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Our Craft Beer Issue A Salute to Tried and True Taverns Cross Over to the Dark Side of Beer Evolving Tastes Drive Craft Beer Growth

Colorful CRAFT

Wilmington Beer Week & Other Tasty Endeavors

NOVEMBER 2013 CO M P L I M E N TA R Y VOL. 26 | NO. 7

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personalized education. affordable tuition. Crystal Rush

B.S. in Organizational Management, 2013 | M.B.A. student

Earn an MBA that’s relevant in the marketplace. Theory meets practice in Wilmington University’s IACBE-accredited MBA programs. Students learn to analyze critical business challenges and create innovative strategic plans under the direction of faculty with real-world experience. Gain the skills you need to meet the changing demands of the global business market. WilmU programs fit your life, with flexible schedules, multiple classroom locations, and 100% online options. Classes start every eight weeks. Apply today at wilmu.edu/MBA

1-877-456-7003 | wilmu.edu/MBA Wilmington University is a private, nonprofit institution and member of the Delaware Alliance for Nonprofit Advancement (DANA). 2 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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2 INSIDE

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magazine

26

Out & About Magazine Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

our staff Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com

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Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net

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Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com Director of Sales Marie Graham Poot • mgraham@tsnpub.com Creative Direction & Production Management Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. matt@catvis.biz Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. tyler@catvis.biz Contributing Designer Carlton Morrison Contributing Writers Matt Amis, Krista Connor, Mark Fields, Pam George, Rob Kalesse, John Leyh, Robert Lhulier, Allan McKinley, J. Burke Morrison, John Murray, Larry Nagengast, Scott Pruden Contributing Photographers Joe del Tufo, Tim Hawk, Les Kipp, Danielle Quigley, Matt Urban Special Projects John Holton, Kelly Loeb

what’s inside START

LISTEN

7 War On Words

56 Tuned In

9 FYI

13 Worth Trying

63 Thanksgiving Classics

19 Stocking Stuffers 21 Winter Parties Contest

37 Harry’s Turns 25

For many customers the craft brew revolution is all about the palate By Scott Pruden

59 Reviews

15 Day Trippin’

EAT

22 Taste For Success

WATCH

11 By the Numbers

FEATURES

26 The Dark Side Cold weather calls for beers with color and character

PLAY

By Rob Kalesse

65 Delaware’s Oldest Bars 73 Snap Shots

33 King For A Week Crafts take centerstage in third annual Wilmington Beer Week

39 Ernest & Scott Redo

By Krista Connor

DRINK 65 Tried and True Taverns

51 Lunar Ale 53 Winter Brews

Cover photo by Joe del Tufo

A salute to Delaware’s longstanding icons By Pam George

For editorial & advertising information: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 Website: outandaboutnow.com Email: contact@tsnpub.com NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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130 Years of Promoting Self-Sufficiency!

Then

Now

During World War I, residents of Little Italy set up garden plots in the Lincoln Street (now Francis Father Tucker) Park.

Today, 100 community gardeners tend 65 garden plots atop the Rodney Street Reservoir in Wilmington.

Since 1883, West End has encouraged youth development through sports and recreation.

In 2012, our track team placed first at a national meet with CJ Cochran ranking 1st in the nation for the Young Mens 400m Hurdles. He later received a full, four-year scholarship to Delaware State University.

West End has promoted youth literacy and education since 1883.

Nearly 400 of our youth advanced a grade or educational level in 2012.

West End’s primary purpose has always been to serve the community.

We serve over 9,000 people every year, including this little guy!

For more information or to get involved, call us at 302-658-4171 or visit us online at www.westendnh.org.

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2 START 2

A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

And the Winner Is . . . In September, we challenged readers to tackle the many problems in this sentence from an article in a Chicago magazine about U.S. and Canadian cities: The Quad Cities are a group of five American cities, who are on the Iowa-Illinois' border across the Mississippi River, in the United States. We had several close-but-no-cigar entries, but after much deliberation we decided to award the prize – a $25 gift certificate to Chelsea Tavern in Wilmington – to Ann Foster of Newark. Here’s how she rewrote the sentence: The Quad Cities are four American cities on the Iowa-Illinois border on the Mississippi River. Actually, while Ann has taken care of all the grammar and punctuation issues in the sentence, her answer – like all of the entries – contains one error. That’s understandable, because “quad” means four, so one assumes that there are four cities involved, not five. But due to a regional history that’s too involved to get into, “Quad Cities” actually does refer to five municipalities: Davenport and Bettendorf, Iowa, and Rock Island, Moline and East Moline, Ill. One note: while other entries were correct grammar and punctuation-wise, they eliminated information, such as “American” (Remember, U.S. and Canadian cities were being discussed), or the fact that they were on the Mississippi River. Our congratulations to Ann, and thanks to all who entered. Media Watch From the News Journal: •“According to reports from the scene, the male victim was taken to the hospital by private vehicle before police arrived with multiple wounds to the upper torso.” Gotta give the cops credit, they did their job despite those wounds. •“Past and present restaurant owners will share their culinary histories and antidotes as part of the Beach Eats Exhibit . . .” We’re hoping the restaurateurs were telling anecdotes, and their food did not require antidotes (delawareonline).

Words of the Month

factotum

Pronounced fak-to-tum, it’s a noun meaning a person having many diverse activities or responsibilities; a general servant.

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By Bob Yearick

•“But local banks all over the country...opted to participate in the TARP program to sure up their finances . . .” The term is “shore up.” •In “Dialogue Delaware,” the author scored a trifecta: woman is spelled “women”; the dreaded “still/yet” construction reared its ugly, redundant head—“Attorney General Beau still has yet to make a public appearance”—and the superfluous “every single one” showed up. The Sports Department Confusion over amount/number continues apace in sports pages. Take Jeff McLane in The Philadelphia Inquirer, for instance: “[Nate Allen] was the safety with the least amount of mistakes.” If it’s plural or you can count it, use number—and fewest. Also, all sports talkers on both TV and radio say “could have went.” It’s could have gone, people! Oddity Remember when we pointed out that the term is “guy wire,” not “guide wire”? In a similar vein, the spelling is “chaise longue,” not “chaise lounge.” The item in question is a small couch (or “fainting sofa”). Chaise longue (literally “long chair”) is pronounced—roughly—“shezz lohng” in French, with a hard G on the end. In English it became “shayz long.” Many speakers, however, confuse French chaise with English “chase” and French longue with English “lounge,” resulting in the mispronunciation “chase lounge.” Literally of the Month Chris Berman, who has become a parody of himself on ESPN, said this about Robert Griffin III, the Washington Redskins quarterback: “He turned the Skins around on a dime, literally.” Chris just couldn’t bring himself to say that RG3 turned them around in an amazingly short time.

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

interlocutor

Pronounced in-tuhr-LOK-yuh-tuhr, it’s a noun meaning one who takes part in a conversation or dialogue, especially as a representative of an organization.

10/24/13 1:18 PM


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Three singer-songwriters demonstrate the variety, versatility of traditional American music

Special Guest:

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Arden Concert Gild, The Green Willow, Brandywine Friends of Oldtime Music, and the Latino Community Advisory Council are valued partners for many performances in the 2013-14 season.

Host your next Business Meeting at TheGrand Call 302.652.1179 8 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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www.thegrandwilmington.org/Rentals/Special-Events

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F.Y.I. Things you absolutely need to know

FIGHTING LYME DISEASE Victim’s birthday becomes benefit event

F

EARLESS: A Fight Against Lyme is a 35th birthday party and benefit for Sarah Davenport, an area woman who endured extreme physical hardship over the past 25 years, including two miscarriages, from misdiagnoses that finally led to the correct diagnosis in September— Lyme disease. On Saturday, Dec. 7, at 7 p.m. at Arden Gild Hall, guests can support Davenport and help raise awareness about Lyme disease. An open bar and buffet, kids’ activities, and live entertainment featuring The Glimmer Twins Rolling Stones Tribute Band are included. There also will be a silent auction that will include signed Rolling Stones memorabilia, an authentic mint-condition Gibson Les Paul guitar, and limited edition photography and art by Davenport, and wine and beer from Ward's Fine Wines and Twin Lakes Brewery. Tickets are $35 in advance and $50 the day of. Kids ages 10 and under get in free with an adult ticket purchase. To learn more about Sarah's story, visit and share her page at gofundme. com/4qqydk.

MISPILLION RIVER BREWING New Milford brewery opens Nov. 15

T

he first batches are being prepped at Mispillion River Brewing in Milford, the newest Delaware brewery. After two years of planning, brewing and tasting, the brewery will be opened Friday, Nov. 15, by husband-andwife founders Eric and Megan Williams. Quality is key to Mispillion, and the founders want their customers to walk away knowing the highest quality ingredients have been used. For more information, visit mispillionriverbrewing.com.

KICKOFF AGAINST CANCER Sixth annual fundraiser set for Nov. 23

W

hen a field goal attempt falls way short during a football game, have you ever shouted at the television screen something like “How could you miss that—I could have hit that”? Well, now’s your chance— Saturday, Nov. 23, at the Brandywine Youth Club Facility in Garnet Valley. That’s when the sixth annual Tom Bogush Foundation’s Kickoff Against Cancer will be held. For a $25 donation ($10 for children ages 13 and under), kickers of all ages can try a gamewinner while helping the National Brain Tumor foundation.   Prizes, food and other activities will be provided, ensuring that even if you’ve never kicked the can, kicked a habit, or kicked some butt, you’ll still get a kick out of this competition. For more information or to reserve a spot, contact John Driban at jmdriban@ yahoo.com or call 610-733-7683.

2

HIKE ACROSS DELAWARE Wilmington Trail Club hosts 20th annual 14-miler

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aturday, Nov. 2, will mark two decades of the Wilmington Trail Club’s annual 14-mile hike across the width of the First State, from the Maryland state line near Chesapeake City to Delaware City. This year, participants can check in at the gazebo in Delaware City between 8 and 8:45 a.m., when boarding begins for the bus ride to the starting point at the Maryland state line near Chesapeake City. The group will then hike along the north side of the C&D Canal to the Delaware River. The route lies mainly on land designated as the Canal Wildlife Zone. At the eight-mile checkpoint at St. Georges, food, drinks and rest rooms will be available, and hikers have the option to be transported back to their vehicles. East of St. Georges, the route leaves the canal, enters the woods, and circles a marina. Then it returns to the canal and continues toward historic Delaware City on Clinton Street. The fee is $13 for WTC members and $16 for nonmembers, which covers the cost of shuttle bus transportation, restrooms, a t-shirt, and refreshments, including a 20th anniversary cake. For more information and to sign up, visit wilmingtontrailclub.org. ►

NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START

to n o s a e S e h ‘Tis t

FYI continued from page 9

E T A R B CELE

GOLDEN HOPS Stewart’s receives gold medal in prestigious national competition

ThE PERFECT PARTy

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• Venues to accommodate 20 - 1,500 people • Inclusive packages for 100 or more guests Contact our Banquet Team at 302.994.2521 ext. 7212 or via email: banquetmanagement@delawarepark.com

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tewart’s Brewing Company in Bear recently claimed a gold medal at the 2013 Great American Beer Festival (GABF) competition, which recognizes the most outstanding beers produced in the United States. The top three winners in 84 beer-style categories were announced Oct. 12 at the awards ceremony at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver. Stewart’s won the Belgian-style Strong Specialty Ale category with its Stumblin’ Monk, a golden ale weighing in at 9.2% ABV. This is the third major award for the beer, which captured silver and bronze awards at the World Beer Cup in 2002 and 2006. The 2013 GABF competition winners were selected by an international panel of 201 experts from the record number of 4,809 entries from 745 U.S. breweries. For more information, visit stewartsbrewingcompany com.

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by the numbers A few facts about the beer brewing industry

2,483 Number of craft breweries operated for some or all of 2012, the highest total since the 1880s.

1980s The decade that marked the beginning of micro-brewing.

31 Number of gallons of beer in a barrel.

1040

4

Number of primary ingredients in craft beer: water, malted barley, hops and yeast.

Year the Weihenstephan brewery in Freising, Bavaria, is believed to have been established, making it the oldest existing brewery with a traceable history.

10

Most Americans live within this number of miles from a craft brewer.

NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Worth Trying Random suggestions from our staff and readers

Rise Up Coffee In our Annual Beer Issue, I recommended Evolution’s Rise Up Stout for our Suds Worth Sipping section. Now I want to recommend the coffee that the beer is brewed with, Rise Up Coffee. As I wrote back in July, it’s my favorite coffee shop in my hometown of Salisbury, Md., not only because they have a convenient drive-thru, but I think they arguably produce the best coffee in the region. My favorite is their House Roast blend, which is a medium-roasted coffee that is full-bodied, with notes of caramel and chocolate (I pick up at least two bags whenever I’m down there for a visit). And if you find yourself at one of their three locations on the Eastern Shore, I highly recommend their Coffee Smoothie; it’s life changing. But if you're not down south anytime soon, you can buy the coffee online at RiseUpCoffee.com.

The Sermon at World Cafe Live I caught a set by The Sermon recently during their monthly "Hump Nite" performance at World Cafe Live at The Queen. I was blown away and can't wait for their next performance on Wednesday, Nov. 20. If you are a fan of funk, soul, or jazz, the monthly show at The Queen is absolutely worth trying.

