART CITY? A smart city uses digital technologies to integrate cost saving energy solutions and modern technologies such as broadband into the environment via alterations to a city’s infrastructure. The idea is motivated by green ‘clean energy’ targets around the world and various governments are dedicating funds to transform major cities with smart technologies. According to Frost & Sullivan, the key aspects that define a smart city are: smart governance, smart energy, smart building, smart mobility, smart infrastructure, smart technology, smart healthcare and the smart citizen.

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Effective asset management means knowing what assets you own, where they are, their worth, what they are costing you, their life spans and history, and who is responsible for them. i-Chain can assist with all of this whilst maintaining compliance with regulatory requirements. T 011 807 0683 E sales@ichain.co.za

www.ichain.co.za

the limelight as a hive of economic activity, SUM is examining the opportunities available on a wider scale. “We have interest in our offering from Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Uganda and Ghana. All African economies can benefit from our services as the world becomes more energy conscious; we are deeply invested in the technology and sustainable solutions. “Africa is an attractive market for smart technologies; it encapsulates both a first and third world environment. Our versatile offering means that we can offer something for both ends of this scale,” says Pretorius. In native South Africa, the company is deploying broadband to some of the most underdeveloped township areas of the country while at the same time deploying LED technology that offers energy savings in excess of 65 percent. SUM remotely monitors and manages the energy consumption every hour. This remotely controlled


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system uses the 40 metre high mast to deploy communication over a 500 metre radius. As a result, the existing high mast has three uses; lighting, electricity and water meter management, all remotely monitored and measured.

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Innovat training academy

KEY BUSINESS PARTNERS KMW Based in South Korea, KMW is a strategic partner to SUM and fully understands the design concepts provided by SUM for the manufacture and timely delivery of energy efficient lighting. “It’s all about synergy between our company and KMW; they supply us with the technology and we manage the product,” comments Pretorius. Envirolight Envirolight is the local South African distributor of the Giga Tera range of LED lighting products manufactured by KMW and is also a local manufacturer of energy efficient lighting products.

DMB Holdings ensure that SUM employees are trained in key life skills that enable them to progress internally; this is enforced by one of its seven subsidiaries dedicated to training, known as Inovat. “Our attractive training is designed to compete on the world stage. Moreover, everything we sell comes with its own training policies which are backed by economic development initiatives. We partner with local companies in order to be able to support our products and ensure they are fitted to a professional standard, no matter the location,” says Pretorius. Under the watchful eye of DMB Holdings and through the installation of its integrated utility management solutions, SUM strives to substantially improve the service delivery of energy, water and broadband in order to make a difference to the lives of African people.

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Fourth

Largest Harnessing the Power of the Continent’s

The Zambezi River Authority is planning for a series of significant projects as it continues to lay the foundations for both Zimbabwe and Zambia’s futures Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: Tom Cullum

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within the basin. The area of the river shared by Zambia and Zimbabwe specifically comprises 58.7 percent of the entire catchment area – the largest throughout the river’s journey – making the success of the Zambezi River Authority all the more significant. “The Zambezi River Authority is the only dam management organisation along this river which involves two states,” explains the company’s Chief Executive (CE), Munyaradzi Munodawafa. “The major economic activities within the basin include mining, tourism, hydropower generation, fisheries, agriculture and manufacturing, so the mandate for the Authority now, given this major economic activity, is to obtain economic, industrial or social development for the two republics through maximising the natural

benefits that come from the waters of the Zambezi River.” This collaborative effort primarily revolves around energy production, which is evenly distributed across the two nations. However, to achieve this aim, the Authority is currently planning for two massive rehabilitation projects on the Kariba Dam in order to safeguard the future of the river’s economic prosperity.

Kariba Dam projects

The Kariba Dam is the Zambezi River Authority’s chief concern in fulfilling its obligations to Zambia and Zimbabwe, and while this usually comprises day-to-day maintenance and monitoring, the organisation’s most pressing works at present revolve around two specific projects. The first addresses the dam’s plunge pool which

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is in severe need of refurbishment, as Munodawafa explains: “We have to refurbish the dam to ensure that it is in accordance with international standards and in terms of the Kariba Dam, we have to implement two projects asserted by the deficiencies that the dam is now experiencing through old age. “The plunge pool is a depression at the base of the waterfall created by falling water, which is now about 90 metres deep. When the dam was built, there were no investigations

Zambezi River

The Zambezi River at the junction of Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Botswana

carried out on the rock formation which has grown weaker from erosion so now, the weak formation is more pronounced towards the foundations of the dam which we need to do something about.” The Authority has mobilised financing to carry out these works which are set to begin in September 2015, and will last three years. And while the project itself should be relatively uncomplicated to complete with the expertise at hand and the meticulous planning that has gone into it, the benefits of the works will be invaluable. Munodawafa continues: “The risk of inaction downstream of the dam is around three million lost lives, as well as lost livelihoods, and that’s not including all the animals, flora and fauna as well. And let alone the loss of power to the region if we didn’t take action. “The Kariba and Cahora Bassa dams provide 40 percent of the Southern African power pool of electrical energy. To put the dam in the right

Nickname: besi Countries: Zambia, DR Congo, Angola, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Malawi, Tanzania Source: Location: Elevation:

Mwinilunga, Zambia 1,500 m (4,921 ft)

Mouth: Indian Ocean Location: Mozambique Coordinates: 18°34’14”S 36°28’13”E Length:

2,574 km (1,599 mi)

Basin:

1,390,000 km2 (536,682 sq mi)

Discharge: Average: 3,400 m3/s (120,070 cu ft/s)

The Kariba Dam construction in the 1950s

position now, we need to invest US$292.4 million, but should the Dam get destroyed, its replacement value would be about US$5 billion.” This investment will be compounded by the second project of significance occurring also in 2015 onwards, which involves the spillway which is the pathway for water being released through the floodgates once they are opened during flood releases. A refurbishment of the again agewearied gates will take as long as six years but will once again safeguard the future of not only the Kariba Dam, but the value that is extracted from the Kariba Dam in Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Diligent operations

As part of the planning process that has gone into both of these projects, the Zambezi River Authority has identified a series of international partners who will now bid on attaining the contract, with no stone being left unturned as to bring the best people in for the job.

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Complementing this global reach though is a local focus at the heart of the company with local knowledge, expertise and sustainability always kept in mind in the Authority’s ongoing development. “From the due diligence we have been doing during the preparation stage, we note that European companies have got a lot of expertise in these kinds of works so I’m sure the bidding will be competitive to that affect,” says Munodawafa. “From Zimbabwe and Zambia though, we make use of the universities and technology institutions with my wish that students will benefit from our works in the future.” There is also a more local focus in the company’s day-to-day activities which include reservoir management to ensure the lake levels are in a healthy condition, the quality of the water itself, the condition of the fishes and wildlife in the area and also a vast amount of monitoring and data collection. All of this is carried out as part of a collaborative effort with Cahora Bassa to ensure that the Zambezi River’s influence will remain prominent throughout climatic changes that are already occurring.

The Kariba and Cahora Bassa dams provide 40 percent of Southern Africa’s power needs

A robust future

All pictures from Zambezi River Authority website

Another key facet of the Authority’s ongoing activities consists of its corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts. While, by virtue of its works on the river, it improves the lives of the surrounding communities as a matter of course, the company has also set up a development fund to firstly ensure that the environmental impacts of its works are minimal, and also in the form of irrigation schemes and helping to provide water in the areas that need it most. The continuation of this strategy, combined with the key Kariba projects, will form the crux of the Zambezi River Authority’s work moving forward, but

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the company also has its eyes firmly fixed on future challenges that need to be addressed now. “The major thing we need to do quickly is what we call dam break analysis. The Kariba Dam break analysis, which will spill over to the Cahora Bassa dam too is to help us produce a unified document for emergency preparedness in terms of flood control for the basin,” notes Munodawafa. “We need to complete this by 2017 alongside another project

which will be very instrumental for the electricity and energy requirements for the whole region, let alone the two countries.” This significant second project focuses on the area upstream of the Kariba Dam and the building of a new dam, The Batoka Gorge Dam, which will be operational in 2021 and comprise the full array of power stations and dam functionality. Munodawafa adds: “By 2050 the world’s population will have grown

This significant second project focuses on the area upstream of the Kariba Dam and the building of a new dam, The Batoka Gorge Dam, which will be operational in 2021

SOUTHERN CROSS MOTORS

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outhern Cross Motors Limited is a motor vehicle distributor that specializes in supply of reliable and affordable vehicles. Southern Cross Motors is the official franchise holder of Mitsubishi, GWM, Mercedes Benz, Freightliner, Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Fuso Trucks and Buses in Zambia. We offer comprehensive back up for all our products. We have a team of highly qualified and experienced staff. Southern Cross Motors limited has full after sales support facilities with technicians that undergo regular refresher training courses by brand manufacturers. T +260 211 844778-81 E info@southerncross.co.zm

www.southerncross.co.zm

All pictures from Zambezi River Authority website

The Kariba Dam

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The Kariba Dam


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Zimbabwe and Zambia are in the epicentre of power distribution for the Southern African region

in such a way that water storage infrastructure is going to be extremely important and there will be more need for clean water, and a lot of competing needs for the usage of that water. “The Zambezi River is going to be pivotal in terms of provision of that scarce requirement, so this new dam is a master plan for water harvesting to that affect. “Zimbabwe and Zambia are in the epicentre of power distribution for the Southern African region. So the additional power which is going to come from the Batoka Dam will strengthen this transmission system to make it a robust base, which will be able to now transmit power from as far as even the Grand Inga Dam from the Congo. “That power will pass through this central corridor and will provide the cheapest transportation of that power for the region,” the CE concludes.

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thiopian Airlines (Ethiopian) has already become the largest airline in Africa based on fleet size and could overtake South African Airlines (SAA) this year as the largest in terms of passengers carried. With plans to further expand both its fleet and network, the flag carrier hopes to widen the gap between itself and the other leading African carriers. Fuelled by 15 percent year on year growth, in 2014 Ethiopian carried six million passengers and is one of only four airlines in Africa with more than five million annual passengers, and one of only four airline groups with a fleet of more than 50 aircraft. Having doubled in size since the beginning of the decade, Ethiopian has aggressive plans to tap the booming Asia-Africa market moving forward, with plans to launch services to Tokyo in April this year, which will become its 11th destination in Asia. The carrier will also add its second US destination in June as a service to Los Angeles is launched.

Booming Asia-Africa market

With further fleet and network expansion plans in 2015, Ethiopian Airlines has been able to jet ahead of the competition Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Tom Cullum

CEO Tewolde Gebremariam told CAPA TV in November 2014 that the airline believes most of its future growth opportunities are in Asia, Africa and Latin America. He pointed out that while “Europe is a strong market for us”, most of the growth over the past decade has been to Asia and China is now Ethiopian’s single largest market. Ethiopian currently serves Beijing, Guangzhou and Shanghai, with all three destinations now served with daily non-stop flights. Hong Kong is currently served with three weekly non-stop flights and one to Bangkok per week. The airline has gradually upgraded its routes to non-stop as new generation widebody aircrafts are now being used that do not need to

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Boeing 777-200F aircraft

stop-over, rather than using China as a gateway into India and Thailand. Not only is Tokyo being added to the Ethiopian flight network in April, but Singapore is due to be served with three weekly non-stop 787-8 flights in the same month. “With the launch of a new Tokyo route, Hong Kong will be upgraded to a daily non-stop service. “The new non-stop option in Singapore should be able to improve Ethiopian’s performance as it will open up one-stop connections to Australia and New Zealand and offline destinations in Southeast Asia,” said the company. Singapore has limited local traffic to Africa but Ethiopian intends to use this location as a hub for offline traffic, leveraging its fruitful partnership with

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Singapore International Airlines (SIA). Moreover, Ethiopian has been codesharing with All Nippon Airways since October 2014, which seems a logical move ahead of its launch of services to the Japanese market. The non-stop services to Singapore, the launch of Tokyo and the upgrade of daily flights to Hong Kong have only been possible through additional fleet expansion. The carrier plans to take on three 787-8s and two 777-300ERs in the first half of 2-15, which will free up aircrafts to fulfil its other international commitments.

US and European growth

In June, Los Angeles will become Ethiopian’s second destination in the US after Washington Dulles, which is


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Emerging as Africa’s leading airline

The non-stop services to Singapore, the launch of Tokyo and the upgrade of daily flights to Hong Kong have only been possible through additional fleet expansion

served daily with 777-200LRs. Ethiopian has also cemented its presence in the US market with a new codeshare with United Airlines that was implemented in November last year. Los Angeles and Washington Dulles are both United hubs. Additionally, Ethiopian currently serves Toronto with three weekly 787-8 flights. Washington Dulles and Toronto are served non-stop eastbound but both flights stop in Rome on the westbound leg due to payload limitations in departing from the high altitude of Addis Ababa. Over in Europe, Dublin will become Ethiopian’s 10th destination for the continent. Ethiopian has continued growing its network in Europe – adding Madrid, Stockholm and Vienna

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A

CONTINENT

T H AT

GROWS.


A PA R T N E R S H I P T H AT S OA R S .

Partners in Africa’s Growth Together, Ethiopian Airlines and Bombardier are rising to the challenge of connecting communities in Africa through the Q400 NextGen aircraft. We’re proud to support one of the continent’s leading airlines through its continued growth.

Bombardier, CSeries, CS100, CRJ, CRJ1000, Q400, NextGen and The Evolution of Mobility are trademarks of Bombardier Inc. or its subsidiaries. All rights reserved © 2015 Bombardier Inc.


Bombardier Bombardier Commercial Aircraft: Supporting Growth in Africa Elsewhere in this issue of Africa Outlook, Tewolde Gebremariam, Chief Executive Officer at Ethiopian Airlines, refers to the Bombardier Q400 NextGen turboprop airliner’s role in developing a network of regional routes linking Ethiopia’s diverse communities with each other and connecting to the country’s capital, Addis Ababa, as well as to international destinations. It’s a role ideally suited to the Q400 NextGen aircraft because of its outstanding characteristics . . . performance, economy, flexibility, reliability and -- in the two-class configuration chosen by Ethiopian -- extra passenger comfort and convenience. Ethiopian’s diverse operational requirements provide an excellent example of the Q400 NextGen aircraft’s abilities.

