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Also In This Issue The Arts as Activism Series: Reeds Refuge Q&A With County Executive Candidates Canned Crafts Make a Dent in Del.

FALL INTO ARTS Our annual season preview

SEPTEMBER 2016 CO M P L I M E N TA R Y VOL. 29 | NO. 7

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50 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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6 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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R Allan


2 INSIDE 2

15

33 Out & About Magazine Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

our staff

47

Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net

Creative Director & Production Manager Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. matt@catvis.biz Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. tyler@catvis.biz Contributing Designer Ryan Alexander, Catalyst Visuals, LLC

Contributing Writers Mark Fields, Pam George, Paula Goulden, Rob Kalesse, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Robert Lhulier, Dan Linehan, Karl Malgiero, Allan McKinley, John Murray, Larry Nagengast, Scott Pruden, Eric Ruth, Matt Sullivan Contributing Photographers Joe del Tufo, Tim Hawk, Les Kipp, Anthony Santoro, Javy Diaz, Matt Urban Special Projects Sarah Green, John Holton, David Hallberg Interns Emma Driban, Evie Kortanek

what’s inside START

EAT

11 The War on Words 13 F.Y.I. 14 By the Numbers 15 Overcoming Divides 17 Worth Trying 19 Part 3: The Arts as Activism 23 ‘Our Local Gangster’ 27 TheDCH Grows Greener 29 Triple Threat 33 Graphic Success

65 The Farmer & the Chef 67 Bites

FEATURES 23 ‘Our Local Gangster’ on Big Screens De Niro and Scorsese will produce a film based on true crime bestseller about mob figure Frank Sheeran.

DRINK 69 Making a Dent 75 Sips

By Scott Pruden

29 Triple Threat

Director of Digital Media & Distribution Marie Graham Poot • mgraham@tsnpub.com

77

LISTEN 77 Modern Mavericks 80 Tuned In

Associate Editor Krista Connor • kconnor@tsnpub.com

Actor, real estate agent, entrepreneur: Lyman Chen manages to toggle effortlessly from one to the other. By Bob Yearick

LEARN

WATCH

12 Career Success

83 Reviews 85 Six-pack Cinema

36 Arts Attack!

FOCUS 36 Arts Attack! 47 Q&A with County Executive Candidates

WILMINGTON 53 Art on the Town 58 On the Riverfront

PLAY

From ballet to jazz to opera, we’ve got you covered this season. By Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald

87 Where to Watch the Game On the cover: The August performance of Bitter Homes & Gardens presented by The Bearded Ladies at the Delaware Art Museum.

47 5 Questions For County Executive Candidates Three of the four candidates address major issues facing New Castle County.

Photo Joe del Tufo / Moonloop Photography

Editorial & advertising info: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 Website: outandaboutnow.com Email: contact@tsnpub.com SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

Close, But No Cigar I heard a man at the Democratic Convention say, “We are all in agreeance with Joe Biden.” This word got a lot of press more than a decade ago when rocker Fred Durst, lead singer of Limp Bizkit, uttered this at the Grammy Awards: “I just really hope we’re all in agreeance that this war should go away as soon as possible.” Wordsmiths responded with derision, saying it should be agreement. Then some Oxford English Dictionary expert contended that it was a word, but he admitted it had gone out of use in the early 1700s, then made a comeback in the 18th and early 19th centuries. But since then it has again fallen into disuse. Bottom line: it’s wrong. Go with agreement. Media Watch • Matt Breen, in The Philadelphia Inquirer: “Pete Mackanin said he is not sure how long Bianco will be out for.” The non-rule about not ending a sentence in a preposition is silly (As Winston Churchill allegedly said, “That is the kind of nonsense up with which I will not put.”), but in this case the “for” is totally useless and amateurish. • USA Today: "What do you get when you cross a international pop star with . . ." Proof once again that “an” is disappearing from the language. Remember, the rule is to use an before a word starting with a vowel sound. Otherwise, use a. • Phillies radio broadcaster Scott Franzke: “He is leaving a lot of space between he and the shortstop.” Franzke thus joins his TV counterpart, Tom McCarthy, in not recognizing that prepositions such as between require the objective pronoun him. • Wall Street Journal: “The most basic tenant of the decision is that . . . the death penalty must be decided by the jury.” The correct word is tenet, meaning principle, rule, not tenant, meaning a renter of land or property. • Keith Pompey, in the Inquirer, scored a double: “In addition to being solid from the three-point line, the Sixers are getting a good locker room guy.” This is a dangling modifier; it’s the guy who’s good from the three-point line, not the Sixers. Same story: “They want to have a face-to-face meeting with Waiters to squash the concerns about the South Philly native.” The word is quash. Common mistake. • The University of Pennsylvania Gazette: “The Pentagon people came to us instead of we going over there.” Should be “us,” of course—again, object of the preposition. And from an Ivy League publication yet.

By Bob Yearick

• The News Journal: “Wendell Smallwood didn’t have a big viewing party, just him and his immediate family at their home in Smyrna.” Here, the subjective case is needed—he. • And finally, we have this from Donald Trump, who spoke of “picking up” on the emails of Hillary Clinton: “Believe me, I’m going to pick up bigly.” As usual with Trump’s comments, I have no rational reaction. Department of Redundancies Dept. (Note that the word of the month, tautology, describes this department.) There are phrases that have been accepted for years that simply don’t pass muster here. Two examples: • Compare and contrast. This is a Signs of the Times: From a classic tautology popular with high resale shop in Pennsylvania. school teachers everywhere. Note to Our highlight. them: just make it compare. If one is comparing two things, there will naturally be contrasts. • Sooner rather than later. This is a favorite of loquacious people, especially those in TV and radio. Just make it “soon.” Movie Gaffes Herewith a new category, in which we point out misuses, misspellings, and general semi-literacy in random movies. In 2012’s Parental Guidance, Bill Crystal says to Bette Midler: “You must've sang that to the kids a hundred times.” Sung is the past participle of sing. From Manhunter (1986): A headline in a newspaper reads “FBI Persues Pervert.” That’s pursues. Noticed any movie gaffes? Send ‘em in.

Follow me on Twitter: @thewaronwords

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

Word of the Month

tautology Pronounced taw-tol-uh-jee, it’s a noun meaning the saying of the same thing twice in different words; a redundancy.

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NEED A SPEAKER FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION? Contact me for a fun power point presentation on grammar: ryearick@comcast.net.

8/24/16 10:13 AM


LEARN

A SECOND CAREER SUCCESS Meet Sandra Hall, The 2016 Delaware Teacher of the Year

S

andra Hall was 42 years old when she took the first step in following her professional passion. At that time, she already held two degrees—an associate of science in business degree from Goldey Beacom College in Wilmington, and a bachelor of science degree in business administration with a concentration in management from the University of Louisville, Ky. However, the business world did not entice her; teaching did. The Delaware native and Smyrna High School graduate says several life events compelled her to pursue a second career. “I had an inspiring teacher in high school who made me want to work harder than I had ever worked before,” she says. “She believed in me and made me believe in myself. And having my daughters (Allison, a senior at the University of Delaware, and Anna, a junior at St. Thomas More Academy in Magnolia, Del.) taught me how to be a teacher. They were naturally curious and inquisitive, and I loved being their first teacher.” But her strongest influence came from 20-plus years as an Army wife, including 10 in Germany. While living overseas, she became a Family Readiness group leader, helping young Army families who were struggling or needed advice. “I became their advocate,” she says. “I loved helping others.” So, in the summer of 2005, she enrolled at Wilmington University to earn her master’s degree in elementary studies. Two years later, she began teaching third grade at North Smyrna (Del.) Elementary. Hall calls her experience at WilmU “very positive,” noting, “my professors were very knowledgeable.” The mother of two adds, “I was able to raise my family, work and go to school. The seven-

WE ARE

WILDCAT COUNTRY

HOMECOMING 2016 SEPT 12–17 • wilmu.edu/Homecoming

week blocks allowed me to graduate in a timely manner without overloading my coursework.” To say that she has thrived as an educator would be an understatement. In fact, this year she received the ultimate honor her profession can bestow. From a pool of 9,000 teachers, Sandra Hall was selected as Delaware’s State Teacher of the Year for 2016. Hall’s new title has kept her busier than ever. As part of her duties, she has spoken at several conferences and conventions in Delaware, Texas, and Washington, D.C. And in July, she attended the International Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala. In addition to these unique opportunities for travel and enrichment, she won a $5,000 grant to use for the educational benefit of her students and two personal grants totaling an additional $5,000. Moreover, Hall says she has received “great feedback and incredible support” from her fellow educators. “There’s a wonderful team of teachers at North Smyrna Elementary,” she says. “They have been so supportive, and they always inspire me to be better every day. I also have a great administrative support team that continually encourages me. I’m very lucky.” Second careers take flight at WilmU every eight weeks as new classes start. Committed to nurturing a work-life balance for students and employees, WilmU offers unsurpassed flexibility through day, evening, weekend and online courses and tuition that is among the most affordable in the region. Looking to pursue your professional passion while balancing family and career commitments? Look to WilmU. Visit wilmu.edu today or come to the WilmU Fall Open House on October 19.

Fall Open House October 19 wilmu.edu/OpenHouse

12 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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F.Y.I. Things worth knowing Compiled by Evie Kortanek

BRANDYWINE FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS

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eturning for its 55th year, the Brandywine Festival of the Arts will feature nearly 200 artists and crafters from around the country in the Josephine Gardens of Brandywine Park. There also will be children’s activities, food vendors and performances by local musicians. Named Editors’ Pick as Best Art Show and Sale 2015 by Delaware Today, the event showcases talented local artists as well as dozens of emerging artists nationwide. The dates are Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 10 and 11. Admission is $5, and children under 12 are free. For more information, visit brandywinearts.com.

GET DOWN AND DIRTY FOR LEUKEMIA

G

rab some friends and an old pair of sneakers and enter the Eighth Annual Delaware Mud Run on Sunday, Sept. 18, to raise money for the Leukemia Research Foundation of Delaware. Last year’s Mud Run raised $200,000, with 100 percent going to Leukemia research. The 5K takes place at Frightland in Middletown and features muddy bootcamp style obstacles with competition for a cause. The event also has live music, featuring band Split Decision, several local food trucks, including a stand for Dino’s Ice Cream, and the Muddy Bar for participants 21 and over. Gates open at 7 a.m., and the race starts at 9. For more information, visit delawaremudrun.com.

60TH ANNUAL POLISH FESTIVAL

S’MORE-GASBORD OF FAMILY FUN

W

J

DINING FOR WOMEN

EXPLORE KENNETT’S UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

hether it’s to support the century-old church or to feast on the fantastic pierogies, visit St. Hedwig’s 60th Annual Polish Festival from Monday to Friday, Sept. 19-24, at Delmarva Lane, Wilmington. Bring the family and enjoy Polish food and tradition with live music, dancing, rides, games, vendors and more. Funds from the festival will be used for repairs to St. Hedwig’s Church. Admission and parking are free. For more information, visit sthedwigde.org.

J

oin Dining for Women in celebrating their fifth anniversary on Tuesday, Sept. 27, at Red Clay Presbyterian Church. The organization was founded with one chapter of 10 women, and today there are more than 400 chapters nationwide with 8,000 members. Dining For Women is dedicated to reaching out to women and girls around the world in extreme poverty, and giving them tools to be self-sufficient. Co-Founder Marsha Wallace will come from Greenville, S.C., to join the local chapter in sharing food, learning about the featured program for September, and reflecting on the programs they have supported over the last five years. For more information, visit diningforwomen.org or contact Peggy Smith at dfwpsmith@gmail.com.

KOREAN THANKSGIVING CELEBRATION

M

ark your calendar for Saturday, Sept. 17, for an interactive day of cultural immersion at the Delaware Art Museum’s Korean Festival and Harvest Celebration. The event will celebrate the Korean Thanksgiving, Chuseok, and promote a culture exchange with guests participating in activities and experiencing performances that reflect traditional and modern Korean culture. With free, public events, the museum offers accessible programs for the community by connecting its collections with Delaware’s arts and culture. For more information, visit delart.org.

oin interactive storyteller Clem Bowen for campfire tales, s’mores and a night of family fun on Saturday, Sept. 24, at White Clay Creek State Park. The experience will begin at 6 p.m. with traditional and handmade musical instruments to complement Bowen’s imaginative stories, and audience participation to involve all guests. The night will be capped off with a campfire favorite, delicious homemade s’mores. For more information, visit destateparks.com.

O

n Sunday, Sept. 18, take a guided bus tour through Kennett Square’s Underground Railroad. The tour includes visits to five abolitionist homes, Kennett Square’s first street and its integrated homes at the time, abolitionists’ descendants, a 19th century Quaker Meetinghouse and the new Kennett Underground Railroad Center. Each stop includes historical narratives from tour guides. Join the tour at the Brandywine Valley Conference and Tourist Center. Admission is $20 for adults and $15 for children. For more information, visit thebrandywine.com.

BIKE THROUGH AMISH COUNTRY

T

he 30th Annual Amish Country Bike Tour, the state’s largest cycling event, is set for Saturday, Sept. 10. It features five loops ranging from 15 to 100 miles, each starting at Legislative Mall in Dover. The tour includes a map, giveaways, famous food stops along the way, including the “pie stop” at the Amish Schoolhouse, and a catered picnic at the tour’s end. With thousands of participants from more than 25 states in the past, the tour is sure to be a hit again this year. It’s a rain or shine event with registration at $60 for adults, $30 for children ages 5-16, and free for children under 5. For more information, visit amishcountrybiketour.com. SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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by the numbers A few facts about the performing arts.

40

Don’t forget!

Book your Holiday Luncheon before 10/1 & receive a $50 Gift Certificate Visit our website for more details and pictures!!

The percent of projected growth in the employment of actors from 2014 to 2024.

The number of professional theaters with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center in New York City.

18.80 The median hourly wage in dollars for actors as of May 2015. The lowest 10 percent earn less than $9.27 and the highest 10 percent earn more than $90.

69,400 We have Private Spaces for Meetings & Special Events

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The number of actors employed in the United States as of 2014.

105.36 The average cost, in dollars, for a ticket to a Broadway show. Prices range from $50 (Chicago) to $477 (The Book of Mormon).

26 The number of shows playing on Broadway as of Aug. 16.

14 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Grand Teton National Park. Photo Michael Feuda

OVERCOMING OUR CONTINENTAL DIVIDE What a decades-long conservation effort teaches us about America

O

ur National Park Service celebrated its 100th birthday last month. Unfortunately, the party may have been overshadowed by politics. In an election year that has seen widespread hostilities rising to dangerous levels, our 84 million acres of national parkland offer us more than just temporary escape from the madness. We may find another kind of inspiration as well. Take the creation story of Grand Teton National Park. A little more than a month after becoming director of the National Park Service in 1929, Horace Albright saw something finally come to fruition that he had fought 12 years for: a bill signed by President Calvin Coolidge that created the 96,000-acre park. There was just one problem. Albright and a group of local ranchers whose support it took years to garner were not satisfied. While the mountains and lakes were protected, the park did not include the neighboring valley. Thus the area’s ecosystem still was at risk. Fortunately, Albright and the ranchers had a secret plan underway. Two years earlier, Albright had convinced oil tycoon and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller to begin purchasing land in order to protect the valley from commercialization, overdevelopment, and the inevitable harm to the environment. The covert conservation mission took the form of the Snake River Land Company, which, unbeknownst to the sellers, bought the land on Rockefeller’s behalf in order to avoid an instant “gold rush” of inflated real estate prices. In 1930, after more than 35,000 acres had been purchased, Albright and Rockefeller announced the plan to dedicate the land as an extension of the newly created park. The announcement was met with unforeseen backlash. A new wildfire of controversy ignited with anti-government voices crying foul and former landowners launching charges of wrongdoing against the Snake River Land Company. Through Senate committee hearings, the company was cleared of any illegal activities. However, the matter of the park extension became stuck in a quagmire of public outrage and political gridlock.

That changed in 1943, when Rockefeller wrote a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Having sat on the land for more than 15 years, Rockefeller was now threatening to sell (although his son, Lawrence, would later admit the threat was merely a tactic to get the extension deal done, finally). Whatever the case may be, the letter worked. A month later, Roosevelt used the power of presidential proclamation to decree 221,000 acres of federal land (including Rockefeller’s property) as the Jackson Hole National Monument, thus effectively protecting the land. In doing so, Roosevelt expended a considerable amount of political clout, vetoing efforts by Congress and the Wyoming delegation to undo the proclamation. Later, after a series of notable compromises, President Harry S. Truman signed a bill that combined the original 1929 park with Roosevelt’s 1943 monument, thus creating the Grand Teton National Park as we know it today: an attraction that most area residents—including the descendants of those who initially opposed the measure—would likely consider a godsend to both the local economy and the ecology. A 2001 report by the National Park System Advisory Board, came to the conclusion that “the creation of a national park is an expression of faith in our future.” As we reflect on 100 years of National Parks, we should delight in the beauty of our American landscape. And, in instances such as Grand Teton National Park, we should also see the beauty in what can be achieved when unlikely allies— the visionaries, concerned citizens, public servants and the socalled 1 percent—work together to accomplish something for the benefit and enjoyment of us all. To find out more about our National Park Service, including how to download your personal copy of the National Parks Owner’s Guide, research travel and hiking suggestions, and make a donation, go to nationalparks.org. — Jim Miller SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Worth Trying Suggestions from our staff, contributors and readers

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children As an avid reader, I’m always looking for great books to read. When I picked up Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, a fictional YA by Ransom Riggs, I found exactly that. This novel is part of a series about a boy named Jacob who learns that the world is not as simple as it seems. I highly recommend these books and am looking forward to the movie, which will be released on Sept. 30.

Nasi Malay Thai Sushi in Bear A friend of mine bartends at Nasi, and I have to thank him for turning me onto this spot. It’s ideal for sushi newcomers—the menu has some traditional options for any picky eaters. The staff was very friendly and accommodating. So stop in and ask for Jorge. —Ryan Alexander, Contributing Designer

—Emma Driban, Intern

Del Pez Brunch This relatively new option at Newark’s Main Street Mexican gastropub deserves some local acclaim. The Mayan Stacked Hashbrowns, particularly. A messy pyramid of potatoes, eggs and an addictive cheesy sauce, it’s the epitome of a weekend treat. More traditional options— French toast, classic eggs and bacon—seem equally wonderful. And with $4 mimosas, it simply can’t be beat. —Krista Connor, Associate Editor

Remaking Murdertown This podcast series about Wilmington's crime and violence problem and how it's connected to the vast economic poverty experienced by many of its residents has been getting a lot of buzz this summer. Released in May, with support from the Delaware Center for Justice, it features host Zac Phillips interviewing various people who know the causes, including Ricky Reyes, who grew up experiencing the city's street life first hand. It's a sobering reality that faces scores of cities in America in the age of vast income inequality, and a case study on how urban violence is the result of poverty. I think it's something quite a few people need to hear. Give it a listen at remaking.murdertown.us. —Tyler Mitchell, O&A Graphic Designer

Have something you think is worth trying? Send an email to Jim with your suggestion to jmiller@tsnpub.com

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THE ARTS AS ACTIVISM:

This is the third and final installment in a series of profiles about creating social change through artistic expression.