— Tyler Mitchell, Graphic Designer, O&A

Michael Palin: Around the World in 80 Days

— Jeremy Hebbel, Gable Music Ventures

Hello Ladies

More than a decade before The Amazing Race, the BBC aired this like-minded, high-concept series, with Monty Python’s Michael Palin as himself taking up the mantle of Jules Verne’s Phileas Fogg in a race around the world. In the pilot, Palin ponders his challenge: He has 80 days in which to circumnavigate the globe utilizing only transportation that was available in 1873, the time when Jules Verne published his popular adventure. Watch Palin hobnob with the rich and famous aboard the Orient Express, clean the canals of Venice with the local sanitation department, and ride a camel in the shadow of The Great Pyramid of Egypt. But keep up: That’s just the first showand-a-half. Available through Netflix.

Stephen Merchant, the lanky, bespectacled British actor/writer who played Ricky Gervais’ totally useless agent in Extras, brings his goofy hubris to this HBO show. Merchant, who is also co-creator of the series, plays Stuart, an Englishman looking for love in Los Angeles. Stuart’s penchant for cringe-worthy opening lines—“What are you wearing?—and too-long hugs for women he has just met lead to sure-fire failure with the ladies. He uses his forlorn friend, Wade (Nate Torrence), who is in the midst of a separation from his wife, as a wing man when convenient, and abandons him when he sees better opportunities. The one poignant note: Stuart returns home alone each evening, first stopping for a late-night microwaveable meal to devour in his lonely house, from whose rooftop he can just barely see the H in the “Hollywood” sign.

— Jim Miller, Director of Publications, O&A

— Bob Yearick, Contributing Editor, O&A

Have something you think is worth trying? Send an email to Jim with your suggestion by scanning this QR code ► (jmiller@tsnpub.com)

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14 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DAY Trippin’ This narrow little state and the surrounding areas conceal many fun, quirky and fascinating destinations. Sometimes we just have to veer off the highways to find them. That’s what Day Trippin’ is all about. Have ideas? Send them to Krista at kconnor@tsnpub.com.

PENNSYLVANIA RENAISSANCE FAIRE had been a gypsy in 16th century England for less than five minutes and already my sister’s halfwit lad of a boyfriend wandered into the town’s only jail cell, guided by shouts of encouragement from the guard; he would only be released if he’d “perform a jest” for her. Naturally, Jimmy offered to twerk his way to freedom. “Yes, against the cell wall,” said the female guard, who wore a Renaissance peasant dress. Although it was the year 1588, she must have been quite wellversed in tactless 21st century dance moves. “I can’t do that,” Jimmy replied, his courage gone. “That’s okay, the idea was jest enough,” the guard responded. Her mock accent was heavy and convincing as she let him go. The Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire is a place where anything is permissible, save for (real-life) violence, debauchery and crime. It’s a land set aside for people who have retained their childhood love for dress-up and fantasy; for people who like a face-to-face interaction with history, one that can be breathed in and touched. For each of the past 33 years, this Renaissance town, the Shire of Mount Hope—located in the woods and fields of

I

By Krista Connor

Mount Hope Estate and Winery in Manheim—has come to life as thousands flock to its gates every weekend from August to October. On this October weekend, citizens of the Shire—members of the Faire staff in Renaissance costumes—filled the streets with improvised songs, swordplay, begging, bantering, or hurling insults and innuendos at each other as well as passersby. One peasant, covered in filth and ratty clothes, lay behind a bush holding a string that stretched across a portion of the walkway, connected to a box. He was waiting for the opportune moment to pull the string and trip someone, while people walked over and around it without even noticing him. One little girl noticed, though, and as her parents stood by she kicked the box, ruining the man’s trap. “Hey! Fix it! Fix it, you little brat!” the peasant shouted angrily while the girl skipped away. A little later, another costumed staff member walked by, and the peasant pulled the string and started a scene that ended with a lashing. ►

NOVEMBER2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRIVE FOR DELAWARE WIN A 2014 KIA SOUL! Increase your annual donation by $52 to United Way of Delaware and be entered to win a 2014 KIA SOUL.

Last Year’s Winner: Linda DiSabatino

To donate online or for complete details, visit www.uwde.org.

AMERICAN MODERNS, 1910–1960: FROM O’KEEFFE TO ROCKWELL OCTObER 12, 2013 – JanuaRy 5, 2014 Drawn from the Brooklyn Museum’s renowned American art collection, this impressive exhibition features work by Milton Avery, Stuart Davis, Max Weber, Georgia O’Keeffe, Norman Rockwell, and Grandma Moses. 2301 Kentmere Parkway | Wilmington, DE 19806 302.571.9590 | delart.org 2 Yellow Leaves (Yellow Leaves), 1928. Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986). Oil on canvas, 40 x 30 1/8 inches. Brooklyn Museum, Bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe, 87.136.6. | American Moderns, 1910–1960: From O’Keeffe to Rockwell has been organized by the Brooklyn Museum. The Delaware Art Museum’s presentation of this exhibition is generously supported by the Johannes R. and Betty P. Krahmer American Art Exhibition Fund, DuPont, Wilmington Trust, and individual donors. Additional support is provided by grants from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency dedicated to nurturing and supporting the arts in Delaware, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts.

16 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START DAY TRIPPIN' continued from page 15

Left to right: The Circus Vagabonds keep the crowd breathless with their tricks; lively bands perform traditional folk and Celtic music; the Ultimate Joust at Bosworth Field turns into a battle for the throne.

Twenty-four Royal Kitchens dotted the Shire, with names like The Celtic Kitchen, Tutberry’s Tuber Tavern, and Die Deutsche Kuche. Swashbuckler beer and wine were also available at eight ale houses (Red Beard’s Irish Red, a malty Amber Ale, and the hot cider—good!). The words on the not-quite-authentic plastic cups effectively summed up the Faire’s mocking, jovial mood: “Life, alas, is very drear. Up with the glass! Down with the beer!” About 90 shows and musical performances filled the day. At the Shakespeare Globe, Scottish band Albannach performed ancient tribal war songs and haunting ballads, taking listeners back to a time when, allegedly, pipes and songs were banned because of their power to stir hearts. The Mud Squad bickered and threw each other into a mud pit, and Circus Vagabonds showed off acrobatic skills, one of them even balancing on an acrobatic swing while juggling three torches. Dozens of artisans’ booths and huts were scattered throughout town; Renaissance clothing, incense, clay flutes, soaps, pottery, books about sorcery or past centuries, and more were for sale. Besides good ale and good company, what’s one thing every Renaissance village apparently needs? An elephant, of course. Once we realized it was there, my friends and I rushed across town to the corral to make a dream come true. There, lumbering along in a life of walking in circles with (primarily) children on its back, was the beautiful, stinky, tragic beast. My friend Kristen and I got in line, and soon enough we were awkwardly climbing onto the giant’s back. From my newfound viewpoint, I realized we weren’t very far from civilization after all. I could see the road nearby. I waved to passing cars. In the meantime the elephant’s backbone jabbed at our tailbones with each lengthy stride, and within a minute the ride was over and we were climbing off the creature’s back. I wondered if African warrior queens or Indian princesses astride such beasts in years past also felt that riding an elephant wasn’t a particularly exhilarating experience. Our encounter with the pachyderm complete, we hied ourselves to the wine tasting. Free tastings were available at Bacchus’ Retreat, a pavilion run by sweaty men and women in winestained linen shifts and trousers. A contrast to any wine tasting I’ve ever been to, there was lots of crowding, chaos and shouts from the wine samplers. I was actually starting to wonder if the mean, intimidating guy giving us samples wasn’t acting anymore when he warned me that he hated having to pull the same bottle out twice within a few minutes. After a few samples, I grabbed my final one, Honey Mead, a sweet wine made with Lancaster County Honey, and sidestepped the heck out of there.

The year 1588 was a time of peace in England, although unrest lurked just outside its borders in Ireland. Based loosely on real events, the Faire tells the story of Pirate Queen Grace O’Malley, who had come to face Her Majesty and state her case for the freedom of Red Hugh O’Donnell, leader of the Irish rebellion, who had been captured by the Queen. As evening fell and the crowd gathered at Bosworth Field for the Ultimate Joust between an English and an Irish knight, there was palpable tension in the air. A young guy wearing breeches and a blue and red cotton shirt balanced atop a fence, egging on the crowd, which cheered its loyalty to the Queen while jeering at the Irish. Loud, pulse-quickening music filled the air. And when the knights rode their horses onto the field and began to joust, shouts of encouragement or rage rang out from the crowd—and it didn’t feel like make-believe anymore. Even the little boy behind me—wearing a kilt, his faces covered in juice stains—was roaring. “On this day I ride for three reasons,” shouted the amply-bearded English Sir William atop his white steed. “My father in heaven, my country, and you.” He indicated us, the crowd—“My people.” That final gesture transported the crowd to another time and place, and we became a part of it, shouting and booing as if the knights’ very lives were at stake. Forget that most of us were wielding iPhones to snap pictures—these passionate actors had the power to convince us, if even for a few hours, that we were part of another world. Definitely worth the $30 entrance fee. Things started to go wrong in fiction world when the Irish knight got too sassy, leading a revolt of peasants and soldiers directly to the Queen’s throne. Cannon blasts (pyrotechnics) and smoke burst out during the quick hand-to-hand battle involving all of the characters. Soon Grace O’Malley saved the Queen’s life, which led to a truce, and the evil Irish knight was stabbed to death by heroic Sir William. The crowd and actors gathered at the Globe Theatre for a final hour of Celtic jigs and English songs, music and laughter before driving home, pulling off the costumes, and preparing for the next day’s nine to five.

Although the Faire season is over until next August, Mount Hope hosts events year round, including Poe Evermore, a glimpse into the world of Edgar Allan Poe through Nov. 10; a Christmas Open House from Nov. 28-Dec. 1; and a Dickens of a Christmas play from Dec. 4-23. Visit parenfaire.com for more details. NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Shop Mamie (Various Pricing)

The ladies at Shop Mamie recently opened a boutique in Trolley Square. They sell cute, affordable clothes and accessories including jewelry, bags, and scarves. Shop Mamie is a great spot to grab gifts for ladies of all ages on your holiday shopping list. —Marie Graham Poot

Delaware Lottery Tickets ($1–$5)

Who doesn't love finding theses guys in their stockings? Instantly amp up the suspense with a few scratch-offs. You may end up spreading some serious Christmas cheer! — Staff

CTC Tickets (Various Pricing)

A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

The War on Words ($9.95)

Language lovers will treasure this collection of War on Words columns (OK, maybe I’m slightly prejudiced). A lesson on every page. Order yours at outandaboutnow.com. — Bob Yearick

Stuff It! Stumped for gift ideas? Try these budget-friendly suggestions.

Imagine what would happen if the original cast of Saturday Day Night Live had children with the grown-up members of The Partridge Family. You’d probably get a talented and funny group of actors and singers who resemble the local stars of City Theater Company. If last season’s productions such as Bat Boy: The Musical, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson and Xanadu were an indication of where this group is headed, then their opener last month, Jesus Christ Superstar, was the exclamation point to that observation. Compared to other larger-budgeted arts outfits, the CTC does more with less while nurturing a core of local talent worth watching. Tickets to their performances would make a great Christmas gift for anyone who appreciates good theater. —Jim Miller

Teavana Loose Teas ($5-$50)

Tea makes my soul happy any time of year. But sharing a steaming cup of peppermint tea with friends or family while snow falls outside and Christmas lights twinkle--well, it's perfection. — Krista Connor

Gift Of Landscaping (Many Value Options) Rabbit Wine Aerator & Pourer ($25)

You don’t need to be a sommelier to know that exposing wine to oxygen (“letting it breathe”), enhances the taste. Using a decanter is wonderful if you have the time (it also removes the sediment), but a wine aerator is quick and easy to use. —Jerry duPhily

Surprise those on your list by helping them plan for the spring. Go to www. GiftOfLandscaping.com for discounted gift cards to put toward upcoming exterior projects. They're even delivered as a unique USB credit card in a nice little gift box! Fancy! — Matthew Loeb

NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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GROWLER BAR IS OPEN!

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START Catch 5 Days of Great Films! Featuring 100 of the finest independent features, documentaries, and short films.

SHARE YOUR GREAT WINTER PARTY IDEA

Seminars and cultural events complete the experience.

Complete descriptions and schedule online at www.rehobothfilm.com

Wed-Sun, Nov 6–10 at the beach!

You could win a dinner party for eight at Piccolina Toscana

A

s the holidays draw to a close at the end of December, winter turns dreary and January, February, March and, yes, at least part of April, stretch endlessly before those of us in the Northeast. Short days force us inside, where we do our best to fend off cabin fever until spring has once again sprung. One thing that helps to reduce the winter-time blues are house parties, especially those that are creative and different. We’re talking about parties with themes. For instance, we know one group that holds an annual party where everyone brings a bottle of wine and judges an assortment of homemade soups. You can also have dress-up parties, with themes like Mad Men or the Roaring ‘20s. We’d like to hear your best party ideas for these fun winter get-togethers. Describe them in 100 words or less and send them to jduphily@tsnpub.com. The best idea will receive a dinner party for eight at Piccolina Toscana (Wilmington). The menu will be farm inspired and entrees will be served family-style. The dinner party is valued at more than $330. The deadline is Dec. 10, so get your party cap on and send in your most creative thoughts.