Ethiopia offers unique challenges to an airline because of climate and terrain. The country has a low point of -410 ft. (-125 m) and a high point of 14,938 ft. (4,553 m). Its highest airstrip is at 9,997 ft. (3,047 m). Despite these challenges, Ethiopian Airlines’ Q400 NextGen aircraft have an impressive dispatch reliability that’s very close to 100 per cent. That is a strong tribute to both the aircraft and Ethiopian Airlines’ strict maintenance practices so it’s not surprising that the airline has won Bombardier’s Airline Reliability Performance Award for the highest Q400 dispatch reliability in Africa and the MiddleEast region for four consecutive years (2010 – 2013). Mr. Gebremariam earlier said, “Overall, our experience with this excellent aircraft in a wide range of weather and other conditions proves that it is ideally suited for operations in Africa.” Ethiopian has gone one step further with its Q400 NextGen airliners. It leases four of its aircraft to its affiliate ASKY Airlines


of Togo to establish a West African hub at Lomé from which it serves 23 destinations in West and Central Africa. Another Ethiopian Q400 NextGen turboprop is leased to Malawian Airlines at Lilongwe that began flying between there and Blantyre a year ago and plans to add more aircraft and more markets. “This forming of strategic alliances is an historic intra-African co-operation in the airline business,” said Mr. Gebremariam. “By joining with us, ASKY and Malawian Airlines are linked into the Star Alliance network and all the benefits and advantages it provides to the airline passenger.” Ethiopian Airlines has also been an Authorized Service Facility for Q400 and Q400 NextGen Turboprops in Africa since November 2013 and has a Q400 training simulator that is used for in-house and third-party training. John Kassis, Regional Vice President, Sales, Middle East and Africa, Bombardier Commercial Aircraft, pointed to this initiative as one of Bombardier’s prime

Ethiopian Airlines has won Bombardier’s Airline Reliability Performance Award for four consecutive years objectives in Africa. “We want to help airlines develop their domestic routes linking regional cities with larger centres which act as gateways to the world via an airline’s intercontinental jets,” he said. Altogether, Ethiopian Airlines, ASKY Airlines and Malawian Airlines operate a fleet of 17 Q400 NextGen aircraft -- the largest on the continent. Another 14 operators from the Mediterranean to the tip of South Africa use another 46 Q400 and Q400 NextGen aircraft, making it the turboprop of choice. Recent additions to the Bombardier family in Africa include Q400 NextGen aircraft operators Air Côte d’Ivoire, Senegal Airlines and RwandAir. Other Bombardier commercial aircraft -- Q100, Q200, Q300 turboprops, as well as CRJ100, CRJ200, CRJ700/CRJ700 NextGen, CRJ900/CRJ900 NextGen and CRJ1000 NextGen regional jets -- are also working hard for their users in Africa. In

total, African customers operate, or have ordered, 115 Q-Series turboprops and 58 CRJ regional jets. Waiting in the wings is Bombardier’s exciting CSeries aircraft, the all-new 21st century airliner with two models designed specifically for the 100- to 149-seat market segment. The CS100 aircraft with 110 to 125 seats is scheduled to enter revenue service in 2015 and the CS300 with 135 to 160 seats is scheduled to follow six months later. The CSeries aircraft will offer operators a 15 per cent operating cost advantage, a 20 per cent fuel burn advantage, exceptional operational flexibility, widebody comfort in a single-aisle aircraft and an unmatched environmental and noise footprint. Among the CSeries customers is an unidentified but current Bombardier aircraft operator in Africa that has signed a letter of intent to acquire five CSeries aircraft. The 100- to 149 seat aircraft category is expected to account for 48 per cent, or 336 aircraft, of the 700 new aircraft expected to be delivered to African operators between 2014 and 2033, according to Bombardier’s Commercial Aircraft Market Forecast for the period. The 60- to 99-seat segment is expected to attract 46 per cent, or 322 aircraft and the 20- to 59-seat segment is forecasted to amount for only six per cent of deliveries, or 42 aircraft. “We continue to improve and enhance our products to make them even more of an asset to their operators,” said Mr. Kassis. “Some of the jets and turboprops offer business-class seating to accommodate growing business traffic and provide seamless service with larger aircraft. We have added an optional passenger-cargo combination configuration and an optional, extra capacity 86-seat passenger configuration

to the Q400 NextGen aircraft. Enhancements to the CRJ900 NextGen regional jet have resulted in a 5.5 per cent reduction in fuel consumption compared to earlier versions of the CRJ900 aircraft. The CSeries is also very well suited to the African continent. The CS100, the smaller variant, can be configured as a 100-seat dual class airliner that allows for significant baggage payload and exceptional performance while maintaining a seamless feed to the large narrowbodies. There are simply no better products in their seat segment for operators in Africa.” The forecast noted that African airlines have historically experienced low load factors in the 70 per cent range, indicating a mismatch between seat capacity and passenger demand. Smaller aircraft with 70 to 120 seats segment in dual class are the right size to support profitable route development. Supporting the success of Bombardier’s aircraft in Africa is a well established support infrastructure. Operating from the company’s regional office located in the United Arab Emirates, Bombardier Commercial Aircraft’s sales and marketing team is well positioned to provide industryleading solutions to its current and prospective customers.

T +44 (0)28 9045 8444 www. bombardier.com


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VIVO ENERGY

W

ith a vision to create Africa’s most respected energy business Vivo

Energy sources, distributes, markets and supplies Shell’s high-quality fuels and lubricants to retail and commercial customers in more than 20 countries across Africa. Vivo Energy also sells jet fuel to its customers at 23 airport locations across Africa, and is a proud supplier to Ethiopian Airlines.

Ethiopian is growing both its fleet and network around the world

In partnership with Vitol Aviation, Vivo Energy is building its aviation customer

to its portfolio in 2014 – and has now begun focusing on North America.

Fleet expansion

With plans to approximately double its fleet over the next 10 years, Ethiopian strives to maintain its status as Africa’s largest airline. In line with this, it phased-in 16 game-changing aircrafts last year. At the end of FY2009 Ethiopian’s fleet consisted of just 34 aircraft, including 29 passenger aircraft and five freighters. In order to meet its goal of operating 150 aircraft by 2025, Ethiopian will need to commit to at

least 29 more aircraft. “Assuming the ageing 757 and 767 fleets are retired over the next decade, at least 44 more aircraft will be needed,” stated the company. Furthermore, new orders will be needed to maintain the level of growth targeted by the company. Supporting the fleet expansion is the Ethiopian Aviation Academy, which in 2014 enrolled more than 1,200 students in different fields including pilots, aircraft technicians, cabin crew, marketing and finance staff and customer service position. 96 aviation technicians, 46 marketing professionals and 48 cabin crew

base across Africa. We operate to the latest international Joint Inspection Group (JIG) refuelling standards across our network of airports. We also conduct regular inspections of airport facilities to ensure that quality control and the safety of our onsite refuelling operations and processes are adhered to rigorously.

Vivo Energy currently has aviation operations in the following countries: • Cape Verde • Ghana • Ivory Coast • Kenya

With plans to approximately double its fleet over the next 10 years, Ethiopian strives to maintain its status as Africa’s largest airline. In line with this, it phased-in 16 game-changing aircrafts last year

• Mauritius • Morocco • Senegal • Uganda

T +44 1234 904 026

www.vivoenergy.com

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Vivo Energy, creating Africa’s most respected energy business Vivo Energy is the company behind the Shell brand in Africa. We are here to offer customers the very best of Shell’s products and services, including supply reliability, technical expertise, and unmatched customer service, in the countries in which we operate. We have in place industry-leading health and safety standards, and are committed to delivering Shell’s high-quality fuels and lubricants in an environmentally and socially responsible manner. Vivo Energy also has aviation operations in eight of its markets, selling jet fuel to its customers at 23 airport locations, through its partnership with Vitol Aviation. A joint venture between Vitol (40%), Helios Investment Partners (40%) and Shell (20%), Vivo Energy represents a unique combination of resources, experience and expertise. With a strong and growing presence across Africa, we have plans to invest further – with around US $300m of capital investment planned in the next three years. Our local teams have the experience to go beyond meeting initial customer needs. Through access to superior technology, products and related services we are able to add additional value to customers’ operations. In this way we aim to be the first and trusted choice for our customers.

Shell trademarks used under license.


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graduated from the academy last year. The premier Pan-African Aviation Academy represents the highest international standards and is dedicated to bridging the aviation skill gap on the continent. “The academy is the backbone of Ethiopian’s success and we are continuously investing in the expansion of both its intake capacity and the scope of training it provides. “As per our vision 2025 strategic roadmap, we plan to scale up our yearly intake capacity to more than 4,000 trainees with a view to cater to the growing needs of the continent,” said Mr Gebremariam. As a result of continued dedication to an all-round excellent service, Ethiopian was named Airline of the Year by the African Airlines Association (AFRAA) on November 9, 2014, amongst others. “Ethiopian proved to be a multi-award winner in 2014, receiving recognition from more than 12 different bodies, including awards for exceptional leadership as well

Ethiopian Airlines has

won the ‘Airline of the Year’ Award

The Aviation Academy represents the highest international standards

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as training and services,” stated the company. “We were crowned Airline of the Year due to our consistent profitability and sound strategy, which has enabled us to forge win-win partnerships... This is the third year that Ethiopian has continued to receive the award from AFRAA,” commented the company.

A bright outlook

Due to several strategic moves, Ethiopian has quickly emerged as Africa’s leading airline in recent years. Most importantly, the group is still continuing to evolve and take a more invested role in setting up joint ventures throughout Africa, Asia and North America. Corporate social responsibility is a crucial element to the success of the airline, and Ethiopian support some of the most significant events and

48 cabin crew graduated from the academy in 2014

Ethiopian Airlines carried six million passengers in 2014 and is one of only four airlines in Africa with more than five million annual passengers

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The flag carrier plans to again double in size over the next 10 years

causes across the length and breadth of Ethiopia including sponsoring music concerts, supporting individuals, fashion shows, contributing supplies to the Ebola crisis, helping where they can in terms of education, and assisting people both young and old. By contributing to the spirits of the local communities, Ethiopian hopes to demonstrate its caring nature for the country and the people supporting the economy. Ethiopian Airlines still faces challenges and obstacles in its quest to again double in size over the next 10 years. But the flag carrier has successfully entered the next phase of its development with a level of scale and efficiency that is rare for the region

By contributing to the spirits of the local communities, Ethiopian hopes to demonstrate its caring nature for the country and the people supporting the economy

and industry. Ethiopian’s willingness to develop aviation across the continent and beyond is noteworthy, in a market where most others have struggled. This puts Ethiopian in a strong position to cash in on the growth and vast potential that Africa offers.

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Freight Transporting

On the

Double WP Transport has almost doubled in size as a consequence of the recent acquisition by Imperial Logistics, putting it in a prime position for further regional expansion Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: Tom Cullum

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espite already being a reputable, wellestablished and successful market player since the turn of the century, WP Transport is enjoying an even more exciting transition stage at present as it expands both its internal infrastructure and its footprint across Sub-Saharan Africa. The Namibian freight transporting company has grown exponentially over the past 14 years from a small fleet of just 10 trucks in 2000, to its current state which comprises a fleet of more than 100. This is a figure that has doubled as recently as September 2014, however, thanks to an acquisition which promises to take WP Transport to the next frontier of success in the region. “In 2006, Imperial Logistics’ Africa division acquired 60 percent of the business and the company grew steadily up to last year when the

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Group also acquired the remaining 40 percent,” explains the company’s Managing Director, Markus van der Merwe, who also joined WP Transport in September last year. “As it stands now, WP Transport is wholly owned by Imperial Logistics’ Africa division, but while our operations have remained a continuation of what we were achieving prior to last year, a significant change has come about in that we have acquired 50 more trucks from a sister company under the Imperial Logistics brand, doubling our fleet size as a consequence.” This has laid the groundwork for extensive growth within WP Transport, with the new MD now focused on ensuring that the enhanced scope and financial backing is capitalised on fully. “I’m a Namibian resident returning to the country so it was very exciting to join a well-established business like WP Transport with a strong customer base and set


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processes, and quality standards. “We are now focussing on facilitating the expansion - integrating the new fleet, brought in from a different company, with different cultures and different ways of doing things, and the different people - into the WP Transport business.”

High performance culture

Incorporating these facets and building a stronger, more united entity within WP Transport has been van der Merwe’s initial goal since joining the company and this has begun with ensuring that the right skills are situated in the right places. “The focus has been on building strong teams within WP Transport with operations managers, supervisors and driver trainers all in place, and supported by an administrative and technical team to all function together optimally, and to create a high performance culture within the business,” the MD says. “There’s a lot of talent in the business so identifying the right people and putting them in the right places so they can function to the optimum of their abilities was a key target.”

Markus van der Merwe, Managing Director

The significance of such a strategy is made even more pivotal considering the inherent shortage of skills within the industry in Namibia at present and the subsequent pressure that is therefore placed on retaining the best personnel possible. van der Merwe continues: “There is an immense shortage of skills when it comes to middle and senior management level in Namibia, but WP Transport is blessed with incredible personnel. Four of the five operations managers have been here many years and hold vast experience.” Even more impressively, these four individuals actually began life in the company as truck drivers, emphasising

The focus has been on building strong teams within WP Transport with operations managers, supervisors and driver trainers all in place another core facet of the business’s continuous improvement strategy to encourage internal growth. “We have a big local focus in the company and on progression through the company, making the most of the big talent pool that we have,” van der Merwe notes. “If you invest in your people, spend quality time with them, give them the right tools to be able to do their work, encourage them to take accountability, and allow them to show initiative, then you can really grow your people internally to become the top managers that you want.”

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SCANIA NAMIBIA

S WP has invested in and developed its people, giving them the right tools while encouraging them to take accountability and have pride in their work

cania Namibia, the official Scania dealer in Namibia has a market share of about 35 percent of the domestic market for heavy-duty trucks and 70 percent for buses. Scania already boasts the best service network for fleet owners in the country and they aim to create a complete one-stop facility for their customers. Scania Namibia offers customers the following: • New and used truck sales • Full maintenance plans • Tyre management plans • GRW trailer sales and services • Service contracts • Finance packages • Insurance and industrial and marine engines. T +264 (61) 262 101 E scania@scania.com.na

www.scania.com.na

Key clients

A strong internal structure has been pivotal to WP Transport’s success over the years, and another vital stepping stone in that ongoing development in 2015 will include the company striving for ISO 9001 and ISO 18001 accreditation to emphasise its adherence to occupational health and safety regulations. This will have a direct knock-on effect on arguably the company’s other key differentiator in the market; the establishment and retention of clients. “WP Transport has worked with key clients like Coca-Cola Namibia and Namibia Breweries for a number of years so our aggressive growth over the past six years combined with the expansion of our fleet has helped facilitate the growth of our clients too, giving them additional flexibility for that contract,” van der Merwe explains. Other key clients of WP Transport’s

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include numerous household names within the retail world, as well as massive multinational brands including Nestle, and DHL Global Freight Forwarding; signifying the company’s standing within the industry and especially now with the additional backing of the Imperial Logistics name. van der Merwe adds: “The type of clients we have worked with over the years has allowed WP Transport to

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For a first class service on all import and export declaration needs,

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build a strong brand with a reputation for good quality service, reliability, efficiency, flexibility and, most importantly, competitive pricing. “We manage and communicate with our existing clients on a daily basis, while establishing new clients via word of mouth which has been achieved as a result of our strong presence in the industry.”