At Reeds, kids spend before- and after-school hours learning photography, music and more in a laidback setting. Photo courtesy of Reeds Refuge Center

A SAFE HAVEN Reeds Refuge Center helps at-risk kids grow through the performing arts in a secure, nurturing environment By Krista Connor

F

red Reed was a teenager living in Riverside in 1996, sitting on a flight of steps practicing with members of his singing group, 4U. The group was partially invested in the song and half-focused on a nearby TV crew wrapping up filming the aftermath of a violent crime. It was then that Reed first saw how music could change a life. The Channel 3 Philadelphia crew approached the guys and started filming their song. A few weeks later, the group was

contacted by a Philadelphia music manager who had seen the performance and the group’s potential. Soon enough 4U was on tour through the U.S. and playing in London, opening for artists like Mary J. Blige, performing on BET’s Teen Summit and at the Apollo Theater in New York City. In short, music transformed Reed’s life, and now he is in the nonprofit sector, and using the performing arts to help children who are growing up in circumstances similar to his. ►

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“I didn’t think I would ever see outside of the walls of the A SAFE HAVEN projects,” Reed says. “But I began continued from previous page to see other places, and pursue something, and I thought that if I could just bring that back here, to create a desire in kids, it would ignite a fire in them.” That’s where Reeds Refuge Center comes in. It’s a program Reed formed with his wife, Cora, four years ago after working in nonprofits and childcare centers even years before that. With a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education, Reed was an assistant teacher for Christiana School District for 10 years, and for the past two decades the couple has run two childcare centers, one next door to Reeds Refuge and another in Newport. Located at 1601 N. Pine St., the center is adjacent to 23rd Street and around the corner from the East Side. It’s dedicated to providing a safe, nurturing outlet for inner city youth ages 6-15, enabling them to explore and express their creative ability through the performing arts—music, dancing, singing, even videography and photography. Right now approximately 60 children are members—through state-assisted funding—and there is also an open-door policy. But more than teaching the arts through these outlets, Reed and the staff are emphatic about instilling self-discovery, discipline and self-expression, so that ultimately children leave as confident young adults with skills and knowledge that open avenues other than drugs and violence. “As the saying goes, music soothes the savage beast—and it gives you the option for expression,” says Reed. “I can’t think of anything else that gives you that time to really express yourself. Music is in everything.”

PRACTICAL STEPS TO CHANGE LIVES

Instilling positive traits requires sensible day-to-day lessons and activities, says Reed, who admits that he can’t save the world, nor does he want to. Rather, he emphasizes that he wants to help the one or two kids who can then branch out, and so on. Aside from the performing arts components of the program, the children—who in the summer are welcome from 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and during the school year before school at 6:30 a.m. and in the afternoon—spend time on character building. “You not only teach music but talk about a lot of things, like life skills,” says Reed. Every morning they have “Morning Motivation,” where kids and staff discuss their upcoming or previous day, or how they can approach daily situations. Then kids perform Rock the Stage, where they rap, sing, dance, etc. As long as it’s positive, they can do it, Reed says. Kids at the center are served three meals a day, too. Reed says these may be the only solid meals they get all week. The father of nine himself, he expresses dismay at the priorities of some parents. “I watch how some of them will take all their money and go buy a pair of Jordans. They’ll buy those, but when it comes to making sure kids’ teeth are brushed or stomachs are fed, they won’t do that—I don’t understand,” says Reed. “But we can stop it.” Service is another key component of the program. On Fridays the kids and staff head out to feed the homeless and every other Friday they collect litter and trash on nearby streets. Then there are social skills. One volunteer, Lisa McDonald, comes in every Tuesday to teach an etiquette class, where kids serve a meal to their parents.

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And at Reeds, it’s never too early to get creative about the future: one curriculum builds off a small business concept, where kids make business cards, discuss ideas on how to gain customers, customer satisfaction, and more. Field trips, too, are important. Last month the staff, kids and their families were invited to Dorney Park in Allentown, Pa., and Sahara Sands in West Berlin, N.J., for a day of summer fun.

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But of course, music rules, whether it’s performance, practice or recording tracks in the built-in studio. “It’s our draw,” says Reed. “For a young person, music engages them and gives them a chance to express themselves positively. We do pop, rock and roll, hip-hop, poetry, everything.” With a staff of nine professionals—a musical engineer, videographer, vocal arranger, photographers, music instructors, an after-school tutor—and great recording room equipment (one microphone cost $10,000), the kids are getting a quality experience. (Reed notes that he is always looking for volunteers, particularly music teachers.) “Nothing in here is cheap, we all put a lot of time and effort into it,” says Reed. “This gives them the opportunity to handle real equipment respectfully and we teach them how to properly use it. It’s all very hands-on, engaging, interactive.” In addition to the kids, sometimes up to 25 young adults will come in and work on recordings until 10 p.m. They’ll come back, too, to do work with the summer camp kids and initiate rap battles, teach piano, and more, to increase the positive cycle of “pulling them away from the streets.” After being surrounded by so much positivity, transformation is inevitable, says Reed. Kids often come into the program shy and insecure in their musical abilities, and come out as confident musicians, photographers, or dancers. Various fall educational programs encourage kids to be leaders—S.T.R.E.A.M, Building Youth Leaders—and one effort in particular, the “Believe” project, is the main focus this autumn. “Believe” is a video under production, with the theme of encouraging kids to understand their worth through self-belief and unity. Video equipment was donated to the center for the project, which is quite the endeavor. Reed estimates that 110 people are involved, including police, business owners, the fire department, and several religious groups. “We have to show the unity,” Reed emphasizes. Kids and staff will work on all aspects of the video, of course: filming, organization, editing, background music. The plan is to premiere the video online (reedsrefugecenter.org) early next month. Reed also mentions that he wants to refurbish the building’s facade, and he displays a rendering that shows bright colors and graphic designs with musical instruments. He hopes to employ young adults, 18-24-years-old, to work with the project contractors, so they can take pride in their neighborhood, and their work. “It makes them want to see their streets clean,” says Reed. “I believe that’s what we’re doing with ‘Believe,’ too—pouring hope back into the community. People resort to drugs and alcohol but the problem is still there. Changing the minds of the youth is important, and this particular project helps give them a trade if they need it.” Reed, who is often at the center for 12 hours a day, says he’s earned the nickname “Uncle Fred.” “A lot of the kids don’t want to go home because they love it here so much,” says Reed. “I’ve gained about 300 nieces and nephews the past few years. I think that the center is the light in the middle of the block where people feel like they can come and seek refuge.”

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Frank “TheFrank Irishman” Sheeran, circa 1970. Courtesy of Frank Sheeran "The Irishman" Sheeran, circa 1970.

Charles Brandt, author and Delaware's chief deputy attorney general in the early 1970s.

‘OUR LOCAL GANGSTER’ HEADED TO THE BIG SCREEN De Niro, Scorsese will produce film based on true crime bestseller about mob figure Frank Sheeran By Scott Pruden Photos courtesy of Charles Brandt

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elaware Valley Teamsters Union bigwig and admitted mob associate Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran might seem like an odd subject for a Martin Scorsese-helmed crime movie. Sheeran, who died in 2003, is a bit different from the protagonists of Scorsese mob movies like Goodfellas and Casino. The hulking World War II vet, at 6’4” and with nary a drop of Italian blood, goes against much of the general public’s conventional knowledge about organized crime figures. But his life, as told in author Charles Brandt’s true-crime thriller I Heard You Paint Houses, is anything but conventional. In the book, Sheeran claims to have been either at the fringes or the center of some of the biggest stories of the 20th century, including the disappearance of International Teamsters Union President Jimmy Hoffa. Brandt’s book will form the basis of the forthcoming Scorsesedirected feature film The Irishman, produced by Robert De Niro’s TriBeCa Productions and starring De Niro as Sheeran. Al Pacino and Joe Pesci are also reportedly attached to the project, slated to shoot in 2017, with distribution through Paramount Pictures. The movie will be of particular interest to Delawareans thanks to Sheeran’s longtime status as “our local gangster,” says Brandt. Sheeran was president of Wilmington Teamsters Local 326 starting in 1966 when it was split off from its Philadelphia parent. He surrendered the post in 1976 after he was sentenced to 18 years in prison on federal racketeering charges.

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“The newspaper reporters of the day would invariably find good copy when they wrote about Frank,” Brandt says. “He was very colorful.” In addition to Local 326, then headquartered on Front Street (now Martin Luther King Boulevard), the book name-checks a number of Wilmington locations, suggesting the potential for some local shout-outs in the movie. Brandt, who maintains a Delaware home in Lewes and a second one in Idaho, says the pending film version of his book couldn’t be in better hands. “It’s unimaginable. If you sat down and wrote a book about the Hoffa disappearance and you had a magic wand, your first choice would be for Scorsese to direct it and your second choice would be for De Niro to be in it,” he says. “It’s at the highest level you can imagine for a book about the Mafia, to have landed on board with those guys. I can die now. It’s a dream come true.” In the book, Brandt, a New York native and University of Delaware graduate who in the early 1970s became the First State’s chief deputy attorney general, combines Sheeran’s direct testimony and his own legal and journalistic legwork to create not just a vivid picture of a mob loyalist and prolific assassin, but a man tormented by a cruel childhood, the scars of war and remorse for betraying those closest to him. ► SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START 'OUR LOCAL GANGSTER' HEADED TO THE BIG SCREEN continued from previous page

The title of the book comes from the first words Sheeran says Hoffa ever spoke to him during a phone call arranged by mob boss Russell Bufalino. “Painting a house” was vivid mob slang for a killing, alluding to the blood spatter that remained on the walls after a hit.

INTERVIEWS WITH SHEERAN

In his personal testimony, recorded by Brandt in one-on-one interviews over the course of five years, Sheeran offers direct insight to his experience growing up on the fringes of pre-war Philadelphia, the horrors of his 411 days in combat during World War II, and the political machinations of the various crime families operating in the United States after the war ended. The ailing and remorseful Sheeran says he was the sole killer in the 1972 hit on New York mobster “Crazy” Joey Gallo —a killing long thought to be perpetrated by several gunmen. And almost like a mobbed-up Forrest Gump, he also admits to having a hand in critical moments of American history, including the CIA’s invasion of Cuba’s Bay of Pigs and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. But the most definitive account focuses on the disappearance of Hoffa, who vanished without a trace on July 30, 1975. In the book, Sheeran admits to knowing exactly what happened to Hoffa that day because he was the one who pulled the trigger. Born in Darby, Pa., Sheeran parlayed his work as a truck driver and small-time hustler into friendships with some of the most powerful underworld figures in Philadelphia. He thrived in a world dominated by Italians—the shamrock in the red sauce, as it were—and rose to a level of respect among American organized crime usually reached only by “made” men, the mob elite who by definition had to be of Italian heritage. Philly mobsters—particularly his main benefactor, Bufalino—were charmed by his command of Italian, which he picked up during the war, as well as his loyalty, trustworthiness and brutal efficiency. At the same time as he took care of assassinations for the mob, he maintained a “straight” job, climbing the ladder of the Philadelphia Teamsters organization to eventually run the Wilmington local. Along the way, he fostered a close friendship with Hoffa, who ran the International Teamsters with not just an iron fist, but also with the willingness to lend money from the union’s retirement fund to his organized crime associates.

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Hoffa’s fate has been an enduring mystery for more than 40 years, with local, state and federal law enforcement, filmmakers and amateur investigators all insisting they’ve determined what happened to him after he went missing from his Michigan cabin. Books, magazine articles and the Jack Nicholson film Hoffa have suggested a variety of fates, but Sheeran’s account stands out by offering a first-person description of the killing itself.

THE IRISHMAN ON THE BIG SCREEN

Tribeca originally contacted Brandt regarding the availability of film rights for I Heard You Paint Houses in 2007, then began working with screenwriter Steve Zaillian, who won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay for Schindler’s List. “De Niro and Zaillian gave the book to Martin Scorsese,” Brandt says. “He read it and loved it, so a package was put together with Paramount Pictures, with Scorsese and De Niro producing it, De Niro starring in it and Zaillian screenwriting it.” By August of 2009 the screenplay was complete. But De Niro and Zaillian weren’t finished just yet. De Niro invited Brandt to come to New York and share any additional information with Scorsese and Zaillian that hadn’t been included in the 2004 and 2005 printings of I Heard You Paint Houses. “That material I’d kept out of the book because it involved Mafia figures who were still alive and flourishing,” Brandt says. “But by 2009, the principal among them, Russell Bufalino, had died, and Billy D’Elia became the new boss. And Billy didn’t like me, so I didn’t mention anything about Billy in the book.” By 2009, D’Elia had been arrested and turned state’s evidence in cooperation with the FBI. “When [the FBI] went to him, the first question they asked him was, ‘What happened to Hoffa,’ and he told them to read my book,” he says. That conversation with the filmmakers also resulted in 57 pages of testimony from Sheeran and independent corroboration of Sheeran’s claims being added to the 2016 edition of I Heard You Paint Houses. “This has the material I gave them and then it has a ton of corroboration about not just Hoffa and Crazy Joey Gallo, but corroborates the Mafia’s role in the assassination of JFK,” he says. “Sheeran had made these confessions to me, and now they’re totally corroborated.”

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Photo courtesy of TheDCH

TheDCH Grows Greener The Delaware Center for Horticulture is tucked behind Trolley Square in a lush utopia.

While promoting gardening and conservation, the nonprofit celebrates renovations, new projects and, on Sept. 24, Taste of Trolley

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he Delaware Center for Horticulture, the nonprofit tucked behind Trolley Square in an idyllic plant heaven that promotes gardening and conservation, has recently undergone huge renovations and is prepping for a busy autumn. This includes involvement with Taste of Trolley Square on Saturday, Sept. 24, a garden party and green roof initiatives. The fun kicks off with Backyard Berries Plant Sale at the Taste of Trolley from 1-5 p.m. Pawpaw, a fruity relative of the papaya, will rule the day. There will be pawpaw-infused craft beer from Bellefonte Brewing Co. and homemade pawpaw ice cream from the UDairy Creamery. Pawpaw trees and other fruit plants, including blueberry bushes, grape vines, and hop vines, also will be available. And anyone who signs up for TheDCH membership will go home with a complimentary perennial. Says Vikram Krishnamurthy, TheDCH executive director: “We are a resource in the community and throughout the region to not only learn about the power of plants but also how to integrate environmentally-friendly steps in improving the world for all of us.” Additionally, slated for completion mid-to-late September, is the Infinity Green Roof on TheDCH’s building. Overlooking Brandywine Park and Conaty Park, it will feature a combination of containers, rooftop plantings and outdoor seating. Speaking of Conaty Park, another initiative is the “Rain Gardens and Conaty Park” project, to be finished this fall. A series of rain gardens adjacent to Conaty Park will demonstrate efficiency in improving water quality and sustaining pollinators. The rain gardens were created thanks to grants from New Castle Conservation District, the Starrett Foundation and in partnership with the City of Wilmington. They will also will be a teaching opportunity, according to Krishnamurthy.

“The rain gardens will be an educational tool for the public and our members to see the efficacy of a rain garden and how its elements can be adapted for their home gardens and property.” In general, the renovated center will utilize, showcase and demonstrate energy efficiency, storm water mitigation practices, and state-of-the-art green technology. This includes a new atrium roofing system to reduce heat loss, separation of the building’s sanitary and storm water systems to eliminate any potential combined storm water overflow problems, a water cistern to collect rain water, and a solar array to offset energy costs. And finally, there is the Front Green Roof, which should be completed next spring. An extensive green roof on the new wing of TheDCH building, it will slow storm water runoff, conserve rain and lower building temperatures, among other benefits. “One of the primary goals of the building’s renovation was to better integrate the idea of biophilia—connecting the natural world with inside space to improve a person’s wellbeing and health —into the design,” says Krishnamurthy. Guests are invited to celebrate these changes at the free Discover TheDCH Open House & Garden Party on Tuesday, Sept. 27, from 5:30-7 p.m. Tour the grounds and building while enjoying refreshments and wine tastings from Moore Brothers. “My vision is that, through the work of TheDCH, horticulture addresses the current and future challenges of our planet and our neighborhoods at the same time,” Krishnamurthy says. “We will have achieved our mission when all Delawareans view horticulture as a necessary and integral part of their daily lives.” —O&A SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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harry’s savoy ballroom NooN · 3Pm www.harrysweddings.com | #harrysido 28 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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TRIPLE THREAT Photo courtesy of Lyman Chen

Actor, real estate agent, entrepreneur: Lyman Chen manages to toggle effortlessly from one to the other By Bob Yearick

Owner of RE/MAX Sunvest Realty and Berri Yummi Frozen Yogurt, Lyman Chen currently has a role in Mr. Robot.

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nlike author and minister Robert Fulghum, who wrote the 1986 best seller All I Really Need To Know I Learned in Kindergarten, Lyman Chen received his life-changing and painful lessons a few years later—in middle school. Born in Newark to parents who had immigrated from China, Chen entered those formative years at the height of the school busing movement, which for him proved to be bad timing. “I wasn’t black and I wasn’t white,” he says. “So I got it from both sides.” Sixth to eighth grade became a personal gauntlet for him, punctuated by the occasional beating and frequent thefts of his money, lunch and comic books. He complained to his father, who, hardened by his previous life in China, showed little sympathy. “My dad told me I wasn’t there to make friends,” says Chen, “just to get good grades.” So he did. He adapted, survived and, eventually, thrived. Indeed, Chen looks back on those years with his characteristic jovial attitude. Laughing, he says, “I’m actually thankful for that experience. It taught me people skills, how to get along with people.” And, he admits, it involved a bit of acting, too, a nascent talent he would develop later in life. His years at Newark High School, where he was captain of the tennis team, went much smoother. He moved on to the University of Delaware, where he joined Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity and spent four happy years. With a degree in finance and marketing, Chen embarked on a career in the financial world, going straight out of college to J.P. Morgan & Co. on Wall Street, no less, before being assigned to the firm’s Delaware office. Although he was successful in his work, he came to realize that banking, as he says, “was just not my thing.”