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Westtown - Rt. 3 1646 West Chester Pike West Chester, PA 19382 (610) 431-1410 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EVOLVING TASTES DRIVE CRAFT BEER GROWTH For many customers, the craft brew revolution is all about the palate By Scott Pruden

Photo Joe del Tufo

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Photo Tim Hawk

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Steve Powell, owner and head brewer of Argilla Brewing Company at Pietro’s Pizza in Newark.

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teve Powell’s inspiration to start his own brewery grew from an unlikely place—a pizza shop trade magazine. As part of the family that ran various Pietro’s locations around Wilmington since the mid-1970s, Powell knew pizza almost from the day he was born. But because of the quick-dining or take-out focus of the restaurants, offering even big-name beers as a beverage wasn’t really an option. Then one day about 10 years ago, inspiration struck. “There was this story about [the brewpub] the Moose’s Tooth in Anchorage, Alaska,” Powell says. “These two guys went to school together down in Washington and then moved up to Anchorage and wanted to open up a brewpub.” The story described how the two decided on a menu of pizza to go along with the craft brews. “And I thought, ‘That sounds pretty cool. I’d like to have a craft brew pizzeria,” he says. “And not really thinking I was going to do it, I went and bought a homebrew kit and messed around with it a little bit.” His early efforts met with mixed success. But as batches improved, word spread. Soon he and his homebrewing friends were throwing parties that included both homemade pizza and beer.

When he decided he wanted to combine pizza and beer on a larger scale, the first place Powell considered was the former Pietro’s location in Pike Creek. “There was space there for 1 ½ barrels, but if we wanted to expand there was nowhere to go,” he says. A space in Meadowood Shopping Center on Kirkwood Highway, meanwhile, was available and held promise. “It was close to where we’d been in Pike Creek for 22 years, and it had the space to not only put the brewery in but expand as well.” That site became Argilla Brewery at Pietro’s Pizza, which now produces about five barrels of craft beers a week, supplying six of its eight taps with in-house brews like East of England English pale ale and Queen’s Way IPA and filling out the remaining two with offerings from other local microbreweries. Meanwhile, Powell is on the lookout for another location that might provide more production capacity. Powell’s story is not unlike that of many of today’s larger craft brewers—just some guys who started brewing beer in their basements or garages with the encouragement of friends and under their wives’ dubious eyes. ► NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS EVOLVING TASTES DRIVE CRAFT BEER GROWTH continued from previous page

WINTER IS COMING

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ALL WINTER LONG AT PREMIER!

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But as the number of small breweries grows in Delaware and around the country, different business models for those guys—and women—in craft brewing are emerging. Consider these figures from the Brewers Association, a craft brewer advocacy group based in Boulder, Colo.: In 2012 craft brewers made up 6.5 percent of the total U.S. beer market by volume—up from 5.7 in 2011—and 10.2 percent in sales. In addition, 2012 saw an 18 percent increase in the number of craft breweries in operation, topping out at more than 2,400 nationwide. Joe Satran, writing for Huffington Post Small Business, took those numbers and extrapolated this intriguing but unlikely scenario: if the 2012 trend continues, craft breweries will outpace brewing giants Anheuser-Busch and MillerCoors before 2050. Claus Hagelman, who left the wine world to work as the head of marketing at 16 Mile Brewery in Georgetown, believes that realistically the craft brew industry could capture more like 25 percent of the overall market. He suggests that any major victory by the craft brewing industry would come both as a result of growth and of the larger brewers being forced to cut underperforming brands and offer deep discounts to save their names. In the same story, Satran and others cast doubt on those figures, noting that after a surge in the 1990s, craft brewing shrank nationally. But with each step back for the craft brewing industry, there are a few steps forward based on something the Big 2 brewers can’t seem to anticipate—the evolution of the beer drinker’s taste. In that regard, Hagelman points to what has happened with the beer business since World War II. By the 1960s, local and regional breweries whose recipes harkened back to traditional German pilsners were gradually challenged by stalwarts like Budweiser and Miller, who became more focused on lighter, highly-carbonated beers designed for the broadest possible customer base. That shift, paired with the mega brewers’ monumental focus on TV advertising starting in the early 1970s, accomplished two things. First, it essentially killed the tradition of the “hometown beer” that relied on a drinker’s taste buds and regional loyalty. Second, because of the massive budgets required to maintain their TV campaigns, the big brewers began to focus more on the entertainment value of commercials to motivate customers to buy their brands. What’s driving the growth of craft beer business, Hagelman says, is a complete reversal of that philosophy on the part of craft beer brewers and drinkers. Because those brewers prefer to put their money back into their beers, advertising and marketing budgets run lean. “If I have to tell you it’s good then I’m wasting my money,” Hagelman says. “Word of mouth is more how we get the message out, talking about what makes us unique and saying, ‘This is why we do what we do.’” For customers, “the craft revolution is all about palate,” he says, with younger beer drinkers proving less susceptible to big advertising campaigns and realizing that, like wine, beer can have its own flavor profile and deep complexities. It’s also about more independent thinking, with customers less concerned with what a beer says about them than what it’s saying to their taste buds. “A cutout of a girl in a bikini is not going to make young people drink a beer anymore,” Hagelman says.

24 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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And when it comes to craft brews, that growing appreciation for flavor and rejection of the conventional is a tide that lifts all ships, from Milton-based Dogfish Head, which delights in pushing the limits of what beer can be, to those focused on a product that appeals to a wider audience, such as Twin Lakes Brewing Co. in Greenville. Perhaps on the opposite end of the spectrum from Argilla Brewing and its tiny tanks tucked in the corner of a pizza restaurant is Twin Lakes’ co-founder and CEO Sam Hobbs. He took the old tractor shed on his family farm and converted it into a 25-barrel brewery, where he uses the pure and mineral-rich water from the site’s deep rock artesian well to produce his ales and lagers. The details of the property only add to the brewery’s colorful history. The 252-acre Twin Lakes Farm, its working buildings and several family homes sit on and among some of northern Delaware’s best real estate—just a quick drive from Centreville and Winterthur. What’s more, it has been in the family almost as long as we’ve been a nation (while planning the Battle of the Brandywine, George Washington is said to have tied up his horse to a tree that still stands). The brewery’s tasting room was formerly the art studio of duPont scion and artist George “Frolic” Weymouth, who also happens to be Hobbs’ uncle. For Hobbs, the business of craft brewing comes down to some specific goals: making a few premium brews that can appeal to a broad palate; using only grain, yeast, full-flower hops and water as ingredients; and keeping things local. The first two jobs fall very much to Rob Pfeiffer and Jess Doyen, head and assistant brewers, respectively. While Pfeiffer— bearded and 50-ish—in many ways represents the old guard of craft brewing, Doyen—20ish and, most notably, female—is the living image of craft brewing’s newest customer base. Doyen’s initial interest in brewing came from a long love of craft beer. It’s a preference shared among many of her female peers and one that she’s seen growing among the general public. “There are so many girls now at beer festivals,” she says. “At this thing we just did in Manayunk, there were maybe a few more men, but there were a lot of women.” Female drinkers and brewers make up a growing segment of the business, so much so that a group of female brewers have formed the Pink Boots Society, based in Denver, to bring attention to women in brewing, foster and promote careers for women in brewing, and award their achievements. For Twin Lakes, its growing base of customers—both male and female—is fostered by CFO and administrator Carol Tedesco, who handles many of the brewery’s day-to-day functions. She sees the growing interest from women even from her back office, and the expanding base of female customers hasn’t escaped Hobbs’ notice, either. “You’ve got to remember,” he says, “a lot of women want to drink beer now, but there are very few women that come in and say, ‘I want an IPA.’ Most of them come to these brew festivals and they’re drinking cider. The reality is there are different preferences.” “I think they’re there. They’re coming. But it’s still traditionally a guys’ universe,” he says. “There are definitely more and more women whose palates are opening up to some of the craft brewing industry. They’re going for lighter tasting beers, but ones that are more full-flavored. The ones who are beer drinkers are confident beer drinkers.”

HOME BREWING GETS A

Feminine Touch

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ho makes up the next segment of passionate beer drinkers who decide to brew their own at home? How about your mom? And your sister. And possibly your daughter. “Women do like beer,” says Marlana Gallo, who co-owns How Do You Brew?, a home brewing and winemaking shop in Newark, with her husband, Joe. “Sometimes we see women brewing with their spouse, so it’s an interest they can share together, but that’s not always the case. We do have women coming in and brewing on their own just because they can.” A former mass-market beer drinker, Gallo admits that it took her a while to come around to craft beers. Many women say the same, she says, but then they were attracted by the complexity of craft beers. “It’s not that [the big beers] are bad, but they just don’t have the oomph,” she says. The interest in home brewing is coming both from a growing preference for craft brews thanks to their wide availability, and also to the growing do-it-yourself ethos. “You taste what’s out there and you think, ‘Hmm, that’s pretty good.’ And then you find out you can make it,” Gallo says. “So it’s all about the taste and what you can do yourself.” In addition, there’s the opportunity to share your work with friends and peers. Groups like the First State Brewers hold monthly meetings where beers are shared and critiqued. —Scott Pruden

NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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CROSS OVER TO THE Cold weather calls for beer with color and character By Rob Kalesse

Photo Joe del Tufo

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inter approaches. The weather is getting colder and each day gets shorter as skies grow dark a little earlier. But rather than fight the oncoming cold and darkness, why not embrace it? Why not welcome the happy holidays on the calendar, the bonding with friends, and—especially—the dark beers that are on their way? Afraid of the dark, you say? Well there’s nothing to be scared of in a robust porter or a silky stout. But don’t take our word for it. Instead, listen to this six-pack of local folks whose recommendations will have you celebrating the dark side. ► NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS CROSS OVER TO THE DARK SIDE continued from page 27

My goodness! My Guinness? Brian Finn, head brewer at Iron Hill – Wilmington, and Ric Hoffman, head brewer at Stewart’s Brewing Company in Bear, both teach beer classes to new employees when the newbies arrive at their respective establishments. And with every class, Finn and Hoffman set the record straight: Guinness is basically a light beer. “People get so hung up on the idea that, just because Guinness is opaque, it must be a heavy beer,” says Hoffman. “But the classic draft is practically a light beer, in terms of body and alcohol. If you closed your eyes and drank it, you wouldn’t know you were drinking a black beer.” Compare a 12-ounce glass of Guinness with 12 ounces of Miller Lite, and the numbers are very close. The classic dry Irish stout comes in at 125 calories, while a 12-ounce can of the “original light beer” has only 29 fewer. “A lot of beer drinkers have been force-fed this yellow, fizzy lager all their lives, so when it comes to a dark beer, they think it must be full of calories and alcohol, and must be too bitter or too roasty,” Finn says. “But there’s a whole world waiting out there where coffee, chocolate and vanilla help with a smooth transition from light to dark.”

New Happy Hour Selections

Find Your Flavor Profile Stop thinking about beer for a minute. Do you drink coffee? How about bourbon? Do you eat oatmeal? Do you love chocolate, or do you prefer vanilla? If you answered yes to any of those questions, then there is a dark beer out there with some of your favorite flavors incorporated in the brew. Tim Crowley, general manager at Kelly’s Logan House in Trolley Square, finds that a bourbon-aged beer makes for an easy transition, because “the sweetness produced by a bourbon-aged barrel will counter the roastiness of a dark malt beer.” Finn says he likes to flip the spectrum on beer drinkers who are uneasy about going to the dark side. “I’ll go with something like the Tröegs Java Head, which puts the focus on the coffee and chocolate notes. That way we’re focusing on the flavor rather than the color.” The Java Head is one of many stouts that features chocolate and coffee in the flavor profile, but it’s also a style that includes a traditional breakfast dish: oatmeal. ►

New Seasonal Cocktails New Fall Menu

2216 Penn. Ave. • Wilmington, DE 19806 302.571.1492 • www.ColumbusInn.com NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WILMINGTON BEER WEEK | Nov. 2nd-9th DELAWARE BEER NIGHT • Wednesday, Nov. 6 Featuring unique beers from your favorite breweries of the First State.

FLYING FISH BREWERY NIGHT • Saturday, Nov. 9

Meet the brewer and taste his fantastic beer! All specials that night will be sourced from within a 100 mile radius.

SOUTHERN TIER RARE BEER TAP TAKEOVER Wednesday, Nov. 27

Join us for the biggest party night of the year, featuring the unique beers of one of our favorite breweries: Southern Tier.