Cross-border presence

Currently, this strong presence is not only apparent within the company’s native Namibia but across most of Sub-Saharan Africa, with 70 percent of WP Transport’s distribution network

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...in two-five years’ time we would like to be one of the prominent freight transporters servicing this concept of a logistics hub in Southern Africa

occurring cross-border to South Africa, Angola, Zambia, Botswana, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. “We cover most of Southern Africa, and while Coca-Cola Namibia is our core contract locally and our biggest client on a national scale, everything else we do is basically cross-border work,” van der Merwe notes. This international scope presents both opportunities and challenges, as WP Transport has to negotiate regional differences in its operations to optimise the potential that comes from being a multinational player in the logistics domain. However, the advantages far


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Proudly

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outweigh the disadvantages, and as the business continues to expand, so too does the lure of doing business with such a company. “There are a lot of companies in the region, and especially South Africa, who are expanding and looking to export to neighbouring countries; especially to places like Angola and Zambia where we are seeing a lot of growth. So for them to know they could have a strategic transport partner that is reliable and with a good infrastructure, it gives them the

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security to push for growth into these new markets with us.”

There are not many freight transporters in Namibia, operating in our segment of the industry, with a fleet size in excess of 100 trucks

Logistics hub

The amount of competitive advantages that WP Transport has escalates on an almost yearly basis and van der Merwe now pinpoints three facets as being the most critical to the company’s ongoing growth in the future. The strength of the WP Transport workforce is certainly one, complementing a core infrastructure of 100 trucks which the new MD notes as the second core asset. “There are not many freight transporters in Namibia, operating in our segment of the industry, with a


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fleet size in excess of 100 trucks,” he says. “This gives us economy of scale, allowing for better flexibility, service delivery, reliability and pricing. “The final big contributing factor now is that we are part of Imperial Logistics so we have that financial ability and backup. If we want to carry out any large capital investments for growth, fleet expansion or fleet replacement, we have the ability to do that, while they also support areas of our business processes like marketing.” All of these differentiating factors will be put to good use over the coming years, as Namibia looks set to become a logistics hub in the future.

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The renovation currently occurring in the coastal region of Walvis Bay will open up a myriad of business opportunities, and no more so for the supply chain sector. van der Merwe concludes: “We believe Namibia is very well placed in Sub-Saharan Africa to become the logistical hub for the region, with the expansion that is in progress now at Walvis Bay. “There will be bigger volumes of products running in and out of Walvis Bay and the continent, and in two-five years’ time we would like to be one of the prominent freight transporters servicing this concept of a logistics hub in Southern Africa.”

Being a part of Imperial Logistics ensures financial stability and support

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DCG (DSM CORRIDOR GROUP)

COMMITTED TO EFFICIENCY IN

Cargo Handling

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As a favourable name in Tanzania known for reliability and quality, DCG has extensive experience to streamline the movement of bulk and breakbulk cargo with efficiency in mind Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: Tom Cullum

n 2004, DCG (DSM Corridor Group) discharged its first vessel from the port of Dar es Salaam, a port known as the most economical corridor for Zambia, Northern Malawi and DRC. More than ten years later the company stands strong, continuing its journey as an unrivalled cargo handler; specialising in non-liquid dry bulk goods including the handling of fertiliser, cereals, bulk sulphur, sugar, coal, clinker and various mined minerals. After a decade of building the capital needed, DCG has invested in its own new port handling equipment supplied by Verstegen Grabs, bulk terminals, clearing department and warehousing. “Our view was that Africa had enough second hand equipment and as a result, we wanted to stand out from any competition by offering the highest quality tech with zero downtime,� says Erik Kok, CEO of DCG. Backed by this belief, DCG introduced Tanzania to the use of small skid steers to significantly minimise

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( D S M

C O R R I D O R

From day one, we knew that the port was only the beginning for DCG. In order to reach efficiency, we needed to improve corridor efficiency as much as possible to provide the speedy delivery of cargo from A to B

G R O U P )

DCG is able to handle

approximately

1.6 million metric tonnes of cargo per annum

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trimming and therefore reduce the discharge time. “More than anything, we wanted reliability for efficient vessel discharges – this is the core of our existence,” highlights the CEO. Typically, cargo holds can be as large as a football field, and removing the last 1,000 metric tonne proved time consuming prior to the introduction of the skid steers, taking up to two days of extra time to remove that last cargo. A vessels ‘lay time’ can easily cost a business US$20,000 a day, so any time shaved off this stationary period provides huge savings for the client. Proudly maintaining various joint ventures and partnerships with some big names across the mining, food and agriculture sectors - including Premium Agro, SSB-Azam, Yara Tanzania and Glencore - DCG is always keen to build further business relationships. “I am particularly proud of the long


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YOUR

TOTAL SOLUTIONS

FOR WEIGHING

Sahel Trading

Tel/Fax: +255 22 2120886 Email: info@mizani.co.tz Website: www.mizani.co.tz

term relationships we have made over the years, many of our partners have been with us since day one. The longer the relationship, the more tailored discharge services we are able to develop together,” says Kok.

A cargo handler you can trust

Initially, with just a basic set of industry equipment, DCG was able to double the discharge speed of vessels leaving Tanzania’s ports. “The news that we were able to speed up discharges spread fast in the early years of our operation. The reliable quality of our trustworthy service outweighed the additional cost attached for clients and we were initially unrivalled in the industry. We grew our capacity quickly, handling 800,000 metric tonnes of cargo by 2008,” says Kok. In order for the business to sustain this level of growth, DCG had to look beyond the port and examine corridor efficiency. Consequently, the company

DCG proudly maintain various joint ventures and partnerships with some big names across the mining, food and agriculture sectors

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D C G

( D S M

C O R R I D O R

G R O U P )

Our aim is to assist the ports in Sub-Saharan Africa in terms of creating the physical infrastructural handing capacity to be able to handle the growth levels required in the present day

By operating and building its own terminals, DCG is now able to handle approximately 1.6 million metric tonnes per annum

started operating and building its own terminals, and is now able to handle approximately 1.6 million metric tonnes per annum. “From day one, we knew that the port was only the beginning for DCG. In order to reach efficiency, we needed to improve corridor efficiency as much as possible to provide the speedy delivery of cargo from A to B,” adds Kok. Subsequently, DCG offers the complete range of services required for imports and exports from vessel to destination or vice-versa, depending on customer requirement. Accompanying this growth is the company motto ‘leave it in our capable hands’, which is supported by a team

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of well-trained staff and enforces that DCG is a company you can trust. “Ultimately, this ethos has taken DCG to the next level,” says Kok.

It’s all about capacity

DCG has been a part of substantial growth at the port of Dar es Salaam and related industries including mining and growth in the agriculture sector, namely due to the increased demand for fertiliser. “Our aim is to assist the ports in Sub-Saharan Africa in terms of creating the physical infrastructural handing capacity to be able to handle the growth levels required in the present day,” says Kok.

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Erik Kok, CEO of DCG (DSM Corridor Group) CEO Erik Kok has been working in ports all over the world from the Equator to the Philippines, working in more than 70 ports in 65 countries. “I remember discharging a wheat vessel in Dar es Salaam in the 1980s, which took more than a month to discharge 15,000 metric tonnes at a rate of 400 metric tonnes a day. It is therefore very satisfying to now see wheat vessels discharge in excess of 12,000 metric tonnes a day,” he explains. The experience during this time inspired DCG’s CEO to implement more efficient ways of discharging a vessel, using new equipment along the way. “DCG was started with just four people of whom three are still with us and we quickly built up a core team to ensure fast-paced development of the company. The first four years of operation will always be very memorable to me as it demonstrated just how much we could accomplish with a little bit of teamwork. This culture of working together has been cemented into the company’s core values ever since the beginning,” Kok says.

Discharge in excess of 12,000 metric tonnes per day


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In line with this, DCG continue to expand its equipment repertoire and constantly retrain staff in order to make them as dependable as possible. “Training is vital in our industry and something we take very seriously. Last year, we trained more than 300 people in ISO 9001 quality management,” he adds. In 2014, the company purchased land in Kisarawe with the hopes to build an in-land terminal for the handling of bulk and break-bulk commodities. This project will help lighten the load at the port and create further capacity as Kok explains: “Whoever creates capacity will have cargo. Consequently, all ports need to focus on facilitating this need at all times. As long as we continue to grow our footprint in Tanzania, then DCG will continue offering its services here.”

Part of Tanzania’s logistical clockwork

With customers spread all over the world including regional and local trading houses, commodity producers, commodity receivers and more, Kok is proud of DCG’s progress and says Dar es Salaam’s port would not be the same without them. “We see ourselves as a key component in the logistical clockwork at Tanzania’s busiest port. Our ability to reduce dwell time of cargo coming into the port in turn reduces the delay time of those waiting outside to enter. Put simply, I believe the port would not be efficient enough to manage the current capacities without the presence of DCG.” As a favourable name in Tanzania known for reliability, DCG has extensive experience to evaluate the possibilities for the optimum movement of cargo from A to B, making them an excellent partner for cargo importers and exporters who are looking for a company that goes the extra mile.

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fter turning 60 last year, Edendale Hospital is entering the next significant stage of its evolution as it looks to improve its already comprehensive level of healthcare in South Africa. Established today as a leading regional hospital in the country it has not always been a smooth progression, but thanks to a dedicated workforce and a long-standing commitment to helping the nation’s level of wellbeing, Edendale has grown to now reduce some of the country’s most significant health issues. “When we opened, Edendale only contained a few hospital beds,

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Edendale has made a name for itself as a regionally significant hospital through its efforts in treating some of the country’s most serious diseases

which was built up to 600 beds until around 30 years ago,” explains the hospital’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Zanele Ndwandwe. “Since then, it has gone through a lot of phases to be better aligned to the political landscape of the country, as well as in line with the growing population.” This demand for capacity growth has led to the hospital now comprising more than 900 beds to cater for the widened population that Edendale looks after. While this is a significant regional achievement though, Ndwandwe pinpoints a much more widespread


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trend, or reversal of it, as Edendale’s main success story in recent years. “Our key achievement has been to successfully reverse the trend of high mother-to-child aids transmission, and our general contribution to making South Africa a much healthier, aids free nation,” she emphasises. “We have successfully retained our status of being a mother-baby friendly hospital and have taken the mortality rate from 10 percent down to less than two percent as a result of our contribution in the province. “The reduction of child mortality is one of our key priorities at Edendale and is something we have done exceptionally well in achieving.”

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Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Zanele Ndwandwe

Quicker care

These kinds of success stories are the culmination of 60 years’ hard work and expansion, but the healthcare industry never stops moving forward

and it is equally important for Edendale as a regionally significant healthcare provider, to stay ahead of these industry curves. “In line with the changing disease patterns as well and many other scientific developments, the hospital has grown in leaps and bounds to align itself with modern medical technologies,” affirms Ndwandwe. “We have subsequently proved beyond any reasonable doubt that we are capable of rendering that high level of care at a regional level.” Being the core healthcare provider across two key districts, the need to offer as wide an array of treatments as possible is imperative, and Edendale

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has developed over the years to cater for this necessity. Comprising a specialist based facet as well as the district hospital entity, disciplines under the Edendale umbrella include internal medicine, surgery, intensive care, obstetrics and gynaecology, paediatric services, operating theatres, orthopaedics, ENT, urology, an emergency department, ophthalmology, medical outpatients and psychiatric services. Housing also units of radiology, laboratory, blood bank services, pharmacy, dental services, dietetics, social work, clinical psychology, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech and audiology, Edendale ensures that as many bases are covered for the ever-expanding region. To keep all of these entities modern and up to the highest standards requires significant and ongoing investment though, as the CEO explains: “A lot of money has been invested into upgrading some of the existing departments. For example, we have recently seen an expansion of the medical outpatient and emergency departments as well as an upgrading of the psychiatric unit, and a new communicable disease clinic.” A major incentive for recent investments has been in enhancing not only the quality of care given to patients but also the speed in which

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Improving efficiencies to diagnose patients and intervene as quickly as possible

it is administered, again reducing the likelihood of serious illness or mortality as a consequence. Ndwandwe adds: “We have introduced more advanced medical equipment and are now able to, for example, diagnose TB much faster than before when it could take up to a week to receive the results. A patient can now be tested and receive the results on the same day by means of a Gene-Xpert machine. “We have also improved the efficiency of CT scans by now carrying them out on site rather than having to

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send patients somewhere else. We are introducing more and more equipment to enable us to diagnose and intervene as quickly as possible.”

Service excellence

To compliment the constant development and upgrading of Edendale’s efficiencies, the hospital has to dedicate the same levels of focus on up-skilling its personnel also, to ensure that the two go hand in hand to provide optimum care. This sometimes means overcoming skills shortages in key areas, but thanks


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Heavy duty stainless steel pedal bins manufactured in South Africa

to an extensive recruitment strategy, significant affiliations with domestic and international NGOs, and a budget set aside to ensure the attraction and retention of staff, Edendale has embedded high levels of service excellence within its core. “We hold our own internal Service Excellence Awards to recognise the departments that have outperformed others and the individuals who have done exceptionally well each year,” Ndwandwe explains. “This initiative began five years’ ago and helps to create an atmosphere where people are motivated to do better knowing that their good work will be rewarded by management. “We recognise areas of clinical intervention and innovation; levels of good practice on six key priorities; health and safety, infection control, positive staff attitudes, cleanliness within the hospital, patient care in terms of things like reducing waiting times, availability of medicines, blood and other supplies, and also loyalty to the department with some people having been with the hospital for as long as 40 years.”

Future expansion

These awards are indicative of the philosophies that Edendale Hospital has stayed true to over the years, and will continue to do so in the future. Across areas of corporate social responsibility, the hospital has formed vital partnerships on an international scale to provide youth health academy and educational opportunities, while also helping the wider battle against diseases such as TB and aids. With these activities combined with the core functions within the compounds of the hospital though, there is a growing need for even further physical growth; a wish which Ndwandwe pinpoints as the key to Edendale’s future.