He wanted to be his own boss, much like his father, who was in real estate. “He ran a little mom and pop shop and he encouraged me to get into the business,” says Chen. At first he resisted, but soon relented and found himself studying for the exam, which he passed while still at Morgan. He dabbled in real estate on the side for a while, then, after two-and-a-half years, he left the financial world and went into the business full time. It was a quick and successful transition. “Real estate came easy to me,” Chen says. “I had worked at the old Wick’s Ski Shop during summers and I learned there that I had a knack for selling. And I had a ready-made customer base in the Newark area because I had spent my life there.” He formed RE/ MAX Sunvest Realty, which has multiple offices in Delaware. Meanwhile, his wife, Caroline, who also was in the banking industry, was accepted by Wharton, the prestigious business school at the University of Pennsylvania. But she too was unhappy and decided to pursue her true love—art. She started a graphic design firm—Chengraphix—and also developed her talent for painting. Today she maintains a studio at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts, and she was included in the 2010 book 100 Artists of the Brandywine Valley by Catherine Quillman. Both Chens achieved success in their banking careers, but, says Lyman, “We decided we didn’t want to be held hostage by money, and we pursued our passions.” But he wasn’t finished with alternate careers. While he enjoyed selling houses, Chen discovered that his true love was something that had its beginnings back there in middle school: acting. ►

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“I was always a movie and TV fanatic,” he says. “I was one of those annoying people who would mouth the TRIPLE THREAT continued from previous page lines of the character on screen. I saw random Asian actors and I would say, ‘I can do that!’, and other selfdeluded statements.” Finally, Caroline said, “Oh, you think it’s that easy?” and called his bluff by buying him acting classes at Delaware Theatre Co. Inspired, Chen then took lessons at Mike Lemon Casting in Philadelphia. Lemon quickly saw the potential in the 6’-1”, 210-pound Chen. “There were no Asian men actors in Philly, and especially none my size,” says Chen. “Mike was like, ‘where have you been?’” Lemon soon cast him in a training video for the DuPont Co. (“They were pushing diversity,” says Chen). That 2004 project was his introduction to how a movie is produced, and he reveled in it. “We put in 14- or 15-hour days,” he says, “and all the extras were miserable. But for me, it was, like, the greatest day ever. I got to see behind the scenes on a film.” His next significant role was a small, recurring one on Hack, a TV drama about a former Philly policeman who becomes a crime-fighting cab driver that starred veteran character actor David Morse (ER, The Green Mile) and Andre Braugher, who won an Emmy for Homicide: Life on the Street, and who currently stars in Brooklyn Nine-Nine. For two years, Chen was in almost every episode of the one-hour show. “It was great,” he says. “The job didn’t interfere with my real estate business, and I got to watch David Morse and Andre Braugher work.” Aside from garnering acting techniques, the garrulous Chen picked the brains of the crew, learning film-making terminology and procedures. “I treated it as my master class in film,” he says. That approach is appreciated by casting people. “Lyman understands the business, whereas many actors don’t,” says Diane Heery of Heery Casting in Philadelphia, who has worked with him several times. “And this is huge. Plus, he’s a very personable, fun guy; everybody enjoys working with him.” She adds that Chen’s availability to travel and his ethnicity also are advantages. “It’s all a package,” she says. Following Hack, he landed in a series of commercials as what he calls “the token Asian.” In one, for Campbell’s Soup Co., he was garbed in winter clothing and eating chili. “The commercial was shot in 90-degree weather on a set that made it look like 10 below,” says Chen. “It ran for two years during football season, and I was on screen for maybe a second, but the residuals were pretty phenomenal. In fact, sometimes when my wife asked if I was going to work that day I would tell her, ‘let me check the mail box.’” But seeking roles in commercials soon became frustrating. He was driving to New York four days a week for auditions that often didn’t result in a job. “That was four hours a day away from my family.” (The Chens, who live in North Wilmington, have a 17-year-old daughter and a 12-year-old son.) So he told his agent he wanted only movie or TV work. “I thought that was probably the end of my acting career,” he says. But in 2005, his biggest role came along. His agent called him to audition for The Departed, the Martin Scorsese-helmed movie loosely based on Boston crime boss Whitey Bulger. Chen went to New York four times for auditions, then waited. And waited. A month went by and he heard nothing. Which is not unusual, he explains. “If you don’t get the job, they just don’t bother to tell you.” The Departed was one of the year’s major productions, with a cast full of heavyweights— Jack Nicholson, Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Mark Wahlberg—and Chen assumed he had little chance of landing the part. “I said, ‘this is a joke,’ and I was ready to quit. I had given it three years, I had a couple good wins, but I figured that’s it, I better get back to selling houses.” And then, out of the blue, he got the job. “I was beside myself,” says Chen. In his first speaking role in a movie, he played an interpreter negotiating a deal between Nicholson’s mob and a Chinese gang. The scene, which included Nicholson and DiCaprio, was shot on three consecutive nights in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn. “It took about 100 takes because of the different camera angles,” says Chen, adding that DiCaprio stayed through the entire scene, even though he didn’t have a line in it and could have easily had a stand-in take his place. “He’s a great guy,” says Chen. “He came up to me and introduced himself on the first night.” Chen ranks DiCaprio right behind Danny DeVito among the friendliest actors he has worked with.

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Photo courtesy of Lyman Chen

Jack Nicholson playing Frank Costello, next to Lyman Chen playing a Chinese translator in the Martin Scorsese film, The Departed.

Following The Departed, his next career milestone was the role of a concierge in the campy Sharknado 2 in 2014. His character was swept away by a wave, created by the sharknado, which shot out of an elevator door. He of course was a fan of the original, and he threw a party for about 250 family and friends at Theatre N to watch the movie’s premiere on the Syfy channel. The audience cheered wildly when he delivered his two lines—"Can I help you? No one else is here." Last year, he and his whole family got a fleeting, uncredited moment in Creed, the Sylvester Stallone boxing film that was shot largely in Philadelphia. They played tourists at the Rocky statue. “My wife stressed over hitting her marks,” he says, “but it helped her understand what I do and that it is pretty stressful.” And last November, he landed a recurring role as Joseph Yun, a Chinese CIA agent in Rush Hour, a CBS show based on the 1997 film starring Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan as two mismatched police partners. Unfortunately, the show was cancelled after one season. His acting gigs inadvertently led Chen to yet another endeavor. While doing some TV work in California, he says he became “quite addicted” to the frozen yogurt served in the Los Angeles area. And he wasn’t alone. “Those places were just packed with customers,” he says. When he came back to Delaware, the real estate market was in a severe downward cycle. Looking to make up the lost income, he sat down with his wife, who also had become a fan of frozen yogurt, and said, “Why don’t we diversify?” So it came to pass that the week before Christmas of 2011 the Chens opened Berri Yummi Frozen Yogurt in a strip mall on Naamans Road near Shipley. Despite the winter weather, he says, “There was a line out the door right away.” The next year he opened a second store in the Shops of Limestone Hills, and both locations are busy year-round. Today, Chen toggles effortlessly from one of his three careers to the other. At 44, he has accumulated more than 30 credits in his IMDb in just 12 years, and he has one or two projects lined up. That includes a small but recurring role on Mr. Robot, the popular USA Network drama that’s in its second season, airing Wednesdays at 10 p.m. “He’s been very successful, especially in the past year,” says Diane Heery. “There are so many variables in acting that it’s hard to predict, but I think he can go as far as he wants to go.” Chen has thoroughly enjoyed his ride as an actor, and whatever roles may come his way will just be icing on his many-tiered career cake. He chooses to use a different metaphor to describe his acting endeavors: “I’ve been playing with house money since day one.”

BURGERS

PANINI

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Precision Color Graphics' 10,000-square-foot shop features several large-format printers. Photo courtesy of One Light Imaging, LLC

GRAPHIC SUCCESS IN RIVERSIDE In less than 10 years, Precision Color Graphics has built a client base that extends up and down the East Coast and as far west as California By Larry Nagengast

T

he location—the Riverside section of northeast Wilmington —isn’t exactly picturesque, but Simon Cranny says it’s ideal for his business, Precision Color Graphics. His shop, a converted warehouse originally built for a heating and air conditioning company, is tucked away on Todds Lane, a couple of blocks east of Northeast Boulevard, a few long home runs from the site of the old Wilmington Ballpark, where the original Blue Rocks played from 1940 to 1952. “When we were renovating [in 2013], some people were telling us the area was dangerous, that we’d have to put in roll-down doors over our entrance,” Cranny says. “We ran out of money for the doors, but we put in lights and cameras for security.” As Cranny points out, for a regional business, the location couldn’t be much better. With I-495 a mile away, it’s just a 20-minute drive to the Philadelphia Airport or downtown Newark. Precision Color Graphics was founded in 2007 as a short-run digital print/copy, large format and banner production operation, with its shop at the foot of Wilmington’s Seventh Street Peninsula. The business survived a personal crisis—Cranny’s massive heart attack on July 1, 2008, suffered while he was jogging in Rockford Park—and the recession of 2008-09 before expanding into the

larger production and custom display and installation operation housed on Todds Lane. The defining moment—the project “that kind of gave me my street cred,” Cranny says—was production and installation of the 114- by 22-foot mural extolling Wilmington’s musical heritage. It wraps around the second and third floors of the former Delaware State University building at the corner of Sixth and Market streets. Cranny, 50, a native of Ireland, moved to the United States when he was 24. He expected to stay in Wilmington with his brother for a couple of weeks before heading to Boston with some rugbyplaying friends to do some asbestos-removal work. But he went to a party at O’Friel’s, where his brother worked, met the woman he would marry and, except for a six-month stay in London, has been here pretty much ever since. Having studied accounting in Ireland, he landed a job handling the books for Color Repro, one of the many color print shops that served the city’s bustling advertising/marketing/graphics design community in the 1990s. It didn’t take long for him to find that the front end of the business—meeting customers, taking orders, making prints and beating the constant deadlines—was more exciting than crunching numbers. ► SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo courtesy of Brett Schoen/One Light Imaging

The New Fall Menu Will Be Here Soon!

A native of Ireland, Simon Cranny came to the U.S. 26 years ago.

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“It gave me a bit of a buzz doing that kind of stuff,” he says. Cranny had been working at Color Repro for a couple of years when a colleague opened a new print shop, MetroColor, and he switched to the new business. In 2003, Parcels Inc., a larger printing and delivery operation, bought out MetroColor. Cranny stayed with Parcels for four years before striking out on his own. Having worked downtown for nearly 20 years, he had hoped to locate Precision Color there because he would be closer to many of his clients. But the space he needed—both for the shop and to store his vehicles—just wasn’t available. “We had 3,000 square feet [at our first location] and now we have 10,000,” he says. In addition, he has 6,000 square feet of parking space, enough to accommodate a bucket truck, two delivery vehicles, the installers’ van and dumpsters. While the neighborhood has the somewhat grungy look you might expect in an industrial area that’s home to a traditional print shop, a commercial frame shop, a trucking company, a truck rental business and a stone veneer manufacturer, Cranny had the Precision Color Graphics workplace designed to be warm and inviting while paying homage to its earlier uses. Wooden trusses, weighing 22,000 pounds each, support the roof, and the valves and piping for the sprinkler system stand to the right of the main entrance. Bright red and lime green paint brighten the concrete block walls in the work area and new windows high on the rear walls bring in more light. “It’s a nicer way to spend your day,” Cranny says, adding that six of his eight fulltime employees have been with the business for at least five years. Spread around the shop are examples of work for easilyrecognized clients—the University of Delaware, Wilmington University, WSFS Bank and the Delaware Lottery. But those big local names are just a fraction of the company’s workload. The convenient location, coupled with the contacts Cranny has made during his 20-plus years in the business, have enabled Precision Color to build a client base that extends up and down the East Coast—and as far west as California. (The company also has a satellite office in Chicago—one that focuses on trial board displays and audiovisual setups for law firms in the Windy City.) How did that happen? “There’s a price and trust advantage,” Cranny explains. “We had done signage, wall murals and displays for a commercial kitchen business in New Jersey. They were taking over a facility

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Photo courtesy of Brett Schoen/One Light Imaging

Light pole banners at Christiana Care's Wilmington campus, an example of banner stiching with Precision Color Graphics' industrial-grade Singer sewing machine.

in California, and they called and said, ‘we know what you’ve done for us in New Jersey. Can you match that out here?’” He could indeed. In fact, with the equipment in his shop, Cranny feels he can match almost any competitor. A flatbed printer can handle pieces of up to 8 by 10 feet on just about any surface imaginable, including acrylic, vinyl, wood, blinds and foam core. Four 60-inch large-format printers produce images on a wide variety of media, from standard paper to backlit and ecofriendly materials. A CNC router (the letters stand for “computer numerical control”) enables custom cutting of signage and display pieces into virtually any shape the client desires. Not every piece of equipment is of recent vintage. Printing and installing banners makes up a significant portion of the company’s work, and the stitching for many of those banners is accomplished with an industrial-grade Singer sewing machine, made in Germany in 1947, the same year the shop was built. Another of Precision Color’s relatively new services is printing and installing car wraps. In addition to wrapping vehicles owned by local businesses, Precision Color makes wraps for Carvertise, the three-year-old Wilmington business that recruits commuters to have their cars wrapped for several months at a time as part of marketing campaigns for regional businesses. “Simon is great. His shop is high quality and always delivers on time,” says Greg Star, Carvertise cofounder. As part of their arrangement, Cranny lets Carvertise’s wrap team use his shop’s heated car bay for weekend installations. “We’re getting really good at it,” Star says. “We’ve gone from taking an hour and a half to complete a wrap down to half an hour.” When Carvertise is working on a campaign outside the region, Precision Color prints the wraps and ships them to the destination, where Carvertise uses its employees or subcontractors to complete the installation. Star also praises Cranny as a mentor. “He’s been super helpful, not only in providing services but also in talking to us about how the printing industry works,” he says. Now firmly established in his new location, Cranny says Precision Color has plenty of opportunity to grow. Right now, he’s operating with a single shift, and he’d love to hear that printing equipment humming for twice as long each day. “The goal is to go to two shifts,” he says. “To spend a lot on machinery and turn it off at 6 o’clock, it just breaks your heart.”

BUILD A BETTER YOU

2 5 1 8 We s t 4 t h S t . Wilmington, DE

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FOCUS

ARTS

ATTACK! From ballet to jazz to opera, we've got you covered this season By Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald

ARDEN CONCERT GILD This fall, Arden’s concert series returns with the outstanding variety and quality, highenergy artists they’re known for, all within the confines of a 165-year-old barn with a hometown atmosphere. On Saturday, Oct. 15, comes the mesmerizing blues guitar and soul-testifying vocals of Joe Louis Walker. A different energy arrives on Sunday, Oct. 23, with the "raw and ragged pop-rock" of Islands, the latest band from Unicorns founder Nicholas Thornburn. On Saturday, Nov. 5, (finally) returning is Ben Sollee, an engaging world-class cellist, songwriter, storyteller and activist. A busy November continues with a gear shift to Buenos Aires Cumbia with La Yegros—marking Arden’s second year of a salsa/rock/dance-filled evening. And never in a rut, the Gild has its first spoken-word show with the renowned Andrew WK—a show that was trending on Facebook when it was announced and will certainly sell out. More to be announced, so stay tuned on Arden Concert Gild’s Facebook page and website. 2126 The Highway, Arden • 898.9308 • ardenconcerts.com Facebook: @ArdenConcertGild • Twitter: @ArdenConcerts

CHRISTINA CULTURAL ARTS CENTER Christina kicks off its year-long 70th Anniversary celebration on Friday, Oct. 21, with a performance by renowned jazz musician Jermaine Bryson. The center’s arts season rounds out with “Movies for Grown Ups” at Theatre N sponsored by AARP in September. In October, there will be the unveiling of its new Shipley Street mosaic wall and “Life RE-imagined”—a partnership with AARP, including a workshop with art-making. Bebe Ross Coker brings the musical work “Sistas Can Sang” to CCAC in November, and December revels in the return of Eleone Dance Theatre and the breathtaking performance of Carols in Color—a retelling of the Gospel according to St. Matthew through electrifying music, exuberant modern dance and powerful narration. 705 N. Market St., Wilmington • 652.0101 • ccacde.org Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @CCACDE

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CITY THEATER COMPANY Delaware's Off-Broadway experience turns 23 and is partying throughout 2016-17 with new and classic offerings. Following (recent) CTC tradition, the kickoff begins at World Cafe Live at The Queen on Saturday, Oct. 22, with I Want My CTC: A Tribute to the '80s—an old-school dance party with an all-star band and CTC powerhouses performing the biggest hits of the early '80s, all led by Joe Trainor. CTC transforms The Black Box into a sizzling nightclub for La Cage aux Folles (December 2–17), in an over-the-top romp of the musical comedy by Harvey Fierstein and Jerry Herman. February sees a World Premiere by acclaimed playwright David Robson—After Birth of a Nation—a farcical send-up of history, sexism, racism and politics centered on a comically disastrous evening at the White House in 1915. Fearless Improv also will host a series of workshops and performances in February at The Black Box. The season wraps in April with the Regional Premiere of Lizzie, a tour-de-force tale of rage, sex, betrayal and murder described as "…American mythology set to a blistering rock score"—with four women fronting the live six-piece rock band. Performances: The Black Box, 4 S. Poplar St., Wilmington • 220.8285 • city-theater.org Facebook: @CityTheaterCompany • Twitter/Instagram: @CityTheaterCo

DELAWARE ART MUSEUM Fall’s first offering celebrates Imaginative Realism—a genre often related to science fiction and fantasy. The IX Preview Weekend (Sept. 23–25) includes an exhibition of more than 16 artists recognized for contributions to Star Wars, The Lord of the Rings, Avatar, Marvel & DC Comics and others. The kick-off commences at 6 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 23, with fantasy-inspired live sketching with Dr. Sketchy; live music, food trucks, cocktails and more. On Saturday, Sept. 24, visit the Copeland Sculpture Garden for a screening of Star Wars: The Force Awakens. The Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism (Oct. 22– Jan. 22) exhibit is inspired by Robert C. Jackson’s Behind the Easel: The Unique Voices of 20 Contemporary Representational Painters. Featuring 20 artists from the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit surveys realistic painting at the start of the 21st century. A wealth of diverse programming fills out the fall—New Yorker cartoonist Emily Flake on Thursday, Sept. 15; the Korean Festival & Harvest Celebration on Saturday, Sept. 17; Thursday Labyrinth Walks on Sept. 22 and Oct. 27; and numerous film screenings, gallery chats and Kids’ Corner creativity hours. A powerful live performance arrives Sunday, Nov. 20, with Connected: Spoken Word. Presented by community activist group 302 Guns Down, this is an afternoon of poetry inspired by art and featuring Delaware Poet Laureate Nnamdi Chukwuocha and other artists. 2301 Kentmere Parkway, Wilmington • 571.9590 • delart.org Facebook: @DelawareArtMuseum • Twitter/Instagram: @DelArtMuseum

DELAWARE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL In September, DelShakes celebrates First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare, the national touring exhibit at the Old College Gallery at the University of Delaware. Producing Artistic Director David Stradley collaborates with Professor Steve Tague to examine acting techniques based on clues in the First Folio on Wednesday, Sept. 14. Stradley then presents his one-man collection of monologues and remembrances, How I Came To Love Shakespeare on Saturday, Sept. 24. In October, usher in fall with masters of the macabre and Delaware's most literary Halloween tradition, Shakespeare/Poe. DelShakes actors read bone-chilling selections inside the gothic halls of Rockwood Mansion, the grandeur of the Read House & Gardens in Old New Castle and colonial-era Stone Stable in Historic Odessa. But choose quickly—there are only 30 souls per performance! The Company rounds out the fall with Pericles, a tale of loss and redemption, which will tour statewide with free performances at venues like the Sunday Breakfast Mission, Dover Air Force Base and Rose Hill Community Center. Ticketed performances of the production will be held at the Delaware History Museum on consecutive weekends, Nov. 12 and 13 and 19 and 20. Performance venues: Vary • 415.3373 • delshakes.org • Facebook/Instagram: @DelShakes

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DELAWARE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The DSO and Maestro David Amado launch the 111th Anniversary Season at The Grand on Friday, Sept. 23, with a powerful Classics Series program of Mahler's monumental Symphony No. 5. Andre Previn also will be on hand to receive the A.I. du Pont Composer's Award prior to the performance of his Double Concerto, featuring violin and cello soloists, Jaime Laredo and Sharon Robinson. The Classics Series continues Friday, Nov. 18, with guest violinist Jinjoo Cho and music that orbits around Hollywood: the Bo Derek career-launching Ravel’s Bolero; Eric Wolfgang Korngold’s virtuosic Violin Concerto; and Bernstein’s genre-bending West Side Story. DSO’s first Chamber Series travels to the Gold Ballroom on Tuesday, Oct. 18, with Schoenberg’s luminescent Verklärte Nacht and DSO concertmaster David Southorn as violin soloist in Vivaldi’s timeless The Four Seasons. Bring the entire family to Cab Callaway School for the Arts Auditorium for Family Concerts on Sunday, Nov. 20, and get ready for a fun, musical ride with violin soloist Jonjoo Cho and music from West Side Story and composer John Williams. 100 W. 10th St., Suite 1003, Wilmington • 656.7442 • delawaresymphony.org Facebook: @DelawareSymphony • Twitter: @DelawareSymph

DELAWARE THEATRE COMPANY DTC continues its vision as Delaware’s only theater developing new shows for Broadway with the American Premiere of Warren Adler’s The War of the Roses. Baring its evil grin Sept. 14–Oct. 2, this dark comedy follows Jonathan and Barbara Rose as their seemingly perfect marriage devolves into a search-and-destroy mission for each other’s most prized possessions. From Oct. 26–Nov. 13, Anthony Giardina’s impassioned political drama, The City of Conversation, pilots audiences through Washington, D.C.’s evolving atmosphere over 30 years and six presidencies. Returning this holiday season is Patrick Barlow’s new spin on the timeless classic, the tour-de-force adaptation of A Christmas Carol, running Dec. 7–30. Join DTC for yet another artistically ambitious season. 200 Water St., Wilmington • 594.1100 • DelawareTheatre.org Facebook/Instagram: @DelawareTheatreCompany Twitter/Snapchat: @DelawareTheatre

FIRST STATE BALLET THEATRE First State Ballet Theatre opens at The Grand on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 22 and 23, with Swan Lake—the timeless story of good versus evil with music by Tchaikovsky. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 11 and 12, FSBT presents Up Front. Performed in Studio 1 at the baby grand, Up Front brings audiences and dancers up close and personal, with classical repertoire and contemporary pieces choreographed for the company. The season continues with a Wilmington holiday tradition, The Nutcracker, on Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 17 and 18, at The Grand Opera House. Experience the magical journey through the land of sweets in this lavish production, which will include new costumes and choreography for the battle scene. 818 N. Market St., Wilmington • 658.7897 x3851 • firststateballet.com Facebook/Instagram: @FirstStateBallet • Twitter: @FSBTheatre

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2016 / 17 SEASON

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by Yasmina Reza; translated by Christopher Hampton Two couples meet to civilly discuss a schoolyard squabble between their sons, but harmony quickly devolves into hostility when everyone’s inner child comes out swinging in this raucous comedy.