Happy Hour 3 to 6 pm weekdays $1 off drafts and $4 house wines

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for our Text Message Alerts and be the first to know which keg we’re tapping! 522 Philadelphia Pike Wilmington • 302.764.0377 • PecosLiquors.com 30 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS CROSS OVER TO THE DARK SIDE continued from page 29

A Stouthearted Selection In the vein of the classic Guinness, stouts are probably the “easiest and greatest crossover beers,” according to Mike Whitwell, of Premier Wine & Spirits on Limestone Road. “They have a rich, fulfilling taste, but you can still have three or four of them without getting that ‘pickled’ feeling,” he says. Whitwell favors the oatmeal stout made by Schlafly Beer, out of St. Louis, although there are a ton of oatmeal stouts on the market, from the venerable Samuel Smith to the younger Wolaver’s Oatmeal Stout, produced by Otter Creek Brewing in Vermont. Venu Gaddamidi, owner of Veritas Wine & Craft Beer on the Wilmington Riverfront, is a big fan of the Wolaver’s, as well as the Southern Tier Choklat. Yes, it’s a big imperial stout that registers 10 percent ABV, but as Gaddamidi happily puts it, “Who doesn’t like chocolate?” Ben “Gumbo” Muse, of Two Stones Pub, knows a thing or two about dark beers, as evidenced by Two Stones’ immense selection. His tastes go a little heavier in the stout department, with bigger beers closer to 8 and 10 percent alcohol. “The Southern Tier Warlock, an imperial stout at 8.6 percent, is a nice crossover into darker beers, particularly for all the pumpkin fans,” Muse says. “It’s chocolaty, roasty, and has a lot of pumpkin pie spices. “For the folks who aren’t scared of the dark and want to dive in right away, the Brooklyn Black Chocolate is an imperial stout at 10 percent. It’s a seasonal classic with notes of espresso, dark chocolate and even a little vanilla. Awesome, awesome beer.”

Porter in the Court The difference between a porter and stout is almost negligible. History says (and most brewers agree) that porters got their name because of their accessibility for workers at London ports in the 1700s. A stout porter, later called simply “stout,” was just a stronger version of the original porter recipe. Regardless of where you fall in the argument, the key thing to remember is that porters offer just as many flavors to convert beer drinkers to the dark side as do stouts. Take, for example, vanilla, probably the lightest and sweetest of all the flavors used in dark beers. The Leinenkugel Snowdrift Vanilla Stout, Crowley says, is an approachable varietal that makes for a natural dark side gateway beer. Muse recommends the Evolution Lucky 7 porter, a 5.8 percent porter with a hint of smoke, “perfect for those last few cookouts of the year. It’s not too scary for the folks just dipping a toe into dark beers.” Muse also feels that Iron Hill’s Pig Iron Porter, a staple of Two Stones’ house beer list since the first Iron Hill opened in Newark, is a classic. “It’s still my favorite beer they brew; perfect for [cold] weather.” Whether you go with a porter or stout, brown ale or fruit beer, it’s best to keep an open mind and gravitate toward the flavors you like. Just remember: there’s no reason to be afraid of the dark.

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250 S. Main Street, Suite 101 • Newark, DE • (302) 454-1592 www.TheGreeneTurtle.com NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KRESTON WINE & SPIRITS

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CRAFT BEER IS KING FOR A WEEK

FOCUS

Area restaurants and pubs gear up for tap takeovers

S

ixteen of the area’s craft beer meccas plan to pour it on during the third annual Wilmington Beer Week, Nov. 2-9. The weeklong celebration will showcase 35 craft brewers while featuring dinners, tap takeovers, firkin parties, meet the brewers and more. Look for unique brews from 16 Mile, Abita, Brooklyn Brewery, Cisco Brewers, Dogfish Head, Erie Brewing, Evolution Craft Brewing Co., Flying Fish, Flying Dog, Fordham, Goose Island, Heavy Seas, Harpoon Brewery, Kona Brewing Co., Leinenkugel’s, Long Trail Brewing Co., Magic Hat, New Belgium, Old Dominion, Ommegang, Rodenbach, Rogue, Saranac, Samuel Adams, Sierra Nevada, Sixpoint, Sly Fox, Starr Hill, Stone Brewing Co., Stoudts, Troegs, Twin Lakes, Victory, Weyerbacher and Yards. The venues are BBC Tavern and Grill, Buckley’s Tavern, Chelsea Tavern, Columbus Inn, Dead Presidents, Ernest & Scott Taproom, Harry’s Savoy Grill, Harry’s Seafood Grill, Iron Hill Restaurant & Brewery, Kid Shelleen’s, Pizza By Elizabeths, Stanley’s Tavern, Two Stones Pub, Ulysses Gastropub, World Cafe Live at The Queen and Washington Street Ale House. Many of the restaurants will also be featuring prix-fixe menus tailored to specific beers. Costs are determined by the venue and reservations are required for special events. Beer Week will start with a kickoff party Saturday, Nov. 2, at Iron Hill Restaurant & Brewery from 4 to 10 p.m. Join in the celebration of the 32 best brews made within 100 miles of Iron Hill’s door. This is the first Beer Week for Two Stones Pub, and co-owner Michael Stiglitz is ecstatic about being involved. “This corner of

the map is very craft brew oriented,” he says. “It’s important to feed the need people have for craft brew.” On Nov. 5, Two Stones will feature Tuesday Taco Madness: Beer Week Edition. On Wednesday, the pub will spotlight Giving on Tap Dogfish Head Tap Takeover. “We look forward to helping grow the yearly event, and also look towards doing other beer fests in the upcoming years to help bring focus to the great beer lovers in the area,” says Stiglitz. A Mystery Beer Special will be featured all week at The Queen. Come in and roll the dice on a mystery selection of bottled craft beer. In addition, a Grilled Cheese & Craft Beer Tasting is set for Wednesday, Nov. 6. Also on Wednesday, Stanley’s will hold a Southern Tier Tap Takeover & Growler Party, and Dead Presidents will host a Sam Adams Tap Takeover Happy Hour along with an optional fourcourse dinner.   “Unfortunately we can all get caught up in the day-to-day ways of life,” says Dead Presidents’ owner Brian Raughley. “It’s nice to have a week just for trying some rare or new beers you might not have the chance or inclination to otherwise.” Dead Presidents, involved for its second year, will close the week out on Saturday, Nov. 9, with a parking lot party focusing on East Coast breweries, tailgate food, games and a special appearance by the Washington Nationals Racing Presidents mascots. “What week wouldn’t be better if everyone decided to strictly focus on beer?” asks Raughley. Visit the website at www.wilmingtonbeerweek.com for additional special events, brews and more. — Krista Connor NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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• Understand that you are sacrificing the beer you know for something unknown. Again, hopefully it will be something you enjoy. • Styles that have a high alcohol content (8 percent ABV is a good barometer) are excellent candidates for cellaring. Barleywines, Imperial Stouts and Belgian Dubbels all meet this criteria. • Brands that are hop forward such as IPA or Imperial IPAs are best consumed fresh and thus poor candidates for cellaring (think about Stone Brewing’s Enjoy By Series).

34 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS THE SECRETS TO AGING ALES continued from previous page

• Look for either the date of production on the bottle or the date of expiration. If the brewer has put an expiration date on it, odds are it’s best to drink the beer before that day (brewers are smart guys, they know when their beer tastes best). Many times a craft brewer will put a production date on the bottle if the brand or style can be aged. They are actually trying to help you keep track of how old it is. • Anything that references barrel aging or a type of liquor (bourbon, whisky, etc.) is a prime candidate for aging; these barrels give the beer incredibly unique flavors and characteristics. Evolution Brewing’s Migration Series is an excellent example. • Lastly, consider bottle conditioning. Bottle conditioning is when a brewer has introduced a small amount of sugar and yeast to the bottle just before it has been sealed. This allows the yeast to do its thing and create the new flavor profiles you are looking for. So now that you have found the beer you want to cellar (and you have built up the discipline to put it away and not drink it), you have to know how to take care of it. Keep it in a cool, dark and dry place. The colder you can keep it the better; this will help prevent it from oxidizing, which adversely affects carbonation and flavor. Some great commercial beers to start with are Ommegang Three Philosophers, New Belgium Brewing’s Lips of Faith Series, and the Goose Island Vintage Ales Line.

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302-655-9949 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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36 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

WE’RE STILL WILD ABOUT HARRY’S

Xavier Teixido, owner of Harry’s Hospitality Group, hopes the retro and chic dining room makeover will attract more regulars and casual diners. Photo Tim Hawk

Iconic restaurant celebrates its 25th anniversary with an eye on the future By Pam George

W

hen Harry’s Savoy Grill opened in November 1988, the martinis were shaken until they were icy cold. Prime rib was carved center stage in the dining room. Cigar smoking was not just tolerated—it was encouraged. And it all happened in a space with a decidedly English attitude, thanks to the Tudor-style façade, a beamed ceiling, and dark wainscoting. Twenty-five years later, the Tudor appointments no longer reign. A new coffered ceiling and wood-like flooring have replaced the

beams and the carpet. Stylish stacked stone now highlights the carving station, and cherry red seat backs provide a pop of contemporary color. And while prime rib, lolling in heady juices, still appears on a good number of tables, you’re just as likely to see squid-ink bowtie pasta with tender tendrils of calamari and dusky olives. Yet at Harry’s Savoy Grill the more things change, the more they remain the same. “We are really just doing what we have done all along: evolving the classics into the new,” says owner Xavier Teixido. ► NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT WE’RE STILL WILD ABOUT HARRY’S continued from page 37

Consider that in 1988, the brand new restaurant was bucking dining trends. Red meat had acquired a bad reputation and martinis were for grandparents. Most restaurants served “white” or “red” by the glass, not 12 brands, and prime rib had been so shabbily treated by most kitchens that many erudite diners turned up their noses at it. While Harry’s Savoy was determined to reintroduce the classics—done right— it also strived to debut novel ingredients. A salad with mesclun greens appeared on the menu from the start. A few years after the opening of Harry’s Savoy, Chef David Leo Banks seared tuna to make sushi-inspired raw fish more palatable. And although diners were initially hesitant, they soon accepted pale pink tuna on the plate. “Harry’s has always offered cutting-edge foods and held cutting-edge events while remaining true to their sense of hospitality,” says David Dennett, general manager from 1992 to 2001, who’s currently a director of sales at Southern Wine and Spirits of Delaware. Still, no restaurant can survive 25 years by resting on its reputation. Hence the recent dining room redo. Says Teixido: “The customer wants to be rewarded. They love to see you spending their money on them.” (The renovations follow a less-visible project that addressed the infrastructure, bathrooms, and kitchen.) Few would argue that Teixido—also co-owner of Harry’s Seafood Grill, Kid Shelleen’s, and Harry’s Fish Market + Grill —is savvy about his industry. But it takes more than business acumen to keep a restaurant alive for a quarter of a century. “I feel that the essence of Xavier’s success and longevity over the years—and what makes him brilliant—is that he always had an intimate connection with his community,” says Carrie Leishman, president and CEO of the Delaware Restaurant Assn. “He carries a deep passion for not only helping his community, but he also dives beneath the surface—he strives to fully understand people and their needs.” A HISTORY OF HOSPITALITY As early as 1939 or 1940, there was a tavern or restaurant on the site along Naamans Road in north Wilmington, perhaps even when the now busy artery was a dirt road. Many say the first restaurant to quench area customers’ thirst was Brownie’s Tavern, followed by the Cedar Inn, a roadhouse celebrated for its jukebox and 75-cent drinks. Gaby O’Brien, a long-time Harry’s Savoy customer, says her parents had their first date at the Cedar Inn in 1954, and her father proposed to her mother there two years later. The King’s Inn took control in the early 1960s, and longtime residents may recall the statue of Gambrinus, a legendry Flemish king and unofficial patron saint of beer, that stood out front. O’Brien remembers that her family dined at the restaurant when it was briefly the Smuggler’s Inn, and then it became Old Admiral’s Inn, popular for its salad bar. At some point, the building became part of Wally Sezna’s holdings. (The golf personality had owned the Columbus Inn since 1953.)

