Page 1

Also In This Issue: A Possible Industrial Revolution? Farmers and Chefs Join Forces Fresh Feel for Trolley Square Part 5: Building A Better Wilmington

Showtime! Area arts groups are ready to dazzle this season

SEPTEMBER 2015 CO M P L I M E N TA R Y VOL. 28 | NO. 7


09_Inside.indd 16

8/24/15 3:33 PM


DREAM STREETS

FESTIVAL 9.18.15 . 6 PM – 10 PM . FREE . CASH BAR

Celebrating Dream Streets: Art in Wilmington 1970–1990 with performances and music by Streets Xpressions Arts Organization, Inc., food and fashion from Rolling Revolution, and more! SPONSORED BY

2301 Kentmere Parkway | Wilmington, DE 19806 302.571.9590 | delart.org

09_Inside.indd 1

BREAKDANCING HIP HOP DJ SCARFO RICHARD RAW TRACEY QUAKE INDIA SAGE TERRANCE VANN 10+ FOOD TRUCKS LIVE DEMOS Sleaze Digest No. 1 (detail), 1976. Tom Watkins (born 1951). Color photocopy, 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches. Courtesy of Jerry Grant. © Tom Watkins.

8/24/15 3:14 PM


Brandywine Valley RESTAURANT WEEK

Experience the best of area upscale dining with prix-fixe menus

3-course dinner:

Sept

14-19

35 2-course lunch: $ 15

$

BrandywineTaste.com BVRW_Spread2015.indd 2

8/24/15 3:15 PM


WIN!

Featuring:

Entertainment Prize Package

Details at BrandywineTaste.com

COLUMBUS INN

RED GRILL

FECHA / DATE

30/08/11

MARCA / BRAND

CAMPO VIEJO

C1

PANTONE 202 U C 2

PANTONE 871 U C 3

C1

NEGRO

NEGRO 50%

C2

re

STEAKHOUSE

C4 Estampado ARQUÉ K006B

PANTONE

C5

PANTONE

Cuando sea necesario reproducir este logotipo, es esencial que las proporciones y relaciones entre todos los elementos se mantengan. When it is necessary to reproduce the logotype, it is essential that the proportions and relationships between all the elements are maintained.

Presented by:

© Los materiales gráficos incluidos en este archivo son propiedad de Domecq Wines España, S.A., prohibida su reproducción y difusión, salvo autorización expresa de Domecq Wines España, S.A.

TM

coloRADo

BVRW_Spread2015.indd 3

N.Carolina

8/25/15 1:59 PM


TAVERN

eclipse bistro



m a i n st r e et

n e wa r

A

k , de



Di Ma

Cr

RED GRILL

re

STEAKHOUSE

And

PlatinumDiningGroup.com

4 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Inside.indd 4

8/24/15 3:20 PM


Friday, Sept. 25: 5:30 PM –9 PM

With great food! Enjoy cold craft beer and wine from local breweries & distributors, and delicious food from local restaurants. Guests must be 21 to be admitted. RAIN OR SHINE.

Ticket prices below. Sign Up Now!

Our Sponsors:

Tickets: $45/person; $35/person Zoo members; $50/person at the door. ($30/designated driver)

brandywinezoo.org • 302.571.7747 Ext. 603 Brandywine Park, Wilmington, DE • FREE PARKING The Brandywine Zoo is managed by the Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation, with the support of the Delaware Zoological Society.

09_Inside.indd 9

8/25/15 7:33 AM


SFH ER O&A Ad_DE Today Ad 8/7/15 12:41 PM Page 1

Treating Your Emergency with Urgency

32 Minute Average Wait Time* Saint Francis Healthcare provides fast access to the latest technologies and medical experts. For example, stroke patients can reach an MRI or CAT scan within 8 minutes. A procedure can start within 45 minutes of arrival. Our dedicated team will also treat you with understanding and empathy. We care about your feelings as well as your physical health. Meet our ER Team and learn more about our ER at SaintFrancisHealthcare.org/emergency *Arrival to Room, January-April 2015

Š 2015 Saint Francis Healthcare. A Part of

09_Start.indd 2

8/24/15 4:26 PM


2 INSIDE 2

38

19 Out & About Magazine Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

91

our staff Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net Associate Editor Krista Connor • kconnor@tsnpub.com Director of Digital Media & Distribution Marie Graham Poot • mgraham@tsnpub.com Creative Director & Production Manager Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. matt@catvis.biz Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. tyler@catvis.biz Contributing Designer Ryan Alexander, Catalyst Visuals, LLC Contributing Writers Matt Amis, Mark Fields, Pam George, Paula Goulden, Rob Kalesse, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, John Leyh, Robert Lhulier, Allan McKinley, Andréa Miller, John Murray, Larry Nagengast, Scott Pruden, Eric Ruth, Matt Sullivan Contributing Photographers Joe del Tufo, Tim Hawk, Les Kipp, Danielle Quigley, Matt Urban

Intern Matt Moore Special Projects Sarah Green, John Holton, David Hallberg

09_Inside.indd 5

79 what’s inside START

EAT

9 The War on Words 11 F.Y.I. 12 By the Numbers 15 Better Than Fiction 17 Brandywine Arts & Crafts 19 Enlightened by Nightscape 22 Sovereign Air

63 The Farmer & The Chef 67 Food Notes

DRINK 69 Sips

WATCH

FOCUS

73 Buddies from U.N.C.L.E. 77 Back-to-School Favorites

26 Let the Shows Begin! 38 Trolley Square: Transitioning

LISTEN

WILMINGTON

79 fiancé: Fully Committed 86 Tuned In 88 Musikarmageddon

49 Art on the Town 54 Theatre N 55 City News 58 On the Riverfront

On the cover: These enthusiastic performers, representing the area’s arts groups, are set to entertain you in the coming months. Photo Joe del Tufo

PLAY 89 Art Is Social 91 Snap Shots 93 It’s Loop Time! 97 Pancakes for Parkinson’s 99 Save the Valley

Editorial & advertising info: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 Website: outandaboutnow.com Email: contact@tsnpub.com

FEATURES 19 Enlightened by Nightscape Longwood Gardens’ current featured installation is a psychedelic journey that is drawing big crowds. Ricardo Rivera discusses the inspiration and challenges involved in creating the unique visuals and sounds. By Krista Connor

26 Let the Shows Begin! Autumn offers an eclectic cornucopia of performances and exhibits. Here’s your clip-and-save list. By Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald

38 Fresh Feel for Trolley Square Shedding its raucous legacy, the area has become a friendly small town within a large city. And more changes are coming. By Larry Nagengast

79 fiancé: Fully Committed The Newark band has gone from the high of touring England to the low of seeing their label dissolve. Now they’re looking to the future. By Matt Moore

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

7

8/25/15 12:02 PM


Handmade Dessert Shoppe

Made the way it should be Visit our shop at: 1006 North Union St., Wilmington, on the web at: sweetsomethingsdesserts.com

DE 19805

302-655-7211

www.facebook.com/SweetSomethingsDesserts

09_Inside.indd 10

8/25/15 7:34 AM


START

A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

Media Watch • MSNBC, on a report about the prisoner who hanged herself in a Texas jail: “Some are questioning the efficacy of the report.” Efficacy means effectiveness. The word should have been authenticity, veracity, accuracy. • A reader cites two examples of CNN’s ignorance of possessive pronouns: “Four died and one is fighting for their life,” and “A man fired over a dozen shots, then got back in their car.” One and man are singular, so the proper possessive is his. • A WDEL announcer, trying too hard to sound cultured: “Police are looking for whomever fired the shots.” It’s “whoever.” When there is a dependent clause, choose whoever or whomever based on the verb in that clause, regardless of the rest of the sentence. In this case, whoever fired the shots. On the other hand, the sentence “we all have a right to criticize whomever we choose” is correct because whomever is the object of choose. • Reader Bob Maguire submits this from a News Journal editorial by Carron J. Phillips: “Could the country's first black president precede America's first female commander-andchief?” Bob, an Air Force veterans, says, “I am quite familiar with the title of commander-in-chief, but have never heard of a commander and chief.” Niceties • “Problematic" used to mean "uncertain," not "presenting a problem.” Likewise, a “conundrum” is a riddle or anything that puzzles. It does not mean, as some people seem to think, “a problem.” • And let’s clear this up once and for all: The correct expression is “I couldn’t care less,” not, as many people think, “I could care less.” Think about it: If you are trying to express a complete lack of caring, why would you indicate that you must care a little by saying it’s possible for you to care less? • And finally, there is no need for “of” in such phrases as “not that big of a deal.” Pronunciation Etcetera is pronounced pretty much as it’s spelled. There is no k in it. It is not pronounced EK-setera.

Word of the Month

pathography Pronounced puh-THOG-ruh-fee, it’s a noun meaning a biography that focuses on the negative. The opposite is a hagiography.

By Bob Yearick

Phillies Follies We seem to have accumulated a plethora of items attesting to the fact that our favorite baseball team commits errors off the field as well as on it. Here they are in one ugly mashup: • Reader Ed Weirauch saw this quote from former Phillies Manager Ryne Sandberg, who was referring to Chase Utley: “That’s something that me and him will stay in communication with.” Wow! And we thought Charlie Manuel mangled the language. • Word Warrior Walt DelGiorno reports that the Phils advertised a day for kids at Citizens Bank Park thus: “Kid’s Opening Day.” As Walt points out, “That must be one special kid.” • From the Philadelphia Inquirer: “Mike Schmidt trotted onto the Veterans Stadium turf donning a wig and sunglasses.” Using “don” to mean “to wear” seems to be the latest misguided linguistic trend. Don refers to the act of putting on clothes, not wearing them. • In another Schmitty item, the former All-Star third baseman and now mediocre weekend color analyst claimed he was a “Phillies alumni.” Sorry, Mike; you were great, but you’re only one person. So you’re an alumnus. How Long, Oh Lord, How Long? (in which we chronicle the continued abuse of the apostrophe) From a News Journal obituary: “He then pursued his PhD from John’s Hopkins University.” Who is this John? Does he have a last name? Literally of the Month Upon learning that actor Tom Selleck was in trouble for stealing water for his California ranch, Nancy Johnson of the 93.7 “Wakeup Crew” naturally went right to: “Tom Selleck has landed in hot water—literally.”

Follow me on Twitter: @thewaronwords

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

Quotation of the Month “Rightly or wrongly, most people consider language as an index of culture, breeding, upbringing, personality, sometimes even of intelligence, decency, and integrity. Under the circumstances, it is unwise, not to say harmful, to pay no heed to your language.” —Mario Pei, Language for Everybody (1956)

09_Start.indd 3

8/24/15 4:24 PM


09_Start.indd 6

8/24/15 4:43 PM


START

F.Y.I. Things worth knowing By Matt Moore

FINDING HOPE THROUGH ART Local artist opens gallery in LOMA

A

fter the passing of her husband of 32 years, local artist Eunice LaFate was compelled to open a gallery exhibiting her art as a way to cope with her loss. Despite her siblings’ suggestions to move to New York City, where most artists flourish, LaFate chose to remain in Wilmington. “I told them I love Wilmington, and wanted to stay here,” she says. LaFate Gallery, featuring the artist’s unique, inspiring work, will open on Wednesday, Sept. 30, at 227 N. Market St., Wilmington.

BIKING THROUGH AMISH COUNTRY Tour welcomes cyclists of all ages, abilities

E

xperienced cyclist or absolute beginner, the Amish Country Bike Tour invites you. Set for Saturday, Sept. 12, in Dover, the ride includes several stops, including an Amish schoolhouse where locally-baked pies will be served. The cost to register is $60 for adults, $30 for ages 5-16, and free for children under 5. Admission includes a fully-catered barbecue meal, map and up to four food and rest stops.

WILMINGTON CHORUS PERFORMS IN GERMANY

HIGH PRAISE FOR AN AREA FAVORITE

47 kids spend week with host families

WXPN wins Station of the Year

A

s part of a cultural exchange program, the Wilmington Children’s Chorus spent the first week of August performing in Fulda, Germany, combining with the town’s youth orchestra. The singing ambassadors of the City of Wilmington were welcomed by an official delegation in the town’s center of local government, the Lord Mayor’s great marble hall. During their stay, the 47 high school-aged members lived with host families and rehearsed for their performance at the Klosterkirche am Frauenberg, a Baroque church at a monastery that dates to the Middle Ages.

L

ast month, the member-supported radio station WXPN won “Station of the Year” at the annual Friday Morning Quarterback Triple A Conference in Denver, Colo. Since 2010, this conference has honored the best in Triple A Radio, as chosen by radio executives, record company executives and artist management companies. The station’s associate general manager, Bruce Warren, was also named Program Director of the Year.

RUN FOR FUN AND CHARITY Ninth annual Nun Run 5K is Sept. 12

T

he Little Sisters of the Poor invite runners and walkers of all ages to compete in one of the area’s largest 5k races—the Nun Run—on Saturday, Sept. 12. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m. at the Jeanne Jugan Residence in Newark. Cost is $25. Runners can park directly across the street at Christiana High School. Trophies will be awarded to the fastest male and female runners, as well as walkers in open and masters divisions. After the race, enjoy live music, food, cold beer and goody bags. All proceeds will aid the Little Sisters of the Poor in their efforts to purchase a new refrigerator to help feed the hungry.

MODERN-DAY FAIRY TALE Local author publishes fourth novel

A

fter spending the last 24 years in law enforcement and social work, Lisa Burdziejko began shifting her focus to another passion: writing fiction. This resulted in the release of her first book in 2007. Since then, she has published three more novels. Her most recent, Kissing Frogs, centers on a single mom’s experience in getting back into the dating world for the first time in years. Kissing Frogs is a modern-day, fractured fairy tale that captures the excitement, anxiety and laughable moments of the protagonist, Ethel, as she learns she must kiss many frogs before finding her prince. The book is available online at Amazon and Barnes and Noble on Sept. 3. SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 5

11

8/25/15 11:22 AM


more reasons to come

INN

START

by the numbers A few performing arts figures worth noting

Brunch 1,933 lunch…

The seating capacity of the Gershwin Theatre in New York. Taking up almost six stories, this is the largest Broadway theater.

11,447 5,732 … Return September 20th & 21st Tuesdays NEW! $49 Tasting Menu For 2!

The number of times The Phantom of the Opera has been performed on Broadway since its opening night in 1988, making it the longest-running Broadway show to date.

The approximate number of times The Beach Boys have performed since their first concert in 1961.

4 Course Sharing Menu + 2 Glasses Of Wine

Beer Bucket SpecialS NEW! $15 domestics $

20 – 25 seasonal crafts & microbrews

3,500,000

$

Brandywine Valley r eStaurant week Accepting Reservations For September 14th – 19th $ 35 3 Course Dinner Menu ColumbusInn.net 302.571.1492 2216 Penn. Ave, Wilmington

The number of people in attendance for a performance by French composer Jean Michel Jarre in 1997, tying Rod Stewart’s 1994 performance in Rio de Janeiro for the all-time highest attendance at a concert.

1581 The year the first ballet was performed. Titled Le Ballet Comique de la Reine (The Queen’s Ballet Company), the performance was staged by Balthazar de Beaujoyeux in Paris.

12 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 4

8/25/15 10:01 AM


AFFORDABLE LUXURY A PA R T M E N T S D O W N T O W N

W I T H R E N T S S TA R T I N G AT J U S T $ 74 3 A M O N T H , F I N D O U T I F YO U Q U A L I F Y A N D YO U C O U L D B E N E X T T O C A L L M A R K E T S T R E E T H O M E !

village.residemkt.com | msv@residemkt.com | 302.607.7488 Leasing Office: 5 East 9th Street, Wilmington, DE

DREAM STREETS ART IN WILMINGTON 1970–1990 JUNE 27 – SEPTEMBER 27 Discover the artistic community that flourished in Wilmington during the 1970s and ‘80s! This landmark exhibition features craft, design, painting, performance art, photography, and more.

Dream Streets: Art in Wilmington 1970–1990 is made possible by DuPont and the Johannes R. and Betty P. Krahmer American Art Exhibition Fund. This exhibition is partially funded by a grant from the Delaware Humanities Forum, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional support is provided by grants from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency dedicated to nurturing and supporting the arts in Delaware, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. Image: Southern Approaches (detail), 1984. Kevin McLaughlin. Oil on canvas, 38 x 60 inches. Lent by Thomas C. Shea, Jr. © (2015) Kevin McLaughlin.

2301 Kentmere Parkway Wilmington, DE 19806 302.571.9590 | delart.org

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 21

13

8/24/15 4:51 PM


09_Start.indd 6

8/24/15 4:52 PM


START

Photo courtesy of Tico Moore

Better Than Fiction

Writer and English teacher Tico Moore stumbled upon Wilmington last year. Inspired by the enthusiasm he found here, he’s now a key part of the Creative District. By Krista Connor

S

ometimes, a literary trope comes true in the real world: a person will make an unanticipated discovery in an unexpected place. Such was the case with Tico Moore, a New York City English teacher and writer who, on a whim, hopped on a train bound for Wilmington last year for a weekend getaway. It was his first visit to Wilmington and while here he learned about the city’s initiatives aimed at growth and improvement, such as the Creative District. He sensed a momentum and enthusiasm that inspired him. “I go on vacation and come back with a sense of purpose,” he says. “There are moments in life where you can say, ‘This is where my life changed,’ and that moment happened.” An English teacher for the past six years and an education consultant, he went back to New York determined to get involved in Wilmington’s renaissance. Last September, that led to the creation of a consultant organization that advances writing and passion for literary arts among African Americans. This includes an African-American writer residency program, among others, with the ultimate goal of preserving African-American literature. Moore created the African-American Writers Institute (AAWI), a nonprofit umbrella organization, and pitched a partnership proposal to the Wilmington Renaissance Corporation (WRC), which oversees the Creative District. Currently in development, the District is a project in which artists will live and work in a creative community in Downtown Wilmington west of Market Street and bordered by Shipley, Fourth, Washington and Ninth streets. Moore and the AAWI would be based in the District. The proposal was enthusiastically embraced by the WRC, and since last fall Moore has traveled back and forth between his New York teaching jobs and his current place in the Cool Spring

neighborhood, developing a plan as a member of the first wave of Creative District artists. Moore has recruited the English Department at the University of Delaware, which will provide AAWI with interns. Ideally, the interns will become instructors for programs for the organizations AAWI is partnered with. Moore, who has a flare for the dramatic, says, “It’s about fate: me coming here one random weekend and me daring to dream, and this city being so supportive and encouraging of that dream.” Currently working on a consultancy basis, Moore and his AAWI collaborate with Wilmington organizations like The Creative Vision Factory and youth-based organizations, as well as the WRC, to implement writing programs, modify curriculum, and develop staff members. “The goal is to get people to write. They can be ex-offenders, youth, mentally ill patients, art connoisseurs,” he says. “This is the ideal place, and with the Creative District being formed in the neighborhood, there’s a cornucopia of stories.” He notes that he’s also working on his personal writing career, with plans to publish a novel within the next few years that will be based on his life experiences. “People are waiting for my energy to dwindle, but it’s infinite,” he says. An African-American originally from Mississippi, Moore was the first of his large family to graduate from college and study abroad. He lived in London for two years and has traveled to 15 countries. By the fall of 2016, he hopes to establish the AAWI with physical space to welcome its first participants for the writing residency. From there, residents will take part in the various programs Moore is initiating with city nonprofits. “This is an opportunity to really have an impact,” he says, “for Wilmington to be a destination for a modern writer renaissance.” SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 7

15

8/24/15 4:54 PM


Celebrating Historic New Castle & Historic Delaware City

Saturday, Oct. 3 (11:30am-5pm) Presented by:

REC RE ATIO NAL BIKE RID E & CO MPE TITIVE TIME TRIAL Name yo ur d istance . S o meth ing fo r all ab ilit y levels

C RAFT BE E R FE STIVAL IN BOTH HISTO RIC TOWNS More th an 16 craft b rew eries represe nte d

FRE E FA MILY FE STIVALS IN BOTH HISTO RIC TOWNS Live music featuring: Special Delivery, The Bullets, Buffalo Chip & The Heard Food • Game s • Ride s • E xhibit ion s • Ve n do rs

RiverTownsFestival.com RiverTowns_Full.indd 1

8/24/15 5:05 PM


Photo courtesy of Tom Burke

START

Tom Burke in front of a bird home replica of Martha Stewart’s home, Cantitoe Corners.

Arts and Crafts by the Brandywine The annual festival brings the usual—hundreds of exhibitors— plus the first-ever featured artist, bird-home-builder Tom Burke

F

eaturing hundreds of artists, the annual Brandywine Festival of the Arts returns to Wilmington on the weekend of Sept. 12-13. The 54-year-old Delaware tradition brings some 20,000 visitors to Brandywine Park’s Josephine Gardens for an end-of-summer celebration. The exhibiting artists and craftsmen encompass a wide range of styles, and the event includes live music performances, children’s activities, and many local food vendors. This year, the festival celebrates its first-ever featured artist, bird-home-builder Tom Burke. The Wilmington native’s bird homes aren’t your average back porch nesting nooks. Some are 9 ft. wide and bring commissions of up to $14,000 from such clients as legendary film director George Lucas and members of the DuPont family. Until 15 years ago when he took up bird-home-making, Burke was in the construction business with his father, building houses for humans. He moved on when competitive corporations came to the area, and got into his current craft as a hobby. Once his skill was discovered by friends, family and, eventually, wealthy people, the hobby quickly grew into a fulltime job of making replicas of historic buildings or his clients’ homes, like Lucas’ Skywalker Ranch.