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by Molière; translated into English verse by Richard Wilbur Molière’s wickedly funny play of deception, hypocrisy and false morality. When threatened with exposure of his pious masquerade, Tartuffe ups both the ante and the hilarity in this laugh-out-loud comedy.

DELAWARE’S RESIDENT PROFESSIONAL ACTING COMPANY performing at the University of Delaware

ROSELLE CENTER FOR THE ARTS | NEWARK, DE | (302) 831-2204 | WWW.REP.UDEL.EDU CW from top L: To Kill a Mockingbird w/ Stephen Pelinski & Evangeline Heflin; The Patsy w/ Michael Gotch & Kathleen Pirkl Tague; Wait Until Dark w/ Deena Burke; Red w/ Michael Gotch and Stephen Pelinski.

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GABLE MUSIC VENTURES After the smashing success of the fifth Ladybug Music Festival, Gable continues to be the conduit for live music in and around Wilmington. Friday, Sept. 9, heralds the return of Save the Valley Music Festival to World Cafe Live at The Queen, with six acts, including Maryland-based blues singer/saxophonist Vanessa Collier; Splashing Pearls; and American indie/roots rock band Bronze Radio Return. The Ladybug Music Festival presents a collection of singers for its “County Bugs” showcase on Saturday, Oct. 1, and Saturday, Oct. 22, celebrates artist Shane Palko’s Seventh Story album release—all at World Cafe Live at The Queen. Gable also continues to provide live music to Cool Spring Farmers Market through September. For tickets and more details, visit queentickets.worldcafelive.com. Performance venue: World Cafe Live at The Queen, 500 N. Market St., Wilmington gablemusicventures.com • Facebook: @GableMusicVentures Twitter: @GableMusic • Intsagram: @GableMusicVentures

THE GRAND OPERA HOUSE & THE PLAYHOUSE ON RODNEY SQUARE The Grand and The Playhouse are off to an exciting start. The Grand offers options for the whole family, from children’s sensation The Wiggles to Grammy Award-winning blues artist Jonny Lang. A cappella phenomenon Straight No Chaser returns for two shows, and music legends Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen collaborate in a special acoustic performance of their hits. The Playhouse’s Broadway in Wilmington series starts in October with a limited engagement of the Tony Award-winning classic, Rent. Following is the Playhouse Premiere of 2014 Tony Award-winner for Best Musical A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder, and a limited engagement of another Premiere, Broadway Christmas Wonderland. Closing out the first half of the series is the wildly popular Broadway hit Kinky Boots. The Grand: 818 N. Market St., Wilmington • 652.5577 • TheGrandWilmington.org The Playhouse: 1007 N. Market Street, Wilmington • 888.0200 • ThePlayhouseDE.org Facebook: @TheGrandWilmington • Facebook: @ThePlayhouseDE Twitter/Instagram: @TheGrandWilm

THE KENNETT FLASH In downtown Kennett Square, The Flash is less than 15 minutes from Wilmington. A sampling of fall offerings includes singer/songwriter Tim Easton on Wednesday, Sept. 14; Blues guitarist and Yardbird Johnny A. on Friday, Sept. 23; Leigh Nash (lead singer of Sixpence None The Richer) on Sunday, Sept. 25; “Midnight at the Oasis” songstress Maria Muldaur on Saturday, Oct. 1; former Frank Zappa stunt guitarist Mike Keneally with his group Beer For Dolphins on Friday, Oct. 28; NPR's Echoes welcomes guitarist Adrian Legg on Wednesday, Nov. 9, and folk favorite Steve Forbert on Friday, Dec. 2. This fall also sees tributes to Eric Clapton, Phil Collins, The Beatles, Steely Dan, The Who, Jethro Tull and more. Look for Open Mic Nights, up-and-coming national acts, former Billboard chart toppers and more at The Flash. 102 Sycamore Alley, Kennett Square, PA • 484.732.8295 • kennettflash.org Facebook: @TheFlashMusicCafe • Instagram/Twitter @TheKennettFlash

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See t he Un r e a l , E xp e er i enc e t he Imp o s sibl e

Preview Weekend Septem ber 2 3-25 FEATURING OVER 16 SCI-FI, FANTASY ARTISTS

Kick-off Party

9.23.16 | 6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. | $10 Fantasy-inspired live sketching with Dr. Sketchy’s costumed models, music, and over 12 local food trucks. Cash bar.

Outdoor Film – Star Wars: The Force Awakens

9.24.16 | 7:00 p.m. | $5 suggested donation Enjoy this free outdoor film in our Copeland Sculpture Garden. Cash bar.

Tickets on sale at del art.org

Pre-purchase for additional discounts.

2301 Kentmere Parkway Wilmington, DE 19806 302.571.9590 | delart.org

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH:

SPONSORED BY:

Top Portal (detail), 2016. Donato Giancola. Oil on panel, 60 x 40 inches.. Image courtesy of the artist. Bottom, clockwise from top-left: Moby Dick and the Sea Monster, 2012. Bob Eggleton. Oil on canvas, 24 x 36. | Gift of Galadriel, 1977. Greg and Tim Hildebrandt. Acrylic on board, 40 x 38 inches. | Crom, 2014. Matt Stawicki. Oil on masonite, 18 x 24 inches. | Dream Ripple. Dorian Vallejo, 2014. Oil on canvas, 71x75 inches. SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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MARKET STREET MUSIC Wilmington’s most affordable and diverse music series ARTS ATTACK! presents full-length Festival Concerts featuring Pyxis continued from page 40 Piano Quartet on Saturday, Oct. 1, and Sunday, March 19; organist David Schelat on Sunday, Oct. 23; Mastersingers of Wilmington on Saturday, Dec. 3, and April 1; and La Bernardinia Early Music Ensemble on Sunday, May 7. Popular Thursday Noontime Concerts begin at 12:30 p.m. on Oct. 6 with members of Mélomanie and continue with such varied artists as Lyra Russian Choir— the Russian Vocal Ensemble of St. Petersburg—in their only area appearance; local jazz favorites Alfie Moss & Dexter Koonce; local pianist Daniel Carunchio; the holiday tradition of the Cartoon Christmas Trio, and more. Performance venue: First & Central Presbyterian Church, 1101 N. Market St., Wilmington • 654.5371 • marketstreetmusicde.org Facebook: @MarketStreetMusicDE

MÉLOMANIE This ensemble’s “provocative pairings” return for a 23rd season, starting with an intimate performance on Sunday, Sept. 18, at Wilmington Friends School. Up Close & Personal: The Viola da Gamba, features Donna Fournier and Tracy Richardson in a program of Baroque and contemporary music. The regular Wilmington series returns Sundays at 2 p.m. to The Delaware Contemporary on Oct. 9, Feb. 5, April 2 and May 14. Featured in the series will be World Premiere works written for the ensemble by composers Daniel Dorff, Bonnie McAlvin and Michael Stambaugh. Mélomanie also launches a new concert series in Rehoboth Beach this fall. Performance venue: The Delaware Contemporary, 200 S. Madison St., Wilmington 764.6338 • melomanie.org Facebook: @MelomanieDE

OPERADELAWARE Following last season’s nationally lauded performances of Hamlet and Falstaff, the country’s 11th oldest professional opera company begins this year with two performances of Bravo Bel Canto!—a program devoted to music from the bel canto period—on Friday, Oct. 21, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Oct. 23, at 2 p.m. Next, a Sunday Artist Spotlight Recital on Sunday, Nov. 13, at 2 p.m. Additional details on the full season schedule will be available soon on the company’s website. 4 S. Poplar St., Wilmington • 442.7807 • operade.org Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @OperaDelaware

RESIDENT ENSEMBLE PLAYERS (THE REP) The REP begins the season with God of Carnage (Sept. 15–Oct. 9), a savage comedy of ill-manners that follows two sets of parents as they meet to discuss a squabble between their sons. Harmony devolves into hostility when everyone’s inner child comes out swinging, and the evening descends into hilarious chaos. The modern classic, Waiting for Godot (Sept. 22–Oct. 9), opens shortly thereafter, with two loveable, hapless vagrants grappling with the mysteries of the universe as they wait for a guy who’s lousy at keeping appointments. In November, the Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning satire Clybourne Park (Nov. 10–Dec. 4) tells the tale of a 1959 white community that tries to halt the sale of a home to an African-American family. Fast-forward to 2009: the same house, in what is now a predominantly AfricanAmerican neighborhood, where a white family wants to move in. It’s a feisty, funny and insightful look at race, real estate and role-reversal. Performance venue: Roselle Center for the Arts, 110 Orchard Rd., Newark 4 • 831.2204 • rep.udel.edu Facebook: @rep.udel.edu • Twitter/Instagram: @Delaware REP 42 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WILMINGTON BALLET ACADEMY OF THE DANCE Celebrate the holiday season as this studio celebrates its ARTS ATTACK! 50th year of The Nutcracker performances at The Playhouse continued from page 42 on Rodney Square. This year, the performance will feature New York City Ballet principal dancers Abi Stafford as the Sugar Plum Fairy and Adrian Danchig-Waring as her Cavalier; live music from the Wilmington Ballet Orchestra & Chorus and dancing from the Voloshky Ukrainian Dance Ensemble. Shows are 2 and 7 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 3, and 2 and 6 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 4. Get a sneak peek of their Nutcracker Waltz of the Flowers during the New Castle County Faerie Fest at Rockwood Park on Sunday, Sept. 18. Wilmington Ballet will also celebrate its 60th Anniversary with a Gala Benefit in April 2017. Performance space: The Playhouse on Rodney Square, 1007 N. Market St., Wilmington • 655-1004 • wilmingtonballet.org Facebook/Instagram: @WilmingtonBallet • Twitter: @wilmballetAD

WILMINGTON DRAMA LEAGUE WDL opens with High School Musical (Sept. 9–25), the tween favorite adapted from the hit Disney Channel movie. Up next is Shakespeare’s epic tragedy, Macbeth (Oct. 14-23), brought to life with an all-female cast. Arriving just in time to entertain you in political season is An Ideal Husband (Nov. 4–13), a comedy by Oscar Wilde that explores themes of political corruption, blackmail, class-structure and honor. WDL’s holiday production is the inspiring A Little Princess (Dec. 9–30). Based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel woven with lively dance and Afro-infused music, it chronicles a young girl’s courage and resilience. 10 W. Lea Blvd., Wilmington • 764.1172 • wilmingtondramaleague.org Facebook: @WilmingtonDramaLeague • Instagram: @WilmingtonDramaLeague

WILMINGTON RENAISSANCE CORPORATION/CREATIVE DISTRICT WILMINGTON Wilmington Renaissance Corporation continues the momentum of progress and engaging community events in Wilmington’s Creative District. On Friday, Sept. 7, celebrate Park(ing) Day as the latest iNSPIRE LOT series event. The New Wilmington Art Association will debut the design of the 7th Street Art Bridge “Musical Bench,” and the Challenge Program will unveil its innovative parklet, while The Souldaires provide the music. Friday, Oct. 7, marks the final installment in this series, featuring the dedication of the 7th Street Arts Bridge Sculpture Garden by local artist Andre Hinton. The day is complemented by music from singer/songwriter/instrumentalist King Zimm, with food trucks and refreshments by CityFest. The iNSPIRE LOT, 215-219 West 7th St., Wilmington • 425.5500 bigideaswilmington.com/WRC Facebook: @WilmingtonRenaissanceCorporation & @CreativeDistrictWilm Twitter: @CreativeWilm • Instagram: @WilmRen & @CreativeDistrictWilm

WORLD CAFE LIVE AT THE QUEEN A music-packed fall brings noted acts like Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Leon Russell on Sunday, Oct. 9; alternative rockers Blue October on Thursday, Oct. 13; Sunday, Oct. 16, WXPN welcomes An Intimate Night with soulful singer-songwriter Allen Stone; Americana country band Reckless Kelly on Monday, Oct. 24; and Live Nation presents English folk artist Frank Turner & The Sleeping Souls on Monday, Oct. 31. Family musical holiday fun ensues at 11am on Saturday, Oct. 29, with a special Halloween costume party with Jason Didner and The Jungle Gym. 500 N. Market St., Wilmington • 994.1400 • worldcafelive.com Facebook/Twitter/Instagram: @WCLatTheQueen

44 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Date Night? Make it Opening Night at the Symphony! Friday, September 23, 2016, 7:30 pm, at The Grand

David Amado and the Delaware Symphony Guest artists Jaime Laredo and Sharon Robinson

Photo: Jim Graham

Photo: Christian Steiner

Photo: Lillian Birnbaum

Renowned composer André Previn’s new Double Concerto PLUS Mahler’s powerful Symphony No. 5

David Amado

Jaime Laredo and Sharon Robinson

André Previn

Tickets start at $14: Grand Opera House Box Office 302-652-5577 | www.ticketsatthegrand.org For information and the DSO Season Schedule: www.delawaresymphony.org | 302-656-7442

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Celebrating Historic New Castle & Historic Delaware City

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Five Questions for County Executive Candidates Three of the four candidates address major issues facing New Castle County

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he Sept. 13 primary election is almost upon us. Two of the more important offices on the ballot are mayor of Wilmington and New Castle County executive. Whoever wins the Democratic primary election for mayor will be the winner in the November general election, since no Republican has registered for the primary. It’s a slightly different picture in the race for county executive, where two Democrats and two Republicans are contending. Last month, as a service to our readers, Out & About posed five questions to the eight Democratic mayoral candidates. In the same spirit, this month we submitted five questions to the candidates for county executive. Three candidates responded. Republican Barry Nahe declined to submit answers. Below are the questions, followed by the candidates’ answers, in the order in which they responded. Candidates were asked to limit each answer to 200 words or fewer. Where they did not comply, space limitations required us to edit the answers. 1. What is the most important issue facing the next New Castle County executive? 2. What is your philosophy on county land development, and please provide specific strategies you have for preserving open space/land? 3. How, specifically, do you plan to create more jobs in New Castle County? 4. Under your leadership, how can NCC become a safer walkable and bike-able county? 5. The City of Wilmington has significant challenges. As chief executive, how do you plan to help? ►

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5 Questions with NEW CASTLE MARK BLAKE (R)

continued from previous page

1. What is the most important issue facing the next New Castle County Executive?

One of the most important issues the next County Executive will face will be a dwindling tax base coupled with the ever-increasing pension fund costs and health care expenses. The County Pension fund is growing faster than the revenue sources the County has and these increased costs will eventually exceed the County's ability to fully fund these critical obligations if something isn't done soon. I would propose that we freeze the current pension fund so that those already in the system are protected and will be guaranteed to receive the benefits they were promised and expect. We would then implement a new pension or retirement (401k) plan for all new hires that would include more employee participation and various contribution levels and options, as is done in the private sector. To accomplish this, I would work with the existing pension fund panel and outside pension fund experts to ensure that any plan presented would be effective and fair, while making certain that the new fund would provide adequate returns for new County employees and be sustainable for generations of future County employees.

2. What is your philosophy on county land development, and please provide specific strategies you have for preserving open space/land?

The current County Executive's "Farmland Preservation" debacle/sweetheart deal underscores the necessity for NCC to work more closely with the successful State Farmland Preservation program. First, NCC does NOT even have a Farmland or Open Space Preservation program, and spending in excess of $27,000 per acre of taxpayers’ money to "purchase development rights only" does not preserve those farms from future development. I would work with the state to earmark County funds that would go to the state preservation program specifically for the purchase of NCC Farmlands that could continue to operate as a productive farm, while being protected from development. For sensitive areas, the County can work with developers to provide more open space offsets for development projects and utilize federal programs and grants to obtain funds for purchasing other land as natural open spaces. During my 13 years with the Greater Hockessin Area Development Association, we have preserved more historic buildings and far exceeded the NCC open space requirements for developments by working with developers and builders in an open manner. County Council and the Land Use Department have commented that "this is how land use projects should be done, by working with the local civic groups.” The County should not be picking lands based on politics and friendships; it should provide County Preservation Funds to the state and let the state administer the program for the benefit of all. The price being offered to two influential farmers is more than six times what other similar size farms have been paid for true preservation.

3. How, specifically, do you plan to create more jobs in New Castle County?

County government can't "create jobs,” especially private sector jobs. Rather, the County government must create the right environment to attract companies here. Only the expansion of existing companies and new companies locating here can create more jobs. I’ll work with experts, bring ideas that foster a balanced approach for new and existing companies. The Uniform Development Code (UDC) has been in place for almost 20 years with less than 100 minor changes to the process. Antiquated land use policies have adversely affected our economy; we need to update the UDC to represent ALL stake holders while protecting the environment. By implementing Targeted Development Zones (TDZs) we can have growth while making sure special waivers aren't given to political insiders that will worsen existing traffic or environmental issues. TDZs will ensure that new or redevelopment takes place at locations where infrastructure already exists. We need to revamp the current UDC to address the Commercial Regional (CR) zoning classification. Using time-proven “Best Practices” from the business world, we’ll identify all the available vacant, abandoned, and “brown-field” parcels and combine that with the latest traffic studies to determine what areas could support a project. By doing that, we could react more quickly to attract projects and jobs. Simply put, our County government hasn’t been responsive to the needs of our residents or our businesses. I'll develop a comprehensive plan for economic development that will seek new businesses and bring them to the County by streamlining the UDC. My 25 years of experience in the business community positions me to help make the County attractive to businesses.