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In the next two years, we are hoping that we’ll be sharing the good news that funding has been acquired for the building of a brand new regional hospital

“In the next two years, we are hoping that we’ll be sharing the good news that funding has been acquired for the building of a brand new regional hospital, because we need it,” she notes. “We are looking after a population too big and, at this stage, the current size of the hospital does not align with the number of patients. The CEO concludes: “We are the only regional hospital within the two large districts so it can be overwhelming to deal with those numbers. A brand new regional hospital has already been planned for and we know what we need to have, so we hope to source this funding and get this expedited, so we can offer even more healthcare services in the future.”

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he KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) region of South Africa has been graced by the comforting presence of Hillcrest Private Hospital for nearly four years and is now being complimented by the first tailored, purpose-built surgical hospital in the area; Gateway Private Hospital. The two healthcare facilities are now working in tandem to produce a turnkey offering for patients within the region, improving not only the scope and capacity emanating from the parent Ross Healthcare Group, but also the quality and standards of healthcare being offered across both. As a division of J.T. Ross, Ross Healthcare specialises in facilitating

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the development and management of private healthcare facilities, leveraging the history and reputation of the wider organisation to incorporate its own business philosophies. This was first brought to the fore in 2011 through the inception of Hillcrest Private Hospital, overcoming skills shortages to establish a core medical facility within the area for as many as 200 patients at a time. Priding itself on the speed of admission as well as the management and investments being made to the hospital, the Group has now replicated the initial successes of Hillcrest to unveil Gateway Private Hospital; a facility which is sure to adhere to Ross Healthcare’s ethos of quality workmanship, integrity and reliability.


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ENHANCED Healthcare Ross Healthcare has added Gateway Private Hospital to its existing Hillcrest Private Hospital facility to provide much needed surgical support to the KwaZulu-Natal region Writer: Matthew Staff • Project Manager: Eddie Clinton

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Housing 160 beds and consisting of two ICU units, six state-of-the-art operating theatres and a cardiac catheterization lab, Gateway Private Hospital is located in the rapidly developing medical hub of New Town Centre, Umhlanga Ridge, and opened in December 2014. Being affiliated with Hillcrest has already elevated this new establishment to reputable status, while Ross Healthcare has ensured that the same modern and comfortable design has been applied. Proof of the Group’s strategic success was evident before the doors were even opened as it attracted 200,000 online applications for positions within the hospital; subsequently allowing the institution to cherry pick the very best skills for the job. This was an aspect that had initially proved challenging when

Proof of the Group’s strategic success was evident before the doors were even opened as it attracted 200,000 online applications for positions within the hospital

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Our primary goal is to provide Pathology related services to health care practitioners and their patients. We are reputed for our innovation, professionalism and quality of service. We offer an extensive national network of more than 150 facilities including reference laboratories, regional laboratories, satellite (STAT) laboratories and service depots. Our laboratories are accredited and ISO certified by the South African National Accreditation Authority. They operate 24 hours a day. 7 days a week and offer over 200 different diagnostic analyses. T 031 270 0400 E buitendachl@ampath.co.za

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YOUR CONSULTING PATHOLOGISTS Mission: “We provide the benchmark for diagnostic services differentiated to meet the needs of doctors, patients and funders through products which are accessible, user-friendly, reliable and innovative.”

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Vision: ‘To be the first choice for diagnostic services in South Africa and extending globally” Ampath Laboratory is proud to be associated with Ross Healthcare group at Gateway Private Hospital & Hillcrest Private Hospital

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getting Hillcrest off the ground four years previously, emphasising how far the organisation has come. Overall, the new facility adds a vital specialised surgical care unit to an already extensive portfolio comprising; a cardiac and orthopaedic unit, an emergency unit, cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, neurological surgery, spinal surgery, joint replacement surgery and orthopaedic surgery. Throughout all these provisions, the differentiators needed to become a leading private institution are seen not only through embracing the latest in technologies, equipment and instrumentation, but also via the levels of comfort and serenity that patients can expect during their stay. Again following from Hillcrest’s lead in this respect, Gateway boasts private rooms accessing spectacular views as well as numerous leisure and relaxations facilities to enhance the healing process and general well-being of each and every patient. “As patient and family centred care is the guiding principle of service delivery at Gateway Private Hospital, every effort has been made to ensure that facilities are provided to enhance the experience of all those who visit the facility,” the hospital said upon its inception.

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Having a clear idea of how the hospital should run and to what values it should operate has allowed for immediate success for Gateway. Priding itself on key areas of service, quality care, positive interaction, sound financial stewardship, consistent growth and sustainable community engagement, the platform has been laid for rapid development. “As a unique specialist surgical hospital, Gateway Private Hospital has been purpose built with the latest and most advanced technology and equipment to provide patients with the best experience and positive clinical outcomes,” the hospital said. “With a focus on both patient and staff safety, the hospital has purchased mobility assistance devices and prevention equipment from world-class suppliers to limit the risks of pressure ulcers, falls and venous thromboembolism.” Addressing pressing areas of

Gateway Private Hospital

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mobility, bed capacity and standards, training initiatives, and the levels of care each patient receives has already led to the hospital carrying out more than 100 cardiac angiograms. The company continued: The cardiac catheterization unit can not only boast the latest technology and equipment, but is also currently one of the few units in the country where radial approach angiography is predominantly performed. “Radial approach procedures allow patients to have coronary angiography and interventions, including stent placements, by accessing a small blood vessel in the arm rather than having to puncture the large vessel in the groin. “This improvement on the standard approach has a marked increase in the safety of the procedure by reducing the risk of bleeding and vascular damage, and improving the comfort of the patient. The radial approach procedures can allow patients to be admitted and discharged on the same day.”

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Hillcrest Private Hospital

Not to be outdone by its younger sister hospital, Hillcrest is also on the verge of some exciting new developments and additions to a facility which has gone from strength to strength since opening in 2011. Again following a core ethos, this time of customer, care and comfort – the three ‘Cs’ – a brand new rehabilitation and vascular theatre is set to be unveiled in March 2015, complementing eight new doctor suites and the application for enhanced cardiac facilities and also a spinal and stroke rehabilitation unit. Remaining proactive and progressive is pivotal in such a fast-moving industry and especially in the private sector where a competitive element to be seen as the best healthcare provider is

Mom’s Lodge

Again following a core ethos, this time of customer, care and comfort – the three ‘Cs’ – a brand new rehabilitation and vascular theatre is set to be unveiled in March 2015

also brought into play. To this end, a new specialists wing has also recently been completed to garner the best possible working conditions for the hospital’s consultants, while a new state-ofthe-art laser is also having a dramatic impact on the safety of cataract surgeries. “Hillcrest Private Hospital has recently installed state-of-the-art femtosecond laser equipment enabling full laser cataract surgery. Ophthalmologists can now perform bladeless cataract surgery with a laser, a first for Kwazulu-Natal. This technology represents a major advancement in the way cataract surgery is performed,” the hospital

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explained. “Cataract surgery is one of the safest operations performed in medicine today and has now become even safer with the use of fully computer generated and guided laser controlled surgical incisions to perform the entire operation without any manual blades or knives.”

Hospitals of choice

Developments such as these are indicative of not only Hillcrest Private Hospital, but the overall environment that Ross Healthcare has manifested over the past few years; combining facets of a relaxing and healingconducive surrounding, with the very latest clinical advancements.

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Alongside this exists a very active presence in the KZN region, making sure that the same high levels of care are not just restricted to the confines of the Group’s hospitals but also into the surrounding areas through corporate social responsibility efforts. Offering free blood pressure and glucose tests to the general public is just one of these initiatives that have helped bring the introduction of Gateway Hospital into the consciousness of the local population. Sue Bailey, Marketing and Communication Specialist for the hospital said: “The community awareness day was an opportunity for Gateway Private Hospital to showcase the specialized services that the new hospital has to offer the community. “In addition the awareness day forms part of the ongoing commitment by the hospital to assist the community. We believe that by offering free blood pressure and glucose tests, Gateway Private Hospital proves that it is serious about taking healthcare management to the people it serves.” This is an initiative which Gateway will certainly be repeating over the coming months as the hospital’s reputation will inevitably continue to grow parallel to Hillcrest’s success. With the Ross Healthcare blueprint engrained now across the KZN region, and proactive investments being carried out on an ongoing basis across both hospitals, Gateway should now provide the final piece to the jigsaw through its surgical capabilities; ensuring that an overall infrastructure is firmly in place to achieve its vision. “Gateway Private Hospital aims to be the hospital of choice for specialists, patients and staff by providing a modern, serene environment, which embraces the latest medical technology and equipment. In short, Gateway Private Hospital is the future of patient and family centred care in KZN,” the hospital concludes.


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Paediatrics ward and reception area

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Uchumi: Your Home of Value Kenya’s oldest supermarket chain celebrates almost four decades in East Africa Writer: Emily Jarvis • Project Manager: Callum Philp

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ith a total of 37 branches spread across the East African region, Uchumi Supermarkets bring close to 40 years of experience to the retail sector in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Proud of the company’s commitment to excellence and value, CEO Jonathon Ciano says that through the company’s strong branding and qualified staff complement, Uchumi provide the best customer service in the business: “Uchumi is a treasure hunt for its consumers and we take pride in keeping the in-store

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experience fresh and unique. Originality is our middle-name - we take creativity and innovation to another level. “For example, our stores are designed to be modular so that we can quickly adapt to industry trends in terms of products and how to best stack them on the shelves. These are just a few of the ways Uchumi stands out from the crowd.” Established in December 1975, Uchumi Supermarkets Limited has witnessed substantial growth over the years, recording 4,500 employees in 2014. Furthermore, Uchumi is the only supermarket that is listed on the three East African stock exchanges’ Nairobi,

Uganda and Tanzania, which means that all operations reach a reputable industry standard. Revenue has steadily grown to reach highs of KSh 17 billion in the financial yearend July 2014. In the past 12 months, the East African retail giant has witnessed exceptional growth and has widened its business scope by opening nine additional branches across the three countries of operation as a result. Testament to its commitment to expansion, Uchumi continues to forge strong relationships with partners including the Co-operative Bank, Kenya Commercial Bank and Equity Bank in order to further increase its customer reach. “Our shareholders are very important

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to us. We aspire towards continued growth and profitability in order to provide value to not only the customers, but our partners too,” Ciano says. “In furtherance to our mission to be ‘the supermarket of choice in the East African region’, we hope to open our first store in Rwanda by the middle of next year,” he adds.

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Recognising industry trends

Uchumi monitors supermarket trends on a global scale to bring only the best practices to East Africa. With the rise of online shopping for convenient and timely delivery of goods, Uchumi is currently finalising an ecommerce platform of its own which will be marketed aggressively through digital marketing channels such as Facebook and Twitter. “We have incorporated social media into our various avenues of marketing communication with our customers. This strategy complements our other brand marketing activities and is progressing well,” says Ciano. Accompanying this approach is a new and innovative customer reward programme, the Value Plus card, which succeeds the U-Card, and is designed to improve customer loyalty through incentives to shop with Uchumi.

As an East African chain store, our role is to assist local wealth by encouraging it to circulate and multiply within communities and the wider East African region

We are part of Aon plc (NYSE: AON), a global giant in the insurance arena with more than 60,000 colleagues worldwide across 600 offices, in over 120 countries. We unite to provide our clients with distinctive client value through innovative and effective risk management and workforce productivity solutions. We use our international network and the knowledge of our local experts to give you proven solutions, attentive service and the best advice. Our product solutions provide a full range of world class, cost effective personal and business insurance covers and related services for individuals, local and multinational corporations. We believe that all our clients have a vision they wish to achieve and our partnerships with them helps to achieve their goals. We encourage our clients to give us continuous feedback to enable us to adapt to their growing needs and hence improve our service delivery. In addition to this, our staff is encouraged to obtain the highest qualifications in insurance to give us the leading edge in technical insurance expertise for the benefit of our clients.

Striving to be the supermarket of choice in the East African region

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“The Value Plus card programme has been created to show our appreciation to our loyal customers. When the card is scanned at the point of sale at the time of purchase, points are credited into a customer’s card account. Once a minimum of 100 points is reached, customers are given the opportunity to redeem points from our online rewards selection,” Ciano further explains. The Value Plus Card, just like the U-Card, will embrace the somewhat western concept of a loyalty card scheme in order to provide the best possible level of interaction with the customer. “Indeed, the reward programme is based on the promise of exemplary service delivery,” he adds. Dr Jonathan Ciano, CEO, Uchumi Supermarkets

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Local goods

Uchumi stores are known for their wide variety of product stock which is not only fresh, but is sourced locally from the East Africa region. “As an East African chain store, our role is to assist local wealth by encouraging it to circulate and multiply within communities and the wider East African region. In light of this, we champion a government initiative called ‘Buy Kenya Build Kenya’. All the fresh produce that we sell is sourced from local farmers. It is vital that our supply chain should contribute rather than detract from the local farming and manufacturing aspects of the economy,” says Ciano. People are a crucial part of any business and this is no different for Uchumi. The supermarket chain has several policies in place to ensure that staff keep abreast of the latest industry trends, technologies and health and safety enforcements. “These trainings also help employees to improve their skills and grow responsibilities within the organisation. For example, employees who want to further their career by acquiring a degree are allowed flexible

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We have incorporated social media into our various avenues of marketing communication with our customers. This strategy complements our other brand marketing activities and is progressing well


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FINE MEDIA

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ine Media, established in 2005, offers various tangible/ intangible benefits to retailers and consumers, playing a leading role in trade marketing support services and

retail store outsourcing programs. Fine Media also offers customised solutions for retail business, from complete turnkey services to project-based initiatives. We are proud to have Uchumi Supermarkets Limited, a leading retail chain in the region, as a partner in our Retail Store Outsourcing Program, enabling them to save on resources. Get in touch, and let us be your partner!

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Uchumi offer a wide array of in-house training opportunities

working hours so they may attend class,” says Ciano. Moreover, the company offer a wide array of other opportunities including in-house training in the form of individual and group development and exchange programmes with other countries to further multi-skill staff. “With such mentorship and trainings in place, Uchumi is able to provide a customer service that is unrivalled in East Africa,” he adds. As East Africa’s leading supermarket chain, Uchumi Supermarkets believe that engaging in corporate social responsibility (CSR) is vital to local development. Consequently, the company show its support to many annual community events that have a positive effect on the life of others. Every December, representatives visit more than seven children’s homes and give food, bedding and other items, as well as services such as painting the homes or providing hospital equipment. The company is best

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Our customers will remain at the heart of our values. And, after a successful oversubscribed rights issue last year, we have seen improved stakeholder confidence, which serves as recognition that Uchumi is here to stay

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known for its participation in the annual Ndakaini Dam and Lewa marathons and for supporting walks aimed at raising money for women and children such as the First Lady Marathon. These are in addition to sponsoring sporting events such as golf. Uchumi’s acute focus on its core values and maintaining a secure value stream for stakeholders has put the

supermarket chain on a winning path that will see the customer remain at the heart of this vision. “Our customers will remain at the heart of our values. And, after a successful oversubscribed rights issue last year, we have seen improved stakeholder confidence, which serves as recognition that Uchumi is here to stay,” concludes Ciano.