Burke, who is nationally-renowned and has been featured on CBS’s Sunday Morning, will display his Wyeth collection, a series of bird homes based on the paintings of houses by Chadds Ford artist Andrew Wyeth. He will also display a home based on the old Monkey House at the Brandywine Zoo. Burke, who will be on hand both days of the festival to talk to visitors about his art, says being the inaugural featured artist is “a very big honor.” For $5, festival-goers receive a one-time handstamp that will gain them come-and-go admission for both days. The stamp also allows admission to the Brandywine Zoo for just $1. This is a rain or shine event. The first Brandywine Arts Festival, held in 1961, was organized by the nonprofit organization Recreation Promotion and Service, and was a one-day event featuring two-dimensional art and a bull roast. Participating artists hung paintings on clotheslines and fences. Over the years, the bull roast tradition was dropped, fine craft items were added, artists began to use racks and canopies to display their work, and the festival evolved into the tradition it is today. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. —Krista Connor SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 19

17

8/24/15 5:20 PM


DELCO LAGER american amber lager

ASAP

sessionable ipa

WEISSE WIT tart witbier

BELLCRACKER double ipa

BABY BOB american stout

09_Start.indd 18

8/24/15 5:23 PM


START

Enlightened by

Nightscape

Longwood Gardens’ current featured installation is a psychedelic journey that is drawing big crowds. Ricardo Rivera discusses the inspiration and challenges involved in creating the unique visuals and sounds. By Krista Connor

I

t’s 9 p.m., but the crowds are just arriving at Longwood Gardens. The atmosphere is filled with anticipation as spectators enter a familiar landscape that has taken on a new, fascinating personality in the dark. Ambient sounds fill the air, and the trees and shrubs have been transformed into canvases displaying spectacular colors. Ignoring his parents, a young boy is drawn trance-like away from the crowd to the foot of a large tree, called the Legacy Tree. He stares up at the swirls, circles, and enchanting, fairy-like objects that flit about like something out of the film Avatar. The child’s reaction epitomizes the desired effect of Nightscape: A Light and Sound Experience by Klip Collective. That effect: “Wonder,” says Director Ricardo Rivera. Created via video installations scattered around the premises, “Nightscape is a very psychedelic journey, and a way to evoke the subconscious through psychedelic emotions,

visuals and sounds,” Rivera says. “It’s about exploring, and I want people to do that, and to be transfixed.” The journey that led to Nightscape, which runs Wednesdays through Saturdays, July through Oct. 31, took an entire year to visualize and implement, says the Smyrna native. It started two years ago when Rivera, a video artist and co-founder of Philadelphia visual art shop Klip Collective, did an installation at Bartram’s Garden in West Philadelphia. Paul Redman, executive director at Longwood, happened to see the installation and was impressed. He contacted Rivera, and the Nightscape project began soon afterward. The initial stages went something like this: “Okay, Ricardo, this is your palette, these are our gardens,” Redman said to Rivera. “Immerse yourself.” “It is so different from what we have ever done before,” Redman says. ►

Photo courtesy of Klip Collective

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 15

19

8/24/15 5:25 PM


START ENLIGHTENED BY NIGHTSCAPE continued from previous page

Photo courtesy of Klip Collective

Just over a third

of the population in the United States is eligible to donate blood.

Less than 10%

of eligible donors actually

do.

The need for blood never takes a To make an appointment, visit www.DelmarvaBlood.org or call 1 888 8-BLOOD-8

Blood Bank

of Delmarva

Stunning visuals and sounds draw spectators into an enchanting world.

Rivera had gained a reputation doing visual installations at raves as an undergraduate at UD in the ’90s, and later at major festivals like Sundance, and for the Chamber Orchestra in Philadelphia. He approached this project with a specific philosophy—as he does with all his art, he says. “Everything we do is geared toward this idea that what we project on is just as important as what we’re projecting.” Instead of trying to project “random stuff onto random things,” he worked with the space at Longwood to create a natural harmony between visual effects and objects. An example is the Topiary Garden, which, in daylight, consists of a series of large shrubs trimmed round or as geometric shapes. During Nightscape, the angles and shapes are emphasized, coming to life as a symphony of animated projections open to interpretation. Redman says it gives him goosebumps. “[The Topiary] and all other pieces were inspired by the space, by Longwood itself,” says Rivera. The Topiary Garden is his favorite among all the installations, but, he says, Longwood inspired him with “8 million ideas.” He says he knew he didn’t want Nightscape to be a “literal piece or story,” but rather an emotional journey, drawing out the sense of Longwood’s aliveness. This explains the ethereal walk through Flower Garden Drive or the Conservatory, where bizarre, disparate sounds and shapes flood the senses, leaving the interpretation entirely up to the viewer. There are one or two “literal” moments. One occurs when the trees behind the Large Lake function as a natural stage, coming to life with projected jumping fish and soaring dragonflies. An original orchestral piece builds to a climax alongside the visuals. Rivera admits this has—unintentionally—made guests cry. “I think it’s the music,” he says. “It’s a very uplifting orchestral piece.” Redman is awed by Rivera’s accomplishments. “The Large Lake is cinematography on a whole other level,” he says. “It’s breaking ground, and something that no one else has ever done before on a living canopy like that.” Redman says that many guests return to Nightscape, and some relax on the lounge chairs overlooking the lake, absorbing the visuals and sounds. The music was produced specifically for Nightscape. Electronic, ambient—and in the case of the Topiary Garden and Large Lake— orchestral sounds resonate throughout the installments. Among those who worked on the project are composer and musician Jon Barthmus of Sun Airway and composer and musician Justin Geller of Pink Skull.

20 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 16

8/24/15 5:30 PM


Photo courtesy of Klip Collective

Rivera says he’s never spent so much time on a project as he has with Nightscape.

Hagley’s newest exhibition will turn heads from October 2, 2015, through October 2, 2016

“It was very important to have music as a part of this process, and for them to create the work the way I was creating the work, which was in response to the garden,” Rivera says. He met a few unexpected challenges during the installation of Nightscape. Among them: “Plants,” Rivera says, laughing. “We had to develop a whole other visual language [for them].” Throughout his career and in the co-founding of Klip Collective in 2003, Rivera has projected on a variety of objects— cars, buildings, even people; but plants were a new undertaking. Longwood’s flora and fauna required countless hours of documenting, setting up, developing, leaving, coming back, and starting over. Rivera says he’s never spent so much time on one project, although he didn’t bother to keep track of the hours. Now that they are finally established, Rivera says, the installations don’t require much human intervention. In fact, it’s not even a matter of flipping a switch, because his high-tech systems are monitored remotely and set to automatically turn on at the appointed time. And then the technology—or magic, depending on perspectives —takes over. “Ricardo is so visionary and innovative,” says Redman. “I can only imagine where this art form will be in another 10 or 15 years.” Nightscape frequently sells out, and Redman predicts even more sellouts as the event gains popularity and autumn arrives. To purchase tickets and view schedules, go to longwoodgardens.org/nightscape. A beer garden and live music take place at 6 p.m. Thursday evenings, and Redman recommends stopping by prior to Nightscape.

The Director’s Recommendation We asked Rivera the best way to experience Nightscape, and here’s what he said: “I designed it from a specific perspective. Personally, I think it’s best to exit the Visitor’s Center and turn right toward the Rose Arbor. If you go that way, there’s a cascade of installations, which are their own act. Then go down Flower Garden Drive, which is a huge tunnel where I project on a canopy of trees, toward the Legacy Tree projection, and end up at the Large Lake. Circle back through the light and sound installation of the interactive Flower Garden Walk. Then you should go to the Topiary, which can be viewed at any time. It’s its own piece, in and of itself. Then go to the Conservatory, where you’ll find three installations.”

SUPPORTED IN PART BY OUT & ABOUT WILMINGTON, DELAWARE • WWW.HAGLEY.ORG

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 17

21

8/24/15 5:32 PM


START

MADE IN DELAWARE

Joe Otto, owner of Sovereign Air, sees the day when many homes will have a 3D printer.

A POSSIBLE INDUSTRIAL

REVOLUTION 3D printing, or, as Newark’s Sovereign Air prefers, “an additive manufacturing process,” is quick, inexpensive, game-changing By Larry Nagengast Photos by Dennis Dischler

22 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 12

8/24/15 5:33 PM


oe Otto is confident that he’s on the front end of the next industrial revolution, but he doesn’t think that revolution will make him rich. What’s more, he says, as the revolution advances, it will likely change the shape of his business; but he can’t say for certain how that might occur. Otto is the founder and owner of Sovereign Air, LLC, a 3D printing business that opened a little more than a year ago in an office/retail strip just off East Main Street in downtown Newark. Otto calls 3D printing “a terrible name,” and “a slang term,” claiming it hardly begins to describe what he says is “an additive manufacturing process.” Indeed, 3D printing uses no paper or ink. (Otto chuckles as he relates that a common question when he gives demonstrations is “where do you put the ink?”) 3D printers use plastic filament, sold on spools in many different colors and formulations, which is heated and pulled through an extruder device as it follows instructions embedded in a computer design file to create the desired product . . . but we’re getting a bit ahead of ourselves. What’s more important than how 3D printers work is who’s using them and what they’re used for—now and in the future. “Our demographic ranges from 8-year-old kids to 70-yearold grandparents. They’re artists, inventors, people in industry,” Otto says. “It’s kind of interesting. We don’t know who’s calling or what’s happening next.” While Otto suggests that 3D printing can be for everyone, he says that most people don’t have a good idea of how the technology might apply to their work or to their everyday lives. That’s why educating the public takes up a good portion of his time—going to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) programs at schools, robotics expos, Lions and Rotary club meetings, even senior centers. “Anyone who’s interested—we’ll take our printers and give them a presentation,” he says. The most common uses of the technology, Otto says, are for making prototypes and one-of-a-kind creations. He asserts that this “additive manufacturing process” is bringing about another industrial revolution because it’s capable of making new products and manufacturing established products in new ways. “It’s an inexpensive and rapid way of prototyping,” he says. To get started, all it takes is an idea and a drawing created on a computer-assisted design (CAD) software file. Sometimes the CAD file isn’t even necessary, Otto says. “We’ve had people come in with ideas that were literally on a napkin, and we provide design engineering services, so we’ve done the design, created the file and gone on from there.”

J

The technology is versatile, capable of creating items in all sorts of shapes and sizes.

Sovereign Air sells 3D printers at prices ranging from $999 to $4500.

While architects and engineers rely on top-of-the-line software, there are basic programs that beginners can use. For example, with Tinkercad, a free, downloadable program, “firstgraders can take basic shapes, design their own city and create them on the printer,” Otto says. Then there was the bride-to-be who sent Otto a picture of her infinity tattoo that included her name and her fiance’s name. She wanted the tattoo replicated in 3D, to be used as the topper for her wedding cake. Otto found a way to do that—and even incorporated the wedding date into the design. While 3D printing jobs can be as basic as replicating Lego building blocks, they can also be complex, with movable and detachable parts. As examples, Otto shows off a model steam shovel with multiple hinges and a 28-piece model of a tyrannosaurus rex that looks like it could have come out of a kit in a hobby shop. Mark Manisso, president and chief creative officer for Forte, a marketing agency, recently went to Sovereign Air with a project for one of his clients—creating a prototype for a new dental tool. The tool, called Stayclear, is a plastic mirror with a disposable optical head. Sovereign Air helped fine-tune the design and created the prototypes, which Forte used in presentations to several leading manufacturers of dental products. Manisso says he expects a contract to be signed soon to put the tool into mass production. “If we didn’t have the prototypes, we would have had nothing to show,” he says. “We had an idea and Sovereign Air was able to execute it rapidly. The ability to go from a drawing to a 3D working model is paramount in product development.” Being able to execute these steps quickly has the potential to reform American manufacturing, Otto says. It has already enabled Sovereign Air to land a pair of significant mass production jobs. One is with a Big Three automaker, which Otto would not name, to manufacture plastic parts that hold auto transmissions in place on the assembly line and during testing. The car maker had been getting the parts from a supplier in China—10 weeks after placing the order. “Our process can get most of the parts to them in 72 hours, resulting in a huge time and cost savings,” Otto says. The other is an aircraft manufacturer for whom Sovereign Air is making parts that are used in the ventilation systems of jet planes. “We’ve done several hundred parts in the past year,” Otto says. Last month he was working on a prototype for what could become another big job—a natural gas vent pipe for the Consolidated Edison utility company in New York. ► SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 13

23

8/24/15 5:34 PM


START

PiccolinaToscana.com 1412 n. dupont st. 302.654.8001

Architects, as might be expected, can use 3D printing to A POSSIBLE INDUSTRIAL create scale models of their projects. REVOLUTION continued from previous page An architect recently asked Otto to print a 3D model of a home he had designed because his clients wanted to paint it so they could better envision what the house would look like after it was built. Locally, Otto notes that two programs operating at the University of Delaware’s STAR campus, on the site of the former Chrysler assembly plant, do their own 3D printing and sometimes call on him for support. The GoBabyGo program creates robotic mobile devices and is developing kid-friendly exoskeletons to assist children with mobility impairments. The BADER Consortium focuses on development of orthopedic devices for U.S. soldiers and veterans who have been injured in combat. Sovereign Air, Otto says, has also given occasional assistance to the Nemours/Alfred I. du Pont Hospital for Children when it needs customizations that its own 3D printers can’t create. For the immediate future, Otto expects prototyping to expand and businesses to explore ways that 3D printing might benefit their operations. Many businesses have yet to figure out how to make use of the new technology, and many of those that have still haven’t determined whether it’s better to buy or lease printers or outsource their projects to a company like Sovereign Air, Otto says. In a few years, however, it’s not too hard to imagine 3D printers sitting alongside personal computers in home after home. That’s because Otto envisions a revolution in the world of spare parts distribution. He already gets some business from customers seeking a quick replacement for items like broken plastic vacuum cleaner parts. Imagine that on a larger scale. Instead of stocking plastic replacement parts in warehouses, manufacturers could post a digital design file for each part on its website. Instead of ordering the part online, the consumer would pay to download the digital file, turn on the 3D printer and have the new part in a matter of minutes. No warehousing, no shipping, no waiting. And with personal 3D printers proliferating, there will be less business for Sovereign Air, which is one reason Otto doesn’t see himself getting rich from the technology. There is also great potential for a new generation of artisans making customized accessories for your home—vases or candlesticks, for example. Create the design, choose a plastic filament of the desired color and appropriate characteristics (heator water-resistant, for example), and print it out. Should such a revolution occur, just about anything could be made in Delaware—provided that it’s the right size to come out of a printer. (Currently, the largest capacity of any printer available at Sovereign Air is 16 by 14 by 16 inches.) Until then, Otto plans to run what he says is the only fullservice 3D printing operation in Delaware—selling printers and supplies; providing design, engineering and production services; and offering workshops and training programs. Most of the printers at Sovereign Air sell for $999 to $3,399, with one top-of-the-line model going for $4,500. Otto sells a bundle with a basic printer, two cartridges of filament, design software and training for $1,500. Three-hour group classes, for $40 per person, offer an introduction to the technology and the opportunity to make something simple to take home. “Do I think every house will have one? No,” Otto says. “Do I think they will become mainstream and an item in most houses? I’d say yes.” The direction 3D printing ultimately takes remains unclear, but its future seems bright. “It’s still a fledgling industry,” Otto says. “It’s still learning what it’s going to be.”

24 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 14

8/24/15 5:35 PM


MKT

GRAND OPENING R I B B O N C U T T I N G & C E L E B R AT I O N September 24th @ 5PM | Between Market Street 500 & 600 Block followed by IN Wilmington Block Party *Exclusive NEW Construction Lease Up Prices | Call Today!

* P l u s . . . C h o o s e Yo u r A c c e n t C o l o r ! residemkt.com | info@residemkt.com | 844.268.2178 *Custom Color Applies to 608 MKT Only *Exclusions Apply. Ask Leasing Agent For Details

Leasing Office: 605 N. Market St. Wilmington, DE

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Start.indd 21

25

8/24/15 5:38 PM


FOCUS

Let The Shows Begin! Autumn offers an eclectic cornucopia of performances and exhibits. Here’s your clip-and-save list. By Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald

26 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 2

8/24/15 5:40 PM


These enthusiastic performers are set to entertain you in the coming months. They include representatives of Christina Cultural Arts Center, City Theater Company, Delaware Shakespeare Company, Delaware Theatre Company, Fearless Improv, First State Ballet Theatre, Gable Music Ventures, The Grand Opera House, Mélomanie, OperaDelaware, Pieces of a Dream, Wilmington Ballet Academy of the Dance, Wilmington Drama League and UD’s Resident Ensemble Players (The REP). Photo Joe del Tufo

ARDEN CONCERT GILD Autumn in Arden officially begins Friday, Sept. 18, as In The Light presents Pink Floyd’s Animals and Wish You Were Here—and tickets are selling faster than pumpkin spice lattes. This is the same band that rocked the Gild with their 2012 Led Zeppelin Physical Graffiti show – and it was epic, so don’t miss this one. Arden next welcomes The Cumbia All Stars on Sunday, Sept. 20. This is a nine-piece band with legends of Peruvian dance music. On Friday, Oct. 2, critically acclaimed Baltimore synth-pop titans Lower Dens hit the stage, celebrating their breakthrough album, Escape From Evil. Sheer Mag, an Indie “band to watch,” appears Saturday, Oct. 17, followed by a Blues doubleheader from the Damon Fowler Band and Alvin Youngblood Hart on Saturday, Nov. 7. Arden Gild Hall, 2126 The Highway, Arden 475-3126 • ardenconcerts.com

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 3

27

8/25/15 12:02 PM


FOCUS LET THE SHOWS BEGIN! continued from previous page

THE ARTSTHEATRE DUPONT AT TRINITY Delaware’s Trinity is home Broadway to the Experience only free music startsseries with the in the smash city,musical and its comedy new season Sister brings Act, running Oct.regional renowned 14-19. Next talents: (Dec.Serafin 9-14) isString CirqueQuartet DreamsatHolidaze, 4 p.m. on with Sunday, more than Oct.300 25, costumes,by20 followed a moving acts andFestival 30 performers Mass of All showcasing Souls, featuring heart-pounding, Mozart’s Requiem, gravity-defying by the feats. Peter Trinity Choir and withthe chamber Starcatcher, orchestra, theon swashbuckling Sunday, Nov. prequel 1 at 10:30toa.m. Peter AnPan, Evening romps of throughand Gospel our Jazz Neverland with the of Wilmington Wilson Somers fromTrio Feb.fills 17-22. theThe sanctuary DuPont’s onseason Saturday, finishes Nov. withatRain: 14, 7:30 p.m. A Tribute and atoholiday-themed the Beatles (March performance—Christmas 6-8), Camelot (April 14-19) with and the Cathedral perennial favorite Choir School Guys of and Delaware—puts Dolls (May 12-17). you in the spirit on Saturday, Dec. 12, at 7:30 p.m. DuPont Building, Admission is free 1007 for allN.performances; Market St., Wilmington donations gratefully accepted. 656-4401 1108 N. Adams • duponttheatre.com St., Wilmington 887.9300 • TheArtsatTrinity.org

BOOTLESS STAGEWORKS Celebrating the second season in its new digs, Bootless starts 15-16 with Star Wars: A New Musical Hope (Oct. 9 -17). This semi-original work is a parody of Episode IV: A New Hope, with a witty script by local playwright Jeremy Gable, music by Timothy Edward Smith and Hunter Nolen, a fully robotic R2D2, seven-foot Chewbacca and all the space rebels you love. Tickets are $15 online or $18 at the door. November shines with The Light in the Piazza (Nov. 6-21), the story of young love featuring Peabody Conservative alumna Kimberly Christie as Clara. Tickets are $22 online or $25 at the door. Finally, (responsibly) toast the holidays with Bye, Bye Liver: The Philadelphia Drinking Play (Wilmington Edition), Dec. 4-5. This fast-paced romp is two parts sketch comedy, one part audience drinking game with a dash of improv and a slice of music, served up for your entertainment. All tickets are $20. 1301 N. Broom St., Wilmington • 887-9300 • bootless.org

BRANDYWINE BAROQUE The Barn at Flintwoods—the serene and picturesque home of this early music ensemble—once again fills with beautiful music on Sunday, Sept. 27, with selections from The Fairy Queen, a lavish “semi-opera” by Henry Purcell. The concert season continues with a program of Vivaldi concertos on Friday, Dec. 11, and Sunday, Dec. 13. Details and tickets are available at brandywinebaroque.org. The Barn at Flintwoods, 205 Center Meeting Rd., Wilmington 877-594-4546 • brandywinebaroque.org

CHRISTINA THE GRANDCULTURAL OPERA HOUSE ARTS CENTER The Grand CCAC is registering doesn’t disappoint now for fall, as headliners offering several and legends new courses, light up including its season.Novel This month, enjoy Writing for Beginners the Grammy®-nominated with Jayne Thompson, Kenny Wayne and Drum Shepherd Line with Band Peter on Tuesday, Antony. Sept.652.0101 Call 9, and Emmylou for details.Harris CCAC’s with signature Specialevent, Guestthe Nathaniel Christi Awards, Rateliffreturns on Thursday, Friday, Sept.23, Oct. 25.bringing Then, outlaws an electric getparty ready! vibe Join tothe Wilmington legendarywith Red-Headed the theme,Stranger Arts forfor Oura night of City’s Sake. Willie TheNelson evening & Family beginson with Wednesday, renownedSept. jazz pianist 10. Watch Aaron for exciting Diehl, followed shows, including by the awards .38 Special, ceremony Last inComic historicStanding Willingtown and Square more along and an theopen-air, way thisarts-infused season. 818 N. on party Market Market St., Street. Wilmington Tickets are $75 and are available at ChristiAwards.org. In 652-5577 or 800-37-GRAND December, CCAC dazzles your • TheGrandWilmington.org holidays with the magnificent “Carols in Color,” featuring Eleone Dance Theatre. 705 N. Market St., Wilmington 652-0101 • ccacde.org

28 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 4

8/25/15 10:17 AM


E X P E R I E N C E

2015-16 Single Tickets Now On Sale TheGrandWilmington.org

Buddy Guy

Five-Time Grammy® Award Winner

Legendary rock and blues musician returns to The Grand with his fiery blues guitar

FRI | OCT 2 | 8PM | $50-$58

LIVE IS ALWAYS BETTER! SEE THE FINALISTS FROM THE HIT NBC SERIES PERFORM LIVE! The winner and finalists from NBC’s stand-up comedy competition

THUR | OCT 22 | 8PM $36-$46 TheGrandWilmington.org | 302.652.5577 | 800.37.GRAND | 818 N. Market Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

THEGRAND

All tickets subject to box office service charges. Artists, dates, times and programs are subject to change. THIS PROGRAM IS MADE POSSIBLE IN PART BY GRANTS FROM THE DELAWARE DIVISION OF THE ARTS. A STATE AGENCY DEDICATED TO NURTURING AND SUPPORTING THE ARTS IN DELAWARE, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS.

Arden Concert Gild, The Green Willow, Brandywine Friends of Oldtime Music, and the Latino Community Advisory Council are valued partners for many performances in the 2014-15 season.