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TOM GORDON (D)

COUNTY EXECUTIVE CANDIDATES MATT MEYER (D)

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Our County faces serious challenges: reducing violent crime, building an economy that works for everyone and getting our financial house in order. There is no reason why our County should not have a fair and functioning government that produces robust economic growth, sensible land use policies and safe streets. Our County’s leadership, through its cronyism and self-indulgence, has held us back from truly growing, prospering and achieving our true potential. We can do better. It starts with leadership, honesty, transparency and checks and balances. We must put an end to backroom dealing, the old insiders’ game of “you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours.” Residents need to be able to trust our County government and believe that our tax dollars are being spent wisely and sensibly.

Job creation and maintenance, a key to improving residents’ quality of life.

Our land use process and department are broken, and both have lost the credibility of neighborhood associations and developers. The Planning and Land Use Departments must be re-invented and run by professionals with substantial training and experience. Neighbors must have a significant say in how projects proceed. While respecting private property rights, the richest developer in the room cannot dictate the futures of our communities. It is important that there are development projects moving forward in the county, and that they create quality jobs for moderate income people. In collaboration with the state, an effective planning and land use process will produce more reasonable outcomes and likely less contentious court battles. The solution is to find common ground on each specific project, emphasizing mediation and developer-neighborhood conversations early in the process, rather than later stage adversarial court battles. It is important that the public has input into how their neighborhoods grow and change.

Development must be handled in an orderly fashion, targeting established growth areas with adequate infrastructure as well as “brownfield” redevelopment or reuse of previously occupied sites. I spearheaded the first comprehensive overhaul of land-use laws since their first enactment in 1954, largely to prevent overdevelopment and preserve open space—and have led land use revisions ever since, also improving Department of Land Use operation especially to involve the community from the start of the process. We are doing our best to preserve farmland—despite political opposition—and provide excellent stewardship as well as expansion of county-owned open space/parkland. One of the top accomplishments of my administration is creation of Glasgow Park, serving an area with more than 140,000 residents who had no regional-scale outdoor recreation, in the process preventing development of the site, which was proposed for intense development with destruction of the historic barn we recently renovated. The park’s popularity provides dramatic proof that I am aware of and working to meet residents’ need for open space.

There are three ways a government can facilitate the creation of private sector jobs. We can lure large companies here, usually with tax breaks or payments of taxpayer cash. We can grow the businesses that already exist. We can start new businesses. Studies show that collaborating with businesses that are here to grow here and developing ecosystems and geographic hubs to start new businesses are the most effective ways to invest taxpayer resources to create jobs. Having started two successful businesses of my own, I understand what entrepreneurs need to succeed. And I will make sure that entrepreneurs are given every opportunity to succeed in our County. In addition, I believe entrepreneurship is an innovative strategy to approach the barriers to employment of individuals previously convicted of felonies. Not everyone is wired to be an entrepreneur. But for many who are not given a second chance, startup companies can be one channel where those convicted of felonies make their own second chance. I would eagerly approach the federal government, the state government, city governments and private partners, for example, to create a Second Chance Innovation Fund that would provide a certain amount of funding and legal and accounting assistance to selected startup businesses created by those with prior police records.

Our multi-faceted approach emphasizes retaining existing jobs—such as the county’s DuPont Co. incentive helping retain about 1,700 jobs—and acting as an incubator/advocate for small-medium start-ups such as the Delaware Board of Trade. We assist companies to locate here, such as Incyte. Its location process took about seven months and, in addition to the jobs it provides, the company revitalized the long-vacant John Wanamaker’s building at Augustine Cut-Off. Of course, our largest effort is to develop three port sites in partnership with the state and others, expected to create tens of thousands of jobs that will support the county’s middle class over generations to come. New Castle County also provides programs to retrain residents for new types of work and summer youth employment that gives valuable job experience to help our younger residents develop positive workplace habits and references for future jobs.

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5 Questions with NEW CASTLE COUNTY EXECUTIVE CANDIDATES

MATT MEYER (D)

MARK BLAKE (R)

continued from previous page

4. Under your leadership, how can NCC become a safer walkable and bike-able county?

The UDC contains the framework for transforming NCC into a bike- and pedestrian-friendly County. The best way to provide for the necessary infrastructure such as sidewalks and bike paths is when a parcel of land is being proposed for development or redevelopment. With a revised UDC, we can change the available options that developers can select to include in their projects and require that multi-use pathways are part of the project, thus ensuring that new communities will have the amenities that residents are asking for and look for when purchasing homes. We would also extend these upgrades to include all commercial and office development projects, so that eventually the County could work with the state programs to "backfill" older communities with these same amenities that will eventually link entire swaths of communities with a bike-able, walkable path system. We would continue to work with WILMAPCO, DELDOT and Bike Delaware and the local community civic groups to form a master plan that would identify gaps in the existing pathways and work to connect those gaps over time.

New Castle County currently makes its land use and planning decisions based on an automobile-oriented society. That is not appropriate for 2017. That is not appropriate for a County that needs to attract millennials to re-invent our economy. As someone who spent five years as a bike commuter, I believe strongly in multi-modal transportation systems. By integrating walkable and bikeable systems into our planning and land use governance, we will lay the foundations to build a transportation system that works for everyone. Furthermore, we need to sit down immediately with the state Department of Transportation and the cities of Wilmington, Newark, New Castle and Middletown to insure there are safe bikeable routes for commuters coming from each direction—north, south, east and west, into our largest cities and towns.

5. The City of Wilmington has significant challenges. As Chief Executive, how do you plan to help?

We must address the problems keeping Wilmington from becoming an economic driver for the County and state. I will work with the city’s elected officials and the business community to address the lack of good paying jobs and work to attract new businesses to the city while helping businesses already there. There are many opportunities that haven't been explored by city officials. The Riverfront is one example of success, but it could be an even bigger success if obstacles from present and past administrations were honestly addressed. Wilmington's location adjacent to the I-95 corridor provides an opportunity to develop a massive, regional complex for both sports and entertainment events, providing hundreds of jobs. Reducing the serious crime in the city, without the need to appease egos, will foster interest from investors that are needed to back such ventures. County Police and City Police can better work together to implement the Predictive Policing model that has helped NCC reduce crime. There also exist ways to help reduce the cost of operating 911 service that would reduce the response time for serious crimes by allowing a state, County or city officer to respond. Of course this would require a more formalized vehicle dispatch tracking system and plan for all agencies. Volunteer fire companies have been using a similar concept for decades, so it shouldn't be too difficult to work out such a system across NCC and the city.

Wilmington's struggles are our struggles. We are losing an entire generation of young people to crime, drugs and violence. County government must do much more to collaborate with city government to improve public safety and economic development. In 2012, Tom Gordon ran side-by-side with Dennis Williams, promising to fix the city’s crime problem. But once in office, Mr. Gordon forgot that promise. Crime in Wilmington is worse than ever, and the County’s efforts to stem the violence have been virtually non-existent. There are mothers and fathers losing their children on the streets of Wilmington and across our County nearly every week. That is not acceptable. I will ensure that the County provides much more support to Wilmington, so that we can end the horrific violence. We will use prior research, including the CDC Report, the Public Safety Strategy Commission Report, and the Criminal Justice Council's Recidivism In Delaware report to address violence at its roots. There are numerous vacant housing and other issues in which collaboration should improve. To attract employers, we need to attract a talented workforce. The County should work with municipalities like Wilmington and Newark to encourage development that makes our County an appealing place for college graduates. This includes enhanced multimodal transportation, walkable communities, quality apartments and condos, green space, and new restaurants, bars and cafes in downtown areas.

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Ken Matlusky, CPA

TOM GORDON (D)

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A J’s

Under my administration’s first two terms as well as this one, I have worked to ensure plans for new developments are both walkable and bikeable. We have installed uncounted miles of walking, jogging and bike paths throughout the county, while encouraging safety through community outreach that includes such programs as our annual summer Safety Town to educate children to be safe pedestrians, bicyclists and later, safer drivers. Our New Castle County Police also do considerable pedestrian, bicycle and driving safety outreach.

Democrat for

Paid for by Ken Matlusky for City Treasurer

City Treasurer

As we work to increase employment, I will continue the unprecedented level of law enforcement assistance already being provided under my leadership. We have shared new policies, procedures and technology along with our experience creating our Fusion Center and Targeted Analytical Policing System, cutting crime in the county by 16.4 percent. We gave computers when WPD fell behind technologically, provided vital backup/support on critical occasions Chief Bobby Cummings could detail and, more than once, lent a substantial number of officers for periods up to several months. We share information regularly and have conducted many joint operations on offenses from prostitution to violent crime, collaborated seeking grant funding, cooperated on joint efforts and conducted patrols in the city including mobile/mounted units. Our SWAT team assists with uncounted warrants, last week helping arrest many indicted suspects. The County—also providing paramedic service in the city—was the state’s first major agency to adopt overdose-reversing Narcan to save lives and recently began our revolutionary HERO HELP program offering treatment instead of arrest. That builds on our Heroin Alert outreach and my $500,000 grant last year for treatmentoriented heroin/opioid awareness, producing 3.3+ million online ads and still referring addicts and families for help.

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ROB PFEIFFER HEAD BREWER & AFICIONADO

109th Arden Fair Saturday, September 3

Delaware: A Brew Story Saturday, September 3

Wilmington Hispanic Festival Fri, Sept 9 - Sun, Sept 11

Brandywine Festival of the Arts Sat, Sept 10 & Sun, Sept 11

The Farmer & The Chef Thursday, September 15

2016 Polish Festival Mon, Sept 19 - Sat, Sept 24

The Wiggles: Wiggle Town Tour Thursday, September 22

IX Preview Weekend Fri, Sept 23 - Sun, Sept 25

Wine & Dinosaurs Sunday, September 25

TheDCH’s Garden Party Tuesday, September 27

Brew at the Zoo Friday, September 30

Basil Restaurant

Taste of Trolley 2 for specials Saturday, September 24

Full details for the events above plus hundreds more at:

inWilmingtonDE.com

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CITY OF WILMINGTON

On the Town

NAILed IT, Tahra Clarke at Artist Ave Station.

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HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE REFRESHMENTS

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LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

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DOWNTOWN LOOP

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WEST END LOOP

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NORTH WILMINGTON LOOP

NC

NEW CASTLE LOOP

THE WILMINGTON ART LOOP FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 5 - 9 p.m. artloopwilm.org

cityfest

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Downtown Loop

artloopwilm.org

On the Town

THE WILMINGTON ART LOOP

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO THE ART LOOP. STEP 1: Select exhibitions that interest you. STEP 2: Map out your choices and select transportation. You may want to walk, drive or take the downtown

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 5 - 9 p.m. cityfestwilm.com/artloopwilmington

DART Trolley. A limited number of seats are available on the Art Loop shuttle. Please reserve your seat by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov.

STEP 3: Meet local and regional artists while enjoying the newest exhibitions to open in Wilmington and the surrounding areas.

STEP 4: Enjoy one of Wilmington’s excellent restaraunt or nightlife locations. Please visit the food and drink section of inwilmingtonde.com.

STEP 5: Repeat the first Friday of every month!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS WHERE DOES THE ART LOOP START? The Art Loop is a self-guided, go-at-your-own pace tour that can start at any of the locations listed in this guide. There is no designated route for the Art Loop.

HOW DO I APPLY TO EXHIBIT ON THE ART LOOP? Participating galleries book and curate the exhi-

bitions and should be contacted directly at the contact information provided in this guide.

HOW DO I TAKE THE ART LOOP SHUTTLE? Reserve one of the limited number of seats by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov. The bus will pick-up and drop-off at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts.

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cityfest The Delaware Contemporary 200 S. Madison Street Wilmington, DE 302.656.6466 • thedcca.org

New exhibitions by Quentin Moseley, Stephanie Garmey (pictured), Jake Beckman, and (showing jointly) studio artists Ruth Ansel and Graham Dougherty, plus the Wilmington IN the Best Light Photo Contest Exhibition, open artists’ studios, Rolling Revolution food trucks, and cash bar featuring $3 Dogfish Head Beer. We’re a PokéStop! Art Loop reception 5-9 PM. On view Tues, Thurs, Fri, Sat - 10 am-5 PM; Wed, Sun - 12 - 5 PM through September 30th.

Zaikka Indian Grill 209 N Market Street Wilmington, DE www.zaikka.com Reflections, Stephanie Roth. First solo show and artist debut after a two year break from exhibiting and creating art. Roth will exhibit a variety of new statement piece art including some of her sketches she creates while traveling, paintings of varying natural subjects and other ideas that come from a place of reflection. Art Loop Reception 5 – 8PM. On view Monday – Friday 11A – 8 P through September 30th. 2nd & LOMA 227 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE arteun@aol.com www.lafategallery.com David Burslem’s aluminum and mixed media “Sculptural Abstract Landscapes”, digital “Imaginary Landscapes” and large format banners. Art loop reception 5:00 PM – 8:30 PM. On view Mon – Fri 9:00 – 5:00 PM through September 25.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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Downtown Loop

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artloopwilm.org Chris White Gallery 701 N Shipley St Wilmington, DE

Poppycock Tattoo 115 W. 8th Street Wilmington, DE www.poppycocktattoo.com

Retrospective Steve Attinger (1912-2007) Features landmark works that focus on interplay between personal aspirations and day to day living. Art loop reception 5 PM - 9 PM. On view by appointment only.

Art of Murder; Pulp Fiction and other Crime Stories. Mock pulp paperback covers by artist and photographer Ric Frane. Musical Guests Twitching Witches playing at 8:30. Opening Reception Sept 2nd from 6PM-10PM. On view 12 PM - 7 PM.

Delaware College of Art and Design 600 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE www.dcad.edu

Artist Ave Station 800 N. Tatnall Street Wilmington, DE www.artistavestation.com

The first major exhibition of the fall, From the Studio highlights the work of the studio art faculty at DCAD. The art exhibited provides DCAD students and the community at-large the opportunity to explore the current and personal work of the studio faculty. Art loop reception 5 – 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 9 AM – 9 PM; Sat/Sun 10 AM – 4 PM.

Christina Cultural Arts Center 705 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE www.ccacde.org Evocative Impressions by Yakime A Brown An array of acrylic and mixed media paintings which includes colorful and textural works of abstract art which appeals to all levels of aesthetes. A painting will be raffled for free at Art Loop reception. Art Loop reception 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM. On view through 9 AM – 3 PM through October 31, 2016.

Redding Gallery Louis L. Redding City/County Building 800 N. French St. Wilmington, DE 19801

The Grand Opera House – Mainstage 818 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE thegrandwilmington.org/grand-galleries “Glass Reflections” is a compilation of photos taken by Daniel T. Glass, which includes selections from his “Insomnia Collection,” “City Flowers,” and “Under Water Colors.” He enjoys capturing the beauty in nature that is often overlooked in urban settings. Art loop reception 5 PM – 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 10 AM to 5 PM through October 4, 2016. Nights and weekends subject to staff availability.

Mezzanine Gallery 820 N. French Street Wilmington, DE artsdel.org

The Grand Opera House – Baby Grand Gallery 818 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE thegrandwilmington.org/grand-galleries

The Mill Space 1007 N. Orange Street Wilmington, DE www.themillspace.com Moving Parts” consists of more than 10+ artists bringing together works of photography, painting, music, floral arrangements, visual entertainment, and fluid, contemporary art. Live tunes, awesome local food, and amazing Delaware artists welcome you to check out their work at the Mill in the Nemours Building from 5-9:30 with an after party. Art Loop reception 5:00 - 9:30 PM. On view 8 AM - 5 PM through September 30th.

ARTADDICTION is a grassroots art competition that seeks to explore the person behind addiction and recovery through artistic expression. It believes that art is a universal language that can help promote substance abuse prevention, increase understanding about the complexities of addiction and recovery. Art loop reception 5 PM – 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 10 AM to 5 PM through October 4, 2016. Nights and weekends subject to staff availability. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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NAILed IT, Tahra Clarke. Beautiful works of art displayed on the small canvases of fingernails. Art Loop reception 5 PM – 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 10 AM 3 PM through September 30, 2016.

Works of art of 35 children, ranging in ages from 8 months to 5 years old, from Delaware Tech’s Child Development Center. Art Loop reception 6 – 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 8:30 – 4:30 PM.

Patterned Space, The Delaware Division of the Arts is please to present Patterned Space, a selection of new paintings by Individual Artist Fellow Diane Lorio. Art Loop reception 5 – 7 pm. On view Mon – Fri 8:30 am – 4:30 pm through September 30th.

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West End Loop

artloopwilm.org Tonic Bar and Grille 111 W. 11th Street Wilmingon, DE www.tonicbargrille.com Roldan West has a collection of abstract pieces including nature, the universe, and more.

Colourworks 1902 Superfine Lane Wilmington, DE www.colourworks.com Photographer Stephen “Spike” Kilmer has been taking photographs for 35 years. Recently, he started capturing images of dolls, on film, in an effort to explore the creepy/darker side of these abandoned children’s toys. The photographs in this exhibit are a culmination of work created over the last year. Art loop reception 5:30 – 8:30 PM. On view 8:30 – 5:30 PM Howard Pyle Studio Group 1305 N. Franklin Street Wilmington, DE www.howardpylestudio.org LANDSCAPES, an all member, group show, of various mediums and styles of landscapes! Featured photo: ‘Majestical Landscape’, Mixed Media, by Michele M. Foster. Art loop reception 5:30 – 8:00 PM. On view by appointment only 302.652.7847 through October 1, 2016.

JOE RUNYIRI MUSICIAN & MC

WHAT’S #INTUNE THIS MONTH

The Souldaires Friday, September 2

Jenny Lewis Friday, September 16

Analog-A-Go-Go Saturday, September 17

inWilmingtonDE.com

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MARKS and MOVEMENTS UNDER PRESSURE, Vicki Vinton, Mixed media paintings. Art loop reception 5 – 8 PM. On view Tues – Fri 10:00 – 5:00 PM; Saturday 10 AM – 4 PM.

Save the Valley Music Fest Friday, September 9

Full details for the events above, plus hundreds more at:

56 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

Blue Streak Gallery 1721 Delaware Avenue Wilmington, DE 302.529.0506

Station Gallery 3922 Kennett Pike Greenville, DE 302.654.8638 stationgallery.net New Paintings, Frank DePietro, Marlene Dubin, Barbara Straussberg. New work by contemporary realist painter Frank DePietro, abstracted landscapes and mixed media collage by Marlene Dubin, and mixed media abstracts by Barbara Straussberg. Art loop reception 5 PM – 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 9 A – 5P; Sat 10 AM – 3 PM. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

8/24/16 11:33 AM


WVUD.ORG

Something For Everyone.

Saturday, October 22 6:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m.