On Mother’s Day 1988, at midnight, the restaurant and building were purchased by the 1492 Hospitality Group, founded by Davis Sezna, Wally’s son, and Teixido, who had returned to Wilmington after working with Emeril Lagasse at the Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. At the time, “New American” cuisine was all the rage. Steaks were out of favor. But that didn’t stop the partners from embracing the old steakhouse concept, complete with martinis and shrimp cocktail. The name? “We never met a Harry we didn’t like,” Teixido says. They added “Savoy” to pay tribute to the Savoy Hotel in London, which suited the English décor. In 1993, when Teixido left 1492, he obtained Harry’s Savoy. Some considered it the most risky property in the group’s collection. WEATHERING STORMS AND CHANGING TASTES Turns out Harry’s Savoy was onto something. As the 1990s unfolded, it didn’t take long for steaks, martinis, and cigars to steal headlines in the lifestyle sections of newspapers and magazines. But at the restaurant, seafood got equal time on the menu. Oysters on the half shell, once considered a health issue at many restaurants, were showcased at Harry’s Savoy. Banks started buying wild salmon from Alaska, and he played with soft-shell crabs long before they crawled into area favor. As the chains proliferated on Route 202, Harry’s Savoy ramped up its distinct offerings, including more wines by the glass, craft beers, a chef’s multiple-course menu, and dishes such as horseradish-crusted salmon, Bermuda fish chowder, and crème brulee. “We took a local, nice restaurant and turned it into a chef- and food-driven restaurant and a Wine Spectator awardwinner,” Dennett says. To plug a niche, Teixido in 1998 built a $3 million banquet facility with a 10,000-square-foot ballroom around back. Keeping the dining area operational during construction was no easy task, Dennett recalls. Another hardship was the expansion of Naamans Road from two to four lanes. Construction occurred during Thanksgiving and Christmas, the restaurant’s busiest time. In 2003, when Harry’s Seafood Grill opened in the city, many Harry’s Savoy customers were drawn to the stylish riverside establishment. Little sister took away big sister’s thunder for a time. Yet Teixido had realized early on that Harry’s Savoy’s suburban location presented some challenges. “There are so many niche demographics,” he says of Brandywine Hundred. “The early crowd is different from the late crowd. You can’t charge big steakhouse prices because you don’t have the business traveler.” The main market, he’s realized, is the neighborhood — the people who live close by. BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS Teixido believes strongly in participating in the local community. Harry’s Hospitality Group, the umbrella organization for all the restaurants, runs the Share our Strength Taste of the Nation event at Harry’s Savoy, which gives all event proceeds to organizations in Delaware that help the hungry. The Harry’s Hospitality Golf Outing benefits the University of Delaware’s hotel, restaurant and institutional management program. ► NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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40 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

WE’RE STILL WILD ABOUT HARRY’S continued from page 39

Teixido also is active in the hospitality industry. He’s been president of the Delaware Restaurant Assn. and chairman of the National Restaurant Assn. The community, in turn, has embraced Harry’s Savoy like a family member, making it an integral part of many residents’ memories. The banquet space, for example, is popular for wedding receptions, showers, and birthday parties. When O’Brien’s parents celebrated their 50th anniversary in 2006, they held the event at the restaurant. “They always reserved a table near the fireplace, so that’s where we celebrated,” she says. “Harry’s was perfect for this special day. The food, service and atmosphere never disappoint.” Her parents passed away within four months of each other last year. “It was fitting to return to Harry’s for their funeral luncheons,” she says. Rita Turner, who now lives in Florida, fondly remembers taking her mother to Harry’s Savoy for dinner when they both lived in Wilmington. They always sat in the middle of the main dining room, and a charming male waiter usually served them. “I gave them her name (Mrs. Kinzler), and they always used it when addressing her,” Turner says. “She would absolutely glow. The food was always superb and she brought home a doggy bag or two without fail. And we would order dessert for the doorman.” Now that her mother has passed away, Turner cherishes the memories of those dinners. While many admittedly consider Harry’s Savoy a special occasion spot, others make the restaurant part of their weekly routine. Those who do pop in regularly often head to the bar,

now called “the grill.” The relaxed space has a community table and a special menu of small plates, cheese selections, burgers, and sandwiches. Teixido hopes the dining room makeover will attract more regulars and casual diners to the space, which is both retro and chic at the same time. It’s a large room, but the colors—warm stone appointments and drum-shade lighting fixtures—are comforting. TWEAKING THE MENU Banks is the rare chef who also has keen administrative skills, which is why he travels between the group’s restaurants. (He is the co-owner of three.) Consequently, Harry’s Savoy needs an onsite chef. Admittedly, a restaurant the size of Harry’s Savoy—and its established practices—is not a fit for everyone. Philadelphia Chef Tony Clark, for instance, was in and out in a matter of months. Well-known local talent Patrick D’Amico, however, seems to have found his footing in the busy kitchen. “Patrick has a tremendous passion for food,” Teixido says. “He’s always looking to see what’s different and what he can do better.” There are some particularly fun dishes on the lunch menu. Consider finely chopped egg salad, spread on toasted pumpernickel and blanketed by slices of rosy smoked salmon. The open-faced sandwich is nestled next to a salad of pea tendrils and chopped beets. There also are two crepes, packed with chicken in a light sauce and topped with crispy duck confit and a tuft of greens. ►

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302.475.3000 WWW.haRRys-saVoy.com NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT WE’RE STILL WILD ABOUT HARRY’S continued from previous page

As the restaurant this year prepares to mark a major anniversary, Teixido doesn’t see such colorful menu selections and new tiled entryways as changes per se. It’s more about adaptation. “This restaurant has bones, and we have to look at how we dress it,” he says. “Styles change. You need to keep up if you want to stick around, and the guest needs to be able to use the restaurant the way he or she wants to.” They want value and they want quality, he says. Chef Jason Barrowcliff, now at Brandywine Prime Seafood in Chops, has witnessed the evolution. He worked at Harry’s Savoy a year after it opened and then in 2010. “They continue their commitment to the customer and the community,” he says of the management. “They push the staff to be their best.” Customers such as O’Brien, who continues to come to Harry’s Savoy for family get-togethers, are appreciative. “How wonderful,” she concludes, “that they are celebrating their 25th!”

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A $25.25 menu this month will feature a “classic” three-course menu with dishes such as clams casino, hot crab dip, a 10-ounce prime rib, and crème brulee. Twenty-five wines will be offered for $25 each. The restaurant will hold a staff alumni party on Thursday, Nov. 7, for current and former staff members. Call 475-3000 for details.

42 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT The 2nd annual Haunts and Hops at Ernest & Scott Taproom in Wilmington.

Photo Tim Hawk

Meet the Real Ernest & Scott The Market Street taproom refocuses its menu on the famous authors who are its namesake By Rob Kalesse

W

hen Ernest & Scott Taproom opened in January of 2012, the restaurant’s moniker paid homage to writers Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald, and the unlikely relationship the two forged while the latter lived and worked in Delaware during the 1920s. The focus was craft beer. Dogfish Head Brewery had signed on as a consultant on the beer and food pairings, and the décor featured large black-and-white photos of the two American authors. The menu itself, however, never really reflected the literary legends, and featured random items like Chicago-style hot dogs and chicken Kiev. But a new general manager and chef are changing that philosophy by pitting A Moveable Feast against The Great Gatsby. ► NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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facebook.com/fearlesslymefighters 10/24/13 11:39 AM


EAT MEET THE REAL ERNEST & SCOTT continued from page 43

Photo Joe Del Tufo

Create Some oliday Says Joe Van Horn: “[Scott] Morrison is 99 percent owner; I own the door knobs.”

MEET THE NEW BOSS While steering the ship at Chelsea Tavern the last three years, General Manager Joe Van Horn’s goal was to make the restaurant at 821 N. Market St. a craft beer destination, a la Monk’s Café in Philadelphia, beginning with four taps and eventually ballooning to 31. When Van Horn’s business partner Scott Morrison decided to open Ernest & Scott just up the street, with a focus on craft beer as well, Van Horn’s mission became two-fold: to continue to grow his own local following at Chelsea while keeping a competitive eye on the new taproom. “For 16 months, my goal each week was to kick this place’s ass,” Van Horn says, sitting at a balcony table overlooking the old Delaware Trust Building. “And for 57 straight weeks, we did that. My staff [at Chelsea] was competitive, and we consistently beat the numbers here [at Ernest & Scott].” Now the tables have turned for Van Horn, who moved to Ernest & Scott in May at the behest of Morrison, who is majority partner at both restaurants. Van Horn, who serves as operating partner, says of the partnership, “Morrison is 99 percent owner; I own the door knobs.” Regardless of the details, Van Horn must now take ownership of a new restaurant where his mission again is two-fold: fill a place with nearly 100 more seats than his former establishment, and more important, create an identity. “When I got here, I just stared at the walls,” Van Horn says. “The place is immense, the bar is huge, and I saw a lot of potential, but the overall philosophy was vague. People kept asking me if I was Ernest or Scott, and I’d say, ‘I’m neither.’” He began thinking of ways to reflect the personalities, writings and life and times of Fitzgerald and Hemingway in the food itself, and thus came up with two unique sides of a new menu: “The Hemingway” and “The Scott Way.” ►

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EAT MEET THE REAL ERNEST & SCOTT continued from page 45

FITZGERALD VS. HEMINGWAY If ever there was proof of the old adage “opposites attract,” it was the brief friendship between Fitzgerald and Hemingway. The rough-and-tumble Hemingway lived hard and traveled the world, while Fitzgerald was the refined gentleman, born into the upper-middle class and a direct descendent of Francis Scott Key (his namesake). When the finalized menu is revealed at the tentatively scheduled grand reopening of Ernest & Scott Taproom on the weekend of Nov. 1-2, guests will find a similar dichotomy. A Hemingway side will be littered with meat-andpotato dishes like rabbit sausage and wild boar chops, while a Fitzgerald side will feature more refined dining like duck confit and filet au poivre. Other examples include the pulled pork Cuban sandwich ($12.95), with Swiss cheese, Black Forest ham, an over-easy egg, Cuban remoulade and pickle, representing the time Hemingway spent in Havana, and the crispy Florida grouper ($14), with iceberg lettuce, tomato, red onion and a lemon-caper tartar sauce, signifying Hemingway’s years in Key West, a town that still proudly connects with the legacy of the Pulitzer Prize winner. On the Fitzgerald side, upscale items like the calamari skillet ($9.50), served with garlic, butter and fresh tarragon, and the grilled salmon Oscar ($20.50), with orvieto Dijon crème, haricots verts and roasted fingerling potatoes, highlight a menu the Jazz Age writer likely would have approved. Both sides will feature an oyster selection, including Hemingway’s “ Ta b a s c o , ” wi t h fre sh-sha ve d horseradish and lemon, and Fitzgerald’s “Grey Goose,” with smoked salmon and a vodka crème fraiche. And there will be plenty of the “coldest martinis in the world,” Van Horn promises, since both writers were partial to the straightup cocktail. (Even the shakers and garnishes will be frozen.)

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9 EAST COAST BREWERIES INCLUDING WEYERBACHER, YARDS & VICTORY!

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Saturday Nov. 2: Joe Trainor Trio, Hot Breakfast, Ben Smith

CLASSIC TAILGATE GRUB

Friday, Nov. 8: Self-Checkout, Sheep & the Shears, Pulling Punches

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Friday, Nov. 22: Can You Canoe, Heavy Lights, Still Moon Servants

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48 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT MEET THE REAL ERNEST & SCOTT continued from page 47

4019 KENNETT PIKE

Van Horn believes both sides of the menu will appeal to men, women, and the disparate theater audiences that flock to Market Street. “One night you’ve got fans of comedian Ron White, the next night it might be a symphony orchestra crowd,” he says. “Folks from both groups should have no problem finding what they want on our menu.” Van Horn’s partner on the culinary side of this venture is Chef Jasper Bede, a New Jersey native who has traveled the world and recently returned to the MidAtlantic, landing in Wilmington.

JOIN US FOR WILMINGTON BEER WEEK! FIRKINS ON TAP!

MEET THE NEW CHEF

Tuesday, Nov 5 & Wednesday, Nov 6 (5-9pm each night)

Classically trained in French cuisine, Bede spent 10 years honing his craft in Ireland before returning to the states via The Fearrington House Country Inn, a five-star hotel in Pittsboro, N. C. There, he served as saucier at the Fearrington House restaurant, as well as head chef at the adjoining Granary. After moving to Delaware in the spring to be closer to his family, Bede caught on with Chef Bryan Sikora at La Fia on Market Street before answering an ad for a head chef’s position with Ernest & Scott. “I was really excited about the potential with this space,” Bede says. “It’s a great location in a beautiful building; the goal is to make Ernest & Scott a dining destination. That’s why they hired me.” With the menu still under construction, Bede is determining how to best manage his large kitchen in terms of flow on busier nights. In the meantime, he is trotting out certain specials to see what will stick. “We’re doing things like baconwrapped lamb chops, and plan on doing a lot of game and shanks, like wild boar, venison and the like,” he says. “We’ll also be featuring a skinless lobster sausage that is poached, pan-seared and served with a saffron risotto.” Van Horn says the target date of Nov. 1 is still tentative, adding that the new Ernest & Scott does plan to hold a grand re-opening at some point during Beer Week—Nov. 2 through Nov. 9. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and light entertainment will be featured as well.

AR’

Featuring Yards Double IPA, Evolution, Twin Lakes Octobefest, Abita Turbo Dog, and Dogfish 75 Minute IPA

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$6 KETEL ONE TALL DRINKS, $3 DOMESTICS DURING HAPPY HOUR LIVE MUSIC EVERY THURSDAY

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Since 1934

Complete Thanksgiving Dinner • $15.49 per person OVEN-ROASTED TURKEY (BONELESS & SLICED WITH TRIMMINGS) TURKEY GRAVY (MADE FROM NATURAL TURKEY AU JUS) HERB STUFFING • MASHED POTATOES • CANDIED SWEET POTATOES VEGETABLE MEDLEY • COLESLAW • PUMPKIN RAISIN BREAD • CRANBERRY RELISH Please order ahead. (Order by Sat., Nov. 23). Pickup before 2pm Wed. , Nov. 27. Closed Thanksgiving Day.