Host your next Business Meeting at TheGrand Call 302.652.2713 www.thegrandwilmington.org/Rentals/Special-Events

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 5

29

8/24/15 5:48 PM


FOCUS LET THE SHOWS BEGIN! continued from page 28

CITY THEATER DUPONT THEATRE COMPANY Delaware’s Broadway Off-Broadway Experience kicks offstarts a season with the of Delaware smash musical Premieres, comedy firstSister reuniting Act, running CTC withOct. the 14-19. writersNext of their (Dec. 2013 9-14) smash is Cirque Bloody Dreams Bloody Holidaze, Andrewwith Jackson—this more thantime 300 costumes, for a rollicking 20 acts musical and comedy 30 performers based showcasing on Shakespeare’s heart-pounding, Love’s Labour’s gravity-defying Lost (Dec. feats. CTC’s 4-19). Peter and Fearless the Starcatcher, Improv teamthe continues swashbuckling to deliver prequel monthly to Peter bellyPan, laughs romps on throughSaturdays second our Neverland through of Wilmington December at from Penn’s Feb. Place 17-22. in The historic DuPont’s Newseason Castle.finishes Details withtickets and Rain: AforTribute all are to available the Beatles at city-theater.org. (March 6-8), Camelot (April 14-19) and perennial favorite Guys address: Performance and DollsThe (May Black 12-17). Box, 4 S. Poplar St., Wilmington DuPont Building, 220-8285 • city-theater.org 1007 N. Market St., Wilmington 656-4401 • duponttheatre.com

DELAWARE ART MUSEUM Poetry in Beauty, running Saturday, Nov. 7, through Sunday, Jan. 31, is a retrospective of Marie Spartali Stillman, showcasing her importance as an artist within the Victorian avant-garde. The landmark exhibition features landscapes, portraits and subject paintings that reflect her British Pre-Raphaelite training and Renaissance art influence, with works from public and private collections. The exhibit is open Wednesdays through Sundays and is free on Thursday evenings and Sundays. Later in the season, warm up with the Museum’s Winter Arts Festival on Friday, Dec. 11, 5-8 p.m., and Saturday, Dec. 12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m... Browse handmade items by local artisans, tour festive works in the museum collection, enjoy holiday music and more. Admission is free for members and $5 for non-members. 2301 Kentmere Pkwy., Wilmington • 571-9590 • delart.org

DELAWARE CENTER FOR THE CONTEMPORARY ARTS The DCCA is busting at its steel beams with all manner of ArtStuff. Case in point, every first Friday events. Sept. 4 features all 10 Rolling Revolution food trucks; Oct. 2 sees Wilmington Ballet Academy of the Dance collaborating with ensemble Mélomanie; and Dec. 4 pairs “Taste of the Holidays” with DCCA’s annual Holiday Craft Show. At the Fall Arts & Business and Members Cocktail Party on Thursday, Sept. 17, Andy McWilliams of Art-A-Hack and Hardware Hack Lab speaks about “Artists and Technology Disruptions.” October opens the signature Art Salad lunchtime discussions, followed by Free Family Sundays in November. The highlight of the fall season will surely be the Contemporary Gala—an elegant night of art, music, dancing and unconventional entertainment on Saturday, Nov. 14. And remember, admission to the DCCA is always free! 200 S. Madison St., Wilmington • 656-6466 • thedcca.org

DELAWARE THE GRAND SHAKESPEARE OPERA HOUSE FESTIVAL When shall we threedisappoint meet again? The Grand doesn’t as headliners and legends light up its season. This In thunder, lightning, or in rain? month, enjoy the Grammy®-nominated Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band on Tuesday, When hurly-burly’s done, when the battle’s lostNathaniel and won... Sept. 9,the and Emmylou Harris with Special Guest Rateliff on Thursday, Spend a night with two masters of macabre—William Shakespeare Edgar Allan Sept. 25. Then, outlaws get ready! Join the legendary Red-Headedand Stranger for a Poe. At this annual autumnal event, DelShakes actors gather to read bone-chilling night of Willie Nelson & Family on Wednesday, Sept. 10. Watch for exciting shows, selections from the plays the Bard and theand poems short stories of Poe. Dare to including .38 Special, LastofComic Standing moreand along the way this season. choose amongSt., three spooky-cool venues—the gothic halls of Rockwood Mansion, 818 N. Market Wilmington the grandeur of the Read House & Gardens in historic New Castle or the colonial-era 652-5577 or 800-37-GRAND • TheGrandWilmington.org Stone Stable in historic Odessa. But choose quickly—only 30 seats are available for each performance. Tickets are $18.50. Performances run Oct.16-18 and Oct. 23-25. Performance address: Rockwood Park, 4651 Washington St. Ext., Wilmington 415-3373 • delshakes.org

30 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 6

8/25/15 10:20 AM


JOIN THE ONLY THEATRE IN DELAWARE DEVELOPING NEW SHOWS FOR BROADWAY!

Maurice Hines is

TAPPIN’ THRU

LIFE

See Broadway legend Maurice Hines, as he teams up again with the unforgettable Manzari Brothers for the first time since the smash hit production of SOPHISTICATED LADIES to tap us through his incredible career in show business. With song and dance, Hines pays tribute to his brother, Gregory, and the singers who have inspired him, from Frank Sinatra to Lena Horne. To help bring the history of American tap to life, Hines brings The Diva Orchestra, an all-female nine-piece big band. Get ready to laugh, smile and tap your feet to the infectious song and dance of Maurice Hines! Catch this performance before Maurice takes his show on the road and ultimately to the GREAT WHITE WAY!

3 WEEKS ONLY! September 16 - October 4 Title Sponsor

09_Focus.indd 7

Season Sponsor

302-594-1100

www.DelawareTheatre.org

Hospitality Sponsors

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

Media Sponsors

31

8/24/15 6:09 PM


FOCUS LET THE SHOWS BEGIN! continued from page 30

DELAWARE DUPONT THEATRE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Delaware’s This month,Broadway Alan Jordan Experience takes thestarts helmwith as the thenew smash executive musicaldirector comedyofSister the DSO. Act, running Oct. Jordan’s tenure 14-19. coincides Next (Dec. with 9-14) the launch is Cirque of DSO’s Dreams season. Holidaze, Called with Themore Season than of300 the costumes, Bells, it begins 20 acts withand a Friday, 30 performers Sept. 11, memorial showcasing concert heart-pounding, featuring Mozart’s gravity-defying Requiem feats.a collaboration and Peter and thewith Starcatcher, The Mastersingers the swashbuckling of Wilmington. prequel ThetofullPeter season Pan,includes romps through the Classics our Concert Neverland Series of Wilmington of five programs from Feb. and the 17-22. Chamber The DuPont’s Concert season Seriesfinishes of four with Rain: A programs, asTribute well as to thethe Explorer BeatlesExperience (March 6-8), concerts Camelot for(April school 14-19) children. and perennial Maestro favorite David Amado Guys and continues Dolls (May in his12-17). 13th year as music director of the DSO. DuPont 818 N. Market Building, St.,1007 Wilmington N. Market St., Wilmington 656-4401 ••duponttheatre.com 656-7442 delawaresymphony.org

DELAWARE THEATRE COMPANY DTC proudly continues as the only area theater developing new and existing works for Broadway. Maurice Hines is Tappin’ Thru Life (Sept. 16-Oct. 4), starring and created by Hines himself, opens DTC’s 37th season. An infectious musical tribute to his and his brother Gregory’s life, this show joins Maurice with the Diva Orchestra, the Manzari Brothers and one lucky local child tapper. Next is Wilmington native David Robson’s Playing the Assassin (Oct. 21-Nov. 8), based on the true story of the career-ending hit delivered by Jack Tatum on Darryl Stingley in a 1978 NFL game. It’s an exploration into the inherent violence of football and the associated “hero worship.” Join DTC for its final production, Sheryl Crow’s new musical, Diner (Dec. 2-27), based on the 1982 movie by Barry Levinson. Single tickets for all shows and subscriptions are available now. 200 Water St., Wilmington • 594-1100 • DelawareTheatre.org FIRST STATE BALLET THEATRE First State Ballet Theatre opens with a lineup that will delight everyone from the first-time ballet-goer to the most sophisticated aficionado. The first of the company’s productions at the Grand is Tchaikovsky’s beloved Sleeping Beauty. The timeless tale is choreographed by Artistic Director Pasha Kambalov, with costumes from Russia’s finest ballet costumiers. The popular series Up Front with FSBT delivers highlights of classical and contemporary ballet to an intimate audience of just 75, followed by a reception with FSBT’s dancers. Celebrate the holidays with The Nutcracker—a Wilmington’s holiday tradition at the Grand—with gorgeous costumes from Russia, Tchaikovsky’s sumptuous score and staging by Kambalov. All main stage tickets begin at $14 for students 18 and under. Call 1-800-37-GRAND or visit ticketsatthegrand.org. Performance venue: 818 N. Market St., Wilmington • 658-7897 • firststateballet.com

GABLE THE GRAND MUSIC OPERA VENTURES HOUSE The Grand Gable continues doesn’ttodisappoint deliver lush, as headliners live lyrics andtolegends Wilmingtonians’ light up its ears. season. Wilmo This month, enjoy thecurated Wednesdays—a Grammy®-nominated lineup from every Kenny musical Wayne corner—rolls Shepherd Band on weekly on Tuesday, at the Sept. 9, along Queen, and Emmylou with Singer-Songwriter Harris with Special showcases Gueston Nathaniel Saturday,Rateliff Sept. 12,on and Thursday, Oct. 24. Sept. 25. Gable fills Then, the Queen outlaws with getrooms—not ready! Join only the legendary a wall—ofRed-Headed sound on Saturday, Stranger Sept. for a night 26, asofAngela Willie Sheik Nelsontakes & Family over upstairs on Wednesday, and Save Sept. the10. Valley Watch Music for exciting Fest headlines shows, including .38with downstairs Special, ArdenLast Kind, Comic AreaStanding 302, SIRSY, and New moreSweden along the and way more. this Tickets season.are 818 in $15 N. advance Market St., forWilmington each performance. And for a mere $20, Wilmo Rock Circus will 652-5577 or sonically kick 800-37-GRAND you out of your • TheGrandWilmington.org turkey/tryptophan coma on Saturday, Nov. 28. Performance venues: World Cafe Live at the Queen, 500 N. Market St.; Extreme Pizza, 201 N. Market St., Wilmington • gablemusicventures.com

32 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 8

8/25/15 10:20 AM


DELAWARE’S RESIDENT PROFESSIONAL ACTING COMPANY performing at the University of Delaware

SEP. 23 - OCT. 11

JAN. 20 - FEB. 6

THE PATSY

WAIT UNTIL DARK

translated and adapted from Georges Feydeau’s Le Dindon by Greg Leaming

by Frederick Knott

A lightning-fast French farce of old lovers, new flames, and a wildfire of compromising positions.

MAR. 2 - MAR. 20

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

NOV. 11 - DEC. 6

HEARTBREAK HOUSE

adapted for the stage by Christopher Sergel, based on the novel by Harper Lee

by George Bernard Shaw A weekend in the country with eccentric family, screwball friends, and a house full of preposterous opinions. What could possibly go wrong? Sponsored in part by:

09_Focus.indd 9

A sociopathic killer stalks “the world’s champion blind lady” in this edge-ofyour seat mystery thriller.

APRIL 13 - MAY 8

RED

by John Logan An artist’s greatest achievement could become his biggest undoing. APRIL 20 - MAY 8

THINGS WE DO FOR LOVE

by Alan Ayckbourn A three-story house with three stories of love. And an obsession or two.

The beloved American classic of courage, compassion, and coming of age in 1930s Alabama.

ROSELLE CENTER FOR THE ARTS | NEWARK, DE (302) 831-2204 | WWW.REP.UDEL.EDU

35 8/24/15 6:19 PM

JUNE 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM


FOCUS LET THE SHOWS BEGIN! continued from page 32

THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE/ THE PLAYHOUSE ON RODNEY SQUARE The “coming together” of the Grand and the Playhouse earlier this year created quite the arts buzz. They upped the ante with two exciting seasons, including the blockbuster musical Annie opening first at the Playhouse (Dec. 1-6), and a full slate of performances on both Grand and baby grand stages: Sinatra Centennial by Sean Reilly on Sunday, Oct. 18; Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox on Friday, Nov. 13, and the Glenn Miller Orchestra on Saturday, Nov. 28. Tickets for all shows are available now. 818 N. Market St., Wilmington • 800.37.GRAND TheGrandWilmington.org for all Grand events 1007 N. Market St., Wilmington • 888-0200

MARKET STREET MUSIC Market Street Music goes big in its opening performance, pairing the Mastersingers of Wilmington with the Delaware Symphony Orchestra and guest soloists Mary Wilson, soprano; Meg Bragle, mezzo-soprano; Brian Downen, tenor; and Grant Youngblood, baritone, on Mozart’s Requiem under the direction of David Amado. Its popular Thursday Noontime Concerts series begin at 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 1, with the Copeland String Quartet and continues weekly with diverse acts like the Caribbean jazz of Basodee; organist David Schelat; Celtic-meets-Broadway singer Charlie Zahm, and local jazz favorites Sharon Sable and E. Shawn Qaissaunee. Performance address: First & Central Presbyterian Church, 1101 N. Market St., Wilmington • 654.5371 • marketstreetmusicde.org

MÉLOMANIE The “provocative pairings” of this 2015 Best of Delaware ensemble are juxtaposed with contemporary works of the DCCA’s featured gallery artists. Their concert on Sunday, Sept. 13, at 2 p.m. features its co-artistic directors—harpsichordist Tracy Richardson and DDOA Masters Fellow and flutist Kimberly Reighley. They will premier two new works, one from a local and another from an international composer. Friday, Oct. 2, aligns the ensemble with Wilmington Ballet Academy of the Dance for a performance during DCCA’s Art Loop. Their Sunday, Oct. 18, performance at 2 p.m. features another World Premiere piece, this time by composer, guitarist and guest artist Kevin J. Cope. Performance address: Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, 200 S. Madison St., Wilmington • 764.6338 • melomanie.org

THE MUSIC SCHOOL OF DELAWARE The Music School serves up performances for every taste, beginning with A Musical Bounty on Thursday, Oct. 15, at 7 p.m. featuring its Faculty Chamber Orchestra performing Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. Welcome renowned singersongwriter Doug James (Michael Bolton’s “How Am I Supposed to Live without You”) for a songwriting workshop on Nov. 7 and a CD release/concert on Nov. 14, in memory of Larry Walker, who was James’ mentor and a Music School faculty member. On Nov. 8, alumna and Philadelphia Orchestra violinist Barbara Govatos returns for a performance. 4101 Washington St., Wilmington • 762.1132 • musicschoolofdelaware.org

34 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 10

8/25/15 10:21 AM


SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 11

35

8/24/15 6:22 PM


FOCUS LET THE SHOWS BEGIN! continued from page 34

NEW CANDLELIGHT DINNER THEATER Candlelight season starts with the tasty “shock and awe” of Sondheim and Wheeler’s most notorious coiffeur, Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street (Sept. 19- Nov. 1). Next, the madcap life of the eccentric Mame takes over (Nov. 14-Dec. 20). Performances are Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons. Tickets are $59 for adults and $33 children (ages 4-12) and all prices include a buffet dinner. 2208 Millers Rd., Wilmington • 475-2313 candlelighttheatredelaware.com

OPERADELAWARE This fall, enjoy cries of Viva Italia! Join Jeffrey Miller piano; Jennifer Cherest, soprano; Lara Tillotson, mezzo soprano; Jeremy Blossey, tenor and Jose Sacin, baritone, in the casual setting of the Riverfront Studio for a journey through Italian opera in honor of OD’s Spring Festival—Verdi’s final masterpiece Falstaff and the recent resurrection of Faccio’s Amleto (Hamlet). Savor some vino and Italian nosh paired with outstanding music on two dates—Thursday, Oct. 22, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 25, at 2 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 4 S. Poplar St., Wilmington 442.7807 • operade.org

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE’S REP THEATER The REP starts with The Patsy (Sept. 23 -Oct. 11)—a lightning-fast French farce of old lovers, new flames and a wildfire of compromising positions, translated and adapted from Georges Feydeau’s Le Dindon by Greg Leaming. The onstage antics continue with Heartbreak House (Nov. 11-Dec. 6) by George Bernard Shaw. A weekend in the country with eccentric family, screwball friends and a house full of preposterous opinions—what could possibly go wrong? Roselle Center for the Arts, 110 Orchard Rd., Newark • 831.2204 • rep.udel.edu

36 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 12

8/25/15 10:22 AM


CHAPEL STREET PLAYERS A Night of One Acts (Sept. 12-13) kicks off the season at Chapel Street Players, followed by Alone Together (Oct. 17, 18, 23, 24, 25), a witty commentary on grown children leaving the nest – only to return again. It’s a Wonderful Life—a Live Radio Play (Dec. 5, 6, 11, 12, 13) brings to life the beloved holiday-season drama, and Staged Reading: A Behanding in Spokane (Jan. 23-24) is a dark comedy about a man who has been searching for his missing hand for many years. 27 N. Chapel St., Newark 368-2248 • chapelstreetplayers.org

WILMINGTON BALLET ACADEMY OF THE DANCE Look for the Junior Company at the Rockwood Faerie Festival on Sunday, Sept. 20, where they’ll perform a whimsical woodland ballet. The Junior Company also collaborates on a contemporary piece with Mélomanie at the DCCA’s Art Loop exhibit on Friday, Oct. 2. The real treat comes with its 48th annual presentation of The Nutcracker at The Playhouse on Rodney Square on Saturday, Dec. 12, and Sunday, Dec. 13. Dancers team up with the Metropolitan Ballet Academy in Jenkintown, Pa., as well as world-class professional dancers, a live orchestra and chorus to perform this timeless holiday classic. 1709 Gilpin Ave., Wilmington 655.1004 • wilmlingtonballet.org

WILMINGTON DRAMA LEAGUE WDL’s 83rd season opens with the Delaware Premiere of Memphis The Musical (Sept. 11-27). Directed and choreographed by Dominic Santos, this Tony Award-winning story is based on the life of Dewey Phillips, one of the first disc jockeys to bring rock ‘n’ roll to mainstream radio in the 1950s. Next, The Laramie Project (Oct. 16-25), sends the message that lack of acceptance (e.g., for the LGBT community) breeds hate and tragedy, leaving compassion as the only answer. In WDL’s Second Stage productions, Adam Montgomery takes the helm of The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man in the Moon Marigolds for one weekend (Nov. 5-8). Finally, director Ann Bartley rings in the holidays with the evergreen story of ogres, a talking donkey and a lord with a serious Napoleon complex in Shrek the Musical (Dec. 11-30). 10 W. Lea Blvd., Wilmington • 764.1172 • wilmlingtondramaleague.org

WORLD CAFE LIVE AT THE QUEEN The Queen’s fall season brings The Jayhawks on Thursday, Sept. 10, and The Marshall Tucker Band on Friday, Sept. 25. The Delaware Irish Fest says “sláinte” on Thursday, Oct. 8, with well-knowns like Byrne and Kelly, The Young Dubliners, Mythica and Danny Burns. Later, singer-songwriter John Gorka plays Thursday, Oct. 22, and country singer Ashley Monroe on Friday, Oct. 30. AEG Live presents An Intimate Evening with Joshua Radin on Monday, Nov. 2. American Idol rocker David Cook stops by on Wednesday, Nov. 11. The legendary Leon Russell performs on Sunday, Nov. 15, and the jazzy Madeleine Peyroux Trio performs on Thursday, Nov. 19. Ring in the New Year with The David Bromberg Quintet. The Queen also hosts the uber-popular and yummy Grilled Cheese & Craft Beer Tastings, with appearances by Yards Brewing Company, Mispillion River Brewing and Stone Brewing Company. 500 N. Market St., Wilmington • 994-1400 • queen.worldcafelive.com

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 13

37

8/25/15 11:54 AM


t

FOCUS

09_Focus.indd 16

8/24/15 6:28 PM


tRolley squAre: tRansitioning

Shedding its raucous legacy, the area has become a friendly small town within a large city. And more changes are coming. By Larry Nagengast Photos by Joe del Tufo

n

o one expects Trolley Square to easily surrender its cachet as a premier social and dining destination for Wilmington’s young professionals, but don’t be surprised if the neighborhood’s anthem flips from “Ninety Nine Bottles of Beer on the Wall” to the more sedate “A Bicycle Built for Two.” “For a long time Trolley was like a college town without a college: a lot of young professionals, a lot of bars and restaurants, and it was very vibrant,” says Jim Lee, president of the Delaware Avenue Community Association, whose turf stretches from Pennsylvania Avenue and I-95 north and west to the Brandywine and the B&O Railroad tracks, which takes in the core Trolley Square business district. “Now it’s more of a destination for people interested in healthy lifestyles.” For that, Lee says, “you need three things: food, fitness and families.” There’s no doubt that Trolley has plenty of the first two; the third, some might say, is on the way. “It seems like a good place to raise a family,” says Wilmington attorney Wali Rushdan, who lived in an apartment building at the corner of Delaware Avenue and Clayton Street before he and his wife bought a house last year two blocks to the west, at the corner of Delaware and Scott Street. “Technically, I’m in Forty Acres,” Rushdan admits, demonstrating his knowledge of neighborhood boundaries, but the shops and eateries on what Lee drily refers to as “the other side of the tracks” have long contributed to Trolley’s energetic vibe.

Located in the heart of an area first settled in the Civil War era and largely developed in the early 20th century, Trolley Square is actually a name of relatively recent vintage. From 1864 until the 1970s, Wilmington’s horse-drawn trolleys, electric trolleys and buses were kept in a barn fronting on the north side of Delaware Avenue between Clayton and DuPont streets. After the buses were moved under I-95 in 1974, a three-story retail and office complex was built on the site. It opened in 1978 with Trolley Square as its name. In short order, “Trolley Square” became a convenient designation for the commercial and residential areas near the center. “It’s a friendly, small town walking atmosphere, a small town within a large city,” says Lori Dorsz, property manager and coowner of Trolley Investors LLC, operator of three apartment buildings on the southeast corner of Delaware Avenue and Clayton Street. Neighborhood residents, she says, are a mix of “caring people who have lived in this area for a long time and an influx of kids who come in for a couple of years to start their careers.” On top of that, she adds, “you have a solid, successful merchant base that is just feeding into what young professionals want, and a healthy lifestyle. We have tennis courts two blocks away, a yoga studio, a bike store and a local food market.” Not only is that mix the key to Trolley’s success, it’s a formula that could thrive in other parts of Wilmington, says Leonard Sophrin, the city’s planning director. ►

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 17

39

8/24/15 6:29 PM


FOCUS TROLLEY SQUARE: TRANSITIONING continued from previous page

Your Car Wash In “The Flats” FULL SERVICE

DETAILING The iconic Logan House is the oldest continuously family-owned Irish bar in the country.

SELF SERVICE WILMINGTON

300 Greenhill Avenue Wilmington, De 19805 (corner of Greenhill Ave & 4th)

302.655.2131

www.greenhillcarwash.com

developing a city-wide plan

Sophrin and his staff are now starting work on a new comprehensive plan for the entire city, one that will take into account what already exists as well as community-based planning initiatives in various stages of implementation, like West Side Grows Together, Eastside Rising and the nascent Creative District downtown. “As we develop a citywide plan, we would like to replicate Trolley Square’s pattern of mixed-use businesses in close proximity to a residential neighborhood,” Sophrin says. While Trolley Square has its landmarks—starting with the iconic Logan House, originally a hotel and now touted as the oldest continuously family-owned Irish bar in the country—the area wasn’t transformed from a neighborhood to a destination until the late 1970s and early ‘80s. Restaurateur Xavier Teixido came upon the Trolley scene in 1983, as minority partner with Davis Sezna at the then-new Kid Shelleen’s. “It was the heart of the Yuppie Boom. The apartments were being done, the banks were booming. There was nothing upscale in Trolley Square,” Teixido recalls. But the nightlife was nonstop. “When we opened, we aimed at the 21-to-35 demographic and we didn’t care about anybody else,” he says. Teixido split with Sezna in 1993, so he could focus on his other restaurant ventures, and he bought Kid Shelleen’s in 2010. “When we came back, our goal was to reset it to 1983,” he says.