PRESENTED BY:

Thank you, sponsors:

Blue Jean Ball

Purchase tickets at www.fbdbluejeanball.org

Associates International Bank of America Chesapake Utilities Corp. Giant Food NEIL Porter Auto Group RKD Alpha Dog ShopRite Syngenta WSFS Bank

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Harry’s Seafood Grill / Riverfront Market, HARRYS-SAVOY.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. FireStone Roasting House, FIRESTONERIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk 11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. The Delaware Contemporary, THEDCCA.ORG

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13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM Starbucks on the Riverfront 14. Kooma, KOOMASUSHI.COM Goju Training Center, GOJUROBICS.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG Riverwalk Mini Golf, RIVERWALKMINIGOLF.COM 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM 18. Public Docks 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM

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Visit RiverfrontWilm.com for info on events happening at the Riverfront! 20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/ DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG

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27 Riverfront Commuter Lot, RIVERFRONTWILM.COM/PARKING 28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29. CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM 30. The Residences at Harlan Flats, HARLANFLATS.THERESIDENCES.NET 31. Stratosphere Trampoline Park, WILMINGTONTRAMPOLINEPARK.COM 32. The Westin Wilmington, WESTINWILMINGTON.COM River Rock Kitchen, RIVERROCKKITCHEN.COM 33. Delaware Humane Association, DEHUMANE.ORG Photo by Joe del Tufo

8/24/16 9:41 AM


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ts

presen

SIP. SAMPLE. SH

2nd Annual Celebration of

Saturday, Sept. 24 * 1-5pm Craft Beer, Wine & Spirit Tasting

Free Entertainm

At venues throughout Trolley. Souvenir Tasting Mugs.

Corner musicians, street e kid games, rides and a

Small Plate Food Sampling

Retail Scavenger

Enjoy a wide range of Trolley cuisine. From Italian to Asian to American...

Follow the clues and w from Trolley Square me

Audi Wilmington

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. SHOP. STROLL.

RAIN OR S HINE

ation of All Things Trolley

* 1-5pm * Free Admission

e Entertainment

Exhibitions & Demonstrations

sicians, street entertainers, mes, rides and attractions.

Yoga, Martial Arts, Cooking, Nutrition, Horticulture, Cycling, Fine Art & more.

l Scavenger Hunt

Sidewalk Sale

he clues and win prizes lley Square merchants.

Special Taste of Trolley pricing at participating boutiques and retailers.

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10 HD TVs!

Every game

Every week

Sunday

drink specials $6 Crushes| $1 off all draft beer | $3 Miller Lite Bottles

Special football

BruncH

menu

Wilmington’s Largest

& bloody mary bar available from 11-3pm

Trolley Square Oyster House 1707 Delaware Ave | Wilmington, DE 19806 (302) 384-7310 |Trolleysquareoysterhouse.com

64 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

gameday

Funday . . wat c h

Farm Fresh Food and Fundraising Benefitting March of Dimes, ninth annual event is Sept. 15 “Always fresh, never frozen.” Learn the meaning of this tagline on Thursday, Sept. 15, at the ninth annual Farmer and The Chef at the Chase Center on Wilmington’s Riverfront. The fundraising event, which benefits the March of Dimes, helps create sustainable relationships between farmers and chefs while also promoting healthy eating. Some 15 local farmers will team up with more than 25 local chefs to create fresh dishes for guests, who can then vote for their favorite sample. Last year’s winners were Chefs Mike Mullen and Gary James and their students from Delcastle Technical High School, who teamed with Farmer Tommy Eliason from Kalmar Farm. Runnersup were Chef Seth Harvey of Home Grown Café and Farmers Bill and Joan Powers from Powers Farm. Third place went to Chef Robert Lhulier from University and Whist Club and SIW Vegetables. The Newcomer Award was presented to Chef Robbie Jester of Stone Balloon Ale House, who teamed with Crow Farm and Vineyard as well as to Chef Jim Berman from Gordon Food Service with Class Produce and Halpern’s Meats. According to Laura Klatzkin, executive director of market development for the March of Dimes, “The Farmer and The Chef is a unique opportunity to experience the diverse culinary talent in Delaware while celebrating and supporting a great cause.” General admission begins at 5:45 p.m., but The Chef’s pass ($75) allows entry at 5 p.m. and includes one complimentary drink ticket and an exclusive gift. General admission tickets are $45 when preordered and $55 at the door. Proceeds go directly to the March of Dimes, an organization that focuses on advancing research on maternal and family health issues, helping mothers to have healthy pregnancies and supporting families. Says Klatzkin, “We are thrilled and honored to have this group of farmers and chefs joining us in our mission to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.” For more information or to purchase tickets, visit thefarmerandthechef.com/wilmington. —Emma Driban

every

ga me!

Food & Drink Specials NFL "Sunday Ticket" 15 4K Ultra HDTVs 16 Craft Draughts Join Us For Our Kick-Off

Party Thursday September 8th 7:30pm – Close

brunch sunday Starting September 11th

10:30am – 2:30pm Special Menu $ 5 Bloody Marys $ 5 Mimosas

hol iday

Parties!

The Best Dates Are Going Fast!

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302.777.2040 | tonicBargrille.com 111 west 11th street | Downtown wilmington SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Spicy garlic stir fry with chicken is a popular Honeygrow dish.

Come enjoy Back-to-School Casa Noble Margaritas!!! Certified Organic Blue Agave Tequila by Carlos Santana

Come Visit Our Friendly Staff & See What Everyone’s Talking About!

Come see Tara, Tony, Barby, Neal, Julie, Aldo, Tino, Sharon, Zarine, Danielle, & Madline!

Serving the BEST Margaritas & the Largest Selection of Tequila in the Tri-State Area! 3 Mexican Draft Beers and 10 Mexican Bottled Beers Available!

Make Mexican Post Your Football Headquarters! Enjoy These Specials During The Games on Sundays & Mondays:

Wat Eagl ch the es h ere!

$3 CORONA LIGHT PINTS 1/2-PRICE NACHOS & WINGS $9.95 Lunch Specials! LATE NIGHT MENU 7 DAYS A WEEK TIL 1AM

Catch all of the NFL Games Here!

Mon-fri 11am-3pm

STOP IN FOR OUR DAILY MARGARITA SPECIALS!

Featuring 70 types of tequila! • AWARD WINNING MARGARITAS! 302.478.3939 | 3100 Naaman’s Road | Wilmington, DE | MexicanPost.com | facebook.com/Mex.Post

GALLUCIO’S DAILY SPECIALS Mondays

3 Course Meal $25 includes App, Soup or Salad, and Entrée (5-9pm) Anthony Gallucio & The Retreads 10-1am

Tuesdays

Family Night Kids under 10 eat FREE (Kids Menu) ”Q’s” Day Open Mic w/ Shawn Qaissaunee. 8-11pm

Wednesdays

½ Price Pizza (5-10pm) Quizzo w/Keith 8-11pm

Thursdays

½ Price Burgers All Day! Live Jazz Series 8-11pm

Fridays

½ Price Bottle of Wine (5-10pm) With purchase of 2 Dinner Entrees Open Mic w/ Anthony Gallucio Acoustic 6-9pm

Saturdays

All-Star Karaoke 9-1am

Sundays

Eagles Game Day! 23oz. Yuenglings and Miller Lite Drafts

Large Cheese Pizza & 1 Pound of Wings Only $15 Eat In or Take Out

ENJOY THESE SUNDAY-FUNDAY SPECIALS!

South Philly Cheese Steaks: $5 (Wiz Wit or Wiz Witout!) Dine-in Only We Have Philly Soft Pretzels, Too!

Happy Hour M-F 2-6pm $4 Craft Beers $2.25 Domestics

...Enjoy Your Favorites and So Much More! 1709 Lovering Ave • Wilmington • (302) 655-3689 • Gallucios-de.com

66 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

A CELEBRATION OF ALL THINGS TROLLEY

BITES A Tasty things worth knowing

Compiled by Emma Driban

BRANDYWINE VALLEY RESTAURANT WEEK

O

n Monday through Saturday, Sept. 12-17, 11 of the best restaurants in Northern Delaware and Southern Chester County, Pa., will join forces to promote the Brandywine Valley dining scene. These owner-operated venues will serve prix-fixe menus all week, $15 for a two-course lunch and $35 for a threecourse dinner. For the full list of restaurants, menus and more information, visit brandywinetaste.com.

DELAWARE NATURE SOCIETY’S FARM TO FORK

J

oin Delaware Nature Society on Saturday, Sept. 17 for a Farm to Fork dinner to honor Coverdale Farm Preserve, an agricultural estate in Greenville. This year’s theme is “Honoring our Roots,” a celebration of the rich history of Coverdale Farm Preserve. The event begins at twilight, with the first pairing and hors d’oeurves from 6 to 7 p.m., followed by a three-course dinner under the stars, ending at 9 p.m. The menu features ingredients grown right on the farm, a menu pairing by David Weir, chef and owner of Goat Kitchen and Bar in Wilmington, and beer from Dogfish Head Brewery in Milton. Tickets are $150 per person or $1,200 for a group of eight. Registration closes on Friday, Sept. 9. Purchase tickets at delawarenaturesociety.org

fter a banner debut last September, the second Taste of Trolley is set for Saturday, Sept. 24, from 1 to 5 p.m. Participating restaurants will be paired with a craft brewery and offer a small-plate menu designed to complement the beer. There will also be wine and spirits tastings, a sidewalk sale, strolling performers, free kids entertainment, and a scavenger hunt for prizes. There is no fee to attend. Visit tasteoftrolley.com for more information.

OVARIAN CANCER AWARENESS FUNDRAISER

S

eptember is the Delaware Ovarian Cancer Foundation’s Awareness Month. On Sunday, Sept. 18, the sixth annual On the Wings of Hope fundraiser will be held to support its mission. Join DOCF at the White Clay Creek Country Club from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. for a meal, a musical performance by the Imagination Players and bidding opportunities on a wide range of auction items. Tickets are $40 and free for Ovarian Cancer survivors with a paid guest. Tickets must be purchased in advance at deovariancancer.org.

LET US CATER TO YOU. From dinner parties to office get-togethers to weddings, let Janssen’s make your event

TED’S MONTANA GRILL BRINGS JOBS TO STATE

T

ed’s Montana Grill, an Atlanta-based restaurant inspired by the American West, will open its first Delaware location in November at Christiana Mall’s Fashion Center. The restaurant, which features the biggest bison menu in the world, will bring more than 60 jobs to the area. Ted’s is known for its hand-prepared, always fresh classics that are true to the American culinary tradition. It is currently hiring for managerial positions and will hold a job fair later in the year. Applications can be submitted to tedsmontanagrill.com/careers.

special. We offer full-service catering, event planning, party rentals, floral arrangements, and more. Contact our catering director today at (302) 654-9941 x3.

WWW.JANSSENSMARKET.COM 3801 KENNETT PIKE, GREENVILLE, DE 302.654.9941

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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The Deer Park Tavern

SEPTEMBER

Entertainment Schedule EVERY MONDAY:

Showtime Trivia

Welcome Back Students!

EVERY TUESDAY:

Jefe & DJ Andrew Hugh SATURDAYS: 3rd- Ballyhoo! 10th-Vigilantes 17th-As If 24th-Click

Enjoy These Football Specials! All Day Sunday & 4pm to Close During Any Football Game

SUNDAY NIGHT: Chorduroy

$10 Shock Top Pitchers • $8 Bud and Bud Light Pitchers • $7 Nachos • $6 Wings • $5 Old Bay Tots MONDAYS ½ Price Appetizers (5pm-Close)

TUESDAYS ½ Price Burgers ALL DAY! $4 Double LIT’s

WEDNESDAYS - MEXICAN NIGHT! ½ Price Nachos & Quesadillas ALL DAY! $3 Coronas & Margaritas • $1.50 Tacos

302.369.9414 | 108 West Main Street, Newark www.deerparktavern.com

THURSDAYS ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Wings (5pm-Close) ½ Price Burgers (11:30am-3pm) • $2 Rail Drinks

Be our friend on Facebook!

2016 Great Pumpkin

it st s

Debate & Hayride

Saturday Sept. 24th • 7-10 pm Bellevue State Park Figure 8 Barn 45 per person (SAVE $5 BY USING PROMO CODE “QA”)

$

(Benefits Delaware Humane Association)

must be 21 to attend Get Your Tickets Early This Year!

The arrival of autumn each year brings crisp air, beautiful colors, & of course pumpkin beer! This year join us for our 4th Annual “Great Pumpkin Debate.” Enjoy a Hayride, Bonfire, & sample a collection of unique pumpkin beers, vote for your favorite, & help choose the winner of the 2015 Great Pumpkin Debate.

Space is limited - Reserve Your Spot Today! Peco’s Liquors - 522 Phila. Pike - Wilmington – 302-764-0377 emulvihill@pecosliquors.com • PecosLiquors.com

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FOCUS

M A KIN G A D E N T

T ho l of u e g s s h cho th ve ice, t e bottle remains craft beer’s to sta y e h e ca n is resurgent, and it’s her By Rob Kalesse ack in the day (Jan. 24, 1935, to be exact), when canned beer was first introduced to the American public, yellow, fizzy lagers and cream ales ruled the land. Names like Piels, Schlitz, Stroh’s, Ballantine and Genesee, to name a few, carved out a considerable niche on liquor store shelves, at local watering holes, and at the ballgame. Over time, the “big three”—Anheuser-Busch, Miller, Coors—got in on the canning craze and pushed more product via aluminum than ever thought imaginable. (Thanks in large part to the macrobreweries, 55 percent of the beer produced in the United States today comes in a can.) Some 80 years later, cans are taking the world of craft beer by storm. While bottles have been the container of choice since the mid-1980s, upstart breweries like 21st Amendment, Oskar Blues and New Belgium have brought cans to the forefront. Local liquor stores and bars and restaurants are devoting more space to the aluminum cans, and even breweries that have long bottled are making the transition. ►

B

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CANS ACROSS AMERICA

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Since 1934

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Dr. Bart Watson, chief economist for the Brewers Association, a not-for-profit trade association that promotes and protects small and independent breweries, spends a good portion of his time conducting large surveys on beer production. Watson says that while bottles are still the primary choice for a majority of craft breweries, can production has increased the past five years. “In 2011 we calculated that craft volume was 2 percent cans, and in 2014 we estimated it at 10 percent,” Watson says. “Scanned data year-to-date has it closer to 15 percent of packaged volume.” The numbers don’t lie—canned craft beer production is certainly on the rise. However, the numbers can also be deceiving. Yes, canned beer is up to 15 percent of overall craft volume, but bottles still reign supreme, with a nearly 60 percent share of the market. “There are several reasons why bottled craft still dominates, beginning with the fact that a lot of the larger craft breweries have bottled beer for a long time, and continue to do so,” Watson says. “But canned beer is on the rise, and likely here to stay, now that perception has changed.” What has changed perception? One reason is that most breweries now line their cans with a synthetic compound, thus reducing any kind of metallic aftertaste. Also, the aluminum cans protect beer from one of its most dangerous enemies: light. And, finally, the cans give breweries plenty of room to get creative with artistic logos and coloring. Tim Matthews, head of brewing operations for Oskar Blues Brewery in Longmont, Colo., says the company cans all of its beers (and have since 2002) because “our passion for beer mingles with our other passions, like bikes and music and good food. As brewers, we love the cans, because we feel cans line up with those passions and allows us to further that creative spirit.”

CAN-VENIENCE: SAVING SPACE ON THE SHELF

From the Wilmington Riverfront to Trolley Square, there are plenty of bars and package stores across the city where craft cans have taken up prime placement. Venu Gaddamidi, owner of Veritas Wine & Craft Beer on Justison Street, says that when he opened in 2009, he didn’t stock or sell much canned beer at all. Now, roughly 25 percent of his inventory is dedicated to canned craft.

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“It’s amazing how the sales pitch went from ‘canned is crap’ to ‘canned is craft’ in such a short period of time,” Gaddamidi says. “It’s great, because I can stack more inventory in a limited amount of space, and the cans really move quickly. People like the idea of grabbing a light six-pack and tubing down the Brandywine or going on a bike ride, instead of hauling a heavier six-pack of glass bottles, which carry the risk of breaking.” Across town at Kelly’s Logan House, every Wednesday—as has been the case for four years now—customers can take part in the weekly “Can Jam.” For just $3 a pop, craft lovers have their choice of canned craft beer. General Manager Tim Crowley says Kelly’s started offering more craft nearly five years ago, for several reasons. “We felt that most products held up better for the consumer. After all, light is the death of many a fine beer,” Crowley says. “Storing and stocking canned beer is also more convenient, as they take up less real estate and allow us to offer more options. From a brewery standpoint, cans open up additional marketing idea options; it’s difficult to differentiate yourself with a neon green bottle, but you sure can make a cool can.” Breweries that have long resisted canning—most notably Lagunitas Brewing Company in Petaluma, Calif., and Dogfish Head Brewery here in Delaware—have also decided to make the move. Dogfish Head Founder and President Sam Calagione always had a “never say never” attitude on canning, whereas Lagunitas owner Tony Magee said he’d can on the “12th of never.” But, both have come to the conclusion that now is the time to can, and so the “12th of Never Ale” from Lagunitas is already available in Delaware, and the 60 Minute IPA from Dogfish Head is due in the can this fall.

TAKING THE PLUNGE

Sam Calagione has been bottling the 60 Minute IPA, his flagship beer, for nearly 20 years. The logo on the brown bottle is essentially an icon in craft beer circles, but after careful consideration and research, Dogfish Head’s 60 Minute will arrive in cans come November. “Cans are here to stay, I think that’s safe to say. The technology has advanced in terms of canning equipment,” Calagione says. “There’s also no longer that metallic taste people associate with canned beer.” One of the more popular can liners responsible for the absence of that metallic aftertaste is BPA, or Bisphenol A, an organic synthetic compound used to make plastics and epoxy resins. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has banned its use in the production of baby bottles, but says trace amounts aren’t harmful.

Fresh seasonal cuisine. Rustic elegant charm.

COVERED OUTDOOR PATIO HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS LIVE PIANO IN THE BAR EVERY THURS, FRI & SAT BRUNCH ON SUNDAYS 423 Baltimore Pike | Chadds Ford, PA 19317 | 610.388.7700 | thegablesatchaddsford.com

NOW OPEN UNTIL 1AM, MONDAY-SATURDAY

HALF-PRICE HAPPY HOUR

Reservations

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Mon-Fri 4-7pm and 11pm-12am

M O N D AY S $ 6 B u rg e r s

8thandUnion.com

T H U R S D AY S

$1.25 Oysters $7 Craft Cocktails

$1.25 Oysters $4 Titos Mixes Half-Price Wines OPEN MIC NIGHT with Joe Daphne

W E D N E S D AY S

Live Acoustic Music

T U E S D AY S

1/2-Price Appetizers one per customer $ 1 O ff C r a f t B e e r s

F R I D AY S

S U N D AY S

E V E RY D AY:

$2.50 Yuenling $2.50 Bud Lights $3 Green Tea $3.50 Vodka $3.50 Captain $4 Fireball $4 Spicy Tequila $5 Bourbon $5 City Wide Can Beer

Brunch • 10am-2pm

801 N. Union St, Wilm • 302-654-9780 • 8thandUnion.com SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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CRAFT BEER

16 drafts, 60+cans/bottles

Live Music

Wed. - Sat. nights

CRAFT COCKTAILS

Happy Hour

Mon. - Fri.: 4-7pm @bar

Food & Drink Specials

Your table

is waiting.