LET THE EXPERTS AT BACHETTI’S CATERING THIS YEAR’S HOLIDAY PARTY FOR YOUR FAMILY OR BUSINESS We Offer Everything from Full-Service to Buffet-Style to In-Store Pickup

Full menu and prices available online www.ChocolateWaterfall.com | www.Bachettis.com P 302.994.4467 | 4723 Kirkwood Hwy. Midway Plaza NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Wilmington.ExtremePizza.com 50 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

2

Photo by Joe del Tufo

2

LUNAR ALE

I

t started as a joke. There are a lot of hop heads in my company. And we really like Dogfish. Back when they were first introducing their Ancient Ales series, spitting into beer and recreating 3,000-year-old recipes, we thought it might be fun to take it to another level. So we decided, as a design firm, to parody a Dogfish design—create postcards and posters and put them out on April Fool’s Day. And what’s more ancient than the moon? We would call it Lunar Ale—infused with real moon dust! At some point during the design process I realized there was a remote possibility of actually making the beer for real. One of our most interesting clients is ILC Dover, which, among many other things, has designed all of the space suits for NASA. Think of them as the Q Branch of Delaware. I was pretty sure they had some moon dust lying around. We called them and sure enough, they had some. I tracked down Sam Calagione at Dogfish and pitched the idea. He was interested, but skeptical that we could get real moon. In the end, he was right. The moon material brought back from the NASA missions was heavily regulated, and could not be used for commercial purposes. But Sam stayed on it, confident that there had to be a way. We called Doug Durney at ILC and he mused, “Well I suppose we could get a lunar meteorite and grind that up; it’s made of the same stuff.” And Sam was off to the races. Of course, lunar meteorites are not cheap. ILC identified a source and, at $45/gram, it added up fast. But quick as you can say “liftoff,” Dogfish had the meteor shipped to Delaware, smashed it into a fine powder, and worked it into the brew they had planned for it. Celest-Jewel Ale showed up in Rehoboth at the end of September, in the form of a harvest ale/Oktoberfest. It just might be the most expensive beer ever brewed, and arguably the most unusual. And while the 125-gallon batch lasted—just over one week, I’m told—it was delicious. What does the moon taste like? Mostly it tastes like beer. Maybe with a little grit and iron in the finish. At the kickoff event, guests drank CelestJewel Ale from beer koozies supplied by ILC Dover and made from real space suits. They also brought along an astronaut helmet and gloves, and it all was a tiny bit cosmic. —Joe del Tufo, Chief Creative Officer at Mobius New Media

Come Try Our Seasonal Cocktails Featuring: Apple Cinnamon Old Fashioned & Fiery Cider

Open Thanksgiving! Thursday Nov. 28

Holiday Buffet • 12-5pm All The Thanksgiving Fixings and Much Much More! Make Your Reservations Today! Sunday Brunch 10am-2pm $4 4 Make Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

Don’t Forget to Book your Holiday Banquets!

302.376.0600 109 Main Street, Odessa, DE 19730 Mon: Closed • Tues - Thurs: 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat:11:30am-11pm • Sun: 10am-9pm

www.cantwells-tavern.com NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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NEXT MONTH in

r u o y to uds” c i s “Mu Taste B presents:

Craft

Beer Dinner

The

Wine Issue

Thursday, November 21st @ 7:00 pm Featuring a 6 course dinner. Each course paired with a Fall seasonal craft beer. Check out our website or Facebook page for menu and reservation info.

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The Holidays Are Right Around the Corner… Call Us For ALL Your Catering Needs!

BachettiBros. Gourmet Market & Catering Since 1934

Full menu and prices available online www.ChocolateWaterfall.com | www.Bachettis.com P 302.994.4467 | 4723 Kirkwood Hwy. Midway Plaza

52 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

2

2

WINTER BREWS FOR THE WINTER BLUES

s daylight dwindles and the nights get colder, the comfort of home beckons. For many of us, this Norman Rockwell-like scene involves a cozy fire, the company of good friends, a chicken pot pie, or, perhaps, a full-bodied beer with plenty of depth. If you’re lucky, maybe it’s all of the above. When it comes to the category of winter beers, there’s certainly a lot of selection -- especially nowadays. So in the spirit of spreading more comfort and joy this season, we asked area experts what brews they would recommend during the upcoming season of semihibernation. Here’s what they said:

A

ACCUMULATION WHITE IPA – NEW BELGIUM BREWING CO. Making its first winter appearance here in Delaware, New Belgium’s Accumulation White IPA is a strong choice for the bitter winter months ahead. It looks and almost smells like a wheat beer but drinks like a traditional yet feisty IPA (bitter and hoppy). Malty, strong and smooth all around. —Ryan Kennedy, Premier Wine & Spirits

MORNING GLORY ESPRESSO STOUT – DOMINION BREWING COMPANY A full-bodied espresso stout brewed in Dover, Morning Glory is not just another pinup girl. She’s got a nice jolt to her. Dominion uses local roasted coffee beans, and even at 9 percent ABV, the stout imparts a strong aroma of espresso and strong hints of chocolate. Although initially released in 22-ounce bottles, it’s now available all year round in six packs. —Jeff Kreston, Kreston Wine & Spirits FIRESIDE CHAT WINTER SPICED ALE – 21ST AMENDMENT BREWERY Winter brew holds a special place among seasonal brews. Mainly because when you buy any winter brew you will most likely be drinking it surrounded by the warmth of kith and kin. My go-to is 21st Amendment’s Fireside Chat. It will please a wide variety of palates with its big, bold, malty backbone balanced out nicely with seasonal spices. At 7.9 percent ABV it will make your holiday gathering a little merrier.

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Carving Stations with Turkey, Ham & Angus Rib Eye Pasta Station with Spiced Pumpkin Ravioli Gourmet-Style Side Dishes Traditional Pumpkin, Apple & Pecan Pies

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—Ed Mulvihill, Peco’s Liquors NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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3rd Annual

presents

WILMINGTON

BEER WEEK

A Celebration of Craft Beer NOVEMBER 2-9, 2013 BBC Tavern & Grill

THE VENUES:

Pizza By Elizabeths

Buckley’s Tavern

Harry’s Savoy Grill

Stanley’s Tavern

Chelsea Tavern

Harry’s Seafood Grill

Two Stones Pub (Wilm.)

Columbus Inn

Iron Hill Restaurant & Brewery

Ulysses Gastropub

Dead Presidents

Kid Shelleen’s Charcoal House

World Cafe Live @ The Queen

Ernest & Scott Taproom

Washington Street Ale House

THE BEERS:

8 DAYS OF CRAFT BEER MAGIC!

WilmingtonBeerWeek.com

40 OCTOBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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D C CA ’s Fa l l Fundraiser

November 9, 2013 7 - 11 pm Join us for an exciting evening celebrating great tastes inspired by the cuisine from Rt. 66 roadside eateries. Art Auction/Silent Auction Catering by Jimmy Duffy’s Music, Dancing & Drinks Dress: Rt 66 Roadhouse Retro Denim to Diamonds! Have fun with it! Proceeds will support DCCA’s education and exhibition programs.

TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE! Purchase tickets online www.thedcca.org/eatdrinkART

DELAWARE CENTER FOR THE CONTEMPORARY ARTS 200 S. Madison Street Wilmington, DE 19801 302.656.6466 www.thedcca.org

NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

TUNED IN What’s happening in the local music scene:

Perfection is not the goal for Delawarebased indie-pop rockers Stallions, who unleashed their debut album, Wasted Top left to right: Derrick “Napz” Mosley, drums; Nick Matos, guitar; Steve Payne ,keyboards. and Lonely, this past summer, stomping out Bottom left to right: Andrew Price, vocals; Zach beats with self-described Thomas; guitar and vocals; Shane Trimble, bass. authenticity, believability and honesty. Members Andrew Price, Steve Payne, Zach Thomas, Nick Matos, Derrick “Napz” Mosley and Shane Trimble spent the last few years figuring out their musical identity as a group. “We wanted to write music that felt good. Music that had pop sensibilities but wasn’t contrived-sounding,” says bassist Trimble, who doubled as the album’s producer. “It was very important to me that our music had a human element.” Meaning Trimble didn’t want to get caught up in making it sound perfected, like most of contemporary pop music. “I wanted it to be real and more about the song than anything else. We really wanted our sound to be believable and honest—not sterile and perfect.” Check out Stallions on Wednesday, Nov. 27, at the Oddity Bar with Lou Pac and Friday, Nov. 29, at Kelly’s Logan House with Widow Maker Social Club. Both shows start at 9 p.m., with no cover. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/thisisstallions or www.stallionsband.bandcamp.com.

Photo Steve Payne

STAMPEDE OF SOUND Stallions kick up their heels with new album

AREA BAND READIES DEBUT CD The Lift Up to hold release party Nov. 2 at The Queen One part modern rock and one part garage rock, area band The Lift Up’s debut album Without Dreams, We Are Only Sleeping alternates between aggression and quiet moments of reflection, the pressures of modern life and the weight of the past. “We’re much rawer than modern rock groups but at the same time we have some of that jangly sound, and atmospheric shoegaze elements that you wouldn’t associate with garage rock,” says Joe Castro, singer, songwriter and guitarist for the band.

KNOW OF ANY LOCAL MUSIC NEWS? 56 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Justin Clowes

2

The album is available now, and the PhillyDelaware trio—Larry Zappaterrini, John Paul Travis and Castro—will play a CD release party Saturday, Nov. 2, at The Queen, joined by The Cocks, Fiancé and Ryan Conaty. The Lift Up formed last year, although they already had a mutual musical history – they all The Lift Up is set to hold release party Nov. 2 previously played together for a few years in The at The Queen. Situation until 2006, when they broke up. But with a newfound passion and a feeling that there was some unfinished business, the group came together again with The Lift Up. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/theliftup or www.theliftup.com.

UPSTAIRS IN NOVEMBER

Matthew Halley sings and plays piano, guitar, banjo, trombone and bass. And he knows a lot about birds. A musician since age 4 and now a wildlife biologist at 31, Halley finds a connection between his occupation and his pastime. “Although they are often seen as disparate disciplines, I find that science and music operate for me in a very similar way,” says Halley. “Music for me is about pulling away the masks, allowing the notes and rhythm to translate an emotional state in the most raw form possible. The scientific method is similar, in that we pull away various sources of bias. In tandem, music and science can work wonders.” Halley’s parents were major musical influences in his life. His father sang in a barbershop quartet, and from him Halley learned to pay attention to technical details of the voice. From his mother, who directed the church choir that he was a member of, he learned that music could be deeply spiritual. This past summer Halley collaborated with friends Em McKeever and Shane Palko on an album, Snow Day, recorded in Halley’s Newark home. They each contributed about two songs, then added their voices to the others’. “The project was never meant to be commercialized—the point of the project was to celebrate our musical friendships, to create something that captured the moment in time,” Halley says. He is working on a solo album, tentatively scheduled for release in February. Semiautobiographical and heavily inspired by the writings of Swiss author Herman Hesse, whose character Siddhartha is a fitting allegory for Halley’s personal journey, the album needs space and patience to reach its potential, he says. Like Siddhartha, whose eventual wisdom comes from journeys and experiences, Halley felt that in order to understand himself he would need to travel the world and devote his life to the study of biology. He has worked as a biologist in six countries, and his experiences have inspired music like his 2008 album Bird Songs, a collection of songs about bird science and bird watching. “When science gets too technical for the nonscientist to chew, music can break the barrier,” says Halley. “Sometimes a silly song about a bird can reach people in ways that a scientific paper cannot, and vice versa.” For more information, visit www.facebook.com/ MatthewHalleyMusic or www.reverbnation.com/ matthewhalley. Matthew Halley combines both his passions— — Krista Connor music and biology.

Email kconnor@tsnpub.com with ideas. They could be added to our list.