“everyone from 8 to 80”

1704 N. Lincoln Street Wilmington, DE 19806

302.656.8548 www.WardsFineWines.com

But something had changed. The raucous Thursday night dance parties were no longer a good fit with the neighborhood. “There was a lot of noise when the bar let out at 1 a.m.,” Teixido says, and rather than battle with residents, he shut down the dance parties. “We decided to focus more on food, hospitality and our relationship with the community,” he says. “Now we cater to everyone from 8 to 80. I’d say ‘everyone from 4 to 90,’ but you wouldn’t believe me.” Just as Kid Shelleen’s has, in a sense, reached its maturity, so too has Trolley Square. “Those hell-raisers in the neighborhood of a generation ago—I won’t name names—are now some of the community leaders,” Teixido says. Chiropractor Matt Weik was too young to have been a hell-raiser—his parents moved the family out of Trolley Square when he was 5—but he came back two years ago, partnering with fellow Salesianum School graduate Carl Bakomenko to open the Delaware Sport and Spine Clinic at 1426 N. Clayton. Weik lives on North Union Street; Bakomenko regularly walks to work from his home in the nearby Triangle neighborhood. “We like the young environment, the urban setting, the number of health-conscious people,” Bakomenko says. Weik likes being able to walk everywhere he needs to go—from work to home and back, for meals, for shopping, for entertainment. “I don’t feel that there’s any other spot in Wilmington that can give you that,” he says.

40 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 18

8/24/15 6:48 PM


Maybe, but with the rebirth of downtown Market Street and the development of new housing options on the Riverfront, it’s clear that Trolley is no longer the city’s only live-work-play hotspot. All three areas, while sharing some similarities, have distinct personalities. The Riverfront and Market Street, with still-developing residential components, remain primarily places where people work during the day and visit on evenings and weekends. “The Riverfront is kind of its own area, separated by the railroad tracks and the river. It’s a destination. Market Street is a destination too,” says Teixido, who also owns Harry’s Seafood Grill on the Riverfront. In Trolley, he says, the well-established neighborhood means “there are always people dropping by.” Jonas Miller, proprietor of Eeffoc’s Café, echoes that view. Miller opened the first Eeffoc’s in the Riverfront Market and added a location in Trolley Square after he discovered that many of his Riverfront patrons lived in Trolley Square. “At the Riverfront, we do primarily a lunch business. We do a really good morning business here, and the weekends are crazy,” says Miller. Trolley resident Rushdan notes that the neighborhood’s multiple housing options make it more affordable for people of most income levels. “I’m all in favor of trying to make the city better,” he says, but developers at the Riverfront and on Market Street “seem to be pricing people out of some neighborhoods.” “Young professionals who marry and have families are staying rather than moving to the suburbs,” says seven-year resident Erin Marshall. “They see the value of a nice community feeling, of being so close to downtown.”

Think

looking to get edgier

Residents and business owners emphasize that Trolley cannot rest on its laurels. It has to continue to diversify its offerings and freshening up its appearance. “In the face of what’s happening elsewhere in the city, it needs a little more edge,” says Alisa Morkides, owner of the Brew Ha Ha cafés. Morkides gave her Trolley Square presence a fresh look this spring by opening a new, larger coffee roastery and converting her former café into Sunna, a juice bar and whole foods eatery. “If you look back 20 years, nothing much has changed,” she says, pointing to the appearance of both the shopping center and the Rockford Shoppes, where her businesses are located. “It needs, and I’m not sure I’m saying this quite right, a little more beauty,” Morkides says. “Perhaps flowers on the light poles, more art, more gardens—to build on what’s already there.” Chiropractors Weik and Bakomenko are both fans of street art, something they saw in abundance when they lived in Philadelphia. “If we could incorporate some esthetically pleasing artwork, like on the railroad overpass by the Logan House, that would really improve the area,” Bakomenko says. Marcia Stephenson, membership and volunteer coordinator at the Delaware Center for Horticulture, whose headquarters is on Du Pont Street a block north of the shopping center, notes that the organization has been engaged in numerous beautification projects in the area over the years, with even more planned. “We’re trying to work more with volunteer groups, to do more plantings in public landscapes,” she says. As one example, she mentions the bulb plantings in the lot behind the Logan House, at the corner of Gilpin Avenue and DuPont Street. ►

HOLIDAY NOW

escape from the ordinary

CHARCOAL HOUSE & SALOON

BOOK NOW fOr best DAtes

1801 West 14th street • Wilmington, De • 302.658.4600 • WWW.KiDshelleens.com SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 19

41

8/24/15 6:49 PM


FOCUS TROLLEY SQUARE: TRANSITIONING continued from previous page

Jim Lee, president of the Delaware Avenue Community Association, at Trolley Square Brew Ha Ha! A Tom Burke bird house is in the background.

“We’re really engaging neighbors in the process. It’s crucial,” she says. “They will enjoy the beauty but to have them participate is even better. It’s one thing to take care of your front yard, but even more meaningful to do something to beautify the community.”

spicing up the food options

Brew Ha Ha owner Morkides also hopes to see “more interesting food” in Trolley, “maybe a cool noodle bar or a Peruvian restaurant… How may Irish pubs, how many pizza places can you have?” Some of that change is already occurring. Two recent arrivals to the shopping center, El Diablo and Opa Opa, offer tempting Mexican and Greek options, respectively, at moderate prices.

it’s one thing to take care of your front yard, but even more meaningful to do something to beautify the community. —Marcia Stephenson, Membership & Volunteer Coordinator, The Delaware Center for Horticulture Another fresh entrant to the shopping center is the Delaware Local Food Exchange, featuring organic, locally grown fruits and vegetables. Proprietor Karen Igou says she hadn’t planned to locate in Trolley Square but it turned out to be the best of her options when she outgrew space inside a health-food store in Elsmere. Based on her first weeks in business—the shop opened in July—she feels she made a good choice. “Now that I’m here, I realize what a nice community this is,” she says. Her old customers, even those who live in the suburbs, like the new location, she says. As for the local residents who keep dropping in, “They’re a lot of vegans, very health-conscious. They like low-fat, gluten-free vegan food. That’s pretty cool.” Healthy dining and organic foods aren’t the only indicators of the fitness/wellness vibe in Trolley. ► 42 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 20

8/24/15 6:56 PM


30 30 FOR

OUTDOOR SPORTS PROMO Enter to win!

September 5th - October 4th 30 for 30 at the Logan House is 30 different major sporting events OUTSIDE, front and back, on our new, all-weather, ALL-DAY TVs for 30 days. Get a 30 for 30 “ticket” and be eligible for ridiculous discounts, month-long prizes and the grand prize drawing. Ask your server for details or visit loganhouse.com for more information.

GRAND PRIZE

30 FOR 30 SPECIALS

Pair of Eagles Tickets Pair of Flyers Tickets Pair of Sixers Tickets Round of Golf at Deerfield Country Club

$3 18oz. Bud Light bottles $5 Sailor Jerry talls $5 Finlandia talls $3 16oz. Blue Point cans

SEPTEMBER MUSIC L h at the 9/04

Jose Estados - 6-9 p.m. Special Delivery 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

9/05

Velvet Tones 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

9/11

ogan 9/12

Click - 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

9/18

New Sweden & Friends 6-9 p.m. and 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Radio Halo - 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

Jeff & Amanda - 6-9 p.m. Old Baltimore Speedway 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

1701 DELAWARE AVE. WILMINGTON, DE 19806 09_Focus.indd 21

9/19

ouse

9/25

James & Matt - 6-9 p.m. Full Carbon Get Up 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

9/26

Tom’s Attic 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

SEPTEMBER 2015 NEW FALL MENU AND SPECIALS Tuesdays Quizzo w/Dan Healy $3 Lagunitas

Wednesdays James and Matt Acoustic 9-11 p.m.

Thursdays Marty and Kaitlin 10 p.m.-1 a.m. DJ Gifted Hands 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

Fridays Acoustic Happy Hour 6-9 p.m.

LOGANHOUSE.COM (302) 652-9493

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

43

8/24/15 6:58 PM


GALLUCIO’S DAILY SPECIALS Mondays

3 Course Meal $25 includes App, Soup or Salad, and Entrée (5-9pm) Anthony Gallucio & The Retreads 10-1am

Tuesdays

Family Night Kids under 10 eat FREE (Kids Menu) ”Q’s” Day Open Mic w/ Shawn Qaissaunee. 8-11pm

Wednesdays

½ Price Pizza (5-10pm) Quizzo w/Keith 8-11pm

Thursdays

½ Price Burgers All Day! Live Jazz Series 8-11pm

Fridays

½ Price Bottle of Wine (5-10pm) With purchase of 2 Dinner Entrees Open Mic w/ Anthony Gallucio Acoustic 6-9pm

Saturdays

All-Star Karaoke 9-1am

Sundays

Eagles Game Day! South Philly Cheese Steaks $4 (Wiz Wit or Wiz Witout!) And Soft Pretzels, too! 23oz. Yuenglings and Miller Lite Drafts *ALL NIGHTLY SPECIALS IN-HOUSE ONLY

CHECK OUT OUR SIGNATURE BURGER MENU! Paying Tribute to Our Neighborhood… The Forty Acres. Weekly Menu Features with Rotating Craft Beer Selection and New Wine List! Back By Popular Demand: Complimentary Cup of Soup w/Lunch Entrée • M-F 11-2pm

Happy Hour M-F 2-6pm $4 Craft Beers $2.25 Domestics

...Enjoy Your Favorites and So Much More! 1709 Lovering Ave • Wilmington • (302) 655-3689 • Gallucios-de.com

44 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 22

8/24/15 7:01 PM


FOCUS TROLLEY SQUARE: TRANSITIONING continued from page 42

selling a cycling lifestyle

Chuck Hall opened a bicycle shop on Delaware Avenue nearly three years ago and rebranded it last winter as Trolley Bikes, selling only recreational bikes—no high-end road bikes. “We sell a lot of bikes for families who want to ride the greenways with their children, and a lot to commuters who want to bike to work,” he says. Hall says he has attracted a strong following in the neighborhood, as well as from nearby communities the Highlands and more affluent areas on the western edge of the city. Trolley Bikes also runs the Trolley Square Cycling Club, which organizes group rides for cyclists several nights a week. The rides start at the shop and conclude with beverages and eats at a nearby restaurant—Toscana, Anejo or the Trolley Taphouse. Cycling is a great way to keep fit and enjoy the neighborhood’s attractions, Hall says. “There’s nothing better on a great evening than to get on your bike, ride down to Trolley Square, shop and enjoy the restaurants, and, when you’re done, bike home instead of driving.” For those who prefer to walk or run, Trolley offers plenty of options. Jason Hoover, who operates a website design business from his home and meets with clients at cafes like Brew Ha Ha and Eeffoc’s, enjoys running in Brandywine and Rockford parks or heading north onto the trails in Alapocas. Alan Emsley, former president of the Delaware Avenue Community Association, calls Trolley “the ultimate walking community, and it’s been that way for a long, long time.” As idyllic as Trolley Square might be for many of its residents, it’s not without its problems. Finding a parking spot on the street can be a challenge, especially on Friday nights. “Sometimes you’ve got to park two or three blocks from your home,” Rushdan says. But, says Jim Lee, “I’d rather be a neighborhood with a lot of traffic and parking issues than a neighborhood that’s empty because nobody wants to go there.” A recent rash of burglaries and thefts has some neighbors concerned. “For the most part, it’s stealing packages off the porch,” Emsley says. “We live in the city, in a nice part of the city, but we have to accept some things that come with the environment that we’re in,” says Marshall, who is vice president and safety chair of the Delaware Avenue Community Association. “The police officers we have working with us value the fact that residents care about the safety of their neighborhoods.” Nightspot operators and some residents have their occasional dustups, like the one that prompted Kid Shelleen’s to drop its Thursday night dance parties a few years ago. That’s part and parcel of the neighborhood, Marshall says. “A lot of people move to the area because of the nightlife. That’s what makes the community what it is, but you don’t want an outof-control bar scene anywhere,” she says. “The bar owners want to be part of the community. They try as best they can.” A sore spot for some residents is the dated appearance of some of the commercial buildings, especially the shopping center. “It could use a little TLC,” Marshall says. But Lee and Emsley noted that a complex condo-like ownership structure has made it difficult for proprietors to reach agreement on making upgrades and repairs. And while the shopping center bears the community’s nameplate, it isn’t Trolley’s heart and soul. “When I think of Trolley Square, I don’t focus on that building,” Marshall says. “I think of the restaurants and shops on the other side of the street.” “What makes Trolley dynamic is its culture and its people,” Rushdan says, “and that more than makes up for the dated look of some of its buildings.”

Irish Pub & Restaurant

2 Locations

Same Great Football Specials! $4 Personal Pitchers Miller Lite $4 Personal Pitchers Yuengling $4 Blue Moon Drafts $6 Football food menu featuring wings, nachos, roast beef sandwiches & Rooney’s fry bar

*Available All Day Every Sunday & Monday Nights

WILMINGTON: 1616 Delaware Ave • Wilmington, DE • 302-654-9700 NEWARK: 102 E. Main Street • Newark, DE • 302-369-7300

CatherineRooneys.com SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Focus.indd 23

45

8/24/15 7:04 PM


ts

presen

SIP. SAMPLE. SH

1st Annual Celebration of

Saturday, Sept. 26 * 1-7pm Craft Beer & Wine Tasting At venues throughout Trolley. Souvenir Tasting Mugs.

Free Entertainm

Corner musicians, street e kid games, rides and a

Small Plate Food Sampling

Retail Scavenger

Enjoy a wide range of Trolley cuisine. From Italian to Asian to American...

Follow the clues and w from Trolley Square me

TasteOfTrolley_Spread2015.indd 2

8/24/15 12:34 PM


. SHOP. STROLL.

RAIN OR S HINE

ation of All Things Trolley

* 1-7pm * Free Admission

e Entertainment

Exhibitions & Demonstrations

sicians, street entertainers, mes, rides and attractions.

Yoga, Martial Arts, Cooking, Nutrition, Horticulture, Cycling, Fine Art & more.

l Scavenger Hunt

Sidewalk Sale

he clues and win prizes lley Square merchants.

Special Taste of Trolley pricing at participating boutiques and retailers.

TasteOfTrolley_Spread2015.indd 3

8/24/15 12:36 PM


n o t g n i Wilm

WITH H NT MO Y ER EV OF AY SD UR TH H 4T E TH ON TREAT YOUR SENSES TO A MINI-VACATION HAVE! Y ALL LEG N CA TY PAR CK BLO A RE LTU CU D AN TS AR , SIC MU OF THE BEST INFUSION GRAB A DRINK, A BITE TO EAT AND PULL UP A CHAIR AS WE SOAK UP THE SUN ND BEYOND). (A ON GT IN LM WI OF DS UN SO D AN S HT SIG E AND TAKE IN TH — 5 TO 8PM — WE T & WI LD ON WASH IN GT ON — AU GU ST 27 TH MAST ER PIECE ON MA RK ET — SEPT EM BER 24 TH RO DN EY SQ UA RE REVERI E — OC TO BER 22 ND

RE AT: MO DS RE ND HU US PL TS EN EV E ES TH R FO GET FULL DETAILS IN W ILMI NGTO ND E.CO M

09_Focus.indd 24

8/24/15 7:06 PM


CITY OF WILMINGTON

On the Town

Eunice LaFate at LOMA Coffee.

w

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE

THE WILMINGTON ART LOOP

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 5 - 9 p.m. artloopwilm.org

REFRESHMENTS

K

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

DT

DOWNTOWN LOOP

WE

WEST END LOOP

NW

NORTH WILMINGTON LOOP

NC

09_Wilmington_ArtLoop.indd 1

ALSO IN THIS SECTION: This Month at Theatre N cityfest

NEW CASTLE LOOP

Brandywine Creek Raceway Renovations Treehouse Café Branches Out

8/24/15 7:08 PM


Downtown Loop

artloopwilm.org

Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts 200 S. Madison Street Wilmington, DE 302.656.6466 • thedcca.org

On the Town STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO THE ART LOOP. STEP 1: Select exhibitions that interest you. STEP 2: Map out your choices and select transportation. You may want to walk, drive or take the downtown DART Trolley. A limited number of seats are available on the Art Loop shuttle. Please reserve your seat by calling

Italian artist Patrizio Travagli’s upcoming exhibition Golden Touch. September’s Art Loop will feature 12 Rolling Revolution food trucks, live music by Super Bonanza, and opening receptions for: Patrizio Travalgi, Ariane Littman, and DCCA studio artists Richard Remenick and Hallie Albano. Art Loop reception 5 – 9 pm. On view: Tues, Thurs, Fri, Sat – 10 am-5 pm, Sun 12 pm- 5 pm through Sept. 30.

Zaikka Indian Grill 209 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE zaikka.com Life in Macro Jillian Walker. This collection of photographs offers a unique perspective on the complexities and beauty of nature. Art Loop reception 5 – 8 pm On view Mon – Fri 11 am – 8 pm through Sept. 30.

302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov.

STEP 3: Meet local and regional artists while enjoying the newest exhibitions to open in Wilmington and the surrounding areas.

STEP 4: Enjoy one of Wilmington’s excellent restaraunt or nightlife locations. Please visit the food and drink section of inwilmingtonde.com.

STEP 5: Repeat the first Friday of every month!

FREQUENLTY ASKED QUESTIONS WHERE DOES THE ART LOOP START? The Art Loop is a self-guided, go-at-your-own pace tour that can start at any of the locations listed in this guide. There is no designated route for the Art Loop.

HOW DO I APPLY TO EXHIBIT ON THE ART LOOP? Participating galleries book and curate the exhi-

bitions and should be contacted directly at the contact information provided in this guide.

HOW DO I TAKE THE ART LOOP SHUTTLE? Reserve one of the limited number of seats by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov. The bus will pick-up and drop-off at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts.

50 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Wilmington_ArtLoop.indd 2

Studio on Market 219 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE 302.229.7108 studioonmarket.com Into the Light by Liz Besanson Photography - The images are modern, minimal with a bit of whimsy. They were photographed during a time of personal struggle. In that time, I began to photograph things that I saw shaped and changed the light that I hadn’t seen before as well as things that were clean and white.Art Loop reception 5-8 pm. On view by appointment only.

LaFate Gallery, LLC 227 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE 302-656-6786 lafategallery.com

Leap of Faith, Oil on Canvas Eunice LaFate will showcase a variety of paintings in the September Art Loop. LaFate’s vibrant paintings will be for the first time exhibited in her own Gallery, at 227 N Market Street, Wilmington. This Exhibit will also feature LaFate’s famous Limited Edition Lithographs. Art Loop reception 5-8 pm. On view Tue-Sat 11am – 5 pm through Sept 30.

Delaware College of Art & Design 600 N. Market St. Wilmington, DE 302-622-800 Dcad.edu From the Studio: Nineteenth Annual Faculty Exhibition - The first major exhibition of the fall, From the Studio highlights the work of the studio art faculty at DCAD. Opening reception: Sept 11, 5-8 pm, 6-9 pm; Mon-Fri. 10 am – 5 pm & through Sept. 25. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

8/25/15 10:16 AM


West End Loop

artloopwilm.org The Creative Vision Factory 617 N. Shipley St. Wilmington, DE 302-397-8472 thecreativevisionfactory.org Mind’s Eye, Michael Kalmbach. Mind’s Eye exhibition depict bold and vibrant digitally rendered bitmap images, printed, finished and stretched by Scott Strong. Art Loop reception 6-9 pm; Mon-Fri. 10 am – 5 pm through Sept. 25.

Christina Cultural Arts Center 705 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE 302.690.8092 ccacde.org Observations of Delusion, Terrance Vann. Terrance uses a transformational color palette and stark imagery to ask the question; Who are we as human beings if these colors of society and culture were taken away? Art Loop reception 5:30-7:30 pm; Mon-Fri. 9 am – 5 pm & through Sept. 30.

Small Meditational Objects, Michael Kalmbach. Borrowing strategies from the history of abstraction, Kalmbach’s work presents painting as a devotional exercise of process, material, and color. Art Loop reception 5:00 – 8 p.m. On view Mon, Wed, Fri 9am-12noon. Sat 10-2pm, Monday evening 5-8pm through Oct. 10

Howard Pyle Studio 1305 N. Franklin Street Wilmington, DE 302.656.7304 howardpylestudio.org The Visitors, a watercolor by Doris DavisGlackin. Art Loop reception 5:30 – 8 p.m. On view by appointment through Sept 30.

The Grand Opera House Baby Grand Gallery 818 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE thegrandwilmington.org/galleries

Poppycock Tattoo 115 W. 8th St. Wilmington, DE poppycocktattoo.com 302-543-7973

ArtAddiction - The Latin American Community Center’s 7th Annual ArtAddiction work will be on display at the Baby Grand in September. An opening reception will be held on Friday, September 11th from 5:30-8pm. Art Loop reception 5:30 – 8 pm. On view Mon-Fri. 10 am – 5 pm, weekends subject to staff availability through Sept. 29.

Broken Dolls, A series of mock crime scene photos by Ric Frane. Dark, disturbing, frightening, even a little funny. These shocking and beautiful photos are designed to get a reaction out of the viewer. Art Loop Reception 6-10 pm. On View: Mon-Sat. 12 - 7 pm through Oct. 2.

Mezzanine Gallery 820 N. French Street Wilmington, DE artsdel.org

Station Gallery 3922 Kennett Pike Greenville, DE 302.654.8638 stationgallery.net

Interior Monologues, Troy Richards, The Delaware Divisioin of the Arts is pleased to present a selection of paintings by Troy Richards. Art Loop reception 5 – 7 pm On view Mon – Fri 8:30 am – 4:30 pm through Sept 25.

Levitea 228 W. 9th Street Wilmington, DE 302.565.9802 leviteawilmington.com The Floating Paint Collection by Alicia Ferrara. This exhibit feature art created using a technique called marbling to make psychedelic melting designs. Art Loop reception 5 – 8 pm On view Mon – Fri 10 am – 6 pm through Sept 30.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

09_Wilmington_ArtLoop.indd 3

The 3rd Place 1139 W. 7th Street (Use Side Door) Wilmington, DE 717-578-3478 3rdplacewilm.org

New Oil Paintings by Terry Anderson and George Martz. Terry focuses on close up views of trees, often looking up; while George offers serene landscapes with massive skies. Art Loop reception 5 – 8 pm On view Mon – Fri 9 am – 5 pm, Sat 10 am – 3 pm through Sept. 26.