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BIGGER LEADS TO BETTER

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Tanzanian Expansion

One year on and with a vast increase in capacity in place, Coast Millers has turned its attentions towards adding value to its products Writer: Matthew Staff • Project Manager: Callum Philp oast Millers enjoyed one of its most proactive years to date in 2014 as it laid the groundwork for a more prosperous future. Now, in 2015, the company is already reaping the rewards of its efforts. Increasing capacity was the main aim one year ago, enhancing not only storage space from 12,000 to 28,000 metric tonnes, but also its milling capabilities from 160 metric tonnes a day, to almost 300 metric tonnes. “The increase in capacity and investments were made as a result of our success in increasing turnover, and wanting to build this extra capacity to meet current demands and to further enhance future sales,” recalls the company’s Director and General

Manager, Rahul Aggarwal. The investments not only made Coast Millers’ operations bigger, but also better, through an aligning upgrade of all machinery and technologies; playing a pivotal role in the company’s strategic expansion plan as it moves into 2015.

Increased distribution

With the internal infrastructure now in place, the platform is there for Coast Millers to provide more of its wheat flour based products than ever before, so to compliment that, the company has invested much of its efforts in recent months into expanding its distribution channels. Previously operating across isolated, more urbanised areas of Tanzania, the business has now branched out to

more ruralised and peripheral areas of the country. “With the increased capacity we have also concurrently invested into more trucks to enable increased distribution,” Aggarwal explains. “We are reaching further, more rural areas and other big cities, as well as moving into many more regions including the Lake Zone area, the mining districts, and the southern highlands. “The broader reach is giving us a huge competitive advantage, with more and more customers getting door-to-door and timely deliveries.” Previously, more ruralised customers would have to travel into urban areas to purchase goods, but this necessity has been reduced by the Coast Millers expansion, making the company a much more attractive proposition for

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suppliers, business partners and valued customers.

Forming relationships

The formulation of successful business partnerships is a facet of Coast Millers that long precedes 2014’s investment plan, incorporating areas of corporate social responsibility, the internal development of staff members and the company’s supply chain management philosophy. This ethos is built upon a local focus which the company is extremely proud of, being an indigenously Tanzanian enterprise. “We have a workforce of 80100 employees, including skilled, unskilled and casual workers, and out of those people, only around 10 are expatriates,” says Aggarwal. “The same local focus appears in our supply chain, because this is something we believe in, in our mill and business, to support local businesses and local workers as much as possible.”

It’s the relationship we build on an individual basis and the trust we have with the supplier that gravitates us towards doing business with them

Despite the local emphasis where possible, the nature of the food and drink, and wheat milling industry means that Coast Millers often has to look internationally in sourcing the relevant materials and ingredients for its manufacturing operations.

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Holbud Limited International commodity traders of;

Wheat Maize Barley Soyabean Soyameal Rice Sugar Fertilizers; CAN NPK DAP UREA

The formulation of successful business partnerships is a facet of Coast Millers that long precedes 2014’s investment plan

Green peas Pigeon peas Chick peas Kidney beans Lentils Sesame seeds Ground nuts Cocoa Coffee Other Argi products

Contact us: T: +44 207 488 4901 F: +44 207 265 0654 E: holbud@holbud.co.uk 66 Leman Street, London E1 8EU, United Kingdom

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The same core commitment to mutually-beneficial, long-term supplier partnerships is adhered to though, as Aggarwal explains: “We are always willing to work with different vendors, provided that our demands in terms of price and quality are met. “We work with very many suppliers but often with the same individuals. For example, a lot of our procurement is done through trading companies, but a lot of the individuals within the industry will move from one organisation to another, so even though we are working with a new supplier, it will be the same trader who has seen our progress throughout the years. “It’s the relationship we build on an

Completing the multipronged approach to Coast Millers’ recent transition is a concerted focus on value-add at the other end of the process.

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individual basis and the trust we have with the supplier that gravitates us towards doing business with them.”

In terms of further growth we are looking into value-added investments rather than investing in increased capacities

Adding value

Completing the multi-pronged approach to Coast Millers’ recent transition is a concerted focus on value-add at the other end of the process. With the facilities upgraded and fully functional, and a distribution network far exceeding previous years’, everything is in place for the business to now improve the final wheat offering making its way across Tanzania’s bakeries, retail stores and catering outlets. “In terms of further growth we are


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looking into value-added investments rather than investing in increased capacities,” Aggarwal notes. “Already, the quality control has improved, being fully checked from beginning to end, and the entire process flow is also now computerised providing for better checks and balances. “Thirdly, the latest technologies we have invested in are now paying a lot closer attention to the quality of the final, end product to ensure it’s clean, food friendly and safe, and meeting customer demands in terms of quality specifications and performace.” The company has already received positive feedback, providing yet another competitive advantage for the business to leverage moving forward.

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Aggarwal concludes: “We are trying more and more to go for a customised feel, rather than a mass produced offering, where the customers feel they have contact directly with the supplier. “Across all these areas, we have been very successful to the point where buyers are demanding our product and our brand as opposed to our competition. “We now have the increased capacity, storage and logistics, and now it’s a matter of execution and intense marketing efforts to achieve our vision of adding more value added products to our portfolio and to increase our turnover by at least 30 percent by 2016.”

Coast Millers’ latest technologies pay close attention to the quality of the end product to ensure it is clean, food friendly and safe

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Changing Tastes Around the World CATERING F

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Backed by a team of dedicated staff, Unilever Food Solutions aim to deliver high quality products and service excellence to remain a market leader in the food industry Project Manager: Ben Weaver

nilever is one of the most recognised names in the food industry around the world. If you go to your fridge right now there’s a pretty good chance you’ll find something with the word Unilever somewhere on the label. Among the many facets of the business is Unilever Food Solutions, the professional culinary division which is dedicated to offering products and services to the food service market all over the world. As Managing Director Michel Mellis explains: “We work with powerful global brands such as Knorr, Hellmann’s, Robertsons and Carte d’Or in combination with local names such

Marvello, Meadowland and Fine Foods in order to offer culinary solutions to all kinds of operators, ranging from hotels, restaurants, contract caterers to quick service restaurants.” Of course, while Unilever is a globally recognised brand, Unilever Food Solutions can’t rely on brand recognition alone to bring in business. Its unique selling point, Mellis says, is the “incomparable end results our customers can achieve on meal preparation through our brands and services”. “We don’t just sell top quality products and brands, but we also offer services in the areas of menu organisation, kitchen preparation and guest satisfaction,” he says.

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We don’t just sell top quality products and brands, but we also offer services in the areas of menu organisation, kitchen preparation and guest satisfaction

This combination of high quality products and service excellence has been key in consolidating Unilever Food Solutions’ position as a market leader, but the company is still setting its sights higher even in the face of a difficult financial climate. “We feel there are plenty of opportunities to accelerate. The main issue affecting Unilever Food Solutions and the whole industry is a combination of inflation and lower consumer income, which pressures costs on one side and takes value off the market on the other,” Mellis says.

Communicating with the customer

While the economic climate is one thing, Mellis believes the biggest challenge facing the industry right now is something far more prosaic. “Our biggest challenge has been communication,” he admits. “Because the market is so oversaturated and operators don’t follow any specific communication channel exclusively, it is a real challenge to talk to our target food service market. That’s why we must develop multiple forms of communication in search of our customers. Then of course there is also the challenge of operating in the

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Unilever feels there is plenty of room to accelerate growth in the market

Market Leader High quality products and service excellence has been key in consolidating Unilever Food Solutions’ position as a market leader


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developing market environment of South Africa, where the economy is not particularly strong, there is a high unemployment rate, volatile currency and social inequality.” In the face of these diverse challenges, the most important thing is for Unilever Food Solutions to have a team with the skills and experience to deliver the very best. For Mellis, ensuring the business has the best talent is an absolute priority. “We make sure we have the best people by attracting the best talents, developing them and making sure they stay with us. The care we take in creating a great work environment has been recognised. In 2013, Unilever was elected best employer to work for, which obviously helps tremendously in finding people who are willing to work for us. We also have probably one of the best development programmes in the market, which includes real global

In 2013, Unilever was elected best employer to work for, which obviously helps tremendously in finding people who are willing to work for us

FILMATIC

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rom Filmatic’s inception more than 30 years ago, we have over the years re-invented ourselves to achieve positive growth, enabling innovative, turnkey packaging equipment solutions for packaged goods on an international level. Providing quality workmanship, excellent service and successful commissioning of the completed equipment, is only the start of a lifelong relationship. Our clients are our biggest assets and we nurture and grow these relationships through dedication, innovation, quality equipment and service excellence. It is not just our equipment that sets us apart, it is the way we conduct business. T +27(0)21 862 2192 E sales@filmatic.com

www.filmatic.com

SHEPSTONE & WYLIE

S

hepstone & Wylie is a leading South African law firm. Established in 1892 the firm attracts some of the country’s finest legal minds specialising in Corporate & Commercial Law. The dynamic team of industry specialists is thoroughly conversant with all aspects of the law and backed by vast experience and integrity. With our headquarters are in Durban, branch offices in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Pietermaritzburg and Richards Bay, we offer an accessible and complete legal service to our diverse client base. T +27(0)31 575 7000 E info@wylie.co.za

www.wylie.co.za

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Complete filling and turnkey solutions for your packaging needs

Rotary Volumetric Piston Filler FRV21-LS-B-N4

Tel: +27 (0) 21 862 2192 E-mail: sales@filmatic.com

3 Lane Indexing Cosmetic Filler - FXV3-CXOT3

Inline Filler FIPD10-25-VAR

www.filmatic.com

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exposure and local training that ranges from market insights to leadership behaviour, as well as on the job coaching/mentoring.” However, investing so heavily in the company’s staff can be a double-edged sword. When your company has the best talent, it makes them a rich target for head-hunters. “The real challenge becomes preventing other companies tempting our talent away after we’ve worked with them for so long,” admits Mellis. “We strive to avoid this by offering great career possibilities combined with the pride of working for a company with such high ethical principles. If you are interested in developing your career and are a good performer, a major global company like us will always have a place for your next step.”

Unique value proposition

The food service market is very promising in this part of the world and we plan to outpace market growth at least at double rate

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With top of the range talent and brands that are known and loved the world over, Unilever Food Solutions is in a great position right now, and the business intends to make the most of that. “The future is there for us to make the most of it,” Mellis says. “Specifically for Unilever Food Solution in Africa, we will keep developing our South Africa operations and make a more structured move into SubSaharan Africa markets.” As the company builds on its growth in existing markets and approaches new ones, Mellis is confident in Unilever’s unique value proposition. “We have such well-known and loved brands, which work in conjunction with our unique market approach, subsequently, we are looking to enter new markets like Angola, Nigeria and Ethiopia, just to name a few. The food service market is very promising in this part of the world and we plan to outpace market growth at least at double rate.” There are clearly exciting prospects ahead for Unilever Food Solutions,


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Nordson SA (Pty) Limited is proud to be associated with

Unilever Food Solutions.

The new Nordson ProBlue Liberty is an integrated Tankless melter and filling system which reduces waste, adhesive charring/degradation, downtime and energy consumption. This is a completely closed system, eliminating the contamination of dirt, dust and other debris from the adhesive. This closed design also improves safety in the work place. The ProBlue Liberty filling system can feed up to four melters, helping customers reduce adhesive waste caused by manual filling. It is compatible with all Nordson Blue Series hoses and applicators and will process any free-flowing hot melt.

Tel: 021 5101888 | Fax: 021 5101877 | Email: infosa@nordson.com | www.nordson.com

We are a multi-disciplinary engineering company which provides service excellence to ensure that all our clients maintain a competitive advantage.

· CNC Milling and Turning · Jig/machine build · Engineering design · Fabrication

+27 31 914 0027 dirk@dlengineering.co.za Durban, South Africa

We at Unilever Food Solutions spend a significant amount of time talking to consumers, investigating market trends and learning through observation

but more than the wide recognition of their brands, the quality of their products and service, or even the talents of their people, there is one thing that Mellis believes the company should keep in mind above all else – the consumer. “The most important aspect of everything that we do is the consumer, and consumers in our market are very local, despite globalisation in many sectors. We at Unilever Food Solutions spend a significant amount of time talking to consumers, investigating market trends and learning through observation. We do all of this in order to pass all this knowledge onto our customers, so that they will always feel empowered and consequently develop the very best solutions for making their guests, and our consumers, happy,” he concludes. To learn more, visit: www.unileverfoodsolutions.co.za

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MURRAY & DICKSON CONSTRUCTION

‘Khula Nathi’ Murray & Dickson’s new motto, ‘Grow with Us’, is garnering fresh impetus into an already successful expansion drive which has incorporated not only improvements to its offering, but a larger, more skilled workforce Writer: Matthew Staff • Project Manager: Nick Norris

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urray & Dickson Construction (M&D) has managed to grow above the industry average over the past two years; capitalising on, and even surpassing, the generally lucrative increase in construction activity being seen across the region. The company’s target 18 months ago was to not only build turnover

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and profitability, but to also embed a stronger core of sustainability within the business to promote even more future growth. This strategy has reaped dividends for the medium sized construction company who has also leveraged its key differentiator in recent years of producing a diverse offering of services in excess of some of its larger competitors in the market.

“This allows us to respond to our clients’ needs no matter what construction discipline they fall under,” explains Murray & Dickson’s Chief Executive Officer, Rukesh Raghubir. “Each division within the company is run independently of the others, with its own skills set. This results in focused teams delivering on the various services. It also maintains the close-nit fabric that is characteristic of smaller

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companies. “Our targets were aided by a pick-up in general construction activity in the industry, however, M&D managed to double its turnover in the interim, which indicates significant growth in market share.” Moving forward, the aim for the company is to now consolidate the management that has grown alongside its turnover growth, while always remaining innovative and on the lookout for new opportunities.