WINE EVENTS • PRIVATE DINING • HAPPY HOUR • SIGNATURE COCKTAILS 1314 N. Washington St., Wilmington, DE 19801 (302) 655-9463 | www.domainehudson.com

BEST WINE LIST

Gaddamidi, who worked in pharmaceutical sales before opening Veritas, says the evidence denouncing BPA is more anecdotal than empirical. Studies have been done, he says, but the concern is more related to children than adults. “Children are more susceptible to issues like this, as their immune systems are still developing,” Gaddamidi says. “You can read up on which breweries are using BPA, and even where they are mining their aluminum, but it’s not something to be overly concerned about.” Paul Gatza, director of the Brewers Association, says his understanding of the health impacts of BPA is related to body weight and endocrine disruption, but that the compound passes through the body so quickly, it isn't much of a health concern. "We are not scientists, and the science does not always agree, so it's difficult to know how to best advise members beyond FDA guidance," says Gatza. "While the FDA is not concerned about small amounts, many craft brewers are following research into can liners without BPA (BPA non-intent, or BPANI), as a way to meet beer drinker expectations. We should know more in 2017." In the meantime, more breweries are going with aluminum for both financial and environmental reasons. Jon Sipes, New Belgium’s “Delaware Beer Ranger,” says aluminum beats bottles in three different categories. “The average aluminum can is made from about 30-40 percent recycled aluminum, and aluminum cans are the most recyclable package worldwide,” Sipes says. “Cans also use a fraction of energy to produce, ship, and recycle, compared to glass, and it takes less energy to cool down a can, so you can pop the top and enjoy quicker.” Whether or not aluminum cans cool faster is up for debate. Watson says there’s no evidence or study to prove such a theory, though it seems to make sense. Regardless, he says choosing aluminum or bottle can depend on the situation or occasion. “Cans make sense in the summertime; you’re outdoors, they’re lighter,” Watson says. “You might not want to sit at a meal by a fire in the winter with a can of beer. But right now, it’s all about perception.” Whatever your preferred vessel, the perception of canned beer is changing. Cans no longer carry the stigma of poor taste or lower quality. And the more the popular craft breweries step up and commit to the can, the better off beer drinkers will be.

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SaengerbundOkt_2016_ProofA.pdf 1 8/24/2016 10:49:32 AM

The Delaware Saengerbund 2016 Presents The Original. . . Largest in Delaware

Oktoberfest

Just like Munich ~ Under the Big Tent Bavarian Bands & Folkdancing German Food & Beverages Amusement Rides & Games C

M

Y

CM

MY

September 16 17 18 5-11 p.m.

12-11 p.m.

12-6 p.m.

CY

CMY

K

Tickets:

$8 per person

(Includes Unlimited Amusement Rides)

Rain o r Shine !

Visit Delaware Beer Guy on

NEW! - OFF-SITE PARKING

AT OUR LADY OF GRACE (RT. 4) • SHUTTLE SERVICE INCLUDED Delaware Saengerbund - 49 Salem Church Rd. Newark, DE Near Intersection of Routes 4 & 273

(302) 366-9454 | www.delawaresaengerbund.org SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

KRESTON WINE & SPIRITS

Beer Grainiac

Celebrating 84 Years

Craft beer reviews from Grain’s Jim O’Donoghue

Respect the

THIS MONTH:

CRAFT beer can! Cans get colder faster Cans stay fresh more protected from light

Bear Republic Racer 5

Cans don’t Break

A

s it says on Everythingontap.com, "the race" is over and this one wins. Racer 5 IPA by Bear Republic is one of America's most medal-winning IPAs and it's back in Delaware after a long hiatus. This hoppy American IPA is brewed with American pale and crystal malts. The malt is designed to highlight the Columbus and Cascade hops from the Pacific Northwest. This beer goes great with just about anything spicy. If you like Ballast Point Sculpin or Union Jack Wookey Jack definitely give Racer 5 a try. – Jim O’Donoghue

Cans take up less space

coloRADo

N.Carolina

2SPBC GRAY 2SPBC AQUA (WUDDER)

2SPBC ORANGE

2SPBC LIGHT BLUE 2SPBC YELLOW

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Gotham Extra Narrow (Bold)

Gotham (Bold)

and more!

2SPBC BLACK

A Delaware Tradition Since 1933 MIDDLETOWN 448 E. Main Street Middletown, DE 19709 Tel: (302) 376-6123

WILMINGTON 904 Concord Avenue Wilmington, DE 19802 Tel: (302) 652-3792

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74 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

DELAWARE SAENGERBUND OKTOBERFEST

SIPS Here's what's pouring Compiled by Emma Driban

J

oin Delaware Saengerbund on the weekend of Sept. 16-18 to celebrate Oktoberfest on 49 Salem Church Rd. in Newark. The festivities will take place on Friday from 5 to 11 p.m., Saturday from noon to 11 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. For $8, attendees can enjoy German food (like bratwurst and traditional plum cake), entertainments provided by the Enzian Volkstanzgruppe, German music, imported gifts and souvenirs and amusement rides. For more information, visit delawaresaengerbund.org or call 366-9454.

THE 2016 KENNETT BREWFEST

O SEPTEMBER AT PENNS WOODS WINERY

E

very month, Penns Woods Winery in Chadds Ford, Pa., has a calendar full of exciting events, including yoga, painting and movies. Every Saturday and Sunday features music and food vendors. This month, Penns Woods also will host its Autumn Trail event. On Saturday, Sept. 17, there will be a 5K run at 9 a.m. At the same time the next day there will be an 8K run. Both offer a complimentary glass of wine at the finish line, a performance shirt and free downloadable pictures. The races are limited to 400 entries, so be sure to register and pay the $40 registration fee in advance. To register or for more information about the Autumn Trail Run the Vineyards, visit gooddayforarun.com. For more information about Penns Woods Winery and its events, visit pennswoodsevents.com.

n Saturday, Oct. 1, from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m., the 2016 Kennett Brewfest will take place on South Broad Street in Kennett Square, Pa. This rain-or-shine event is open only to those 21 years or older. There will be food and merchandise vendors, live bands, sponsor tables and sample beers from more than 90 local, regional and craft breweries. General admission is $50 and designated driver tickets are $15. For $75, guests can purchase Connoisseur Tasting VIP tickets, which include a meal from noon to 1:30 p.m. This is a fundraiser with proceeds going to Historic Kennett Square, a non-profit organization working to keep Kennett Square a regional economic and cultural center. For more information, visit kennettbrewfest.com.

HEAVY SEAS GREAT’ER PUMPKIN

T

he “Uncharted Waters” series by Heavy Seas Beer is welcoming the 2016 edition of the Great’er Pumpkin. This orange-colored pumpkin ale contains aromas of cinnamon, ginger, allspice, clove, brown sugar and pumpkin. The beer is bourbon barrel-aged, which rounds out its flavor with notes of oak, vanilla and bourbon. The Great’er Pumpkin is a limited release, available in all 17 states where Heavy Seas beer is distributed from September through October.

SEPTEMBER

MUSIC

at Kelly’s Logan House

FRIDAY, 9/09

Travel Songs - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 9/10

Element K - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 9/16

UZO with Xtra Alltra - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 9/17 Click - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 9/23

The Limits with Lifestream - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 9/24 Radio Halo - 10 p.m.

Jose Estados - 2 p.m. Pat Stoner Trio - 6 p.m.

FRIDAY, 9/30

Come Together with Special Guest - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 10/01 88MPH - 10 p.m. Bands and times subject to change.

1701 Delaware Ave. Wilmington, DE 19806 (302) 652-9493

LOGANHOUSE.COM SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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50 JULY 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

HOT BREAKFAST!: MODERN MAVERICKS Delaware’s premier dork-rock duo redefines ‘geeky’ By Evie Kortanek he multi-talented dork-rock duo, Hot Breakfast!, met, fittingly enough, at auditions for the Wilmington Drama League’s production of Jesus Christ Superstar in 2003. Jill Knapp and Matt Casarino were both cast in the rather quirky production, and played together for the first time at the cast party. They collaborated in solo projects until 2009, when they decided to become a duo. Lead singer Knapp and guitarist/songwriter Casarino, who now live together near Arden, have since become Delaware’s premier dork-rock duo. Their style, and even their college degrees, complement each other. Knapp attended Montclair State and received a degree in music education/ voice, while Casarino went to American University to study literature and communication. ►

T

▲ Hot Breakfast! Photo Joe del Tufo SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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State Line Liquors

HOT BREAKFAST!: MODERN MAVERICKS continued from previous page

Family owned & operated Since 1937 — 4 Generations!

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Casarino explains that the genesis of the duo’s name was a t-shirt randomly mailed to Knapp’s house by a friend who bought it at a garage sale. “The shirt features the silhouette of a man with mighty dreadlocks thrusting his fist into the air, while the text underneath reads ‘HOT BREAKFAST!,’” says Casarino. “It not only sounds like a fun and inclusive invitation, but it gives us free advertising on hotel signs across the nation,” he adds, displaying the wit that often informs their music. The duo identifies as dork-rock, a subgenre of alternative rock that fits their unique style and often humorous performances. Explains Casarino: “It’s really about dorky attitude and a desire to abandon all aspects of ‘cool.’ Back in high school, being called a dork, nerd, or geek were insults. But now these words are things to be proud of.” Similarly, their message as a band is “one of inclusion.” “We are all dorks in our own way,” he says. “We all have that secret geeky obsession, that fun collection in our closets, those dorky songs that we sing along with loudly when no one is around. Our differences don’t matter nearly as much as the things that bond us.” Appealing to a wide fan base, Hot Breakfast! has wowed audiences since they started touring in 2011. With original tracks from their 2012 EP, and albums 39 Summers and The Big Reveal, they have racked up eight Homey Awards, including Best Live Act, Best Lead Singer (twice), Best Songwriter and Best Collaboration. “We want to make great rock music while having fun and welcoming everyone into our dorky family,” says Casarino. “Once we’re all laughing together, we’re all the same—our differences mean nothing.” They will perform at Atlanta DragonCon early this month and their holiday EP release show, “Hot Breakfast! and Friends Present: A Very Dorky Christmas,” will be at the World Cafe Live at The Queen on Saturday, Dec. 17. Casarino says the duo is continuing to evolve, and they thank their dedicated fans who start (and end) each day by feeding their soul with some Hot Breakfast!.

Half-Price Wines Every Wednesday & Saturday Night!

78 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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last cigar dinner

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SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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TUNED IN Not-to-be-missed music news JONATHAN EDWARDS RETURNS Concert is Sept. 9 Country-rock troubadour Jonathan Edwards will bring his timeless style to Wilmington on Friday, Sept. 9, at World Cafe Live at The Queen to promote his new album, Tomorrow’s Child, and showcase his unique style, combining soulful roots with today’s maverick scene. With his 1971 hit “Sunshine Go Away,” along with “Honky Tonk Stardust Cowboy” and “One Day Closer,” he is known for his intimate, passionate performances. Tickets are $25. For more information, visit worldcafelive.com.

109TH ARDEN FAIR The Delaware tradition is Sept. 3 For more than a century, hundreds of volunteers from Arden have hosted a fair that’s free to the public, featuring rides and games, arts and crafts, vendors and musical performances. The 109th fair, on Saturday, Sept. 3, also will offer a food court, beer garden, art exhibit, antiques market and a look into the Renaissance to get a taste of Delaware’s evolving culture. The musical lineup at Shady Grove will showcase several performers including Arden Kind, the Diamond State Concert Band and the Kooligans. Join in celebrating Arden’s unique culture and help with repairs to the Gild Hall and in supporting educational services provided by the Arden Club. For more information, visit ardenbuzz.com.

SAVE THE VALLEY Music fest set for Sept. 9 Join hundreds of music lovers and grassroots enthusiasts to protect the Beaver Valley and its remaining undeveloped land along the Brandywine River in Delaware and Pennsylvania at Save the Valley Music Festival. An organization of volunteers, Save The Valley is dedicated to educating the public on the risks of development and significance of the land. Headliner Bronze Radio Return, The Splashing Pearls and several high school bands will perform at the fourth annual festival on Friday, Sept. 9, at The Queen. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. For more information, visit savethevalley.org.

TRANSCENDENTAL JAM SESSION Spiritual performances are Sept. 21 Participate in a cultural and spiritual experience at Milton Theatre’s Transcendental Jam Session on Wednesday, Sept. 21. The devotional chanting, called Kirtan, dates back 5,000 years in Indian culture and tradition. Kirtan is a powerful experience known to induce states of meditation and bliss. The event is free to attend and features a complimentary vegetarian feast. For more information, visit pcade.com. 80 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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THE FINAL FOUR Musikarmageddon’s ultimate battle is set for Oct. 15, live at the baby grand On Saturday, Oct. 15, four finalists will face off at the baby grand for the 10th annual Musikarmageddon championship. In the most recent round—on Aug. 18—high school indie rock band Arden Kind were the winners over Anatomy of an Outcast and Rusty Blue. All three bands know each other. “The trio of bands were probably the most supportive of each other, as competitors, that I’ve ever seen on one bill,” says event manager Joe Trainor. Arden Kind bassist Emmett Dwyer agrees. “It was a blessing for us to compete against Rusty Blue, our favorite local band and our great friends for years now,” Dwyer says. “We were at their very first show, and it’s amazing to be able to look back and see how far we’ve all come since then as musicians, songwriters and as friends. The same goes for Anatomy of an Outcast.” Arden Kind will compete in the finale with Susquehanna Floods, TreeWalker and Hoochi Coochi. Dwyer expects the finale to be similar to the preliminary competition, just on a bigger scale and with different bands. “The positivity and respect from one band to another, however, will remain the same,” he says. The event starts at 8 p.m. For tickets and more information, visit thegrandwilmington.org.

INDIE CRAFT FESTIVAL Dogfish Head’s Analog-A-Go-Go comes to Bellevue State Park Sept. 17 Pumpkin, oversized sweater, bonfire: all words we associate with autumn. Now, aspiring to be part of that list is Dogfish Head’s sixth annual, and revamped, Analog-A-Go-Go festival, to be held at Bellevue State Park on Saturday, Sept. 17. The festival is undergoing major changes “in celebration of all things indie craft,” says Dogfish founder Sam Calagione. As O&A readers know, the biggest change is venue— from Dogfish’s Milton brewery downstate to Bellevue State Park just outside Wilmington—to accommodate a larger lineup and crowd. This includes live music, a cask beer festival featuring 10-15 breweries, a craft spirit garden, a marketplace, and local and regional food. The band lineup, which originally included Ra Ra Riot, has been altered. It still includes headliners Built to Spill, along with Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Talib Kweli, Beach Slang, and Fiancé, bringing to Bellevue indie rock, New Orleans-style jazz, hip-hop, punk and experimental pop representative of the “off-centered” Dogfish brand. Ra Ra Riot’s replacement had not been announced as of press time. To date, Dogfish VP of Marketing Neal Stewart says that Analog is the biggest undertaking for Dogfish. And rightly so—Stewart hopes to see 8,000-10,000 craft drink and music fans, although, at press time, all $75 general admission tickets were still available. However, the general admission + Best Firkin Friends Beer Festival + Distillery Garden package is sold out. Separate upgrade tickets are available for either, though. The Super Friends Cask Beer Festival hosted in the Craft Beer Barn will offer guests 10 cask-conditioned samplings—unfiltered and unpasteurized beer. Limited edition beers will be pouring from Sierra Nevada, Allagash, Stoudts, Funky Buddha, Boston Beer, Iron Hill, Beavertown, Burley Oak, Short’s, and, of course, Dogfish. Some of those beers, like the Oakland Park, Fla., Funky Buddha, and London’s Beavertown brews, aren’t otherwise available in Delaware. Meanwhile, the Distillery Garden on the Bellevue Mansion lawn will treat guests to six scratch-made cocktails from Dogfish Distilling Co. Vendors—notably featuring records and rare indie finds—and food trucks will be dispersed throughout the festival grounds. For more information and tickets, visit analogagogo.com.

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SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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You're Invited

Thursday, October 20, 2016 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM Sheraton Wilmington South • New Castle, DE ENJOY Tailgate Bites Games

Beer Trail Curated by Two Stones Pub

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82 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

Kubo and the Two Strings

4

STARS µµµµµ (l-r.) Beetle, Kubo and Monkey emerge from the Forest and take in the beauty of the landscape in animation studio LAIKA’s epic action-adventure. Photo 2016 LAIKA, Inc / Focus Features

MORE THAN A FAIRY TALE Kubo and the Two Strings demonstrates the artistic potential of the art of animation By Mark Fields

F

eature-length cartoons have never deserved to be dismissed as cinema art—as they have been since the first ones were created in the 1930s. Granted, Disney always favored the entertainment end of the spectrum, and many animated movies today are primarily intended to make money off family audiences. Nevertheless, animation artists have endeavored to bring more to their work than just friendly animals voiced by celebrity actors and colorfully fantastical backdrops (see the Cinema Six Pack on page 85 for several worth watching). Kubo and the Two Strings is one such effort, providing fun and adventure for the adolescent set while still containing some imagery and ideas to sustain the adults in the theater. The story of Kubo and the Two Strings feels familiar and follows some recognizable tropes of the fairy tale format, even though it is an original story. Kubo is a young boy in land that evokes medieval Japan. A talented origami artist, musician and storyteller, Kubo divides his days between caring for his troubled mother and earning some money entertaining the villagers with his strange tales of samurai warriors and mystical foes. As only happens in fairy tales, circumstances put him right into one of his stories and he must go on a quest to find a magical suit of armor that will allow him to restore his distressed family.

Kubo’s narrative is really just a framework for the creators (director Travis Knight and writers Marc Haimes, Chris Butler, and Shannon Tindle—all experienced animators) to weave a visual tapestry that resembles the complex yet delicate art of origami. The film is always beautiful and intricate, even when the bones of the plot itself are predictable, if not creepy. The result is fast-moving, sophisticated and ultimately rewarding, both visually and emotionally. Kubo and the Two Strings benefits from confident and droll voice work from Charlize Theron, Matthew McConaughey, Ralph Fiennes, and young Art Parkinson as the title boy. I do have to note, with disappointment, that a film set in ancient Japan and designed to evoke the richness of Eastern culture is sadly devoid of actual Asian voice actors. George Takei and Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa are present only as minor characters, while the leads are all Anglos. Although the voice talent is excellent, it still feels like an unnecessary slight and a missed opportunity. But I applaud Kubo and the Two Strings for being more than just a straightforward fairy tale. By investing the story with a rich graphic palette and by exploring cultures less familiar to American audiences, the movie demonstrates the versatility and potential depth of the art of animation. ► SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH BEN-HUR continued from previoius page

Photo courtesy of 2016 Paramont Pictures

September 9

Ben-Hur

1

Penn Cinema +

Escape to the movies www.penncinema.com Escape to the movies at Wilmington’s only locally-owned and independently operated multiplex, featuring 15 stateof-the-art screens including the state’s only IMAX® Theatre.

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STAR µµµµµ

Jack Huston as Judah Ben-Hur.

BEN-HUR All you need to know about the newest remake of Ben-Hur is that it is directed by Timur Bekmambetov, the man who brought you Wanted and Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Clearly, with that pedigree, this is not going to be any deep exploration of cultural identity or even a facile Christian morality play. It’s going to be two hours of vaguely embarrassing sword-andsandals exposition before we get to a caffeinated chariot-race finale chock full of CGI effects. Sadly, even the chariot race disappoints, because its desire to provide bigger, more violent, and “cooler” effects overwhelms the humans at the center of the drama. A paint-by-numbers script and wooden performances only add to the silliness. Somebody in Hollywood thought another remake (this is the fifth film adaptation, including a 2003 animated version) was worth doing; I fail to see why.

THE BIG LEBOWSKI

Wednesday, Sept. 28 6:30pm @ Penn Cinema with 401 S. Madison Street | Wilmington, DE 19801

TWIN LAKES BREWING See page 61 for details

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SIX-PACK CINEMA

WATCH

Animated films have come a long way since Snow White By Mark Fields Kubo and the Two Strings continues a proud tradition of full-length animated films that have redefined the expressive capabilities of the medium. We’ve come a long way from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. Fire up the DVD player and explore these innovative features that were drawn (entirely) from the wild imaginations of their creators.