Somerville Manning 101 Stone Block Row, Brecks Mill, 2nd Floor Greenville, DE 302.652.0271 somervillemanning.com

New Paintings, Jon Redmond. With a new studio in Philadelphia, Jon Redmond’s recent paintings explore the dynamics of urban architecture in addition to offering fresh views of his popular regional landscapes and still lifes. Art Loop reception 5:30 – 7:30 pm On view Tues – Sat 10 am – 5 pm, through Sept. 30. SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

51

8/24/15 7:12 PM


North of Wilmington Loop

artloopwilm.org

Blue Streak Gallery 1721 Delaware Avenue Wilmington, DE 302.429.0506

New Castle Loop Bellefonte Vintage 901 Brandywine Boulevard Bellefonte, DE 302.762.7878 bellefontevintage.com

Wilmington Art Now: 15 Artists from Dream Streets. Margo Allman, Greg Barkley, Graham Dougherty, Mary Page Evans, Alida Fish, Larry Holmes, Vera Kaminski, Mitch Lyons, Ken Mabrey, Helen Mason, Flash Rosenberg, Rick Rothrock, Robert Straight, Steve Tanis, and Carson Zullinger. Art Loop

New Works, Mary Wolfe. Inspired by nature, artist Mary Wolfe presents her latest work in oils including still lifes and landscapes. Art Loop reception 5 – 9 pm On view Wed– Sat 10 am – 5 pm, Sun 12 – 4 pm through Sept. 30.

reception: 5-8pm On view Tues-Fri. 10 am – 5 pm, Sat 10 am – 5 pm through Sept. 30.

Blue Heron Gallery 208B Delaware Street New Castle, DE 302.276.0845 blueherongalleryde.com

Bellefonte Arts 803 C Brandywine Blvd Bellefonte, DE 302.762.4278 bellefontearts.com Knox’s sketches of life interpreted in linear transformations, Dorothy of Bobeaux’s Jewelry blends semi-precious stones, freshwater pearls, and repurposed vintage jewelry. Tanya Bracey’s fine art oil portraits, & Jessica Tigue’s Happy Bunny hand-crafted body scrubs. Art Loop reception: 6-9pm On view Tues-Fri. 11 am – 5 pm, Sat 10 am – 4 pm, Sun 12pm – 4 pm through Sept. 30.

Tribute to the Human Form; Olga Nielson, Dennis Young, Rick Phillips. We will be featuring the art of the human form in various mediums, including sculpture, sketches and paintings. Art Loop reception 5 – 8 pm On view Wed & Thu 11 am – 5 pm, Fri 11am -6 pm & Sat 11 am – 5 pm, Sun 12 – 4 pm through Sept 30.

#DIGIN TO THESE DELICIOUS EVENTS:

Pop Up Beer Garden Fridays: September 4 & 11

Delaware: A Brew Story Saturday, September 5

Beer Flight, Bird Flight Thursday, September 24

Brew at the Zoo Friday, September 25

BRIAN MARINE SALES & CRAFT BEER ENTHUSIAST

Get full details for the events above, plus hundreds more at: inWilmingtonDE.com

52 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Wilmington_ArtLoop.indd 4

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

8/24/15 7:15 PM


OCT.

ARTS FOR OUR CITY’S SAKE

23 2015

FEATURING

5:30pm to Midnight

PRESENTED BY

www.ChristiAwards.org

Food & Beverages Live Theater Dance Performances

AARON DIEHL

DAMON BRYSON

705 N. Market Street 5:30 pm

705 N. Market Street 10:00 pm

Jazz Pianist - Jazz at Lincoln Center

of The Roots and his 6-piece band

View exhibits and performances in venues along the 500 and 600 block of Market St. from 7 to 10 p.m.

BUY TICKETS NOW

ChristiAwards.tix.com

Use Promo Code: EB10 and save $10 per ticket before Sept. 30

Reading & Spoken Word Performance Live Music DJs All Evening in Willington Square

ccacde.org

09_Wilmington_ArtLoop.indd 5 STR_CCAC_TIX_Ad_8.5x11_R3.indd 1

8/24/15 7:16 PM 8/20/15 8:30 AM


Theatre N at Nemours

theatren.org

PRICES: $8 | general admission $6 | seniors and children 302.576.2565 Monday - Friday

1007 N. Orange Street Wilmington, DE 19801

302.571.4075 Nights & Weekends theatren.org THE TURBO KID

NR | 1 hr 33 mins | Sept. 5th, 12th, 19th, 26th Saturdays 11pm The story centers on an unnamed character known as The Kid. Orphaned at a young age he grows up in a post-apocalyptic world all on his own scavenging and selling what he finds in order to survive. Most of the time he trades his loot for precious and very scarce necessities like bottles of water, but every so often he scores a Turbo Kid comic as well.

STEVE JOBS: THE MAN IN THE MACHINE

NR | 2 hrs | September 4-6 Fri 4pm, 10pm | Sat 8pm | Sun 4pm In his signature black turtleneck and blue jeans, shrouded in shadows below a milky apple, Steve Jobs’ image was ubiquitous. But who was the man on the stage? What accounted for the grief of so many across the world when he died? From Oscar-winning director Alex Gibney, ‘Steve Jobs: The Man In The Machine’ is a critical examination of Jobs who was at once revered as an iconoclastic genius and a barbed-tongued tyrant.

THE PARDON

PG-13 | 1 hr 54 mins | September 4-6 Fri 1pm,7pm | Sat 11am | Sun 1pm, 7pm The Pardon exemplifies our universal need to be loved and to be forgiven, portrayed in the unlikely but true story of Toni Jo Henry, a woman tried for the crime of murder in 1942 in the state of Louisiana. Toni Jo’s early childhood is one of survival, full of abuse and neglect in an era where the Great Depression ravaged so many families and individuals.

MERU

R | 1 hr 27 mins | September 11-13 Fri 4pm, 10pm | Sat 5pm | Sun 4pm After suffering dramatic set backs in their lives, three close friends who are among the world’s best professional climbers battle their complicated pasts, inner demons and nature’s harshest elements in an attempt to confront the Shark’s Fin on Mount Meru, the most technically complicated and dangerous peak in the Himalayas, one that has never been scaled to completion.

UZUMASA LIMELIGHT – BEST OF PAAFF’14 AT THEATRE N NR | 103 mins | September 11-15 Fri 1pm | Sat 8pm | Tues 7pm

The Uzumasa studio complex in Kyoto is widely regarded as the Hollywood of Japan, having produced many of the best jidaigeki films (period dramas with sword fighting) beloved by Japanese and the rest of the world. These films would not be what they were if it were not for the kirareyaku, actors whose sole job is to be killed by the lead star in elaborate death scenes. Inspired by Charlie Chaplin’s Limelight, this film tells the story of one aging kirareyaku who takes on a female apprentice in the twilight of his career.

INFINITELY POLAR BEAR

R | 1 hr 28 mins | September 18-20 Fri 1pm, 7pm | Sat 5pm | Sun 1pm, 7pm While most fathers spend their days at work, CAM STUART (Mark Ruffalo) is more likely to be found mushroom-hunting, cooking elaborate meals, or working on one of his many half- completed projects. His family’s wealth keeps his family just barely afloat, while Cam struggles to live with manic depression.

CARTEL LAND

R | 1 hr 38 mins | September 25-27 Fri 1pm, 7pm | Sat 5pm | Sun 1pm, 7pm

Spanish with English subtitles

With unprecedented access, CARTEL LAND is a riveting, on-the-ground look at the journeys of two modernday vigilante groups and their shared enemy – the murderous Mexican drug cartels.

A BORROWED IDENTITY

A LEGO BRICKUMENTARY

G | 1 hr 35 mins | September 11-13 Fri 7pm | Sat 2pm | Sun 1pm Oscar winning Director Daniel Junge and Oscar Nominated Director Kief Davidson take us on a journey through the LEGO® brand, like you have never seen before. They explore the brick that has captured imaginations for generations and look at the fundamental question- is it a toy or something more?

54 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Wilmington_Pages.indd 2

NR | 1 hr 44 mins | September 25-27 Fri 4pm, 10pm | Sat 2pm, 8pm | Sun 4pm Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles A BORROWED IDENTITY is a comingof-age drama set in the early 1990s about an Arab teenager trying to find his place in Israeli society. A Palestinian Israeli boy, is given the chance to go to a prestigious Jewish boarding school in Jerusalem. As he desperately tries to fit in with his Jewish schoolmates and within Israeli society, Eyad develops a friendship with another outsider, a boy suffering from muscular dystrophy, and gradually becomes part of the home Jonathan shares with his mother. *Theatre N reserves the right to change the film schedule at any time. Please visit our website at www.theatren.org for the most up to date information for all film and events at Theatre N. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

8/24/15 7:18 PM


CITY OF WILMINGTON

Brandywine Creek Raceway Undergoes Renovations

T

By Tonya R. Richardson, Public Relations & Communications Officer Mayor’s Office of Communications

he Brandywine Creek Raceway is a mile-long ribbon of tranquil water inviting runners and walkers to Brandywine Park, the centerpiece of the Wilmington State Park. The City of Wilmington’s oldest public infrastructure, the Raceway was originally constructed over two hundred years ago to serve the flour mills that dotted the Brandywine. In 1827, the City converted the Raceway for water supply purposes. The Raceway is a man-made channel which flows parallel to, and is fed by, the Brandywine Creek and directs the water to the Brandywine Membrane Plant and the Brandywine Pumping Station, which in turn provides source water to the Porter Water Plant. Treated water emerging from this process is made usable to over 105,000 Wilmington and New Castle County customers on a daily basis. Flowing from the Brandywine Creek into the Raceway and later into the Pumping Station, the water flow is controlled by a pair of headgates. These two large, electronically and manually operated A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

09_Wilmington_Pages.indd 3

doors maintain water flow into the screen house, which is the first step in the process of removing contaminants such as floating debris. Renovations to both the Raceway and the headgates are planned. These renovations are primarily intended to curtail the loss of 30% of current Raceway flow that has not been making it to the screen house because of degradation to the walls of the structure, as well as the irregular stone and rubble floor. These antiquated materials are not conducive to the modern hydraulic conveyance of water. “These improvements are critical to the Raceway system, especially during drought conditions when every drop of water is needed to fulfill the demands of the city,” said City of Wilmington Public Works Commissioner Jeff Starkey. “The threatening collapse of antiquated masonry, as well as water intrusion around the headgates when they are closed, further complicate routine maintenance activities.” Repair to these critical system mechanisms will ultimately add to cost savings. ► SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

55

8/25/15 2:41 PM


As a critical component of the Wilmington’s water system, the City is rehabilitating the Raceway channel and walls and installing new headgates. This process began in late July of this year, and will be accomplished in phases over the next seven months. The cost of the Raceway restoration will be approximately $6 million, which has been provided by a State Revolving Fund Loan. The rehab contract went through the regular bidding process and a local-unionized contractor has been employed in the process. The project received necessary permits in a process that took over a year to complete. There has been cooperation from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC), the Delaware Natural Heritage Program, the State Historic Preservation Office, and Soil Erosion and Sediment Control review from the City of Wilmington. CITY OF WILMINGTON

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS The Raceway restoration will first involve the installation of a concrete liner that will provide structural stability as well as reduce the loss of water along the length of the Raceway. The ongoing work will not alter the current configuration of the Raceway, and construction activity is primarily conducted within the footprint of the existing channel. A large portion of the work below the normal water level will be a new concrete lined bottom and walls, so that it is

structurally sound, leak-free, and the hydraulic conveyance of water along the entire Raceway is improved. Restoration work extending above the water surface includes restoring the stone masonry in line with the current natural appearance of the Raceway. Some mature trees have been removed in the restoration process. According to policies already in place, the City will plant two trees to replace that one removed for this project. The second component of the proposed restoration will be installation of new headgates to control the flow of water from the Brandywine Creek into the Raceway itself. Currently, the headgates are difficult to operate because the gates do not seal properly. The improvements will provide fully functional gates, to completely isolate the Brandywine Creek water from the Raceway, and will improve the ability to control water flow, manage sediments travelling in the Raceway, and facilitate other maintenance activities. The improved headgates will facilitate more water remaining in the Brandywine Creek, providing a stronger habitat to the flora and fauna that rely on this important eco-system daily, and preserving the natural state of a vital and scenic component of the region. Work on the Raceway is expected to continue for seven months. Park access and walking pathways in the area will remain open. Temporary closings of areas, if necessary, will be kept to a minimum. Work on the project will take only place during regular business hours during the week. Evening and weekend access to the park and its paths will remain unhindered.

SERIES Learn how to develop & write your business plan • Program includes one-on-one business plan counseling • $75 per person for City of Wilmington residents & businesses (All others: $100) • Space is limited; All applicants subject to interview & selection process

For Information or Applications

Call or Email: 302-576-2121 smbeo@wilmingtonde.gov Sponsored by the:

Mayor’s Office of Economic Development Small & Minority Business Enterprise Office

ENROLL NOW FOR THE FALL SESSION 56 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Wilmington_Pages.indd 4

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

8/24/15 7:19 PM


CITY OF WILMINGTON

Mayor Dennis P. Williams with Treehouse Café Owner, Ret. Sgt. Diane Moss.

Retired State Trooper Chooses Trinity Vicinity for Treehouse Café to Branch Out

T

By Tonya R. Richardson, Public Relations & Communications Officer Mayor’s Office of Communications

his past April the Trinity Vicinity neighborhood of Wilmington welcomed a new neighbor to its community. On the corner of 11th and North Monroe Streets, the Treehouse Café opened its doors, joining the tree-lined, cobble-stoned street. This cozy, welcoming café may very well become another beloved landmark in the historic neighborhood. “I am a daughter of the South,” said Treehouse founder Diane Moss, a retired Sergeant in the Delaware State Police. “My grandparents were sharecroppers and I grew up with them on a tobacco farm in Clover, Virginia. As a child, I thought many times about being a police woman and owning my own business, even though there were no real role models around me doing those things. It’s amazing how my dreams have come true in every way.” Moss is the first woman of color to retire from the Delaware State Police as a Sergeant. “My life path has taken me all over the world, and through many interesting life experiences, but here, in Wilmington is where I’m absolutely supposed to be.” Moss’s life has certainly been full of interesting experiences. Moss graduated from high school in Virginia before enlisting in the U.S. Air Force. After completing her training at Sheppard Air Force Base in Wichita, Texas and Lackland Air Force base in San Antonio, Texas, she was stationed in Germany. Moss played basketball for the Air Force during that time and as a result earned a full scholarship at Mississippi State University. Even after experiencing undergraduate life, it was the call to become a State Trooper in Delaware that resonated with her. “I was living with my mother here in Delaware when I saw posting encouraging women and minorities to apply,” said Moss. “I couldn’t believe it, but there it was, the first step to fulfilling my dream.” Moss applied and spent twenty years as a Trooper. “I’ve had amazing and diverse experiences as a Trooper. I’ve worked undercover, done electronic surveillance, was a youth aide, and helped to solve hundreds of crimes,” she said. Moss was also the state’s first School Resource Officer, which was a position prescribed under then U.S. Senator Biden’s Community-Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

09_Wilmington_Pages.indd 5

All the while, Moss was working in the community, helping people with a cause very close to her heart, wellness. “I read the writings of writer Louise Hay and she said something that really stuck with me. She talked about how our feelings are often very closely tied to our thoughts. She said, ‘It’s only a thought, and a thought can be changed.’ This is a philosophy that I believe applies to every part of life.” Moss began educating herself and taking courses and certifications in Mental Health Counselling, psychology and behavioral science. She earned her Masters in Community Counselling, and became a Licensed Professional Mental Health Counselor and a Board Certified Counselor. “I was always feeding my passions and in 1999, I opened the Treehouse Wellness Center on Maryland Avenue.” Treehouse Wellness Center became a successful center where the mind and spirit could be nurtured and healed. “As a certified massage therapist, I offered massage therapy, lead counselling groups, and trained professionals in many health-related fields in areas of behavioral and clinical sciences, counseling and domestic violence counseling.” After retiring from the Delaware State Police in 2006, Moss devoted her complete attention to her final goal of providing nourishment for the body. “I chose to live in Trinity Vicinity and when I noticed that there was an empty, derelict building on the corner available for purchase, my vision became complete.” Moss spent nine years fully gutting and remodeling the neighborhood landmark. Treehouse Café’s menu offers balanced and delicious combinations of proteins, fresh vegetables and whole grains to create breakfast sandwiches such as The Wellbeing and The Treehouse. Other popular items include blended, real fruit juices, vegetarian and vegan options, and great lunch sandwiches. “I am very committed to quality, freshness and offering lots of options for diners who are interested in good, whole foods.” Treehouse Café is located at the corner of 11th Street & Monroe Street, directly behind the Blue Cross Blue Shield building. The Treehouse is open Monday to Friday from 7am-4pm, and on Saturdays from 9am to 2pm. Learn more about Treehouse Café and see the complete menu at: http://treehousewellnesscenter.com SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

57

8/24/15 7:19 PM


25 3

2

33

5

1 4 6 7

18

8

10 14

11 13 9

12

1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Harry’s Seafood Grill / Riverfront Market, HARRYS-SAVOY.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. FireStone Roasting House, FIRESTONERIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk 11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, THEDCCA.ORG

09_Wilm_Riverfront.indd 2

13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM Starbucks on the Riverfront 14. Kooma, KOOMASUSHI.COM Goju Training Center, GOJUROBICS.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG Riverwalk Mini Golf, RIVERWALKMINIGOLF.COM 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM 18. Public Docks 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM

8/24/15 7:21 PM


RIV

Visit RiverfrontWilm.com for info on events happening at the Riverfront!

E R WA L K

MINI G LF

NOW OPEN! 26

22 17

16

18

19

24

23 21

34

32

20

31 29

15

30

27

28

20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/ DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG

09_Wilm_Riverfront.indd 3

27 Riverfront Commuter Lot, RIVERFRONTWILM.COM/PARKING 28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29. CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM 30. The Residences at Harlan Flats, HARLANFLATS.THERESIDENCES.NET 31. Stratosphere Trampoline Park, WILMINGTONTRAMPOLINEPARK.COM 32. The Westin Wilmington, WESTINWILMINGTON.COM 33. Delaware Humane Association, DEHUMANE.ORG 34. St. Hedwig’s Polish Festival, POLISHFESTIVAL.NET Photo by Joe del Tufo

8/24/15 7:21 PM


Looking for a fun group/team outing? Take advantage of our group discounted weekday rates in September!

RIV

E R WA L K

MINI G LF

M O N D AY – T H U R S D AY 10 A M – 9 P M F R I D AY A N D S AT U R D AY 10 A M – 10 P M S U N D AY 12 P M – 8 P M $8.00 PER PERSON KIDS 3 AND UNDER FREE

R I V E R WA L K M I N I G O L F. C O M

R5006_riverfront golf O&A_ad_3.indd 1 09_Wilm_Riverfront.indd 4

7/13/15 8/24/15 2:33 7:22 PM PM


GRAND REOPENING! COME VISIT ADOPTABLE DOGS • CATS KITTENS • PUPPIES OCT. 24th • 1-5pm

LET US CATER TO YOU. From dinner parties to office get-togethers to weddings, let Janssen’s make your event special. We offer full-service catering, event planning, party rentals, floral arrangements, and more. Contact our catering director today at (302) 654-9941 x3.

Shelter Renovation Tours Vendors, Demos & More! DRINKS & SNACKS

Kid’s Games & Activities 302-998-2281 • 455 Stanton Christiana Rd. • Newark, DE 19713 WWW.JANSSENSMARKET.COM 3801 KENNETT PIKE, GREENVILLE, DE 302.654.9941

www.DelSPCA.com SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Eat.indd 5

61

8/24/15 7:26 PM


FALL FOOTBALL IS BACK! Check Out Our Football Specials During All Pro Football Games

Come Try Our Seasonal Craft Beers Over 22 Beers on Tap at the Polly Drummond and Peoples Plaza Locations!

MONDAYS

½ Price Appetizers All Day

$6 Buffalo Wings • $7 Nachos $6.50 Pitchers of Bud & Bud Light

at Polly Drummond and Peoples Plaza Locations only

TUESDAYS

½ Price Burgers All Day $1.50 Domestic Drafts after 7pm

WEDNESDAYS

All You Can Eat Wings $11.99 after 5pm

THURSDAYS

All You Can Eat Shrimp $12.99 after 5pm, Prime Rib $18.99

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 108 Peoples Plaza (Corner of Rtes. 40 & 896) | Newark, DE | 302-834-6661 8 Polly Drummond Shopping Center | Newark, DE | 302-738-7814 800 North State Street | Dover, DE | 302-674-0144

Be our friend on Facebook!

www.mcglynnspub.com

FRIDAYS

Prime Rib $22.99, $2.50 Taylor’s Grog 7pm-close

SATURDAYS

$1.00 Off Craft Bottles All Day

SUNDAYS

Beef and Beer $8.99, Steak Night $12.99

SPORTS BETTING IS BACK ! COME PLACE YOUR BETS! You must be 21 to play. Delaware Gambling Hotline: 888-850-8888 The Delaware Sports Lottery is sponsored by the Delaware State Lottery and is not associated with or authorized by any professional or collegiate sports organization.

62 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Eat.indd 2

8/24/15 7:27 PM


Photo Ryan Alexander, Catalyst Visuals LLC

EAT

Farmers provide food & chefs prepare tasting samples to all attendees at both The Farmer & The Chef events.

Farmers & Chefs Team Up For A Good Cause Downstate and upstate fundraisers provide savory dishes to benefit the local March of Dimes chapter By Krista Connor hat pairs better than local chefs and area farmers? Two annual Delaware events, The Farmer & The Chef South and The Farmer & The Chef, do just that this month to create savory food and drinks for a good cause. Both events, which bring together area farmers and chefs to make and serve culinary samples, benefit the local chapter of March of Dimes, a global nonprofit that coaches pregnant women on improving prenatal health by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality. While all funds go to the March of Dimes, the aim also is to continue fostering sustainable relationships between local farmers and chefs in Delaware, while reinforcing healthy eating. Presented by the March of Dimes and the Delaware Department of Agriculture, the events serve to emphasize the importance of agriculture in the state and remind Delawareans to support local farmers by buying fresh, local produce.

W

At both events, area farmers provide the foods, and chefs then prepare tasting samples to all attendees. Guests will vote for their favorites and by the end, a winning farmer-chef team will be announced. In 2014, the events raised $98,000 total. This year, March of Dimes’ Senior Community Director Pamela Armstrong is hoping for $104,000. Now in its fourth year, The Farmer & the Chef South will be held at Baywood Greens in Long Neck on Thursday, Sept. 3, at 5:30 p.m. Then, on Thursday, Sept. 17, the eighth annual Farmer & the Chef will take place at the Chase Center on the Wilmington Riverfront. Tickets are $45 and $55 at the door for both events. Special to the Wilmington event is the $75 Chef's Pass, which allows entry at 5 p.m., provides a complimentary drink ticket and an exclusive gift. General admission entry will begin at 5:45 p.m. ► SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Eat.indd 3

63

8/24/15 7:28 PM


N E W. . . S U N D AY B R U N C H !