Diversified offering

This proactive approach to innovation and never resting on its laurels currently incorporates plans to make a concerted move into the oil and gas pipeline industry. “Our core services remain building construction, civil engineering and large diameter steel pipelines, but the Group has recently embarked on developing its offering in roads and earthworks and has won tenders in the oil and gas pipeline industry,” notes Raghubir. To complement this diversification, the company is also enjoying a footprint expansion, replicating its quality building division operations from Gauteng to the Northern Cape and Limpopo also. Even in areas where engineering works are not currently being undertaken by the company, M&D still tenders actively in these remaining provinces, ensuring its nationwide influence. Arguably the most significant increase within the company’s repertoire though, is the expansion of its earthmoving fleet, as Raghubir explains: “The earthmoving fleet of the company has increased considerably, both in size and in quality of equipment. We have also increased our plant workshop facilities and have built a factory where we manufacture the large pipe fittings required on our pipe contracts. “This has not only given us a

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The company has already won tenders in the oil and gas pipeline industry

Our core services remain building construction, civil engineering and large diameter steel pipelines, but the Group has recently embarked on developing its offering in roads and earthworks and has won tenders in the oil and gas pipeline industry financial edge on contracts, but has allowed us to have control over the programmed supply of fittings to site.”

Khula Nathi (Grow with Us)

M&D’s core services remain building construction and civil engineering

In addition to its operational investments and proactive upgrades, the business has always been equally forthcoming in improving the internal structure of the company; its recent increase of office space to accommodate its larger workforce of professional and estimating staff indicative of this continuous improvement strategy. At senior level, M&D has made key appointments in areas of quantity surveying, civil and mechanical engineering, and safety & quality management to add vital skills to the general expansion drive.


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TRUST PLASTERING CONTRACTORS CC REG. 2006/014914/23 VAT. 4270226105

LEADING SUPPLIER’S / MANUFACTURERS OF CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, BRANDED POWERTOOLS, HANDTOOLS, HARDWARE, WELDING EQUIPMENT & CONSUMABLES FOR 30 YEARS!

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Tel: 011 312 2950 / 083 460 2565 Email: trustplastering@telkomsa.net

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149 Rebecca Street, Pretoria West P.O. box 19485, Pretoria West, 0117 Tel: 012 327 2057/8 Fax: 012 327 2061 Email: matekor@mweb.co.za Website: www.matekor.co.za

Britfire Security Systems

Fire Alarm Systems

T: +27 83 366 5792 E: britfire@telkomsa.net 1 Samlenel Melkhout Street, Mayberry Park, Alberton, Gauteng, South Africa

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“We have, in addition, set up an HR department to ensure that the needs of our increased staff are adequately addressed,” notes Raghubir. This all falls under the business’s new core motto, ‘Khula Nathi’, meaning ‘Grow with Us’; ensuring that there is a family feel within the company conducive not only to developing its staff - which has always been a pivotal aspect of the M&D business model - but also in regards to cementing suitable and sustainable business partnerships in the process. Raghubir continues: “All of our contracts in outlying areas require the employment and development of local personnel. This can be challenging as the skills are often not present and

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CSR

Corporate Social Responsibility of a soccer field for a ☞ Development local college of 10 percent of its ☞ Contribution contract value to a nearby school including the construction of an additional classroom The renovation of a building in Hillbrow for abused women and children The provision of structural bases, plinths and earthworks for the water reservoir storage in a local hospital Sponsoring of three undergraduates at WITS University

☞ ☞ ☞

we, therefore, have a skills training programme on the project if it is of sufficient duration. “It also makes sense to develop strong ties with sub-contractors and clients so we have made great strides in developing relationships with some of the larger water authorities as well as the universities.” Internally, M&D has also increased the size of its buying department and introduced a new requisition system which feeds into the contract manager and then into all accounting structures and cost reports, as part of its supply chain management strategy. “We have always developed relationships with reliable subcontractors and believe that this

Murray & Dickson continues to invest in new equipment

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is crucial to achieving our desired quality standards and construction programmes. We actively develop enterprise development partners and again believe that this offers symbiotic advantages,” Raghubir adds.

A positive future

This level of commitment to enriching the surrounding areas to which the company operates is also seen through the company’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts, which have included the development of a soccer field for a local college; the contribution of 10 percent of its contract value to a nearby school including the construction of an additional classroom; the renovation

Dickson though, the same dedication to improvement and bettering lives is paid through its stringent health and safety initiatives which is currently being emphasised by the roll-out of its ISO programme. Raghubir explains: “We have recently beefed up our SHERQ department and are rolling out the

M&D is in the process of implementing a range of ISO protocols

Taking its core operations to more areas of South Africa than ever before

of a building in Hillbrow for abused women and children; the provision of structural bases, plinths and earthworks for the water reservoir storage in a local hospital; and a more recent sponsoring of three undergraduates at WITS University, with the option to then employ the individuals upon graduation. Back within the confines of Murray &

We remain positive about the future but have to be aware of the economic and political headwinds facing the country, which are capable of very quickly eradicating any improvement seen over the last couple of years Rukesh Raghubir, CEO

implementation of ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and ISO 18001. This process and the safety and quality management that it engenders will, in itself, improve the efficiency within the organisation. “We have also developed our own cost reporting software which is not as cumbersome as some of the off-the-shelf offerings. This allows us to critically analyse the areas of cost concern and to respond rapidly to deviations from our allowables.” Combining these improvements to the internal structure of M&D with the aforementioned business expansion and enhanced service offerings, the company is now in a prime position to strengthen its market share even further in the future; a prospect which Raghubir and the M&D team are confident in achieving despite regional and industry challenges. He concludes: “We remain positive about the future but have to be aware of the economic and political headwinds facing the country, which are capable of very quickly eradicating any improvement seen over the last couple of years. “We believe, however, that our diverse skills and services will insulate us from such an outcome.”


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QUALITY CONSTRUCTION FOR A

Developing

Boasting two decades of experience and a longstanding reputation among key East African clients, Holtan E.A. Limited persists with its commitment to build world class structures Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: James Smith

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rom a small business with one just carpenter to a fully fledged high profile construction company in Tanzania with a turnover of 20 million, Holtan E.A has built its reputation from the ground up. Boasting two decades of experience and a longstanding reputation among key East African clients, the company persists in its commitment to build world class structures. “The majority of our projects are negotiated with skilled architects before the construction phase, which ensures that a client is satisfied before a project commences,” states Robert Scheltens, Managing Director of Holtan E.A. Limited since

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beginning its journey to success in 1996. Holtan’s exclusive list of clientele includes the likes of embassies, banks and insurance companies, law firms, hotels and private housing. Taking a project from concept to completion, the company work on professional contracts for corporate entities. “As a developing country, Tanzania is a great place for our business to grow. We strive to be the best in Tanzania, it is about quality and not quantity,” says Scheltens. Moreover, the company owns the largest woodwork facility in Tanzania which Scheltens says is a significant advantage: “No one else in the country has the large scale capacity that we


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have. Having control over the quality of woodwork that goes into our builds is a huge benefit; clients can trust in our craftsmanship from the ground up, quite literally.” Holtan E.A. has been mass producing a number of wood products including hardwood flooring, outdoor and indoor furniture, wardrobes, kitchens, doors and windows in Tanzania for eight years. This assists project efficiencies, especially when constructing hotels where a significant order of soft furnishings is needed. Supporting this notion of a quality end product is a skilled team of staff who work hands-on in any given project, complemented by a designated a manager that oversees

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About Robert Scheltens Originating from Europe, Scheltens arrived in Tanzania in 1993 and was employed by a local construction company. He planted his roots firmly within the Tanzanian community with no intention of returning to Europe, establishing his own business – Holtan E.A. Limited – in 1996.

Mt. Meru Hotel

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the individual project. “By building relationships based on honesty and respect, both with our clients and our suppliers, we believe in ownership and accountability from the top down. As such, our management team is closely involved in the project at all times, monitoring progress and addressing any issues with finality as and when they arise. “We are 100 percent focussed on delivering a quality product and service, with stringent measures in place to make sure we always deliver the best,” comments Scheltens.

Upskilling Tanzania

When it comes to securing a local African workforce, Holtan turn to training schemes from expatriates around the world in order to upskill the construction industry in East Africa. Building on this, Holtan places health and safety at the forefront of construction activities, aligning with international quality management systems and keeping staff abreast of the latest policies. However, after the national wage increased by 180 percent in the last few years in Tanzania, Holtan E.A. has undergone a major restructure in order to create the best opportunities for its employees. “Continuing training

Bilila Lodge

Chole Road Apartments

of such a large number of people became unfeasible. We have gone from a staff complement of around 500 down to 220 as a result. We have refined our internal training initiatives in accordance with this change,” says Scheltens.

Notable projects The award-winning Arusha hotel in Zanzibar

Mikocheni Beach House

Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) in Dar es Salaam: A huge infrastructure project which Holtan is currently contracted by STRABAG International to undertake the construction of 29 bus terminals Expanding facilities for Standard Chartered Bank Construction of a new South African Embassy

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With projects ranging in size from US$320 million, Holtan has been involved in some of the most expensive builds in the country. Most recently, the company has won a contract to build a new embassy for the South African government. “We have completed several prestigious and acclaimed resorts, lodges and hotels and have been directly involved in more than 350 keys in East Africa,” says Scheltens. Among its portfolio is the construction of the Arusha hotel, which is recognised today as one of the best hotels in Tanzania. “The main reason we are selected to work on a project stems from our single-source accountability, which allows our clients the benefit of dealing with a single entity and being assured of the outcome. The resultant reputation of Holtan ensures that the company is well-placed in Tanzania to continue growing at a steady rate,” concludes Scheltens.

Inside the Volkswagen Showroom

Exim Bank Comoros

Volkswagen Showroom

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Growing

its Presence on the

Stage SJM Flex supply flexible couplings to the automotive industry across 32 destinations around the world and is a well respected name in the industry known for its high productivity levels Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: James Smith

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ith facilities in South Africa, Asia, North and South America, SJM Flex combines cutting edge technology competency with a comprehensive manufacturing experience. Headquartered in Korea, the company is one of only two remaining flexible couplings manufacturers in Africa. Consequently, SJM Flex’s Africa operations have seen significant expansion in recent years with the aim to achieve 26 percent growth this year and to launch four new products by the fourth quarter of 2015. Deon Joubert, Managing Director of SJM Flex South Africa says that although the company is

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internationally known, the various country branches look to South Africa for the most efficient ways of developing the business. “Our overseas branches like the way we do things in South Africa; the team is more like a family here, with a high work ethic and pleasant working environment. “Some of our managers were flown out to China to provide support to our operations there with great results. They really look up to South Africa’s operations when it comes


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to manufacturing capabilities and efficiencies,” he adds. Established in 1975, SJM Flex Malaysia has been providing tier one suppliers with flexible exhaust couplings for forty years, building longstanding relationships with key industry players along the way. Tier one companies are direct suppliers to OEMs, making the company a vital contributor in the automotive industry with a worldwide distribution chain including the likes of Europe, Asia and America.

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The company’s African operation began in 1997 with just 14 people and has since grown to a staff complement of 287, with more employees to be added as part of its growth strategy this year. “Our South Africa operations were originally established as a result of American motor giant Ford’s desire to gain a footprint in Africa. We were the first to manufacture a flexible coupling for exhausts in South Africa, and we remain the only company to build

Deon Joubert,

Managing Director of SJM Flex South Africa

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our own machines here. This means a guaranteed faster turnaround for customers,” says Joubert. Consequently, SJM Flex has been enjoying double-figure growth every year for the past seven years, boasting excellent productivity and attendance levels, which allows the company to remain competitive on a global scale. “Our reputation for honesty and integrity means our operations remain on the world’s radar. As a result of our proven capabilities and capacity offering, we are seeing interest from other countries combined with a high export rate,” comments Joubert. In South Africa, SJM Flex manufactures more than 50 variants of the flexible exhaust coupling for both trucks and passenger vehicles. Last year, the company merged its two facilities into one after manufacturing 3.2 million flexes, witnessing good growth as a result. “The numbers for 2015 have been adjusted accordingly for this growth and we hope to manufacture 4.3

million flexes to match our drive for improved productivity,” says Joubert.

Market strategy

Contending on the world stage requires an extensive strategy that divides the manufacturing load into countries that are closest to South Africa from a logistical point of view. “By this I mean we align our business so that South Africa will supply Africa and Europe, and China will supply Asia. Our new plant which we plan to open in 2016 in Mexico will supply North and South America,” explains Joubert. “This shortens lead times for our customers as we supply our product to 32 destinations around the globe and have to manage this carefully.” Furthermore, in order to remain cost competitive, SJM Flex has to monitor product quality in order to minimise rejects or faulty items. Joubert is particularly proud of the achievement of 1.8 defective parts per million (PPM) achieved during 2014. The global benchmark for this measurement

SELAGO

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elago Industries (Pty) Ltd is a South African owned manufacturing company situated in East London. Established in 1975 and our expertise consist of small to medium sized, high volume pressed, turned and milled components produced from various material types and grades, covering such market sectors as automotive, industrial and refrigeration. We have a specific department devoted to assembling products for the tyre valve industry and the passenger, truck and earthmover markets, which are then distributed to various regions within South Africa and are currently expanding into other African regions. Selago Industries is an authorised distributor for Schrader International Products in the Sub-Saharan African region, and since its inception the company has built a solid reputation for supplying quality products and solutions, while providing a high level of service.

We really believe that everything starts with people. Technology can be built but people cannot and as a Group we have seen 97 percent productivity across all our operations

SJM Headquarters

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MANUFACTURE, IMPORT, ASSEMBLE AND DISTRIBUTE QUALITY AFTERMARKET PRODUCTS.

TURNING | PRESSING | MILLING | DISTRIBUTION

www.selagoindustries.co.za info@selagoindustries.co.za Tel: +27 43 700 6200 1 Dombeya Street, Braelyn, East London, South Africa, 5201

is to be less than 10ppm. “PPM is a crucial quality management system to our business. Minimising this number requires attentive monitoring of any possible machinery downtime.”

“Everything starts with people”

Joubert is keen to emphasise the value of employees at SJM Flex: “We really believe that everything starts with people. Technology can be built but people cannot and as a Group we have seen 97 percent productivity across all our operations. Considering we only utilise a small amount of automation in our manufacturing process, this is an impressive percentage,” he highlights. “This coupled with our high level of attendance (98 percent) makes us truly a company of excellent standards.” In line with this, SJM Flex has an HR department that supports both internal and external training for the company. “The majority of our

Inside our Flexible Coupling product Bellows

Sleeve

Interlock

Cap

supervisors are people who have worked their way through the ranks and we provide appropriate training at each level,” Joubert continues. This year, SJM Flex South Africa will launch four new products to the market with the hope to obtain 95 percent of all manufacturing materials locally by 2016, instead of importing a small portion of them. Combine this with its family-culture and you have an internationally reputable business that is ingrained into South Africa’s economy, cementing the company’s position in the automotive industry for years to come.