Beauty and the Beast (1991) Although cineastes mark 1989’s The Little Mermaid as the beginning of the Disney animation renaissance, it was Beauty and the Beast that became the first animated feature to receive an Oscar nomination as Best Picture. And little wonder: the classic French fairy tale is fleshed out into a compelling story of love and acceptance, bolstered by delightful music written by Alan Menken and the late Howard Ashman (“Be Our Guest,” “Gaston,” and the title song).

Spirited Away (2001) Hayao Miyazaki has crafted some of the most fanciful and profound animation of the last 20 years in such films as Howl’s Moving Castle, Princess Mononoke and My Neighbor Totoro, but his imagination takes full flight in this Oscar-winner. A sullen young girl finds herself alone in a world populated by strange beasts and ethereal spirits. But forget any conventions of story and let the transcendent graphics wash over you. A visual wonder!

The Triplets of Belleville

(2003)

French grand-mere searches for her missing cyclist grandson, aided by her loyal pooch and three fading singing sisters in this delightful but incredibly weird story by Sylvain Chomet. What makes this movie distinctive, however, is that the entire tale is conveyed with virtually no words of dialogue; there are occasional sounds and snatches of melody but no words. Chomet’s uncompromising vision is alternately charming and brusque, humorous and yet creepy. This film is a true original.

The Incredibles (2004) Toy Story established John Lasseter’s Pixar Studio as an animation force to acknowledge, but The Incredibles, a CGI homage to both the superheroes and super-spy genres, took the Pixar magic to another, more sophisticated realm. The animation is top drawer, as is the voice work and Academy Award-winning script by director Brad Bird. But what really brings the movie together is the fresh-yet-oh-so-familiar soundtrack by Michael Giacchino, a coy pastiche of every James Bond and Mission Impossible musical theme ever written.

The Curse of the Were-Rabbit

(2005)

Filmmaker Nick Park created the inimitable Wallace and Gromit, a cheese-loving British man and his long-suffering dog lovingly animated in the stop motion format. First introduced in several shorts (including the hysterical heist caper, The Wrong Trousers), pooch and pal were given feature film treatment in this charming mystery-horror-comedy. The quirks of these two characters are hard to sustain over 85 minutes, but the painstakingly detailed animation still captivates, as does the droll English humor.

Waltz with Bashir

(2008)

Writer-director Ari Folman, a former Israeli soldier, uses animation to tell a horrifying story of the Israel invasion of Lebanon and atrocities that occurred during that conflict. It is, unlikely as it seems, an animated documentary. Folman, whose self-investigation was prompted by a friend’s disturbing dream, interviews his former buddies to reconstruct what happened years ago. Rashomon-like, the stories and their implications vary based on who is telling the story. The choice of animation frees Folman to depict not only the personal accounts but also the nightmares they still prompt. A fascinating indictment of war.

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Monday Night Football: Hosted by Bill Bergey!

PLACE YOUR PRO FOOTBALL WAGERS AT STANLEY’S EVERY WEEK.

Great Raffle Prizes like coolers, chairs, windshirts, hats, t-shirts and the WEEKLY GRAND PRIZE: 2 Lowel Level 35 Yard Line Tickets to an Eagles Home Game w/ Limo Transportation!

•You must be 21 to play. •Delaware Gambling Hotline: 888-850-8888. •The Delaware Sports Lottery is sponsored by the Delaware State Lottery and is not associated with or authorized by any professional or collegiate sports organization.

11th Annual

SHERIDAN GREAT CAR GIVEAWAY Win a 2 year lease on a NEW Ford Fusion or Nissan Altima Courtesy of the Sheridan Auto Group Join our Frequent Fan Club (it’s free to join). Every visit you make to Stanley’s from Sept. 1, 2016 until Jan 1, 2017 gives you a chance to be one of the 4 weekly finalists. Drawing will be during half-time of the Pro-Football Championship Game. (After Jan.)

You must be present to win. Must be at least 21 years of age. Must qualify for lease & supply your own insurance for the car lease.

Stanley’s Tavern 2038 Foulk Road | Wilmington, DE 19810

302.475.1887 | Stanleys-Tavern.com

72 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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BEST RIBS UPSTATE BEST SPORTS BAR

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PLAY

WHERE TO WATCH THE GAME September brings college football and NFL action back to a bar near you! Because of the multitude of options—who has the most TVs? Best beers on tap?—we’ve come up with this directory to guide you through the selection process. Compiled by Evie Kortanek

8TH & UNION KITCHEN 801 N. Union St., Wilmington; 654-9780 8thandunion.com Number of TVs: 4 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 30 Crowd Favorites: Buffalo cauliflower, grilled wings, pad thai, and brisket & steak pho.

AJ’S RESTAURANT AND TAVERN 114 N. Broadway, Pennsville, N.J.; (856) 678-2306, Visit Facebook page Number of TVs: 9 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 35+ Crowd Favorites: Sweet chili wings, smokey mountain burgers, cheesesteaks, and bacon wrapped scallops.

BBC TAVERN & GRILL 4019 Kennett Pike, Greenville; 655-3785 bbctavernandgrill.com Number of TVs: 7 Beers on Tap: 15 • Bottled Beers: 60-75 Crowd Favorites: Nachos, caprese salad, house-made meatloaf, and BBC Burger.

BUFFALO WILD WINGS

CHELSEA TAVERN 821 N. Market St., Wilmington; 482-3333 chelseatavern.com Number of TVs: 3 Beers on Tap: 31 • Bottled Beers: 200+ Crowd Favorites: Wood burning oven pizza, Chelsea cheeseburger, and BBQ pork nachos.

COLUMBUS INN 2216 Pennsylvania Ave., Wilmington; 571-1492 www.columbusinn.net Number of TVs: 5 (and a projector screen) Beers on Tap: 8 • Bottled Beers: 27 Crowd Favorites: Tempura fried tuna roll and crab stuffed heirloom tomato.

DEER PARK TAVERN 108 W. Main St., Newark; 369-9414 deerparktavern.com Number of TVs: 25 Beers on Tap: 24 • Bottled Beers: 31 Crowd Favorites: Wings, mix combo, and nachos.

DELAWARE PARK 777 Delaware Park Blvd., Wilmington; 994-6700 delawarepark.com Beers on Tap: 5-6 • Bottled Beers: 15 Three bars – Club 3, The Cove, and the Sports Bar – all featuring plenty of pro football action plus the Sports Lottery Crowd Favorites: Flame-broiled cheeseburgers, dollar hot dogs, cheese pizzas from Picciottis, wing zings, jalapeno crab fritters, crab fries, crab cakes, and lobster.

ERNEST & SCOTT TAPROOM 902 N. Market St., Wilmington; 384-8113 earnestandscott.com Number of TVs: 10 Beers on Tap: 22 • Bottled Beers: 31 Crowd Favorites: Blackened mahi tacos, loaded fries, and burgers.

Multiple locations: Bear, Dover, Limestone Rd., Middletown, Newark, Rehoboth buffalowildwings.com

FIRESTONE ROASTING HOUSE

Number of TVs: 42 Beers on Tap: 24 • Bottled Beers: 18 (Also features Sports Lottery at Bear, Dover, Limestone Rd., and Middletown locations) Crowd Favorites: Boneless or traditional wings in any of 16 signature seasonings or sauces.

Number of TVs: 24 Beers on Tap: 8+ • Bottled Beers: 30 Crowd Favorites: Firestone original pizza, spinach tomato ricotta pizza, and FireStone burger.

110 W. St., Wilmington; 658-6626 firestoneriverfront.com

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FALL FOOTBALL IS BACK! Check Out This Year’s Football Specials:

All Day Sunday & 4pm to Close During Any Football Game

Come Try Our Seasonal Craft Beers Over 22 Beers on Tap at the Polly Drummond and Peoples Plaza Locations!

$6 Buffalo Wings • $7 Nachos • $5 Old Bay Tots $10 Pitchers of ShockTop • $8 Pitchers of Bud & Bud Light THURSDAYS

MONDAYS

½ Price Appetizers All Day

TUESDAYS

½ Price Burgers All Day $1.50 Domestic Drafts after 7pm

WEDNESDAYS

All You Can Eat Wings $11.99 after 5pm

All You Can Eat Shrimp $12.99 after 5pm, Prime Rib $18.99 SHOWTIME TRIVIA All Locations!

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 108 Peoples Plaza (Corner of Rtes. 40 & 896) | Newark, DE | 302-834-6661 8 Polly Drummond Shopping Center | Newark, DE | 302-738-7814 800 North State Street | Dover, DE | 302-674-0144

Be our friend on Facebook!

www.mcglynnspub.com

FRIDAYS

Prime Rib $22.99, $2.50 Taylor’s Grog 7pm-close DJ DANCE PARTY

SATURDAYS

$1.00 Off Craft Bottles All Day

SUNDAYS

Beef and Beer $8.99, Steak Night $12.99

All Locations!

SPORTS BETTING IS BACK ! COME PLACE YOUR BETS! You must be 21 to play. Delaware Gambling Hotline: 888-850-8888 The Delaware Sports Lottery is sponsored by the Delaware State Lottery and is not associated with or authorized by any professional or collegiate sports organization.

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GALLUCIO’S 1709 Lovering Ave., Wilmington; 655-3689 gallucios-de.com Number of TVs: 7 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 15 Crowd Favorites: Pomodoro pizza, california turkey reuben, sautéed seafood medley, stromboli, and homemade lasagna.

GRAIN CRAFT BAR + KITCHEN 270 E. Main St., Newark; 737-2931 grainonmain.com Number of TVs: 12 Beers on Tap: 24 • Bottled Beers: 60 Crowd Favorites: Fried pickles, street tacos, and cubano.

GROTTO PIZZA 16 locations in Delaware grottopizza.com Number of TVs: 15-25 Beers on Tap: 6-14 • Bottled Beers: 16-22 Crowd Favorites: Boneless wings, appetizer combo, and broccoli bites.

KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE 1701 Delaware Ave., Wilmington; 652-9493 loganhouse.com Number of TVs: 17 TVs including a big screen Beers on Tap: 20 • Bottled Beers: 90+ Crowd Favorites: Buffalo wings, chili nachos, and dirty bird grilled cheese.

KID SHELLEEN’S 14th & Scott, Wilmington; 658-4600 kidshelleens.com Number of TVs: 7 Beers on Tap: 10 • Bottled Beers: 40+ Crowd Favorites: Shelleen’s nachos, buffalo wings, and chicken quesadilla.

MCGLYNN’S PUB Three locations: Polly Drummond, People’s Plaza, Dover mcglynnspub.com Number of TVs: 22 with NFL Package, all games all week Beers on Tap: 32 • Bottled Beers: 40+ Crowd Favorites: Wings, nachos, burgers, and prime rib.

WIN $500!

PIGSKIN PICK’EM

Pick the winners for the first 17 weeks of the regular NFL season and you could WIN a $500 AMEX Gift Card! See store for details.

Home of the

BIG BEER

3

$ 50 22oz Drafts All Day, Every Day

ENTER TO WIN

EAGLES PHLITE DECK TIX

Thurs $3 Leinenkugel Pints Sat & $350 Miller Lite Sun 22oz Big Beers Mon $3 Blue Moon Pints Bar area only. Certain restrictions may apply.

For a full location listing visit

GrottoPizza.com

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Now in Newport, Delaware (adjacent to the Tile Market)

TWIN LAKES IS BACK!!!

STILLFRESH! STILLLOCAL!! STILLDELICIOUS!!! Our new Brewing Facility, designed by founding Brewer, Jack Wick, features a new., stateof-the-art 5,000,000 BTU steamfired boiler, to ensure we continue to produce some of the best brews around utilizing traditional processes and beers “True to Style.”

PLUS our continued commitment to utilizing: • All-Natural Grains • Whole-Flower Hops • Live Yeast Cultures • The Finest Well-Water from nearby Chester County promises that we are making the same great brews we always did, only maybe a little bit better!!! Coming Soon! New Tasting Room Opening in Early Fall. Tour the new facility and taste some exciting experimental and ‘One-Off’ varieties alongside our original core brands. For More information Go to our Website: www.TwinLakesBrewery.com Phone: (302) 658-1826

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MEXICAN POST 3100 Naaman’s Rd., Wilmington; 478-3939 mexicanpost.com

JOIN US FOR, LIVE MUSIC, STEAMED CRABS, & AWARD-WINNING WINGS!

Number of TVs: 5 Beers on Tap: 5 • Bottled Beers: 24 Crowd Favorites: Fajitas, chimichangas, and nachos.

A J’s

STANLEY’S TAVERN

2038 Foulk Rd., Wilmington; 475-1887 stanleys-tavern.com

Number of TVs: 40 Beers on Tap: 25 • Bottled Beers: 66 Crowd Favorites: Award-winning baby back ribs, wings, and tavern nachos. (Also features Sports Lottery)

STONE BALLOON ALE HOUSE

RE STA U RA N T & TA VE RN

SEPT R TBA EMBER BAND CALENDA

NFL FOOTBALL SPECIALS!

$2.75 Bud light aluminum bottles • prizes & GIVEAWAYS! 50¢ wings on sunday! • $1.50 Bud Light Drafts • 10 tvs!

Deck open year ‘round! Lunch Specials every day - Full line of Craft Beer on tap

115 East Main Street, Newark; 266-8111 stoneballoon.com Number of TVs: 4 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 50 Crowd Favorites: Beef & bacon lollipops, keg fries, short-rib pot roast.

steak & seafood specials thursday—sunday

TWO STONES PUB

Stop In For Subs, Steaks, and Meatballs for Your Eagles Tailgate Party!

Three locations: Newark (294-1890), Wilmington; (439-3231) & Kennett Square (610-444-3940) twostonespub.com Number of TVs: 6-10 Beers on Tap: 20-25 • Bottled Beers: 40-90 at each location Crowd Favorites: Fry piles, hog wings, and chicken wings

TONIC BAR & GRILLE 111 W. 11th Street, Wilmington; 777-2040 tonicbargrille.com Number of TVs: 15 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 28+ Crowd Favorites: Tonic pretzels, Buffalo roaster wings, short-rib empanadas. (Also features NFL Sunday Ticket)

TROLLEY SQUARE OYSTER HOUSE 1707 Delaware Avenue, Wilmington; 384-7310 stoneballoon.com Number of TVs: 10 Beers on Tap: 12 • Bottled Beers: 30 Crowd Favorites: Tuna burger sliders, blackened mahi tacos, , lobster roll, calamari, loaded waffle fries

1 1 4 N . B R O A D WAY, P E N N S V I L L E , N J – ( 8 56 ) 678 - 2306

Celebrating 60 Years!

Casapulla’s SUB SHOP “Home of the Classic Italian Sub” 3rd Generation Owned & Operated!

HEAT & EAT

Our Party Trays & Lunch-Meat Trays Are GREAT For Family Reunions, Parties & Special Events

Featuring: MEATBALLS, SAUSAGE & PEPPERS, And STUFFED SHELL TRAYS SUBS • STEAKS • BURGERS MEATBALLS • SAUSAGES NAPOLETAN AND MORE!

514 CASAPULLA AVE. • ELSMERE

(302) 994-5934

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WHO WILL BE THIS YEAR’S MUSIKARMAGEDDON CHAMPION?

E V I L

Four Bands Will Play

THE MUSIKARMAGEDDON FINALS

usic nthly m o m f o A series : TED BY N E S E R P

live @ the baby grand Saturday, October 15

parties

WHO WILL GET CROWNED CHAMP?

SATURDAY, SEPT. 10th: Susquehanna Floods

1984

Tree Walker

2511 W. 4th Street, Wilmington

w/ Gozer, Left & Right, TBA

AL

Arden Kind

www.MUSIKARMAGEDDON.com

dA O

FOR MORE INFO AND TO ORDER YOUR TICKETS:

n utA

Additional Partnerships with:

1984,Gable Music Ventures, Kelly’s Logan House, Oddity Bar, Rainbow Records, Spaceboy Clothing, TribeSound Studios, World Cafe Live at The Queen, WSTW’s Hometown Heroes

t bou

N

.co w o

Watch, Vote, and Help Us Decide WHO WINS!

m

Hoochi Coochi

LS PBR SPECIA ! L NIGHT

92 SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WHAT’S #INWILM THIS MONTH

Family River Cruise Thursday, September 1

Kalmar Nyckel Sails Fri, Sept 9 - Sun, Sept 18

Canoeing the Christina Sunday, September 18

Fall Equinox Labyrinth Walk Thursday, September 22

CHELSEA JOHNSON PHOTOGRAPHER & ADVENTURER

Full details for these events, plus hundreds more at: inWilmingtonDE.com

The ultimate

doggy treat. Give your pooch the very best in daycare, overnight boarding and spa treatment at Dogtopia, an open-air environment for sociable dogs of all ages. After a healthy workout of both mental and physical exercise, you can both get the relaxation you need at the end of the day.

Dogtopia of Elsmere 319 New Road Elsmere, DE 19805 (302) 998-7877 elsmere@dogdaycare.com

Hours

YOU CAN’T HELP BUT SMILE ABOUT IT

Monday-Friday: 7am-7pm Saturday & Sunday: 10am-5pm

daycare • boarding • spa

WWW.IRONHILLBREWERY.COM/PUMPKINALE

NEWARK • WEST CHESTER • WILMINGTON dogtopia.com

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Presented by

Historic Odessa Brewfest All Proceeds Benefit Historic Odessa

Saturday, September 10, 2016 202 Main Street I Odessa, DE On the grounds surrounding the Historic Houses of Odessa across the street from Cantwell’s Tavern

Beer from over 40 Breweries • Live music by Spokey Speaky, Rainbow Full of Sound, and more! Locally Sourced Food • Selections and Themed Stations • Boutique Wines • Cigar Rollers • And more...!

Tickets available online: www.odessabrewfest.com VIP Tickets: $70

l General Admission: $50 l Designated Driver Tickets Available at Gate: $15

Participating Breweries* 3rd Wave

Cisco

Flying Dog

Long Trail

Rogue

Sly Fox

Troegs

16 Mile

Dogfish Head

Flying Fish

Mispillion River

Starr Hill

Twin Lakes

21st Amendment

New Belgium

Sea Dog

DuClaw Elysian

Fordham & Dominion Heavy Seas

Shiner

Stewarts

Uinta

Shipyard

Stone

Victory

Oskar Blues

Sierra Nevada

Stoudts

Weyerbacher

Otter Creek

Sixpoint

Tall Tales

Yards

Allagash

Eurobrew Imports

Belukus Imports

Evil Genius

Brooklyn

Evolution

No Li NorthCoast

Lagunitas Lancaster Brewing

*Subject to change

For more information: 302-378-4119 www.odessabrewfest.com www.historicodessa.org

www.cantwells-tavern.com

Event Sponsors:

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POLISH FESTIVAL

SEPTEMBER 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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presents the

LOOP FRI, SEPT. 23, 2016 $5 Cover (includes admittance to all spots & free shuttle bus service)

Benefits Urban Bike Project ANEJO • CATHERINE ROONEY’S • CHELSEA TAVERN DEAD PRESIDENTS • ERNEST & SCOTT TAPROOM FIRESTONE • GALLUCIO’S CAFE • GROTTO PIZZA KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE • LAVISH TIMOTHY’S RIVERFRONT TROLLEY OYSTER HOUSE

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Out & About Magazine September 2016