ASIAN GASTROPUB

M O N D AY S www

$ 6 B u rg e r s Happy Hour Drink Prices A L L D AY

T U E S D AY S

$ 5 O ff B i g P l a t e s $7 Craft Cocktails

W E D N E S D AY S

1/2-Price Appetizers one per customer

EAT

Armstrong says she is excited about food trucks, an addition to this year’s events. Both Wilmington and South FARMERS & CHEFS TEAM UP will host the Frozen Farmer truck with Evans Farms, and FOR A GOOD CAUSE Wilmington will host the I Don’t Give A Fork truck paired continued from previous page with long-time participants Highland Orchards. Armstrong also notes the South partnership with Dogfish Head Brewery. Each chef is asked to use a Dogfish beer in preparing his dish. “There are always amazing, fun and delicious results,” she says. This year, the Wilmington event features Woodside Farm, Gordon Food Service, Ramsey Farm, and University & Whist Club, among others. The South fundraiser includes Zitvogel Farms, Espuma, Evans Farms and more. Ed Zitvogel of Zitvogel Farms in Bridgeville, which has been a functioning farm for almost a century, is paired with Chef Jay Caputo of Espuma in Rehoboth for the South event. Their pairing is grass-fed Angus beef. “It’s a terrific event for a terrific cause,” says Zitvogel. “Pam Armstrong does a superb job at getting good local farmers, chefs, and business people to come together in a community style event.” Jim Berman of Gordon Foods, a Wilmington food service store, is making braised brisket with beer-braised slaw tacos with Kirby pickles, and corn salsa, with ingredients sourcing from nearby farms in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and Papen Farms in Dover. Berman has participated in the past, and is proud of the event’s growth and adaptability. “Every year gets bigger and more energized,” he says. “The attendees anticipate the event and that energy is palpable. This year, there are food trucks representing a very serious movement in northern Delaware food. It’s great to see the event grow around trends, enveloping the local movement, not just the partnership with farms, but with the community's changing food scene.” It’s an evening of fun, but Berman offers a reminder for the importance of the cause and the large impact the event has for March of Dimes. “Ultimately, The Farmer and The Chef is an evening of doing, at least in some fashion, a small part to give pause and support. The goodness spreads and we remember that we do, in fact, need to be kind.”

BachettiBros. Gourmet Meats, Market & Catering Quality • Price • Service Since 1934

$ 1 O ff C r a f t B e e r s

T H U R S D AY S

$1 Oysters $4 Titos Mixes Half-price Wines, 11p-1a Spokey Speaky Reggae DJ

E V E RY D AY: $3 Green Tea • $2.50 Yuenling $4 Fireball/ Spicy Tequila $3.50 Captain/ Vodka $5 City Wide Can Beer & Bourbon

ww

801 N. Union St, Wilm 302-654-9780 8thandUnion.com

CATERING FROM FULL-SERVICE CORPORATE EVENTS, TO BUFFET SETUPS FOR FAMILY GATHERINGS Homemade Specialties, Dinners for 2, Made-to-Order Sandwiches, Daily Soups and Deli Salads

Ready To-Go Meals

Just in Time for Back to School Save time and energy...Let us do the cooking. 302.994.4467 | 4723 Kirkwood Hwy. Midway Plaza www.Bachettis.com | www.ChocolateWaterfall.com

64 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Eat.indd 4

8/24/15 7:31 PM


PRO FOOTBALL SPORTS BETTING! PARLAYS, TEASERS AND MORE!

Your Philadelphia Eagles HQ! 20 ALL NEW HD TV’S! GAME DAY FOOD SPECIALS!

You must be 21 to play. The Delaware Sports Lottery is sponsored solely by the Delaware State Lottery and is not associated with or authorized by any professional or collegiate sports organization. Delaware Gambling Helpline: 888-850-8888.

OPEN 10PM

EVERYDAY

BRANMAR, TROLLEY SQ. & NEWARK

GREAT BEER SPECIALS! Including $3 Bud Light Drafts & Featuring: Plus Our Specialty Selection Including: Goose Island IPA & Goose Island 312, Stella Artois and many other craft brands!

302.429.7427 • 930 Justison Street • Wilmington, DE TimothysOnTheRiverfont.com SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Eat.indd 5

65

8/24/15 7:33 PM


Best of DE Winner | reaDErs ChoiCe 2014

Come Enjoy Our Patio!

3 Decades of Authentic & Traditional Family Recipes

Celebrate Labor Day

THAI STYLE!

Sept. 4th-6th!

Delicious Food Specials

$3 Singha/Chang Thai Beers, $5 Patron Thaigaritas

Thai Style Pig Roast! September 6th, Noon - 9pm (Reservations recommended) Jammin Blues music performance by Kitty Mayo and her Emperess Band!

Happy Hour Tue-Sun 4p-7p Bar Only Tapas & Daily Drink Specials

Weekday Lunch Specials Starting at

$10

Thai Cuisine Encompassing All 4 Regions Fresh Whole Fish & Seafood Live Music Wed & Sun Nights

Tue-Thu 11am-10pm Fri 11am-11pm Sat 12pm-11pm Sun 4pm-9pm www.ubonthaicusine.com | 302-656-1706 936 Justison Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

Every Saturday:

Live Music on the Patio!

9/5- Mixx Unplugged 9/12-Bob Stretch 9/19-Tony Mowen 9/26-Kevin McDermott Sunday Brunch 10am-2pm $4 Make Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

302.376.0600 109 Main Street, Odessa, DE 19730 Mon: 11:30am-9pm • Tues - Thurs: 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat:11:30am-11pm • Sun: 10am-9pm

www.cantwells-tavern.com

66 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Eat.indd 6

8/24/15 7:35 PM


EAT FINGER-LICKING GOOD Locale BBQ Post opens

FOOD NOTES

A FINE DINING DEAL

Tasty things worth knowing

Restaurant Week showcases 19 of Brandywine's best

W

EVENINGS IN THE ORCHARD & GARDEN

ho couldn't use a night off from kitchen duty in September? Now you have extra incentive. Eighteen of the area's finest restaurants are once again teaming up to present Brandywine Valley Restaurant Week, a celebration of the exceptional chefs and producers of this historic region. The promotion is set for Sept. 14-19 with twocourse lunches offered for $15 and threecourse dinners for $35. A complete list of participating restaurants as well as their featured menus can be found at brandywinetaste.com.

Food Bank, UD host farm-fresh celebrations

FARM TO FORK Coverdale Farm Preserve hosts starlit dinner

W

elcome fall with the Food Bank of Delaware and T.S. Smith & Sons at the third annual Dinner in the Orchard on Thursday, Sept. 3. Enjoy fresh foods straight from T.S. Smith & Sons’ 800-acre farm in Bridgeville, prepared by students from The Culinary School at the Food Bank of Delaware. Tickets are $30 per person, covering dinner, live entertainment, wine and beer. The event is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Proceeds benefit the expansion of the Food Bank of Delaware’s Milford Branch. On Thursday, Sept. 10, attend An Evening in the Garden to celebrate the bounty of the University of Delaware’s Garden for the Community. This is a community-wide effort to grow fresh produce for Delawareans in need. Enjoy garden-fresh foods, fine wine and live entertainment, while raising funds to help eliminate hunger. Featured beers are Dogfish Head, Mispillion River Brewing Co., Two Stones Brewing, Painted Stave Distillery and more. The event is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at UD’s Community Garden on Rt. 896 in Newark. Tickets range from $20 to $50. For more information, visit fbd.org.

T

he Locale BBQ Post opened on Aug. 17 on Lincoln Street in Wilmington, selling out its first day. The eatery offers reasonably-priced sandwiches, meats by the pound, ribs and whole chickens, and a variety of sides. Sandwich offerings are brisket for $9, pork butt for $8, shredded chicken for $9, pulled ribs for $10, and bratwurst for $8. Half-pound and whole chickens, ribs or rib racks, and more range from $11 to $29. The menu, of course, also includes “the fixings”: $3 stewed tomatoes, coleslaw, collard greens, corn on the cob, pasta salad, side salad; and for $5, baked beans, creamed spinach, hand-cut fries, hush puppies, jalapeno cream corn, mac ‘n’ cheese, and more. Sampler platters are available starting at $38, along with catering for the ultimate BBQ experience. For more information, call 510-4929 or visit the Facebook page Locale BBQ Post.

O ST. HEDWIG POLISH FEST 59th celebration is set for Wilmington Riverfront

F

rom Sept. 21-26, the 59th annual St. Hedwig Polish Festival will offer dancing, rides, music, food and drinks. This year, the festival is located in Wilmington at the Riverfront across from the Chase Center. Live music features Crab Town Sound and The Golden Tones. For hours and more information, visit polishfestival.net.

n Saturday, Sept. 19, an autumn event, Farm to Fork at Coverdale Farm Preserve in Greenville, will highlight the abundance of the fall harvest and honor the important role of pollinators, which are critical for agriculture production. There will be a cocktail reception overlooking the pasture, and a familystyle, three-course seated dinner under the stars. The menu features food grown on the farm along with Dogfish Head beer. The event begins at 6 p.m. Reserve tickets by Sept. 10. Individual tickets are $150 per person; a table of eight is $1,100.

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Eat.indd 7

67

8/25/15 2:00 PM


2015 Great Pumpkin

Debate & Hayride

Saturday Sept. 26th • 7-10 pm Bellevue State Park Figure 8 Barn 40 per person

$

(Benefits Delaware Humane Association)

must be 21 to attend Get Your Tickets Early This Year!

The arrival of autumn each year brings crisp air, beautiful colors, & of course pumpkin beer! This year join us for our 4th Annual “Great Pumpkin Debate.” Enjoy a Hayride, Bonfire, & sample a collection of unique pumpkin beers, vote for your favorite, & help choose the winner of the 2015 Great Pumpkin Debate.

Space is limited - Reserve Your Spot Today! Peco’s Liquors - 522 Phila. Pike - Wilmington – 302-764-0377

emulvihill@pecosliquors.com • pecosliquors.com/greatpumpkindebate.html

68 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Drink.indd 4

8/24/15 8:12 PM


DRINK

SIPS

Here's what's pouring By Matt Moore

NEW TASTING ROOM AT 2SP

2

SP Brewing Company has officially opened its tasting room to the public. Enjoy delicious brews, including: ASAP IPA, an East Coast IPA; The Bellcracker IPA, a smooth double IPA with a great melon flavor, and Delco Lager, a crisp amber lager and area favorite. Hours are Monday-Friday from 3-9 p.m., and SaturdaySunday from noon-9 p.m. at 2SP Brewing Company’s headquarters in Aston, Pa.

A TASTE OF NEWARK

F

rom noon-3 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 27, the ultimate foodie event in Newark is back for the 12th year in a row. Guests can enjoy the culinary delights of nearly 50 Newark restaurants accompanied by the finest area wine on UD’s picturesque Old College Lawn. Celebrity cooking demonstrations will provide entertainment as guests’ palates are tempted by a wide variety of foods from around the world. Tickets are $50, and all ages are welcome.

LONGWOOD BREW EXPERIENCE

N

ow through Saturday, Oct. 31, visitors at Longwood Gardens looking to get a drink before or after experiencing the beautiful Nightscape exhibit can sip some craft brews in the new Beer Garden. Enjoy sitting with friends and family under the stars while enjoying tasty pub fare from a special Beer Garden menu, accompanied by beer from Victory Craft Brewing Company. A new signature brew called Longwood Seasons: Autumn Harvest, a delicious wheat ale featuring floral flavors from Longwood-harvested honey, will be on tap.

SAENGERBUND IS BACK!

S

tarting Friday, Sept. 18, and continuing through Sunday, Sept. 20, Delaware Saengerbund’s Oktoberfest will return to Newark. This annual tradition begins on Friday at 5 p.m. with a parade and an ode to the German city of Munich as the Delaware Saengerbund’s Bavarian dance group, Enzian Volkstanzgruppe, entertains at intervals throughout the festival. On Saturday and Sunday, the festivities will be from noon-11 p.m. As always, a wide range of beer and German cuisine will be offered, in addition to a variety of torten and traditional plum cake. Open to all ages, admission is $8 and includes unlimited amusement rides.

HISTORY & HOPS IN ODESSA

A

t the town’s inaugural brewfest last year, nearly 50 craft breweries and more than 1,400 beer lovers came to Odessa. This year, the Historic Odessa Foundation and Cantwell’s Tavern have once again joined together to bring the second brewfest, featuring even more beer, food, music, and fun. Historic Odessa Brewfest is set for Saturday, Sept. 12, from noon-6 p.m. at the 246-year-old Wilson Warner House. General admission is $50. The $70 VIP admission includes an early tasting at noon, a food voucher and access to limited-quantity beers. Proceeds go to the Historic Odessa Foundation, a non-profit organization focused on preserving the history of the town. You must be 21 or older to attend.

BENEFITING HISTORIC KENNETT SQUARE

O

n Saturday, Oct. 10, from noon-6 p.m., you can sample beers from more than 90 local, regional and craft breweries at the Kennett Brewfest in Downingtown, Pa. There will also be great food and music. Proceeds will benefit Historic Kennett Square—a non-profit organization that works to keep Kennett Square a regional economic and cultural center. There will be vendors, live bands, sponsor tables and more.

PAINTING & PINTS

W

hether you are an accomplished artist or finger painter, Victory Brewing Company invites all to enjoy a night of great beer and painting. Held at Victory’s brewpub in Downingtown, Pa., on Thursday, Sept. 10, this event is $45 and runs from 6:30-10 p.m.

DOGFISH 8K DASH, FARMERS MARKET

S

et for Sunday, Sept. 27, at 9 a.m., Dogfish Head Brewery’s 10th annual Dogfish Dash is expected to attract up to 2,000 people, who will run an 8k “dash” through Milton. This year’s event marks the 20th anniversary of Dogfish Head and the 25th anniversary of The Nature Conservancy, Delaware Chapter—which you can support as a runner, spectator, volunteer or even a sponsor. After finishing the dash, runners can enjoy celebratory beer. Registration to run is $40. On Friday, Oct. 2, the Milton Farmers Market will set up at Dogfish Head’s Brewery in Milton, bringing fresh, delicious food from local farmers. Live music and Dogfish Head Oktoberfest-inspired brews also will be featured.

GRILLED CHEESE COMPETITION

H

eld on Saturday, Oct. 10, from 12:30-5 p.m., Cheesetoberfest is an all-out, no-holds-barred, grilled cheese competition that pits professionals from area restaurants against local amateur chefs. Taking place at Fordham & Dominion Brewing Company in Dover, the event features 20 Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania restaurants and 20 average Joes creating various grilled cheese and mac ‘n’ cheese dishes. Brewery staff and volunteers will pour award-winning Octoberfest brews, Spiced Harvest Ale, Oak Barrel Stout, Rams Head IPA, Copperhead Ale, and Helles Lager. Tickets are $30 and include two beers, food samples and a commemorative stein. This event is open to all ages. SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Drink.indd 5

69

8/25/15 11:40 AM


The Delaware Saengerbund 2015 Presents The Original. . . Largest in Delaware

Oktoberfest

Just like Munich ~ Under the Big Tent Bavarian Bands & Folkdancing German Food & Beverages Amusement Rides & Games

September 18 19 20 5-11 p.m.

Tickets:

12-11 p.m.

$8 per person

(Includes Unlimited Amusement Rides)

12-6 p.m.

Rain o r Shine !

Visit Delaware Beer Guy on

NEW! - OFF-SITE PARKING

AT OUR LADY OF GRACE (RT. 4) • SHUTTLE SERVICE INCLUDED Delaware Saengerbund - 49 Salem Church Rd. Newark, DE Near Intersection of Routes 4 & 273

(302) 366-9454 | www.delawaresaengerbund.org 70 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 6

8/25/15 9:34 AM


SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Drink.indd 7

69

8/24/15 7:49 PM


CELEBRATING 59 YEARS THIS LABOR DAY WEEKEND!

WIN $500!

PIGSKIN PICK’EM

Pick the winners for the first 17 weeks of the regular NFL season and you could WIN a $500 AMEX Gift Card! See store for details.

Home of the

BIG BEER

Casapulla’s SUB SHOP “Home of the Classic Italian Sub” 3rd Generation Owned & Operated!

HEAT & EAT Meatball Sandwich Trays For Family Reunions, Parties, & Special Events!

SUBS • CHEESESTEAKS • BURGERS HOT SANDWICHES • MEATBALLS SAUSAGES AND MUCH MORE!

514 CASAPULLA AVE. • ELSMERE

(302) 994-5934

3

$ 50 22oz Drafts All Day, Every Day

ENTER TO WIN

EAGLES PHLITE DECK TIX

W I N

Delicious Food on the Go! KapowTruck.com

a trip to

to watch the Big Game! February 5 – 8, 2016

Enter online at GrottoPizza.com, starting Sept. 8th See official rules for details. Must be 21 to win. For a full location listing visit

GrottoPizza.com

Kapow Kitchen coming soon to the Booth’s Corner Farmers Market! Until then check our Kapow Food Truck and other Rolling Revolution members at these events: • Sept 4, 5-9pm – DCCA • Sept 18, 5-9pm – Del. Art Museum

72 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Watch.indd 2

8/24/15 7:54 PM


WATCH

The Man From U.N.C.L.E

4

STARS µµµµ Alicia Vikander as Gaby Teller, Armie Hammer as Illya Kuryakin and Henry Cavill as Napoleon Solo. Photo Daniel Smith, 2014 Warner Bros. Entertainment

THE BUDDIES FROM U.N.C.L.E.* Superman and The Lone Ranger form an unlikely but appealing team in a Guy Ritchie movie based on the old TV series By Mark Fields

O

nly old-timers will remember the short-lived (1964-68) yet iconic television series The Man From U.N.C.L.E., which paired American Napoleon Solo and Russian Illya Kuryakin as Cold War secret agents tasked with keeping the world safe from nuclear and other disasters. Thanks to Warner Brothers and Guy Ritchie, who directed and co-wrote the new movie that takes its name from the TV series, a whole new generation will now get to enjoy the exploits of these unlikely partners.► SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Watch.indd 3

73

8/24/15 7:55 PM


©2015 Buffalo Wild Wings, Inc. BWW2015-1139

WIN OR LOSE, IT’S WHERE YOU CELEBRATE THE GAME. 16 SIGNATURE SAUCES & 5 SEASONINGS | AWARD-WINNING WINGS | 20+ BEERS ON TAP WING TUESDAYS® | BONELESS THURSDAYS® | BIG SCREENS AND HDTVS | HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS 1887 PULASKI HWY | BEAR 100 SOUTH MAIN STREET | NEWARK 2062 LIMESTONE ROAD | WILMINGTON

540 W MAIN STREET | MIDDLETOWN 680 BAY ROAD | DOVER 19930 LIGHTHOUSE PLAZA - COASTAL HWY | REHOBOTH BEACH

74 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Watch.indd 4

8/24/15 7:56 PM


WATCH OVER 30 DIFFERENT SIXTELS IN STOCK!

Photo Daniel Smith, 2014 Warner Bros. Entertainment

THE BUDDIES FROM U.N.C.L.E. continued from page 73

WEIHENSTEPHANER

OKTOBERFEST

42

.99

24 - 11.2 oz Bottles

ERIE BREWING CO. Cavill and Hammer trade plenty of bon mots in the movie.

In the film, which is set in 1963, former enemies Solo and Kuryakin are reluctantly teamed up by their superiors for a mission to stop a mysterious international criminal organization with apparent ties to the Nazis. Led by the beautiful and sinister Victoria Vinciguerra (Elizabeth Debickiand), the evil-doers are bent on destabilizing the fragile balance of power through the proliferation of nuclear weapons and technology. Our heroes’ only lead is Gaby Teller (Alicia Vikander—Ex Machina), the daughter of a vanished German scientist, who is the key to infiltrating the criminal organization. They find her, then travel to Rome (where Kuryakin poses as Gaby’s fiancé), and proceed to infiltrate the heinous organization and, ultimately, successfully complete their mission. Intrigue and plot twists aside, it’s the interaction between the two leads that gives the film its appeal. As Solo, Henry Cavill (Man of Steel) is all charm, wit and panache. With his jet black hair and classic profile, he is almost too handsome. The 6’ 5” Armie Hammer (The Lone Ranger) plays Kuryakin as a dedicated agent with prodigious strength and a surprising knowledge of women’s fashions. They start as enemies but grudgingly and gradually build a bond that is at first based on necessity and evolves into friendship. In the process, they slay countless villains, trade withering ripostes with themselves and others, and, on separate occasions, save each other from certain death. Hugh Grant drops by in an uncharacteristic role: head of British naval intelligence, which he pulls off with his usual waggish insouciance and just the right amount of earnestness. An acknowledged master of the action movie, Ritchie (Snatch, RocknRolla) demonstrates that talent here. I’ve never been a fan of car chases, which generally come off as an endless series of squealing tires and crashing metal, but those in The Man From U.N.C.L.E. are spectacular and just long enough. The final one, with Cavill in an ATV and Hammer on a motorcycle, is particularly creative. Hammer ends it by picking up his wrecked bike and crushing the baddie who is about to snuff out Cavill. And I swear that it’s the actors—not stunt doubles—who are at the controls of their respective rides through much of the chase. In the final scene, the new partners are informed that they are about to embark on another mission. It’s only then that their operation is given a name: U.N.C.L.E. Sequel, anyone? *Originally, the initials stood for nothing, but the creators/writers of the TV series were pressed to come up with something. By the time the first episode aired, they decided on the United Network Command for Law and Enforcement.

JOHNNY RAILS PUMPKIN ALE

51

.99

24 - 12 oz Bottles

SCHOFFERHOFER

GRAPEFRUIT

36

.99

24 - 330 ml Bottles

CAPTAIN LAWRENCE BREWING CO.

PUMPKIN ALE

35

.99

24 - 12 oz Bottles

TWO ROADS

ROADSMARY’S BABY PUMPKIN ALE

45

.99

24 - 12 oz Bottles

www.BrewersOutlet202.com Route 202 – One Mile N. of DE/PA Line Mon–Sat 9–9, Sun 10–5 • 610-459-8228

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Watch.indd 5

75

8/25/15 12:12 PM


16 Craft Beer Draughts, Over 70 Craft & Import Bottles

BBC

TAVERN & GRILL

4019 KENNETT PIKE GREENVILLE, DE 19807 302.655.3785 BBCTAVERNANDGRILL.COM

Great Menu Casual Atmosphere Gift Certificates Available

For Sunday & Monday Night Football And Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-7pm $6 Tall Svedka Vodka Drinks $7 Tall Casa Nobles Margaritas

Watch The Games on Our 8 HD Widescreen TVs! Try Our Famously Huge Nachos for Half Price & Enjoy 50¢ Wings!

PLUS: Reward Card Program - Gluten Free Menu Half-Price Wines Every Wednesday & Saturday Night!

76 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Watch.indd 6

8/24/15 8:04 PM


SIX-PACK CINEMA

WATCH

Back-to-School Special By Mark Fields

As the kiddies leave summer behind and reluctantly settle into classroom routines, let’s educate ourselves with six films set in and around schools.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL School of Rock

(2003)

An out-of-work musician (Jack Black) takes over his roommate’s job as an elementary school music teacher and makes a real connection with his pupils when he turns them into a prepubescent rock band. Richard Linklater (Boyhood) directs this light-hearted comedy with a high-voltage bass line, which proves a perfect vehicle for Black’s manic comic stylings. Monsieur Lazhar (2001) After a traumatic teacher suicide at a French elementary school, the mysterious Monsieur Lazhar (Mohamed Fellag) materializes out of nowhere to offer his services as a substitute. An Algerian by birth, Lazhar tries to educate his students while also helping them through their grieving process, all the while harboring painful secrets of his own. The resonant film, which poses more questions than it answers, was an Academy Award nominee for Best Foreign Language Film.