Outer Braid

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GOOD The construction material manufacturing specialist looks set to maintain its steely grip on the sector across the region as it looks to Botswana, Namibia and Angola for future international growth Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: James Smith

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ood Time Steel has progressed quickly and effectively over the past decade to become a regional construction company of note, and is now pressing forward to form the same reputable presence across the rest of SubSaharan Africa. Established in 2005, as a private company with an initial investment of US$700,000, the business commenced production of just a small portion of its current range in 2008, and comprised just 65 people in its workforce at the time. A decade on, and the Zambian

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market specialist now consists of around 500 employees, carrying out a range of processes to produce deformed bars, round bars, angle irons, square and round tubes, galvanised iron pipes, IPE channels, and now corrugated roofing sheets as well. The capacity has inevitably increased alongside this continuous improvement over the years to now achieve 160 tonnes of production a day; allowing not only for a greater influence on the Zambian market, but to also enable the company to bridge out further internationally. Deputy General Manager, Durban


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TIMES across Sub-Saharan Africa Kambaki explains: “Initially, in 2008, our markets were only in Zambia and Zimbabwe, but by 2010 and going into 2011, we started exporting to the Great Lakes region; so into Rwanda, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). “Over the past five years, we have also gone on to cover Malawi and South Africa as well, and further down the line we are looking to expand into Botswana, Namibia and Angola which is one of the major markets available to us at present.”

Capital expenditures

International expansion has gone hand in hand with attaining new business and strengthening the Good Time Steel footprint over the years, while it also emphasises a strong entrepreneurial flair within the business to make quick decisions and move in line with industry and regional trends. This same ethos is placed on capital expenditures, with the company realising that, in quite a traditional and competitive sector, it is important to find a differentiator.

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“I would say what sets us apart is the standards that we have put in place and the quality control,” says Kambaki. “We only use one type of raw material throughout our products – scrap mild steel – so that makes it easier for us to be consistent with the quality of what we produce.” To complement this, Good Time Steel continuously invests into new equipment and facilities, with the recent introduction of a new modern laboratory housing the latest in advanced testing equipment indicative of this approach. The company has also strived to become more efficient and automated where possible; upgrading its induction furnaces for example so that the quantities of steel being produced are increased and the down time of the workforce waiting for the steel to reach the required temperatures is reduced. “We have also become more

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We are also integrating and introducing a new workshop which will enable us to provide training to fabricate all sorts of steel for construction and engineering works

Durban Kambaki, Deputy General Manager


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efficient through recycling,” Kambaki continues. “The initial re-heating furnaces were very inefficient and gave off a lot of smoke and caused leakages, but these have since been replaced with modern coal furnaces which burn more efficiently and are almost smokeless. We have also worked with an environmental agency to come up with a system to collect any emissions or particles that come out of the process.”

Overcoming challenges

Moving forward, Good Time Steel has already put the wheels in motion to modernise its facilities even further; firstly through the acquisition of neighbouring land to facilitate the upgrade of its smelting plant. Kambaki notes: “It is a continuous process. This modernisation of the smelting plant will increase the amount of products we can manufacture and produce, while we are also integrating and introducing a new workshop which will enable us to provide training to fabricate all sorts of steel for construction and engineering works.” To coincide with this progression and expansion, the company also has to ensure that it is building up the right skill base among its workforce; especially in a market where experience working in the steel sector is a rare commodity. “Zambia is a copper country primarily so the steel and iron industry is quite a new thing, and there isn’t readily available trained manpower because of that,” Kambaki says. “To overcome this challenge, we bring in personnel from China to provide in-house training to our staff for all the innovations that come in to the company. “If we upgrade or purchase new equipment, we ask the manufacturers of the machinery to bring their personnel here, train our people, and then we use those people as

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instructors from then on.” The ability to come up with alternative solutions is also set to be advantageous in regards to imports over the next few years as Zambia looks set to exhaust its levels of scrap steel raw material. Once again, the ability to make quick decisions and adapt where needed will be pivotal in overcoming this obstacle, as Kambaki notes: “Our directors come in on a quarterly basis so we have already explained the scrap position, and they have asked us to start looking to firstly see if we can source the scrap from neighbouring countries or, if that fails, we can switch to direct reduced iron instead.”

Local focus

Looking further afield in attaining these raw materials would be a little bit outside of the current Good Time Steel business model which has traditionally tried to maintain as local an emphasis as possible throughout the business. Outside of spare parts specific to the machinery it has to import from China, nearly all the raw materials brought into the company are sourced locally. Subsequently aiding the Zambian economy and the growth of a relatively new industry, Good Time Steel is always keen to enrich the lives of the surrounding areas, and originally put this philosophy to good use in situating its factory in a recently built industrial area.

The company is looking to cement its position as the country’s second biggest steel manufacturer through the provision of quality and timely services, with the customer kept in mind in everything the business does

Good Time Steel is always keen to enrich the lives of the surrounding areas

Kambaki says: “It is a traditionally strong area for farming so as well as working with them on corporate social responsibility (CSR) projects, we have also just finished donating roofing sheets to a nearby school, and are now sponsoring a local football team as well. “Beyond that, we have also just planted up to a thousand trees and bushes to try and restore some greenery in an area where trees had

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Zambia’s second biggest steel manufacturer

previously been cut down.” This commitment to quality and improvement appears both in Good Time Steel’s CSR and construction efforts, for which it has consequently been awarded for on numerous occasions. Now, with an even wider geographical footprint on the horizon, the company is looking to cement its position as the country’s second biggest steel manufacturer through the provision of quality and timely services, with the customer kept in mind in everything the business does.

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The Sierra Leonean family-run business is expanding and improving despite the ongoing power challenges in the country Writer: Matthew Staff Project Manager: James Smith Shankerdas & Sons (S.L.) Ltd has grown and expanded within the manufacturing sector in Sierra Leone since the early 1900s, but the entrepreneurial family business is still looking to diversify and improve 76 years on. Developing and organically growing since 1939, the company began as a small trading company before transforming gradually, through acquisition and market migration, into a manufacturing organisation comprising numerous divisions. Kishore is the current Shankerdas family member holding the Managing Director (MD) position, inheriting a role that had been held by his father previously and his grandfather initially. With the executive board still comprising just him, his father, his mother and his own wife and children, Kishore is proud of how big the G Shankerdas & Sons (S.L.) Ltd business has become and is excited for the opportunities that still lie ahead. “I joined the business in 1976 when I left college, when the business had about 20 members of staff. Today, we have more than a thousand,” he says. “Initially, we were filling wine in glass bottles and selling them, before we moved into plastics. “Today, we have an alcohol division and our own distillery, as well as a plastic factory which manufactures plastic bags, agricultural bags and household items like buckets, basins

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and hangers.” The company also comprises a filling unit where it fills its own plastic bottles of mineral water to compliment its soft drink brands, and it even has the facility to manufacture larger items such as concrete pipes and water tanks.

Organic growth

Being a family run business has allowed G Shankerdas & Sons (S.L.) Ltd to make quick decisions in regards to business diversification over the years, identifying gaps in the market and growing organically, yet rapidly as a consequence. “For example, when I joined the company we had a limited amount of glass bottles so our choice was to either form our own glass manufacturing unit or to go into plastics manufacturing, so we quickly started manufacturing our own plastic bottles,” Kishore explains. “From there, we started making plastic bags

The company changed its manufacturing material from

Glass to Plastic

so invested in some extruders, and from there we moved into household items, and so on. “It has all been a gradual, organic growth rather than a big bang theory.” This philosophy of active investment holds true to this day, with the business upgrading its machinery and equipment on a yearly basis, no matter what the fiscal situation is. “Every year we expand. Whatever our capital, and margins, and profits, we expand,” Kishore continues. “For instance, I recently travelled to India to a plastic trade fair in Gujarat, Plast India 2015, to see what machines I can buy to fit in with what the company needs at the moment.” As far as 2015 is concerned, the company is looking into providing a better economy of scale for its core products, and especially within its plastics manufacturing operations. With extensive competition coming from imports and especially the

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Chinese market, the need to find a differentiator is pivotal and Kishore believes this ongoing diversification and continuous improvement of machinery is key to that. “Where we have the advantage is when someone needs a smaller order because we have the local presence to help cater more quickly for these people,” the MD notes. “We also have an advantage in things like water tanks, which can be expensive to import, so we do have the better economy of scale with products like this and do very well there.”

Socially responsible

Maintaining a more sustainable local focus within the company has been a staple requirement pivotal to G Shankerdas & Sons’ success, and this is currently adhered to through a number of strategies; whether it’s its local farming presence across 500 acres of land to produce its own

Kishore Shankerdas Biography Representative for the Government of Japan as Honorary Consul-General of Japan to Sierra Leone for the past 29 years Honorary Paramount Chief of Koya Rural District Past president of Sierra Leone Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture (2000/2002) Past president of Rotary Club of Freetown (2000/2001) Chairman of the University of Sierra Leone Development Fund (since 1993) Current President of the Fourah Bay College Alumni Association Director, Aureol Insurance Co. Ltd. (AIC) Director, United Bank of Africa (UBA) Former Director of Sierra Leone Ports Authority (2008/2010) Order of the Rising Sun (awarded by the Emperor of Japan, 2007) Member of the Order of Rokel (awarded by the Government of Sierra Leone, 1989) Commander of the Order of the Republic of Sierra Leone (awarded by the Government of Sierra Leone, 2013)

ingredients, or its products’ influence on the wider community, including its BEETA Cola offering which has been in high demand recently thanks to its immune system-building attributes in light of the Ebola crisis. “We always see what we can best do to help the community around us, either through our products or the corporate social responsibility activities we are involved in,” Kishore states. “For example, we have recently built three or four bridges to aid transport in the area, and we have an ongoing strategy giving scholarships to children in need.” G Shankerdas & Sons has built numerous partnerships with both local and national authorities to further impact the country in a positive way, and there is a similar feel-good feeling spread internally, through the company’s local hiring emphasis and subsequent up-skilling ethos, and its similarly local supply chain approach. Kishore adds: “We have had some staff with us for decades because we look after them and make sure they get what is theirs and that they are happy. “We also try and go for local business partnerships where possible to keep this local focus, before looking outside to source materials.”

Sustainable future

Another example of the business’s positive impact in Sierra Leone and specifically the Freetown area occurs in relation to its relationship with a nearby school, with the business sharing its generator-powered electricity on a need-to-use basis, for free. This addresses the biggest challenge stunting the full potential of G Shankerdas & Sons at present as Kishore explains: “The thing is, we need backup generators because of the power and electricity problems in Sierra

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OMPANY SIE EC R NC

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National Insurance Company Limited has established an excellent relationship with reputable International Reinsurance Companies and Brokers.

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Motor insurance: • Comprehensive cover • Third party fire theft • Third party only cover Life and pensions: scheme (nicare) • Money back policy (osusu) • Deposit administration fund • Ordinary life policy • Group life policy • Medical

Technical services: accident • Fire and special perils • Marine • Engineering • Specialized types of insurance • Miscellaneous

G Shankerdas & Sons has a local hiring emphasis and up-skilling ethos

Leone which make us inefficient. “If we had sufficient electricity and were assured this, then our plant could grow from a 1,000 to a 3,000 strong workforce. The capacity and capability is there but the only constraint to progressing further is the electricity problem.” To counteract this challenge, the company has formed a partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency to provide a plant for used plastic waste, and to encourage the subsequent recycling of said waste. This will not only encourage a more sustainable production cycle, but will also help in generating electricity

We also try and go for local business partnerships where possible to keep this local focus, before looking outside to source materials

Strong and Caring Website: www.nic-sl.com Email: info@nic-sl.com Mobile: +23276621030 / +23276615727

through alternative methods. “We should be establishing this over the next 12-18 months, while we are also planning on buying new machinery within our plants to increase capacity even further,” Kishore concludes. “With many of our machines, all we have to change is the mould to get a new product, but with our water tanks especially, we hope to increase our capacity from 8,000 litres to as much as 15,000 litres over the next year or so. “We always try to keep an eye on industry trends and find new areas that we can take advantage of moving forward.”

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Sub-Saharan Africa continues to provide growth potential for Ceramic Industries, with a continued strong demand for tiling, sanitaryware and other bathroom items Writer: Emily Jarvis Project Manager: James Mitchell

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n 2012, Ceramic Industries proudly celebrated its 20th anniversary since listing on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, benefiting from raising capital and increased awareness of the company and its reputation. By trading publically, the Group was able to attract a selection of potential companies when in its early stages. Two decades on and with a strong presence in the market, Ceramic Industries drew interest from Italtile Limited, who

has now acquired a strategic stake in the company, along with its probable delisting. This has allowed Ceramic Industries to focus on its long term vision to serve the customer as one of the leading low-cost manufacturers and suppliers of ceramic tiles and sanitaryware in South Africa. “I am confident that the business will retain the best of its characteristics and benefit from the revised structure,� said Giovanni Ravazzotti, Non-Executive Chairman of Ceramic Industries in a company statement.

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SA’s manufacturing trends

South Africa’s manufacturing sector was the third largest contributor to the nation’s economy in 2013, accounting for 15.2 percent of the GDP. The industry has a diversified offering and has shown its resilience and potential to compete in the global economy. Ceramic Industries plays a key role in this, as the company prides itself on being an internationally competitive manufacturer of ceramics that ensures customer expectations are exceeded in all facets including quality, timely delivery and friendly staff. “The trading environment has remained extremely competitive, fuelled by price-sensitive consumers,” commented Ravazzotti. Another key trend experienced by the Group in recent years has been continued strong demand for tiles and sanitaryware, particularly in underserviced rural and outlying areas. “In line with international trends, consumers have gravitated towards larger format wall and floor tiles and high-value bathroom accessory sets. “Our customers are increasingly seeking convenient and intuitive solutions to their purchasing decisions. We are mindful that this demand will be best satisfied by providing

SUNNY PACKS

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unny Packs Manufacturing is one of South Africa’s leading corrugated board and carton manufacturers and received the PMR Africa Diamond Award for Best Packaging Supplier in South Africa in 2013. Sunny Packs is ISO 9001:2008 certified and our range of services include making cardboard sheets, printing, flat and rotary die cutting & carton erecting, as well as stereo manufacturing. We strive to deliver innovative, custom made, quality corrugated products on time and in full to all our customers, ensuring that the company prospers through impeccable service and customer satisfaction.