HIGH SCHOOL School Ties (1992) A star Jewish athlete must hide his religious identity to avoid discrimination and hostility from his elite prep-school classmates. This portentous 1950s-set melodrama is most notable for the cast of young actors who have since become major stars: Brendan Fraser, Chris O’Donnell, Ben Affleck and Matt Damon. The screenplay is by Dick Wolf of TV’s Law and Order fame. Mr. Holland’s Opus

(1995)

Richard Dreyfus owns this appealing drama about an aspiring but frustrated classical composer who finds himself stuck earning a living as a high school music instructor. Despite his distractions, Holland is an inspiring teacher who unlocks the creativity of his students. Told over the teacher’s entire career, the plotting of Patrick Sheane Duncan’s screenplay can be heavy-handed, especially in the subplot about Holland’s deaf son, but the pay-off of the film is, well, lyrical.

COLLEGE Pitch Perfect

(2012)

This surprise hit banks heavily on the trendy appeal of a cappella singing and the charming, offbeat performances of Anna Kendrick and Rebel Wilson. The Barden Bellas, a fiercely competitive if ragtag allgirl singing group, seek affirmation in a campus sing-off against their male rivals. The music, including the hit “Cups,” keeps the cliché-ridden story from dragging, and it’s hard not to get caught up in the competition finale. Wonder Boys (2000) Michael Douglas plays a charismatic college professor/novelist who attracts a clique of restless students as acolytes. Ironically, though the professor suffers from writer’s block, his convoluted personal exploits —involving a dead dog, Marilyn Monroe’s jacket, a pregnant, married mistress, and lots of pot—would make for great material (foreshadowing!). Curtis Hanson (L.A. Confidential) directs this quirky, literate drama with a screenplay by Steve Kloves (Harry Potter’s go-to scribe) based on a novel by Michael Chabon. SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Watch.indd 7

77

8/24/15 7:59 PM


The Deer Park Tavern

SEPTEMBER

Entertainment Schedule EVERY TUESDAY

THE

Little Black Dress PARTY

with Jefe & DJ Andrew Hugh

Tuesday, Sept. 29th

Jefe & DJ Andrew Hugh

EVERY WEDNESDAY

Country Night with Zodiac Jack

EVERY THURSDAY & FRIDAY:

DJ Willoughby

SATURDAYS: 9/5-Click 9/19-Plot Twist 9/12-Radio Halo 9/26-Hi 5 Swan

SUNDAY NIGHT:

Chorduroy

Every Saturday opening at 10am - Newark’s Largest Bloody Mary Bar & Breakfast Specials! MONDAYS ½ Price Appetizers (5pm-Close)

TUESDAYS ½ Price Burgers ALL DAY! $4 Double LIT’s

WEDNESDAYS - MEXICAN NIGHT! ½ Price Nachos & Quesadillas ALL DAY! $3 Coronas & Margaritas • $1.50 Tacos

THURSDAYS ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Wings (5pm-Close) ½ Price Burgers (11:30am-3pm) • $2 Rail Drinks

FOOTBALL SPECIALS DURING ALL PRO GAMES $6 Buffalo Wings • $7 Nachos • $10 Buckets of Bud & Bud Light Bottles

302.369.9414 | 108 West Main Street, Newark www.deerparktavern.com

Be our friend on Facebook!

Celebrating Our 16 Year Anniversary! Waterfront Dining Live Entertainment Drink & Food Specials Half-Price Pizza Every Wed. Night Facebook “f ” Logo

CMYK / .ai

Facebook “f ” Logo

CMYK / .ai

285 Plum Point Rd • Elkton, MD 21921 • 443-350-9943 • www.TritonMarina.com • check us out on

78 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 10

8/25/15 12:14 PM


LISTEN

fiancé playing at this year’s Firefly Festival in Dover. Photo Joe del Tufo

FIANCÉ: FULLY COMMITTED The Newark band has gone from the high of touring England to the low of seeing their label dissolve. Now they’re looking to the future. By Matt Moore

H

eadphones on, his brow furrowed, Andrew Fusca sits on the edge of his chair, hunched over his guitar, strumming into a microphone. To his right, Jeff Marvel watches while sitting on an amplifier, a guitar in his left hand and a beer in his right. For several minutes, they silently nod in unison to the click of the metronome in Fusca’s headphones and the sound of the guitar strings competing with a low hum from a window air conditioner in the next room. Then Fusca stops strumming and quickly pulls off the headphones, ending the session. He turns around to his computer, taps on the keyboard, and a driving, ambient

pop instrumental begins to play from the monitors on his desk. The sound slowly seeps into the dimly lit room in his apartment, a room littered with empty beer bottles and music equipment, its walls decorated with Christmas lights and a poster depicting a flying saucer with the words “I Want To Believe.” Fusca and Marvel sit back and listen, critiquing almost every aspect of the song until finally clarifying that it has nothing to do with their forthcoming album, set to be released in the fall. In fact, it’s something that might not even be used at all. “This is just what we do,” says Fusca with a laugh. ► SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 11

79

8/24/15 8:08 PM


LISTEN

For almost 10 years, Fusca, Marvel and bassist Tyler Yoder FIANCÉ: FULLY COMMITTED have been writing, playing and continued from previous page recording music together in various groups, performing everywhere from beer-soaked basements in Newark and dive bars in Philadelphia to packed halls in England, venues in Brooklyn and the Firefly Music Festival in Dover. In 2009, the three graduated from Middletown High School, moved into a farmhouse in Newark and soon started a band with a few other friends. In a matter of three years, they cultivated a fan base, hosting house shows featuring other local artists and DJs. But by 2012, there was a growing disconnect in each member’s vision for the band. While some members felt they should perform live more frequently, others wanted to concentrate on the recording and writing process. This dichotomy of focus brought an end to the group, evoking feelings of frustration, detachment, and a need to reevaluate. For Yoder, who had just finished his sophomore year at the University of Delaware, this meant taking a break from music and taking to the road for the summer. “I was ready to just get away from it. I wanted to distance myself from it, not only with different musicians, but literally geographically,” he says while sitting on the porch of his home in Newark, sipping slowly from a Mason jar of ice water. While Yoder packed for his road trip, Fusca and Marvel began working on new songs to be used for another project. The two would spend hours in the farmhouse fleshing out songs, heading in a different direction from the mostly rock-based tracks they had written before. It was during this time that they wrote a track titled “Era.”

On one of his last nights in town, Yoder heard “Era” in Fusca’s bedroom and was floored. “It certainly made me question my decisions a lot,” he says now. But then he left, driving almost 1,950 miles to Paonia, Colo., in a beat-up Kia Spectra. For two months he participated in a program called the World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms, commonly referred to as WWOOF. In Paonia, a small town surrounded by the Rocky Mountains, Yoder camped, farmed and got some clarity. While he was gone, Fusca and Marvel continued to write, eventually finishing a record that they intended to release—until Fusca’s computer crashed and erased everything. While all seemed lost, one song miraculously survived: “Era,” which Fusca unintentionally backed up to the Cloud. Yet the two found themselves at a standstill. After spending months working on new recordings with only one song to show for it, they needed to begin again. It was around this time that Yoder returned to Newark with a clearer understanding of himself and a desire to play music again. He soon began working with Fusca and Marvel for the duration of the summer, and the three started fiancé—a name they settled on because of its simple sound, yet committed nature. For the rest of 2012, they spent hours writing and recording, eventually releasing two singles that received moderate attention from several independent music blogs. Then they recruited drummer Brian “Octie” Bruce, a close friend and staple of the Newark and Wilmington music scenes, and began playing shows. With Fusca providing vocals and guitar, Marvel on guitar, Yoder on bass and Bruce on drums, the band took off locally. They played almost every area bar and basement, developing their sound and generating buzz.

Come enjoy Back-to-School AVION Margaritas!!! Come Visit Our Friendly Staff & See What Everyone’s Talking About! Come see Tara, Tony, Barby, Neal, Julie, Aldo, Tino, & Sharon! Serving the BEST Margaritas & the Largest Selection of Tequila in the Tri-State Area! 3 Mexican Draft Beers and 10 Mexican Bottled Beers Available!

Make Mexican Post Your Football Headquarters! $2 MILLER LITE PINTS 1/2-PRICE NACHOS & WINGS $7.95 Lunch Specials! LATE NIGHT MENU 7 DAYS A WEEK TIL 1AM

Wat Eagl ch the es h ere!

Mon-fri 11am-3pm

Featuring 70 types of tequila! • AWARD WINNING MARGARITAS! 302.478.3939 | 3100 Naaman’s Road | Wilmington, DE | MexicanPost.com | facebook.com/Mex.Post

Catch all of the NFL Games Here!

80 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 12

8/24/15 8:09 PM


KRESTON WINE & SPIRITS

Celebrating 82 Years Photo Nichole Fusca

Stop by Kreston’s for Great Fall Beer Options fiancé: (l to r): Brian Bruce, Samuel Nobles, Tyler Yoder, Andrew Fusca, Jeff Marvel.

In 2013, they released their first single as a four-piece band: “Era”—a more refined version of the song that started everything. From there, they gained more blog attention, eventually receiving a write-up in the popular British music magazine NME. Zane Smythe, of the California-based music label SQE Music, happened to pick up the issue, read the story, and promptly signed fiancé. As “Era” continued to garner attention, Fusca, Marvel, Yoder and Bruce set up in the farmhouse and spent the rest of the year writing a new set of songs and recording them to quarter-inch tape on a Tascam 388 reel-to-reel tape machine. After hours spent self-producing the record with the help of their close friend, Ryan Williams, the band released EP 1—a collection of five songs featuring an analogue-based, filmy, fuzzed-out aesthetic on SQE Music in September 2014. In a matter of months, it was pressed on vinyl, sold in stores and online, featured on even more music blogs and played on local and national radio programs. That October, they embarked on their first tour, performing at venues throughout England to some of the biggest crowds they had ever played to. At one performance in London, Fusca described a scene in which the four of them were positioned behind a curtain and told to begin playing. As they kicked into their first song, the curtain slowly rose, and they saw a hall packed to capacity, the crowd cheering and singing along word-for-word. Fusca describes the moment as both exciting and overwhelming. “I’ve never felt anything like that playing a show before. It was absolutely bizarre,” he says. High off a successful record release and tour, fiancé hardly remained complacent. In order to fully translate the sounds they created in the studio to live performances and expand their writing capabilities, they added another member to their roster, multi-instrumentalist and major player in the Delaware music scene Sam Nobles. With a solidified lineup, they spent the winter and spring in the farmhouse, recording a new set of songs to be featured on their forthcoming self-titled full-length album. But in the midst of their growing popularity, there were significant changes in each member’s personal life. Fusca credits these changes as the force that shifted their songs into a new direction, both musically and thematically. While the band’s first release allowed vocals, lyrics and instrumentation to exist as one in order to demonstrate the fluidity of emotion and convey an ambiguous feeling, these new songs are more direct. For Fusca, there was no other option, listing his mental health and his recent move-in with his girlfriend as two prominent influences. ►

Pumpkin Beer

Octoberfest

Cider

FILL. DRINK. REPEAT. Large section of Craft Bottles & Cans A Delaware Tradition Since 1933 MIDDLETOWN 448 E. Main Street Middletown, DE 19709 Tel: (302) 376-6123

WILMINGTON 904 Concord Avenue Wilmington, DE 19802 Tel: (302) 652-3792

Proud Sponsor of the

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 13

81

8/25/15 12:14 PM


LISTEN

Photo Joe del Tufo

FIANCÉ: FULLY COMMITTED continued from previous page

fiancé had strong local support among the crowd of 90,000 at Firefly.

GREAT FOOD, GREAT ATMOSPHERE, GREAT MUSIC

804 BRANDYWINE BLVD. WILMINGTON, DE 19809 302-761-9175 iz Ca

tVi

s.b

Chef Rudy has...

brand

new

entrées! come check ‘em out at

4003 concord pike 302.477.0240

or you could always stick to brinner (breakfast all day is a wonderful thing)

Catalyst Visuals

WEB PRINT VIDEO wilmington 302 655 9949 catalyst.design

“When living with someone, you watch when you get in manic modes, you pay attention to it,” he says. “You hurt, and that other person hurts—it makes you analyze yourself so much. I wanted to go that route because that’s something that’s always been super hard for me. At this point, it’s still weird and difficult, but I wouldn’t feel happy—I wouldn’t feel like I had done the right thing with what I’m working on if I weren’t being honest.” This growing desire to stray from the obscure and embrace the anxiety that one often chooses to avoid is something that unexpectedly applied to other members of the band as well. “I think the whole realization of feeling like you want to settle on something changes with the age you’re at and what you’re doing with your life,” Yoder says, mentioning that he also recently moved in with his girlfriend. “Being in your early 20s, there is this sense of, ‘What am I supposed to be doing? I need something—I need some sort of answer.’” As the writing and recording process continued, the band kept the number of shows they played to a minimum, save for a few performances in Brooklyn and Philadelphia, and local sets at the Arden Gild Hall, Homegrown Café in Newark and the occasional basement show. That gave them an opportunity to tighten their sound for the recording sessions and see how people responded to the new material. Around this time, the band received a letter explaining their label, SQE Music, was no longer financially sustainable, which led to its subsequent dissolution. In yet another setback, an entire inventory of vinyl—close to 1,000 pressings of EP 1— was destroyed. ►

82 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 14

8/25/15 2:15 PM


HAPPY HOUR EVERYday GET4-7pm FRESH!

martini mondays

LOCALLY-SOURCED PRODUCE & PROTEINS DELIVERED HERE DAILY New Martini FOR YOUR PIZZA!

Featured Every Week

TUES: Buy 1 large pizza,

get 1 free!

WED: OPEN MIC/KARAOKE NIGHT

JOE RUNYIRI MUSICIAN & MC

WHAT’S #INTUNE THIS MONTH

THURS:BAR THIRTY THUrSDAYSYOU 4PM-CLOSE OUR AWAITS FOR... HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT

HAPPY HOUR! FRI: EXtREME FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS

Special Delivery Band Sunday, September 6

Maurice Hines is Tappin’... Wed, Sept 16 - Sun, Oct 4

In the Light: Pink Floyd Friday, September 18

Save the Valley Music Fest Saturday, September 26

LIVE MUSIC & BANDS

7 DAYSDJA WEEK SAT: EXTREME DANCE PARTY $2nfl SLICES and $5 WINGS football sunday funday DRINK & FOOD SPECIALS DURING GAMES 25% OFF DRAFTS 302-384-8012 • 201 Market St, Wilmington $1 OFF WINE BY THEN. GLASS & MIXED DRINKS

$4 CAPTAIN MORGAN, SMIRNOFF, AND BACARDI DRINKS! Wilmington.ExtremePizza.com FREE PARKING! Monday-Friday After 5pm, and All Day Saturday & Sunday At Corner of 2nd & Market!

Full details for these events plus hundreds more at: inWilmingtonDE.com

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

83

302-384-8012 • 201 North Market Street, Wilmington

Wilmington.ExtremePizza.com

09_Listen.indd 15

8/25/15 11:02 AM


LISTEN FIANCÉ: FULLY COMMITTED continued from page 82

CRAFT BEER + craft cocktails

$10 bottles of bubbles all day Monday

$10 pitchers Sun & Thurs nights

WEEKEND BRUNCH Saturday & Sunday 10am-3pm

While most artists may consider their label folding a reason to quit, fiancé pushed on. They soon found a storage unit, rented it, and transformed it into a soundproof practice space. There they continued to build and fashion their repertoire. To Marvel, the collapse of their label only strengthened the new material. “The album as a whole is more cohesive—it’s more thought out,” he says. “It’s a bit more felt.” Perhaps one of the most identifiable characteristics of fiancé as a band is its close relationship with the Delaware community. At every performance, regardless of the crowd size, there is always a core of friends, family and admirers. This support was evident as they took the stage in June at Firefly, where they played before a crowd of 90,000. As Bruce sat down behind the drum kit, someone yelled, “Octie, lend me a smoke,” while his mom cheered and screamed his name. Yoder tuned his bass, flashing a smile to a group of childhood friends in the crowd. Marvel gripped the fret board of his guitar and locked eyes with his girlfriend standing in the front row. Nobles fiddled with the knobs on his keyboard, acknowledging the crowd with a slight nod, mouthing the words, “Thank you.” Fusca walked to the microphone, adjusting his hat and holding his guitar. “We’re fiancé, and we’re from around here,” he said, as the band ripped into the first song on the set list—“Era.” In something as fragile as the music industry, a band inevitably becomes affected by every rise and fall. In a year, they have gone from writing in a bedroom to spinning their album on a turntable, touring England and seeing their label dissolve. Yet for fiancé, the main objective is still to create something authentic and meaningful in the midst of all the uncertainty. It is this mantra that has compelled them to independently release their first full-length album this fall—a collection of sobering, direct and anxious compositions, focusing on the crippling weight of emotional challenges and the importance of being authentic in every aspect of life. “It’s hard to know that you’re doing the right thing,” says Yoder. He sets down the Mason jar down, leans forward and grins. “It’s been a test, but I’m grateful for it—I’m grateful for all the opportunities that we’ve had so far. And if those do end up being the biggest opportunities that we’ve had, then so be it.”

Build Your Own Mimosa bar (includes refills) 60+ CRAFT BEERS | 15 DRAFTS | 20 WINES BY THE GLASS

Home Grown Cafe delivers Local Flavor. Fresh, made from scratch food, an amazing craft beer selection, over 20 wines by the

84 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 16

8/24/15 8:26 PM


THURSDAY NIGHTS AT KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE

ONE NIGHT DECIDES IT ALL!

Head-to-Head Band Competition Each Night

Who Will Be This Year’s Musikarmageddon Champion?

2 0 1 5 MUSIKARMAGEDDON Four Bands Will Play THE MUSIKARMAGEDDON

FINALS

live @ the baby grand Saturday, September 26 For a full list of competing artists go to

Musikarmageddon.com

WHO WILL GET CROWNED CHAMP?

IT IS WHAT IT IS

THE JOLLY WHAT!

POOR YORICK

WEEKDAY WARRIORS

WATCH, VOTE and HELP DECIDE WHO WINS! For Tickets and More Details go to

Musikarmageddon.com The Grand Box Office: 302-652-5577

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 17

85

8/25/15 11:03 AM


LISTEN

World Cafe Live AT THE QUEEN • WILMINGTON, DE

MARSHALl tucker band

SEPT 25 • 8PM

IRISH FESTfeat. BYRNE & KELLY, the

young dubliners, mythica, & danny burns

OCT 8 • 7PM

JOHN GORKA

OCT 22 • 7PM

ASHLEY MONROE

OCT 30 • 8PM

NEW YEAR’S EVE

with

THE DAVID BROMBERG QUINTET

TUNED IN Not-to-be missed music news NEW MUSIC DIRECTOR Wilmington Community Orchestra welcomes Jonathan Moser After a year-long search that drew more than 30 applicants, the Music School of Delaware has found a new conductor for its Wilmington Community Orchestra: Jonathan Moser, who will begin his tenure this fall. Moser was one of four finalists for the position. Each had developed a repertoire for and led a performance of the orchestra during the 2014-15 concert season. Music School Dean Cheri Astolfi led the search, which was conducted by experienced faculty leaders who observed every finalist. Says Astolfi: “Jonathan brought a great understanding of the orchestral process and a warm, jovial approach to the orchestra. He was very well received by the membership.” The Music School of Delaware’s concert season includes four performances by the Wilmington Community Orchestra in 20152016, beginning with Moser’s debut on Friday, Nov. 20, at 7:30 p.m. The other concerts will be held on January 17, March 20 and May 20, 2016, including one featuring the winners of the annual Delaware Concerto Competition for Young Musicians. Concerts are held at several locations in the state, including the Wilmington branch on Washington Street. Tickets for all performances will be available online this fall at musicschoolofdelaware.org or by calling 762-1132. Moser has been a music lover since childhood, when he would sit under the piano listening as his parents played Beethoven, Chopin and Rachmaninoff. Later, he pursued the violin, and received a bachelor’s, master’s and a doctorate in performance. The Music School of Delaware, founded in 1924, is the only statewide, accredited, community music school in the nation, serving residents of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland. A community resource open to the public, the organization employs 90 expert educators offering instructional programs for musicians of all ages and skill levels. For more information, visit musicschoolofdelaware.org.

DEC 31 • 10PM 500 N. MARKET ST. • 302.994.1400 • WORLDCAFELIVE.COM

86 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 4

8/24/15 8:31 PM


New Sweden playing at the 2014 Firefly Music Festival.

2

SPOTLIGHT ON ARDEN In the Light cover band takes on Pink Floyd; Cumbia All Stars hail from Peru Arden Concert Gild is home to diverse concerts in September. First, after previously tackling material by Led Zeppelin, Queen and The Who, Delaware’s premier tribute band, In the Light, returns to Gild Hall on Friday, Sept. 18, to focus on two classic albums by Pink Floyd. Commemorating the band’s 40th anniversary, the first half of the show will consist of Floyd’s 1975 release Wish You Were Here, which includes favorites “Have a Cigar” and the album’s title track. The second half will be the 1977 album Animals, which includes “Sheep” as well as the 17-minute epic “Dogs.” The show will conclude with an encore set of Floyd favorites. In the Light band members are area artists Joe Trainor (vocals, keys), Scott Lawing (lead guitar), Andy Faver (rhythm guitar), Steve Kuzminski (keyboards, guitar), Christian Salcedo (bass guitar) and Matt Urban (drums). The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are $17 in advance and $20 at the door. On Sunday, Sept. 20, Cumbia All Stars stop in Arden—all the way from Peru. Band members come from the legendary founding groups of the musical style Cumbia. After 40 years, these artists meet again to play together the music they helped create. With bold guitars and jerky beats, Cumbia All Stars dust off the best songs of the genre and innovate, composing new melodies while remaining loyal to tradition. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. The show starts at 7 p.m. JAM ON THE BRANDYWINE Annual music fest marks 10 years Saturday, Sept. 12, is the 10th anniversary of Jam On the Brandywine, which takes place early each fall in the Brandywine Valley in West Chester. This year’s lineup: Echoes (a Pink Floyd tribute), The Bullets, Kategory 5, Montana Wildaxe, Brad Newsom Band, Mystery Fyre and Endeavor to Preserve. Gates open at noon for the 1-10 p.m. festival, which will be held at the Brandywine Valley Association’s headquarters, 1760 Unionville-Wawaset Rd., West Chester. Tickets start at $15 per person in advance, $25 at the gate. Kids under age 12 get in free, and tickets are $15 with student ID. Parking is $5 for cars with fewer than three passengers. This is a bring-your-own-beer event, and organizers encourage festival-goers to bring their own water bottles, etc., rather than bringing in disposables. As always, the event will raise funds for the Brandywine Valley Association, which works to protect Brandywine Creek. For more information, visit Brandywinewatershed.org.

UPSTAIRS IN SEPTEMBER Every Wednesday:

Gable Music Ventures presents WILMO WEDNESDAYS (7pm) Except Sept. 2nd

All shows at 8pm unless otherwise noted. Wed 2 - CLINT COLEY w/ Scooter Wilkerson

Thurs 3 - STEVE CAL BAND Fri 4 - MICHAEL FINAZZO. COMEDIAN. MOVIE MAKER. GOOD PERSON.

Sat 5 - THE BRIDES OF FUNK & FX UNCOVERED Thurs 10 - IVA Fri 11 - THE SHOW PONIES Sat 12 - SEPTEMBER SONGWRITER SHOWCASE (7pm) Thurs 17 - APACHE TRAILS AND ALI SPERRY Fri 18 - SYLEENA JOHNSON Sat 19 - SHARK TAPE Wed 23 - NAO YOSHIOKA TARA HENDRICKS

Thurs 24 - THE DELAWARE PICK PRESENTS AYREHEART, INDRAJIT ROY-CHOWDHURY AND BRUCE ANTHONY (7pm) Fri 25 - BOBBY LONG w/Brian Dunne

Sat 26 - GRILLED CHEESE AND CRAFT BEER TASTING Featuring YARDS BREWING COMPANY (2pm)

Sat 26 - ANGELA SHEIK (7pm)

HAVE YOU HEARD OF SOMETHING? Email tuned-in@tsnpub.com with ideas, and they could be added to our list.

World Cafe Live at the Queen 500 N Market St, Wilmington, DE 302-994-1400 WorldCafeLive.com SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 5

87

8/24/15 8:32 PM


LISTEN

MUSIKARMAGEDDON’S

LAST STAGE APPROACHES

S

$~ ¢ã¨nĂ&#x;n

eAÄ‘[AĂ&#x;n Q´AĂ&#x;e™­Â? ãÇA

$2$- $ 0!/ DOGTOPIA OF ELSMERE ôŽ "nÄ?

19805 ŽsÄ—Ăź 319 New /´Aeb Road •¢ã¨nĂ&#x;nb Elsmere, DE

Ă´Ä—ĂźÂ˜ÂŽÂŽsÂ˜Ă§sçç 302-998-7877 Ä?Ä?Ä?Ă?e´Â?ò´Ç™AĂ?[´¨ www.dogdaycare.com/elsmere

Finals are set for Sept. 26

ometimes it’s raw talent. Sometimes it’s sheer volume. But it’s always something. Take it from the Musikarmageddon judges, the ones who return each year to help score the area’s biggest battle of the bands. They will tell you: There is something that sticks out with each series, a theme that distinguishes each year’s competition. This year it’s variety. In all of its nine years, Musikarmageddon has never seen quite the diversity of acts that it has in this year’s competition. Last month’s semi-final rounds offered audiences everything from lively country and pop to heavy rock and hip-hop. On Saturday night, Sept. 26, the final four competing bands will perform one last time, with the winning act being decided by a combination of audience vote and judges’ scores. Poor Yorick, Weekday Warriors, The Jolly What and It Is What It Is will face off at the baby grand, with the highest-scoring band joining the ranks of past winners such as Minshara, Glim Dropper and New Sweden. The Jolly What was the first act to make it to the finals. On Aug. 6, they out-performed Country by Night and Game Seven at Kelly’s Logan House. The next night saw another well-attended show at World Cafe Live at The Queen. Although Maiden Names scored highest with the judges, It Is What It Is won the audience vote, propelling them to first. Galaxy 13 came in second in overall scoring. During competition the following Friday night (Aug. 14) at 1984, Weekday Warriors won both the audience vote and the favor of the judges, although both Lifestream and Bearmouth brought respectable crowds as well. The semi-finals concluded the next day, Aug. 15, at the Oddity Bar. Despite strong performances by Fuzzy Snakefoot and Mark Thousands, Poor Yorick doubled down on audience vote and judges’ scoring. For more information and to purchase tickets in advance for the Musikarmageddon Finals on Sept. 26 at live @ the baby grand, go to Musikarmageddon.com. —O&A

88 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Listen.indd 8

8/28/15 8:42 AM


Photo Kevin McLaughlin

PLAY

Southern Approaches, an oil on canvas by Kevin McLaughlin, 1984.

DREAM STREETS EXHIBIT CELEBRATES 1970-80 ART Delaware Art Museum hosts festival Sept. 18

M

ajor cultural events like the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War had a profound impact on America in the 1960s and ‘70s. During that time, many area poets and writers started meeting in living rooms and cafés to discuss these events and share their work. Writers Lew Bennett and John Hickey soon collaborated to curate a single zine featuring many of these pieces, eventually bringing it to a newspaper printer in southern New Jersey. By 1977, they published Dreamstreets #1, a collection of poetry, prose and visual art. Derived from Hickey’s experience as a cab driver in Philadelphia, the name describes the dreamlike aesthetic of the streets early in the morning. The two diligently distributed the zine, and spread the word about the budding counterculture in Wilmington. Since then, Dream Streets has grown remarkably, holding public poetry readings and publishing hundreds of works from area artists. The same cultural foundations put in place by the Dream Streets community continue to support the visual and performing arts within the city today. Organizations such as the Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts, the Delaware Humanities Forum and the Delaware Theatre Company were

founded during this period, as well as commercial galleries and city-supported arts initiatives. In June, the Delaware Art Museum began featuring a new exhibit entitled “Dream Streets: Art in Wilmington 1970-1990.” Running until Sunday, Sept. 27, the exhibit showcases craft and design, drawing, painting, performance art, photography and sculpture. The exhibit is paired with the release of Dreamstreets #51, a new issue bringing together former and recent contributors’ works. On Friday, Sept. 18, the final days of the exhibit will be celebrated with an outdoor festival at the museum starting at 6 p.m. There will be hip-hop and breakdancing performances by Wilmington artists and musicians, as well as an eclectic set from DJ Scarfo and live painting demonstrations by artist Terrance Vann. Food will be provided by local food trucks, complemented by delicious libations. General admission is $5, but free for members. Come on out and dance, socialize and celebrate a local legacy and thriving arts community. —Matt Moore SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 11

89

8/25/15 2:28 PM


Bee at our table

at Coverdale Farm Preserve, Greenville, DE

6pm

Saturday

September THE FIRST…

Everybody loves a

Carnival

19

Join us for a family-style honey-inspired three-course

dinner under the stars with a menu pairing by

featuring craft brewed

Montrachet Fine Foods

Dogfish Head beers

Reserve your seat

DelNature.org/FarmToFork $150/person $1,100/passel of 8

THE …REST

RUN FEST

10-11-15 Oberod Estate

Form a Team, Have a Blast, Help Kids in Delaware!

bitly.com/RunFest15 The 2nd Annual Oberod 5K Trail Run will occur prior to the Splatter Dash™ 90 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 10

8/25/15 10:07 AM


PLAY

SNAP SHOTS 1. ‘80s Era Video Games Classic Pinball • Skeeball 15 Beers on Tap • Area Craft Brews

Great local & national bands!

2.

She Blinded Me with Internet Porn 3.

(80s and 90s trivia) returns Tuesday, Sept. 15 with physical challenges & video!

Last Wednesday of Each Month Photos by Kristyne McDonough 1. Courtney, Hallie, Sage, Jill, Emily, Denis, & Thaddeus at Stone Balloon Ale House. 2. Colleen Finzal, Christian Jackson, Terry Allen, Robert & Debbie Allen at Stone Balloon. 3. Mike Spriggs, BC Spriggs, Maurice Black, & Dina Black at Home Grown Café.

Nine Eyes playing 4 decades of covers for no cover! 2511 W. 4th Street, Wilmington 302-384-6479 • 1984wilmington.com

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 3

91

8/24/15 8:41 PM


presents the

LOOP FRI, SEPT. 25, 2015 13 Spots - $5 Cover (includes admittance to all spots & free shuttle bus service)

Benefits Urban Bike Project ANEJO • CATHERINE ROONEY’S • CHELSEA TAVERN DEAD PRESIDENTS • ERNEST & SCOTT TAPROOM FIRESTONE • GALLUCIO’S CAFE • GROTTO PIZZA KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE • SATSUMA GRILL SHENANIGANS • TIMOTHY’S RIVERFRONT THE WICKED VINE

OutAndAboutNow.com Octoberfest_Loop2015.indd 1

8/25/15 9:30 AM


PLAY

1.

302.658.6626 :: FireStoneRiverfront.com 110 West St., Wilmington, DE 19801

Photo Lori M. Nichols

Choose us for Fun, Memorable, Perfect Events Wilmington residents Dana Gallagher and Christian Tasker pay tribute to The Flintstones dressed as Pebbles and Bam Bam at the 35th Annual Halloween Loop.

• 2 Private Rooms • • Inside Bar & Lounge • • Spacious Riverfront Patio •

IT’S LOOP TIME! City’s popular costumed pub crawl continues a 35-year-old tradition

N

ightspots may come and go, but some nightlife traditions never die. Such is the case with Wilmington’s City Loop Series, arguably the most popular pub crawl in the state. The 2015-16 series begins on Friday, Sept. 25, with the Octoberfest Loop presented by Samuel Adams. The participating nightspots are donating the $5 cover charges they receive to the Urban Bike Project, a city-based non-profit that supports Wilmington communities by providing access to bicycling as a healthy, affordable and practical means of transportation and recreation. This year’s Loop lineup includes: Anejo, Catherine Rooney’s, Chelsea Tavern, Dead Presidents, Ernest & Scott Taproom, Firestone, Gallucio’s Café, Grotto Pizza, Kelly’s Logan House, Satsuma, Shenanigans, Timothy’s on the Riverfront and The Wicked Vine. The Loop Series continues on Saturday, Oct. 24 with the 36th 4. Halloween Loop, a costumed extravaganza that regularly brings more than 12,000 people to Wilmington. The remaining events on the series: Santa Crawl (Fri., Dec. 11), St. Paddy’s Loop (Sat., Mar. 12) and the Loop for Party Animals (Sat., Apr. 15). The Wilmington Children’s Chorus will be the beneficiary of the Santa Crawl and the Delaware Humane Association will benefit from the Party Animal Loop. For tips on doing the Loop and event updates visit outandaboutnow.com

Celebrate your Big Day • Rehearsal Dinners • Bridal Showers & Luncheons • Girls Night Out • Bachelor & Bachelorette Parties

Close your Next Deal • Business Presentations • Business Networking • Retirement Parties • Milestone Celebrations facebook.com/FireStoneWilmington Instagram/FirestoneKitchen

—O&A SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 5

93

8/25/15 11:30 AM


at Stanley’s is Back! Watch Every Game in HD, Every Week On Our 25 HDTVs

During All NFL Games, Enjoy: 2 for 1 Wings • $2.75 Pints of Miller Lite & Coors Light • $3 Pints of Yuengling Lager

Monday Night Football: Hosted by Bill Bergey & Gianni

PLACE YOUR PRO FOOTBALL WAGERS AT STANLEY’S EVERY WEEK.

Great Raffle Prizes like coolers, chairs, windshirts, hats, t-shirts and the WEEKLY GRAND PRIZE: 2 Lowel Level 35 Yard Line Tickets to an Eagles Home Game w/ Limo Transportation!

•You must be 21 to play. •Delaware Gambling Hotline: 888-850-8888. •The Delaware Sports Lottery is sponsored by the Delaware State Lottery and is not associated with or authorized by any professional or collegiate sports organization.

11th Annual

SHERIDAN GREAT CAR GIVEAWAY Win a 2 year lease on a NEW Ford Fusion or Nissan Altima Courtesy of the Sheridan Auto Group Join our Frequent Fan Club (it’s free to join). Every visit you make to Stanley’s from Sept. 1, 2015 until Jan 1, 2016 gives you a chance to be one of the 4 weekly finalists. Drawing will be during half-time of the Pro-Football Championship Game. (After Jan.)

You must be present to win. Must be at least 21 years of age. Must qualify for lease & supply your own insurance for the car lease.

Stanley’s Tavern 2038 Foulk Road | Wilmington, DE 19810

302.475.1887 | Stanleys-Tavern.com

Stanleys_Full_Sept2015.indd 1

BEST RIBS UPSTATE BEST SPORTS BAR

8/25/15 7:31 AM


Taproom WiTh a TWisT! 302.384.8113 • ernesTandscoTT.com • 902 n. markeT sT., WilmingTon

NFL Ticket is on tap! On 8 HDTVs!

32oz Bud LightS $6 YuenglingS $6 60oz Philly pale Ales $15 DFH 60 minS $15 5 tapped sailor jerry drinks

$

5 jp wiesers mixed ddrinks

$

5 Apps & Wings

$

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 1

95

8/25/15 12:20 PM


Celebrating the legendary wonder of wine with classic and innovative cuisine. The Desmond Hotel – 1 Liberty Boulevard, Malvern, PA

Friday, September 11 Grand Tasting 6:00pm-9:30pm

Featuring wine from around the world and food from the Main Line’s best restaurants

Friday, September 18 Winemakers’ Dinner 6:30pm-9:30pm

Featuring a seven-course, sit-down dinner with exquisite wine pairings

TICKETS & INFORMATION: MainLineToday.com/food&wine Custom sponsorship opportunities available at a variety of price points. For information, contact jbraun@MainLineToday.com or 610.325.4630 A portion of the proceeds benefits

Sponsored by

BUILD A BETTER YOU

2 5 1 8 We s t 4 t h S t . Wilmington, DE

(302) 658-5077

96 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 8

8/25/15 11:18 AM


PLAY

EAT WELL WHILE DOING GOOD Sept. 19 Pancakes for Parkinson’s goal: $100,000

25/Mo.

$

Plus Enrollment Fee

NEW Aerobic & Functional Fitness Rooms All classes FREE with membership!

T

he annual Pancakes for Parkinson’s is a fun and tasty event that benefits Delaware Team Fox and The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research. On Saturday, Sept. 19, from 8 a.m. to noon at Sanford School in Hockessin, join local families whose loved ones have been affected by Parkinson’s, and support the organization that raises money for a Parkinson’s cure. A dozen griddle teams will be on hand. Each gift will go toward this year’s goal of $100,000. Since 2008, Delaware Team Fox has raised awareness and research money—nearly $500,000—to advance treatments for Parkinson’s disease. You can participate by creating or joining a griddle team or by donating to support a griddle team and/or attending the event. Just in case you forget to donate ahead of time, admission is a $10 donation per person on arrival. Enjoy all-you-caneat pancakes, family fun, kids’ activities, music and more. This year, an anonymous Michael J. Fox Foundation supporter is covering all the costs incurred by the Foundation to run the Team Fox program, so that every penny donated to Delaware Pancakes for Parkinson’s can go straight to highimpact research programs to help speed a cure for Parkinson’s disease. For more information, visit teamfoxdelaware.org.

www.creationsgallery.com

Free Shipping!

—O&A SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 7

97

8/25/15 11:36 AM


Yea Yea Yea Yea

CRABS • BEERat • FOOTBALL

SEPT. 25+ + 26

all day every day

1-Year anniversary party

$2 Bud & Bud Light 16 oz. Drafts

Music & Magic Show Outside! Coming

SEPT. 12

Oct. 23

crab fest with Outdoor Music

Crabs Year ‘Round!

DURING THE GAMEs $2.50 Bud & Bud light 18 oz. Bottles All Day Sunday Eat In or Take Out

Johnny neel band 1430 Pulaski Hwy • 302-261-6246

98 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 8

8/25/15 9:44 AM


PLAY

SAVE THE VALLEY MUSIC FEST Third annual fundraiser to preserve 735 acres of Beaver Valley

S

ave the Valley, an all-volunteer grassroots organization dedicated to saving the Beaver Valley from development, is hosting the third annual Save the Valley Music Fest. The Saturday, Sept. 26, event at The Queen in Wilmington features area artists New Sweden, Sirsy, Area 302, Arden Kind and more TBA. The Valley is a portion of Delaware and Pennsylvania near Naamans Road and Rt. 202 that is owned by the Woodlawn Trustees. The Valley, treasured for its beauty, historic and ecologic significance, is a recreational wonderland for hikers, bikers, horseback riders and runners. Two-thirds of it became a National Park in 2013, but developers are aiming to create housing in the remaining third, which extends from Delaware into Pennsylvania. Save the Valley has managed to stall the process for a year or so, but needs exposure to keep the effort alive. Volunteers are joining together to help preserve 735 acres of pristine land—of the total of 2,000—in the Valley currently slated for development. Says Jason Hoover, president of Save the Valley: “Beaver Valley is an irreplaceable piece of land, rich in heritage and beauty amongst a backdrop of urban sprawl.” He adds that historical sites will be obliterated if development takes place. Standing structures that existed before the Declaration of Independence was written would be destroyed. All proceeds from the Sept. 26 event will be donated to Save the Valley. Tickets for this all-ages concert are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Doors open at 5:30 and the show starts at 6 p.m. For more information, visit savethevalley.org. —O&A

Strengthening delaware ymcade.org

1st Place Place Best Best Cheese Cheese Steak Steak 1st

BORN & BRED IN WILMINGTON’S LITTLE ITALY!

1stPlace Place Best Best Deli 1st Deli 1st Hoagie 1stPlace PlaceBest Best Sub

www.capriottis.com

510 N. Union St. • Wilmington • (302) 571-8929 708 W. Basin Rd. • Wilmington • (302) 322-6797

The Bobbie®

Hand-pulled, slow roasted turkey, fresh cranberry sauce, homemade stuffing, and mayo.

Voted the Greatest Sandwich in America! OutAndAboutNow.com AOL | Lemondrop

FRESH NEW LOOK. MORE GREAT CONTENT. SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 9

99

8/25/15 11:35 AM


Get your tickets today! When: When:

Saturday, Saturday, October October 3, 3, 2015 2015** 2:00pm 2:00pm – – 6:00pm 6:00pm

Where: Where:

Twin Twin Lakes Lakes Farm Farm 4210 4210 Kennett Kennett Pike, Pike, Greenville, Greenville, DE DE 19807 19807 ** $55 $55 per per ticket ticket ($60 ($60 day day of) of)**

How: How:

Buy Buy your your tickets tickets online online at at www.rmhde.org/special-events/red-shoe-and-brew www.rmhde.org/special-events/red-shoe-and-brew

All proceeds benefit

*Rain date is Sunday, October 4, 2015 **Online ticket sales end 10/1 at noon

Check online for special pricing.

State Line Liquors Family owned & operated Since 1937 — 4 Generations!

www.statelineliquors.com

Stocking over 1500 different beers • Singles, packs & cases Christiana mall • Newark, DE

Special Events and Tastings Visit us on the web for details

Gourmet Food & Cheeses

RANKED #3 Best Beer Retailer in the USA ratebeer.com

Offering the areas largest variety of seasonal beers.

GROWLER BAR 25 TAPS! 1610 ELKTON RD, Route 279 . ELKTON, MD OUTSIDE MD. (800) 446-WINE, IN MARYLAND (410) 398-3838

Open 7 days a week

Day of registration 7:00-7:45am • 8:00 am start (Near Cabela’s)

All proceeds will be used to build an adaptive, inclusive playground where all children will be able to play safely together.

The race is open to runners, walkers, self-propelled wheelchair/adapted bike athletes, physically challenged athletes & racing chairs/strollers. FOR MORE INFO & TO REGISTER GO TO:

InclusionMeansEveryone.com

100 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 6

8/25/15 11:27 AM


ES T A D THE E V A S RAFT C F O 8 DAYS GIC! A M R BEE

WilmingtonBeerWeek.com

Get The Scoop!

Saturday, October 24 6:30 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

PRESENTED BY: Thank you, sponsors:

Win

Free Stuff!

WEEKLY OutAndAboutNow.com

Acme Alpha Dog Marketing Associates International The Bancorp Chesapake Utilities Corp. DuPont

Blue Jean Ball

Purchase tickets at www.fbdbluejeanball.org

Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellot HyPoint Farms Morris James LLP NEIL Porter Auto Group Richard Y. Johnson & Son ShopRite

SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 12

101

8/25/15 2:33 PM


PAiRINGS

Grilled Cheese

& Craft Beer SINCE 2010

Unexpected

and

DELICIOUS PAIRINGS 4 Courses & Dessert paired with craft beers!

SATURDAY

9/26 STARTS AT 2PM • $40

featuring

YARDS BREWING COMPANY WORLD CAFE LIVE WILMINGTON

500 N. MARKET STREET 302.994.1400 WORLDCAFELIVE.COM

Something For Everyone.

WVUD.ORG

102 SEPTEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 6

8/25/15 9:55 AM


2015 82 JULY 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 4

8/24/15 8:53 PM


“Rove not from sign to sign, but stop in here, where naught exceeds the prospect but the beer.”

- Yellow Cottage sign-board, Philadelphia

Historic Odessa Brewfest Presented by All Proceeds Beneift The Historic Odessa Foundation

Over 40 Breweries l Live Music by Spokey Speaky, Hung Jury, Bruce Anthony, Bob Stretch Locally Sourced Food Selections l Boutique Wines l Cigar Rollers

202 Main Street l Odessa, DE

Tickets available online: www.odessabrewfest.com VIP Tickets: $70 l General Admission: $50 l Designated Driver Tickets: $15 ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE HISTORIC ODESSA FOUNDATION

Participating Breweries* 3rd Wave 16 Mile 21st Amendment Allagash Belukus Imports Brooklyn

Cisco Dogfish Head Elysian Eurobrew Imports Evolution Flying Dog

Flying Fish Heavy Seas Lagunitas Lancaster Brewing Long Trail New Belgium

No Li NorthCoast Oskar Blues Otter Creek Rogue Sea Dog

Shipyard Sierra Nevada Sixpoint Stone Stoudts Tall Tales

Troegs Twin Lakes Uinta Victory Weyerbacher Yards *Subject to change

For more information: 302-378-4119 www.odessabrewfest.com www.historicodessa.org

www.cantwells-tavern.com

Event Sponsors:

82 JULY 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

09_Play.indd 4

8/24/15 8:51 PM


All-stars

Creating 5-star cuisine

SEPTEMBER 17 w! NeBE FIRST TO THE FOOD WITH

THE CHEF’S PASS TICKET!

CHASE CENTER ON THE RIVERFRONT 5:45 – 8:30 PM F O R I N F O & T I C K E T S V I S I T thefarmerandthechef.com B E N E F ITS TH E M A R C H O F D I M E S

/TheFarmerandTheChefDE #FarmerAndChef

PLATINUM SPONSORS The Archer Group Caspari McCormick Out and About Riverfront AV WDSD and WILM GOLD SPONSORS Chase Center on the Riverfront Clear Channel Outdoor Delaware City Refining Company DuPont Growmark FS Produce Marketing Association Signs Now PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF KATHLEEN BUCKALEW PHOTOGRAPHY

09_Inside.indd 16

8/24/15 3:34 PM


09_Inside.indd 16

8/24/15 3:41 PM

Out & About Magazine September 2015  
Advertisement