Playing a key role in SA’s manufacturing sector

T +27 11 878 5920 E sales@sunnypacks.com

www.sunnypacks.com

AMSERVE CHEMICALS

The people of Ceramic have worked extremely hard under testing conditions, and I would like to express my gratitude to them for their continued service to the Group

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n today’s tough and fast changing business environment, we believe at Amserve that it is essential to not only be a dependable Supplier but to also be constantly looking at ways and means that could assist our Customers production or market position, in any small or big way that we can - and then the stronger we also become. When you then add the old fashioned values that still permeate though out Ceramic Industries, you have the pleasure of working in a solid partnership to drive forward with – Andrew Wilmot. T +27 11 465 0018 E info@amserve.co.za

www.amservegroup.com

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Sunny Packs

We are very proud of our long association as a Supplier of Performance Chemistry to Ceramic Industries, who we especially congratulate on their many years of continued growth, expansion and solid investment in manufacturing and skills in Southern Africa.

“Global Strengths, Working Locally” www.amservegroup.com

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Factories

combined tile and sanitaryware solutions, which is a key focus area of the Group’s product development programme going forward,” stated Ravazzotti.

4 1 1 1

Tile factories in South Africa Sanitaryware factory in South Africa Acrylic bath factory in South Africa

ATHLONE EXTRUSIONS LTD

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stablished for over 40 years Athlone Extrusions is one of the world’s leading producers of extruded thermoplastic sheet and film products for supply to the thermoforming, fabrication, printing and furniture sectors. Using state-of-the-art extrusion technologies, and aided by our unique in-house colouring and compounding capabilities, it allows us to provide an extensive portfolio of sheet and film products for use across a range of diverse industries and applications: • Sanitary ware

Tile factory in Australia

• Automotive (including off-road vehicles) • Medical and food packaging • Construction • Leisure (caravan/camper vans) • Point-of-sale display • Furniture

Tile and sanitaryware facilities

Consisting of four tile factories, one sanitaryware factory (Betta) and one acrylic bath factory in South Africa (Aquarius), as well as one tile factory in Australia (Centaurus), Ceramic Industries enjoy several regional and international partnerships that complement the company’s vision and goals. Betta Sanitaryware is the dominant supplier of sanitaryware in SubSaharan Africa, with close to 50 percent market share in the region. The factory is highly automated and makes use of the high pressure casting methodology, which contributes to a reduced wastage factor and consistency in casting. The four South African tile factories (Samca Floor, Samca Wall, Vitro and Pegasus) manufacture a combination of pressed and extruded tiles in various sizes, textures and finishes. Moreover, Aquarius bath factory manufactures a comprehensive range of baths and

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The highly automated factory uses the high pressure casting methodology


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…. one of the world’s leading producers of extruded thermoplastic sheet and film products Head Office / Ireland Athlone Extrusions Limited Grace Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath, Ireland. Tel: +353 90 6492679 Fax: +353 90 6494086

United Kingdom Athlone Extrusions UK Limited Equipoint, Coventry Road, Birmingham B25 8AD, England. Tel: +44 121 7644848 Fax: +44 121 7644443

e-mail: info@athloneextrusions.ie shower trays, catering for all sectors including both local and European markets. Pegasus is a state of the art factory, utilising the latest proven technology to manufacture red body, pressed floor tiles. The factory manufactures different sizes of glazed tiles in a range of finishes, profiles and textures and has the capacity to produce and distribute 50,000m2 of tiles per day. “Pegasus is strategically positioned to serve the emerging and SubSaharan Africa markets as well as providing a very important import replacement service to the local consumer,” said the company. Ravazzotti highlighted the importance of suppliers, partners and stakeholders to the success of each of these key business areas: “The relationships we share with our stakeholders underpin the continued existence of this business. “Our customers in wholesale and

The Netherlands Athlone Extrusions Schouburgring 85, 5038 TK, Tilburg, The Netherlands. Tel: +31 13 5447265 Fax. +31 13 5442747

website: www.athloneextrusions.ie

TRIANGLE BEARINGS Established 1988

Servicing your Industry with Excellence

Our stock holding caters for all our customer’s bearings, seals, power transmission, gearbox, motors and engineering service needs.

Vereeniging branch T: 016 455 5012 E: sales2@trianglebearings.co.za 3 De Villiers Avenue, Vereeniging

www.trianglebearings.co.za

Ballito Branch T: 032 526 37 27 E: david@trianglbearings.co.za No 3 and 4 kudu park, imbonini park, shakas head, ballito

24 HOURS SERVICE 365 DAYS

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Ceramic Industries acknowledges partnerships are a vital part of company success

merchants have continued to support us in a very competitive environment and we thank them for recognising our efforts to deliver the highest quality offering at the best price. The vital partnerships we enjoy with our suppliers and service providers are acknowledged and appreciated.”

Investing in the business

A key focus for Ceramic Industries has always been retaining and growing management talent and developing expertise across the whole Group. Each year, the company invest millions of rand in training which complements the goal to balance satisfying the customer needs with profitability of the business and creating wealth for all of its stakeholders.

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Sub-Saharan Africa continues to provide growth potential for the Group, with strong demand experienced for Ceramic’s offering

“In 2011 for example, R186 million was paid to employees through salaries, benefits and incentives, which in turn enabled them to support their families and contribute to the economic activity of their communities and the broader economy,” the statement said. “The people of Ceramic have worked extremely hard under testing conditions, and I would like to express my gratitude to them for their continued service to the Group.” Accompanying this focus on people development is a responsible attitude towards the environment. The Group is mindful that its operational activities, which include quarrying for clay, could potentially have a harmful impact on the environment.


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“It is therefore a high priority for the long-term sustainability of the business to mitigate any such effects at every possible opportunity and we do so via various initiatives including our involvement with the environmental forum,” said Ravazzotti. The Group implements an energy management plan to reduce its carbon footprint through the relentless monitoring and management of consumption of resources including gas, fuel, clay, water and glaze. “We have started to manufacture thinner tiles at Vitro, Samca Wall and Floor and Centaurus, which is just one example of our commitment to environmental issues. This innovation has the dual benefit of reducing consumption of clay, glaze, electricity, fuel for transport and packaging, as well as reduced emissions,” said the company.

Steady development

The manufacturing sector remains steady in general as a key contributor to the South African economy, and Ceramic Industries hope to capitalise on opportunities within the current environment as Ravazzotti further expanded in a statement: “There are early signs of increased volumes out of our tile factories, therefore our priority focus will be on continuing to drive our efficiencies and enhance the Group’s product range to meet demand in terms of volume and quality. “Sub-Saharan Africa continues to provide growth potential for the Group, with strong demand experienced for Ceramic’s offering. To capitalise on this opportunity, our strategy will be to retain and expand existing contracts while also sourcing new markets. “We will continue to recognise our strengths as leaders in the industry and acknowledge our weaknesses, striving to convert them into strengths,” he concluded.

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Moving forward, the company strategy will be to retain and expand existing contracts, while also sourcing new markets

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Internationally TO GROW

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stamping and assembly of structural parts and vehicle components to steel wheels for all vehicle types and from the world of domestic electrical appliances to earth moving machinery and, to all fields using steel in a more general capacity. Made up of four main divisions, CLN Steel Service Centre (SSC), MW, MFB and MA, the Group aims to be a leader in the development and assembly of high technological content industrial steel products, offering dedicated solutions and services while striving to become a name synonymous with trust and excellence in the steel industry. “Our guiding principles at the base of all our activities generate value for our customers, suppliers and personnel,� says the company. Backed by CLN’s extensive experience, and knowledge of raw materials and semi-finished products combined with the tendency to push experimentation to the limit, MA Automotive is able to create madeto-measure bespoke products and materials for a myriad of customers.

With the desire to be recognised as an excellent international provider of products, processes and services relating to sheet metal working for the automotive industry, when it comes to steel, MA Automotive is a reputable name you can trust Project Manager: James Smith

A Automotive is a subsidiary of the CLN Group that specialises in producing and assembling steel automotive structural parts, components, subassemblies and modules. With an international presence in Africa, Asia, Italy, Europe and South America, the company now manages 26 production plants and three R&D centres across these locations. CLN Group has a presence in the processing and marketing of flat laminated steel for various user sectors including the motor industry; from the

Industrial experts

The MA division of the business is a major supplier of structural parts and components to international passenger car manufacturers and tier one system suppliers; it produces chassis and frameworks, internal and external panelling, locking devices and doors, and extrusions. Supported by a product development team, MA automotive is able to successfully integrate management of the entire value chain as well as demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the industrialisation processes involved in steel manufacturing. Accompanying its expertise in

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MA Automotive share a “zero accidents” objective with the CLN Group

Supported by a product development team, MA automotive is able to successfully integrate management of the entire value chain as well as demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the industrialisation processes involved in steel manufacturing

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manufacturing is a comprehensive understanding of both health and safety compliances and environmental considerations. Consequently, in 2014 CLN Group instigated a reduction in CO2 emissions across its operations equal to 3,200 tonnes. The Group has definable targets for the reduction of greenhouse gases and is working on reducing consumption of gas and electricity and is actively seeking renewable sources of energy to power its operations across all divisions. Not only this, the Group share a “zero accidents” objective in order to prevent accidents and increase risk awareness in the workplace.

Four decades of experience

MA Automotive’s roots can be traced back to the 1970s with the planning of important acquisitions in the Italian business of stamping components and panels for the automotive, commercial


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+27 11 918 3115/6/8 mcsupp@iafrica.com

AUTOMOTIVE FASTENERS & ENGINEERING SUPPLIES

We import the highest quality copper, Chrome Zirconium and Beryllium. We supply many automobile manufactures and have for over 25 years.

Email: mcbarn@telkomsa.net Tel: 012-5413966 / 012-5413967 Fax: 012-5413968 Fax-Email: 0865290164

Manufacture Gun Arms

Seam Welder wheels

Bent and Special Electrodes

Spot Welder Cap Tips and shanks

vehicle and industrial equipment fields. Under the e MAC (Metallurgica Assemblaggi Carpenterie) SpA, the company was established in Turin in 1978 and later became one of Fiat’s main suppliers. As the Group began to evolve, it took advantage of the outsourcing trend in the 1990s, a trend already adopted by many large companies. Subsequently, MA Automotive acquired production plants in Melfi, Chivasso, Cassino and Brescia in Italy, growing its workforce to 900 employees. MA extended its globalisation strategy between 2000 and 2008 by following the production processes of the major OEMs in Europe and South America and became suppliers to a number of major automotive manufacturers. During this time, international expansion was based on joint ventures with important Groups as the company

Key partners in the passenger car sector:

BMW Fiat Honda Ford

Audi Skoda Nissan Renault

CitroĂŤn Volkswagen Toyota Mercedes

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Key tier one suppliers: Faurecia

Magneti Marelli

Lear Corporation

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explains: “In fact, a joint venture was signed with the Japanese Group Unipres involving a production plant in Biache Saint Vaast (France), and with Coskunoz of Bursa, Turkey, the market leader for printing, assembly and high resistance welding machinery.” In 2007, around 5,000 workers were employed by MA’s printing and mechanical process plants, a significant leap in staff complement when compared to its work force in the 1990s. The Company’s globalisation strategy came into its own in 2009, when MA consolidated the Italian market through the acquisition of Wagon Automotive and began to focus on entering developing countries by means of alliances with market leading enterprises. “This was to support the expansion projects of major vehicle manufacturers,” says the company. In South Africa, MA acquired the Comau-Gruppo, Fiat’s Port Elizabeth plant and Läpple-Germany’s plants at Rosslyn and Berlin, and further

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Today MA Automotive manages

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production plants and Research and Development Centres


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Joint ventures play a key part in MA Automotive’s South African expansion

developed to a total of six plants distributed over the territory with a work force of approximately 1,500 to cater to the needs of the major European and American OEMs present in South Africa. Recently, MA signed a joint venture with the Chinese steel’s giant Shougang Corporation for the construction of a stamping and assembly plant for automotive structural parts and components in the Beijing area. This will cement the division’s position in Asia and indeed add to its position as a contender on the world stage.

International manufacturers

MA Automotive prides itself on being able to guarantee the satisfaction of customers, shareholders and

We fully respect and closely adhere to customer specifications, offering reliable solutions that are compatible with the existing production systems, while consistently working to reduce the time it takes to get our products to market

partners through its constant focus on harbouring prosperous and socially responsible growth. “We fully respect and closely adhere to customer specifications, offering reliable solutions that are compatible with the existing production systems, while consistently working to reduce the time it takes to get our products to market,” says the company. Furthermore, with the awardwinning CLN Group standing firmly behind it, MA Automotive benefits from Group synergies, with the ability to use CLN’s various production sites and access the equipment most suitable for an individual customer order. With the desire to be recognised as an excellent international provider of products, processes and services relating to sheet metal working for the automotive industry, when it comes to steel, MA Automotive is a reputable name you can trust and is keen to welcome new industrial partnerships in the future.

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E V E N T RETAIL WORLD AFRICA is the leading marketplace and ideas exchange for African retailers hungry for innovative solutions to develop and expand their business within Africa. A platform for thought-leaders and innovators to present their ideas and solutions to Africa’s retail community, the show presents a lucrative opportunity for the continent’s foremost solution providers to meet new customers, and to grow their client base in Africa. In the face of the exponential evolution of retail, Retail World Africa is the place to keep up with trends as well

F O C U S

as drive growth and innovation. Join the traditional players, the emerging disruptors and risk-taking visionaries of retail. Over the past five years, the event has been attracting visitors from banks, telecoms, government, retailers and key enterprises, giving organisations the opportunity to come and learn about the enormous potential of cards, payments and ID technology. Case studies from specific industry sectors will be presented in six theatres on the exhibition show floor. The event provides a platform for regional attendees to drive new revenues, deliver

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more secure and reliable services, invest in new technologies, and streamline operational process. The event organisers guarantee those who attend will meet crucial industry contacts at the show and with thousands of attendees, including 400+ senior buyers from African retailers and delegations from across Africa, Retail World Africa is one to watch. Exhibiting an unrivalled headline act of keynote speakers and industry heavyweights, the Retail World Africa show places true visionaries all under one roof. In the face of the exponential evolution of retail, Retail World Africa is the place to keep up with trends as well as drive growth and innovation. Join the traditional players, the emerging disruptors and risk-taking visionaries of retail in this annual event.

HUNDREDS

OF FREE SEMINARS

3500

ATTENDEES

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EXHIBITORS

EVENT DETAILS WHEN: March 10-11 WHERE: Sandton Convention Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa

http://www.terrapinn.com/exhibition/retail-world-africa/index.stm

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REGISTER: nivasha.govender@terrapinn.com


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Profile for Outlook Publishing

Africa Outlook Issue 23-24  

Africa Outlook Issue 23-24