Every 1st Wednesday: 4W5 Blues Jam Every 2nd Wednesday: Unsung Hearo’s Open Stage Every 3rd Wednesday: The Sermon! Classic Soul, Funk, Jazz & Beyond Every Friday: Lunchtime Live with Dan Orlando Fri 1 – Highway 41: Celebrating the Music of the Allman Brothers Band Sat 2 – Tric Town Presents The Lift Up CD Release Show and The Cocks w/Fiance Wed 6 – Grilled Cheese and Craft Beer Tasting (6pm) Thurs 7 – On-the-Road & In-the-Round Featuring Don Henry, Michael Johnson and Craig Bickhardt Fri 8 – The Rent-A-Cops w/TVC-15 Sat 9 – 3 Stories High Reunion Show w/Jennifer Yuill Tues 12 – JD Wilkes and The Dirt Daubers (of the Legendary Shack Shakers) w/ Highly Suspect Wed 13 – Classical Revolution Delaware (5pm) Photo provided by Matthew Halley

Photo Steve Payne

WORKING WONDERS Matthew Halley’s job and music complement each other

FREE! Wed 13 – Grillmington BBG Pop-Up Featuring Little Luke’s BBQ Thurs 14 – The Full Carbon Getup Fri 15 – Gable Music Presents The November Singer Songwriter Showcase FREE! Sat 16 – Saskia and the Truly Unruly Band Thurs 21 – Richard Raw Soul Sessions Album Release w/The Sermon!, Hezekiah, Nadjah Nicole Fri 22 – The Splashing Pearls CD Release w/Todd Chappelle Sat 23 – Corb Lund Fri 29 – Box of Rain

World Cafe Live at the Queen 500 N Market St, Wilmington, DE 302-994-1400 WorldCafeLive.com

NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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G N I V I G S K N THA TO-GO WIN

COOL STUFF

Enjoy a delicious fresh-cooked feast prepared by White Clay Creek Country Club’s award-winning chefs. • Fully-Cooked, Whole Herb-Roasted Turkey • Caramelized Onion & Cornbread Stuffing • Roasted Garlic & Herb Smashed Potatoes 10-12 lb Turkey • Serves 6 – 8 • $130

• Green Bean Casserole • Cranberry Orange Relish • Buttermilk Biscuits & Gravy

| 16-18 lb Turkey • Serves 9 – 12 • $150

Additional hot side dishes, soups, salads, seafood and dessert options available. Order Now – November 21 | Call 302.994.6700 ext. 7194 At The Rail will only be open Thursday, November 28 for Thanksgiving To-Go pickups

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DP-19098 November O&A Thanksgiving To-Go Print Ad.indd 1

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58 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

Nebraska

2

STARS

NEBRASKA: HIGH PLAINS DRIFTING

µµµµµ

Director Payne’s latest mistakes ponderous for profound By Mark Fields

D

irector-screenwriter Alexander Payne has a wellestablished reputation in Hollywood as a trenchant observer of American life. In a parade of thoughtful, offbeat films—Election, Citizen Ruth, Sideways, About Schmidt, and 2011’s Oscar-winning The Descendants—Payne has taken a variety of quirky characters and atypical circumstances and used them to craft glimpses into the human condition. One of Payne’s unique gifts as a cinematic storyteller is an ability to find humor, even laughter, in these stories without minimizing the integrity of his characters’ struggles. Nebraska, his latest directorial effort, seems to offer another opportunity to delve into an undiscovered corner of the human psyche. Aging and alcoholic Woody (Bruce Dern), the Grant family patriarch, is determined to get to Lincoln, Neb. to collect a promised million dollar award from one of those ubiquitous and misleading promotional mailings. His caustic wife, Kate (June Squibb), and eldest son, Ross (Bob Odenkirk), patronizingly refuse to indulge Woody’s naïve fantasy. But younger son David (SNL’s Will Forte), himself more than a little lost, decides to help his dad on his errand, loading him into the car for a trip destined for crushing disappointment.

Set against the prairie expanses of Montana and Nebraska, the movie endeavors to tell of a family’s halting attempts to cope with their patriarch’s decline into beer-soaked dementia. But Bob Nelson’s hard-edged screenplay gives little sympathy to anyone. All of the Grant family, as well as their distant relatives and friends, lack sufficiently redeeming qualities or compelling personalities. In fact, they are rather drab and unpleasant. What paltry humor exists here is overwhelmed by the judgmental view Nelson seems to take with every character and situation. The viewer has difficulty either connecting with their situations or even caring about their travails. This disconnect is worsened by Payne’s glacial pacing and his strange decision to film in black and white. The severe landscapes of the northern Plains do not reveal their beauty in black and white; they merely look even more empty. What is intended to be stark and profound is instead just plain boring. I simply can’t figure out what prompted this director and these actors to want to tell this story. Given their track records, I hoped to be taken on a journey of discovery. Instead, I found myself lost in the wilderness. NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM 59

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10/24/13 10:34 AM


Simply Rewarding

Now Available at Penn Cinema Riverfront PennPerks+ DISCOVER MORE AT

www.penncinema.com/rewards

Something For Everyone.

WVUD.ORG 60 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

11_Watch.indd 2

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2 WATCH

WATCH

2

The Fifth Estate

4

THE FIFTH ESTATE: JOURNALISM MORPHS INTO DATA DUMPING

STARS µµµµµ

By Paula Goulden

I

t may not seem to be an actor’s best career move to play more than one loner on the autistic spectrum, but Benedict Cumberbatch —who has become famous as Sherlock Holmes in the PBS series—gives an arresting performance as WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in the new thriller The Fifth Estate. The movie is set in the years leading up to the headlinegrabbing release of U.S. diplomatic and military documents leaked by Army Pvt. Bradley Manning. It depicts the formative years of WikiLeaks and the relationship of Assange and Daniel Berg, WikiLeak’s most enthusiastic and only early volunteer (played sympathetically by Daniel Bruhl). As we watch their interaction, we experience the excruciating dilemmas created by the internet’s capacity to carry immense amounts of information to people all over the world instantly. At first, Berg’s idealistic commitment flourishes as WikiLeaks exposes corrupt regimes and tax evaders. But he becomes more conflicted when Assange seeks media attention for the massive State Department leak. Unlike the newspapers

partnering with him, Assange self-righteously refuses to redact the identities of covert U.S. agents. The risk of harm to innocent people that results from Assange’s insistence on publishing all leaked data without any editing becomes as starkly clear to us as it does to Berg. The movie strays onto shakier ground when it delves into Assange’s motivations. The man is clearly a loner and revels in power, but the film’s speculation that his obsession with spilling everyone’s secrets while hiding his own results from childhood abuse injects a distracting note of psychodrama that dilutes an otherwise compelling thriller. This very good movie would be even better if it concentrated on the consequences of Assange’s actions, which create plenty of drama without the pop psychology. Directed by Bill Condon (Kinsey, Dreamgirls), the movie’s title is a play on the now little-used description of the conventional press as the “Fourth Estate,” implying that a new term is needed for the wholesale dumping of unedited information onto the Internet now practiced by WikiLeaks. NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Check out Kate’s New Menu and the new addition, the Parlor!

KATE'S HOLIDAY SPECIAL Spend $75 on Klondike Kate's gift cards or merchandise and receive a FREE $25 gift card! Special runs from November 29th, 2013-December 24th, 2013 MONDAYS 1/2 Price Burgers, ALL DAY!

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Taco Bar Happy Hour 4pm-7pm

FRIDAYS

1/2 Price Large Salads 11am-4pm Seafood Night!

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI, 4-7PM Live Music Every Friday from 6pm-9pm SATURDAYS

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158 East Main Street | Newark, DE 19711 | 302-737-6100 | www.klondikekates.com 3. Lobster Bake and Raw Bar every Friday 62 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH 2

SIDES OF CRANBERRIES & DYSFUNCTION By Mark Fields

Nothing brings out the worst in people like a family meal during the holidays. After all, who knows better than family where the vulnerable parts are? Hollywood has found these Thanksgiving meal tensions to be fertile ground for both dramas and comedies. Before you lapse into your own l-tryptophan coma, enjoy this fivecourse dinner of Turkey Day-set movies.

Pieces of April (2003) Hand-to-mouth New Yorker April (Katie Holmes) invites her family to her tiny apartment for Thanksgiving dinner without having given much thought to the preparations or the possible outcomes. A broken stove is just the first of many disasters she faces as the relatives nervously head her way. A strong cast—including Derek Luke, Oliver Platt and Delaware’s own John Gallagher Jr.—is grounded by the bravura performance of Patricia Clarkson as April’s dying mother. Home for the Holidays (1995) Oscar-winning actress Jodie Foster directed this quirky dramedy about an unemployed single mother’s unwilling return to the roost for Thanksgiving. Holly Hunter, who has played many uptight parts, is disarmingly scattered as Claudia. Another holiday movie with a stellar company: Charles Durning, Anne Bancroft, Cynthia Stevenson and Claire Danes. But Robert Downey Jr. stands out as Claudia’s impish, unpredictable brother. The Ice Storm (1997) There are no convivial family dinners, not even squabbling ones, in this searing exploration of two neighboring families in crisis. The parents self-medicate their disappointments with alcohol, adultery and a little recreational shoplifting, while their teen-aged children are left to struggle to adulthood on their own. Ang Lee (Life of Pi, Brokeback Mountain) directed yet another outstanding cast that includes Kevin Kline, Joan Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Christina Ricci, Elijah Wood and Tobey Maguire. Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) This is one of the most satisfyingly funny yet resonant films from Woody Allen’s heyday. Effortlessly successful Hannah (Mia Farrow) is surrounded by familial melodrama and disappointment from her urbane sisters and their various aspirations and romantic entanglements. Supporting actors Michael Caine and Dianne Wiest and Allen’s screenplay all won Oscars for the film. Look for Lewis Black and Julia Louis-Dreyfus in bit parts long before either was well-known. Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987) Steve Martin and John Candy are hysterically mismatched traveling companions trying to get home for the holiday. A series of comic mishaps keep diverting them from one form of transport to another, while their divergent personalities continue to collide. Martin plays slow-burning straight man to Candy’s annoying yet lovable loser. For maximum and apropos enjoyment, watch the movie with your hand between two pillows.

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Photo Cameron F. Jones

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Kelly’s Logan House, circa 1955. Named for a Civil War general and former Sheriff John D. Kelly III.

TRIED & TRUE TAVERNS A salute to Delaware’s longstanding icons By Pam George

hey are as well known as the Rockford Tower in Wilmington, the courthouse in Old New Castle, and the Zwaanendael Museum in Lewes. Yet many have been called “dives” at some point in their history. But Delaware’s landmark taverns are our dives. The eau de beer that might greet customers at the door has all the nostalgia-producing impact of Proust’s madeleine. While many old taverns have been renovated in more recent years, much to longstanding customers’ chagrin, the walls of these old taverns are packed with decades—and sometimes a century or more—of memories and experiences. Consider that Sandy Keene and Bob Ashby first met at the Deer Park Tavern in 1974, when it was a seedy watering hole. After tossing back a few, Sandy told Bob he was conceited. Then she tumbled off her barstool.

T

But she evidently made an impression: The couple later married, and in 2001, they purchased the Deer Park and transformed it. Also in 1974, Steve Torpey started working at Stanley’s Tavern in North Wilmington. Today he owns the restaurant, a destination for generations of families, sports enthusiast and beer-lovers. Steve “Monty” Montgomery was just 18 when he got a job busing tables at The Starboard Restaurant & Bar in Dewey Beach. Now he’s the owner of what is still known as Delaware’s most famous party place. For the most part, these three taverns have run continuously since their birth. And they’re in good company, as we learned when Out & About went on the hunt for Delaware’s oldest taverns. From north to south, here’s a sampling.► NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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IT’S CHRISTMAS!

Photo provided by Stanley’s Tavern

DECEMBER 2013 Thursday, December 5th 12:30 p.m. Cartoon Christmas Trio

Kick off the season with this lively downtown holiday tradition! The popular jazz group plays music from classic Christmas cartoons, especially the beloved Peanuts soundtracks of Vince Guaraldi.

Sunday, December 8 3:00 p.m. Mastersingers of Wilmington “Christmas with the Mastersingers”

th

Join this celebrated ensemble as it performs some of the greatest Christmas music of all time. From familiar carols to moving music of the Renaissance, from music hot off the press to the enchanting works of Mozart, Monteverdi, and Michael Haydn . . . this concert will surely put you in a joyous holiday spirit!

Thursday, December 12th 12:30 p.m. Center City Chorale “Christmas Comes Again”

Always a delightful midday holiday treat, the Center City Chorale rounds off our Christmas offerings with a holiday songfest – a mix of old and new music for the holiday season.

Admission & Ticket Sales: Thursdays, December 5th & 12th Always FREE ADMISSION at Thursday Noontime Concerts! Sunday, December 8th Advance discounted admission: $15 at MarketStreetMusicDE.org. Use code MSW12A $10 for students at MarketStreetMusicDE.org $25 at the door

Market Street Music

concerts are held at First & Central Presbyterian Church, 11th & Market Streets in downtown Wilmington, across from the Hotel duPont.

VISIT US ON: MarketStreetMusicDE.org

Stanley’s, circa 1947. A favorite of sports fans and wing-lovers.

STANLEY’S TAVERN 2038 Foulk Rd. - Wilmington 475-1887 - stanleys-tavern.com The original building at Foulk and Grubb roads was built sometime in the 1920s. Torpey discovered a liquor license for what was then Bill’s Place for the year 1935. Prohibition was in effect from 1919 to 1933, but Bill Patton had already been running the business before it was repealed. Whether there were illicit libations before 1935 is anyone’s guess. After purchasing the tavern in 1947, Stanley Minikowksi renamed it Stanley’s Tavern. Since he had no grill, he warmed cold sandwiches in a steamer. (The shaved imported ham on rye bread is still on the menu.) Bill Brooks, well known as the founder of Brooks Armored Car Service, bought Stanley’s in 1972. The entrepreneurial Brooks had other restaurant ventures, including the Buggy Tavern on Marsh Road. To create a brand, he added “Horse & Buggy” to Stanley’s name. It didn’t take. Brooks, who expanded the property considerably, sold it in 1982 to a group of dentists. At the time, it was a “real mess,” says Torpey, who’d left Stanley’s in 1977. Bringing in rock bands attracted motorcycle gangs. Torpey returned as manager, the restaurant cracked down on the activity, and the gangs moved on. Stanley’s, which for decades has catered to sports enthusiasts, was among the first to offer chicken wings. Torpey initially was skeptical. Today the restaurant goes through 86,000 pounds of wings annually. Stanley’s also became famous for baby-back ribs. Although Stanley’s has 300 seats, it remains a “neighborhood pub,” says Torpey, now the sole owner. “We freshen it but we don’t change it. We have people who haven’t been here in 20 years. When they come back they can reminisce.”

KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE 1701 Delaware Ave. - Wilmington 652-9493 - loganhouse.com In 1864, when the train station stood at the site now occupied by Acme in Trolley Square, a three-story Italianate boarding house and bar popped up across the street. It was named the Logan House for John A. Logan, a Civil War general. In 1899, John D. “Whiskers” Kelly, a member of Teddy Roosevelt’s Rough Riders, bought the Logan House, and it’s been owned by the Kelly family ever since. According to Logan House lore, Al Capone paused here for a drink en route to New York, and Wild Bill Hickok supposedly stayed overnight. The third floor was a brothel for a time. Because a spring running through the basement kept it cool, it became a mortuary when an epidemic hit the city, says Tim Crowley, the general manager. The menu has changed considerably over the years, but the “John D.” burger, named after John D. Kelly III, former sheriff of New Castle County and owner of the Logan House for many years, is a staple. The building, meanwhile, is the only 19th-century hotel in Wilmington to survive mostly intact.

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Photo provided by The Deer Park Tavern

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The Deer Park Tavern, circa 1924. Formerly a women’s seminary and a brothel (not at the same time).

The Deer Park was built in 1851 on the site of St. Patrick’s Inn, which Edgar Allan Poe visited before the inn burned down. (Hence the Deer Park’s logo of a raven.) Most alumni remember the Deer Park as a wild party place for students. (Locals sought refuge in the “Townie Bar.”) In 1974, streakers dashed through the parking lot and many patrons decided to follow in the naked runners’ footsteps. It took five police departments to get things under control, says Sandy Ashby. Using a vintage postcard as a guide, the Ashbys returned the Deer Park to its Victorian glory days, right down to the porch spindles. The renovation initially wasn’t met with universal approval. Many people appreciated the dive décor. Time has mellowed the discontents. The Deer Park now is a place where students can make memories and alumni can share their old ones with their children.

BUCKLEY’S TAVERN 5812 Kennett Pike - Centreville 656-9776 - buckleystavern.com

DEER PARK TAVERN 108 W. Main St. - Newark 369-9414 - deerparktavern.com The brick façade has been painted white and gray. Porches were added, removed, and added again. It’s been an inn, a women’s seminary, a brothel, a polling place, a ballroom, a barbershop, a liquor store—even a Chinese restaurant. But for the most part, it’s been a tavern, and a beloved one at that.

Built in 1817 as a private residence, Buckley’s premier location on Kennett Pike led to its role as a stagecoach and tollgate stop. In the 1930s it appealed to a wide range of ages by hosting both a taproom and ice cream store. Dennis Buckley, who took over in 1951, gave the operation its enduring name. Bob Bolling and Bob Applegate bought the building in 1970 and leased space to the tavern business. ►

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Many customers adored the aging building and its paneled walls, much like you would an old uncle who could still spin a good yarn. Others turned up their noses, particularly when the septic system made its presence known. Last year, when the building’s owners didn’t renew the restaurant’s lease, the structure underwent extensive renovations and improvements. The tavern operation got new owners, and it opened last October. The refreshed Buckley’s Tavern is back in the warm embrace of old customers, most of whom were pleased with the changes. “A group of guys come six nights a week,” says General Manager Chuck Lewis. “We’re trying to keep regulars happy.” Consequently, menu changes are handled with finesse. “If we do anything drastic, we risk alienating customers,” Lewis says. Although the Thai noodle soup remains, Chef Tom Hannum has successfully added new offerings to keep things fresh.

THANKSGIVING DINNER MENU

SAMBO’S TAVERN 283 Front St. - Leipsic 674-9724 Serves 8-10 people

$189 includes Feast Roasted Turkey served sliced with Gravy with stuffing, mashed potatoes, green bean casserole, rolls and cranberry relish S I D E S A V A I L A B L E S E P E R AT E LY, s e r v e 8 - 1 0 p e o p l e Cranberry Relish $20, Stuffing $20, Creamed Onions $25, Mashed Potatoes $25, Cole Slaw $15, Butter Nut Squash $25, Sweet Potato Soufflé $35, Green Bean Casserole $35, Steamed M i xe d Ve g e t a b l e s $ 3 5 , B ru s s e l s S p ro u t s $ 4 0 , G rav y 3 2 oz $ 1 0 , Dinner Rolls $6/dozen

DESSERTS Pumpkin Pie $18 Coconut Custard Pie $18 Apple Caramel Cheese Cake $30 Chocolate Raspberry Ganache Cake $40

Please place your orders by November 16th Orders must be picked up on November 20th 2510 West 5th Street . One block off Greenhill

M-F 11-7, Sat 11-3

656-8892

www.movablefeastde.com

If you want to experience this 60-year-old tavern, you’ll have to wait until 2014. Each year, it closes from late October to early April. That’s because this icon revolves around the crab harvest— the local crab harvest. The restaurant is nestled against the Leipsic River and watermen tie up at the dock to deliver the goods. If they come up empty, patrons turn to crab cakes, crab imperial, steaks, and chicken. Samuel “Sambo” Burrows started the tavern in 1953, and it’s now operated by his son, Ike, and Ike’s wife, Elva. Over the years, a visit to the tavern has become a must-do for NASCAR fans, who pack the place during the races. There are celebrity drivers’ photos on the wall, and a cutout of a racecar hangs above a pool table. The tavern is a destination for crablovers throughout the state. Not only do they love the crustaceans, they also love an atmosphere that’s remained relatively unchanged over the years. But leave the little pickers at home. This is a true tavern; no one under 21 is admitted.

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Photo by Don Blake

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Dewey Beach’s legendary Bottle & Cork has been packing them in for decades. This photo was taken by Out & About during the summer of 2003.

THE BOTTLE & CORK 1807 Highway One - Dewey Beach 227-7272 - bottleandcorkdewey.com In 1937, Ginger and Harry Shaud purchased property in Dewey for $7,500 and opened Jack’s Café, which offered dinner, sundry items, and gasoline. After a few years, the couple shucked the gas, candy, and gewgaws. The café became the Bottle & Cork. The bar stayed open all year during World War II to serve troops at Fort Miles in Lewes, now the site of Cape Henlopen State Park. There were big bands on the jukebox and swing dancing, according to an article in the Aug. 29, 2002 Cape Gazette. There were also jam sessions. “It is one of the oldest music venues in the five-state area,” says current owner Alex Pires. In the 1950s, the Bottle & Cork was the hotspot in town during the summer. So much so that Shaud had to institute an “intermission” in the afternoon so the staff could restock the

bar for the next jam session and the patrons could sober up. People dressed up, with their good shoes and pressed clothes, for a night out, and last call was at midnight. At the time, liquor laws required patrons to remain seated with their drink. Barstools were bolted to the floor. Only the servers could move the booze between tables if you wanted to mix and mingle. The Shauds sold the Bottle & Cork in 1957 to Henry and Ann Pack and their daughter, Blanche, who turned it into a rock-and-roll bar. By 1969, customers were allowed to move about with their beverage. The Packs also moved on, selling the spot to Jim and Linda Lavelle and investors, including former Congressman Mike Castle. Highway One bought the Bottle & Cork in 1989, and under its direction the establishment became known for hosting national headliners, including Dave Matthews and Matchbox 20. “It is called the ‘Greatest Rock and Roll Bar in the World,’” concludes Highway One principal, “because it is.” ►

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MILFORD TAVERN 24 S. Walnut St. - Milford 422-3909 Sometime in the 1930s, Al and Mildred Honeycutt opened Al Honeycutt’s in a circa-1928 building that was built as a bank— although it never served as one. They later sold the business to their daughter and son-in-law, who changed the name to the Milford Café. In 1983, New Jersey native Richard Hoomans bought the brick building and business from the couple, and the Milford Tavern was born. On May 30, 2003, around 3 a.m., a fire swept through downtown Milford’s historic section, which included the tavern. More than 200 firefighters fought the blaze, which took down a city block. Hoomans rebuilt his business, and, according to some, vastly improved it. “You can usually find a good crowd there at happy hour,” says Bryan Shupe, who publishes the online magazine MilfordLife.com and owns Fur-Baby Boutique, a shop offering dog daycare and canine accessories that’s also on Walnut Street. Don’t come hungry. With only a taproom license, the tavern doesn’t serve food. “I let people bring whatever they want as long as they buy their drinks from me,” Hoomans says. And if you’re in the market for a bar, he’s looking to sell. “I’d like to move to Florida,” he says.

THE STARBOARD 2009 Coastal Highway - Dewey Beach 227-4600 - thestarboard.com The Starboard started as Duke Duggan’s Last Resort Bar, which opened around 1960 in Dewey Beach, according to an Aug. 3, 2011 article in the Cape Gazette. Duggan, who changed the name at some point, was famous for meatballs and spaghetti and late night singalongs. “It was a true locals’ restaurant,” says current owner Monty Montgomery. There were expansions over the years, and Duggan’s old home is now a dining section called The Shark Tank. The Hearn family bought the restaurant in 1986, and wellknown beach personality Chip Hearn, who now owns the shop Peppers, turned The Starboard into the hotspot it is today—in more ways than one. His love of hot sauces helped create the famous Bloody Mary bar. Today, there are more than 700 ingredients. Montgomery, who was 18 when he started working under Hearn, scrubbing floors and carding, worked his way up to bartender, commuting to Dewey on summer weekends from Washington, D.C. In 1999, he and his partners purchased The Starboard. While the Bloody Mary remains a big draw, orange and grapefruit crushes come close. Consider that the Starboard regularly tops the list in Absolut Ruby Red Vodka sales, Montgomery says. What does the future hold for this famous spot? “We’ll continue in the direction we’re headed,” Montgomery says. “We make small changes to stay ahead of the competition while keeping The Starboard the same as it has been for generations: a cozy beach spot that not only has incredible nightlife, live music—and all the craziness associated with that—but that also offers amazing food.” 70 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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SPECIAL APPEARANC E BY SANTA CLAU S!

KIDS - BRI NG YOUR LETTERS T SANTA TO O THE PARAD E, AN D PUT DOWN YOUR ADDRESS SO SANTA CAN WRIT E YOU BAC K!

50th Annual Wilmington Jaycees

Christmas Parade Downtown Wilmington on Market Street Saturday, Nov 30th, 11am

For more info visit www.WilmingtonJaycees.com

NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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L L A B T O O F ULTIMATE

T U O W O L B

• 1PM – 5PM 4 2 BER SUNDAY, NOVEM

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Event is located at the Third Floor Track Clubhouse. Tickets are $34.95 each & available at the Cove. Visit delawarepark.com for more information.

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ALWAYS IN PLAY ™ SLOTS • LIVE TABLES • RACING • GOLF • DINING • SPORTS BETTING 777 Delaware Park Blvd. | Wilmington, DE 19804 | 800.41.SLOTS | delawarepark.com Just up the road, I-95 DE Exit 4B Video Lottery Agent for the Delaware Lottery. All games are Lottery games controlled by the Delaware Lottery. You must be 21 to play. Play responsibly. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, call the Delaware Council on Gambling Problems Helpline at 888-850-8888. www.dcgp.org

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DP-18856 Oct. Out-N-About Sports Betting Ad 4.5x7.indd 1 11_Play.indd 10_Inside.indd8 9

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SNAP SHOTS 1.

2. 3.

4. 1. Governor Jack Markell, State Senator Nicole Poore (left) and the rest of the field get ready to lead cyclists on the inaugural River Towns Ride. Photo Les Kipp

5.5.

2. After working registration, volunteers Lisa Hatfield (front) and Andrea Ladany grabbed their bikes and joined the field of cyclists for the River Towns Ride. Photo Les Kipp 3. Visitors enjoy the festivities in historic New Castle during the River Towns Ride & Festival. Photo Les Kipp 4. Kerry Kristine McElrone, Tonya Baynes, and Righteous Jolly relax shortly after lighting up the stage during the City Theater Co. performance of Jesus Christ Superstar at The Queen. Photo Jim Miller

5. Eunice LaFate with her husband, Robert (left), and Herman G. LaMont, Consul General of Jamaica, during the opening of her exhibit at the Blue Bell Barn Folk Art Museum entitled. “Eunice LaFate: 20-Year Retrospective of Folk Art.� Photo Jim Miller

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The

Wine Issue

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CherryTreeGroup.Com 74 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DELAWARE DAY December 7, Toast at 7pm

In Honor of Delaware Day and the 2013 Holiday Season, Twin Lakes Brewery has proudly produced 87 Fresh-Local-Delicious quarter kegs of the sensational “Jubilicious Holiday Ale” to commemorate Delaware becoming the First State on December 7, 1787. Twin Lakes Jubilicious will be available at your local watering hole and now liquor stores for growler fills - ABV 7%

The Statewide Toast:

As we have every year, in Honor of Delaware Day, December 7, we ask all of the citizens of the State of Delaware to join your family and friends at a local Delaware restaurant and show your dedication to Delaware, the First State, with a simultaneous toast of local beer at 7pm! DELAWARE HAS THE FINEST

BREWERIES IN AMERICA!

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Network Share Connect Presented By

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Tuesday, December 3

Chase Center on the Riverfront Keynote Speaker: Janice E. Nevin, M.D., MPH Chief Medical Officer, Christiana Care Health System

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Thursday, December 5

Tickets & Info:

DelawareToday.com

302.504.1364 Tickets@DelawareToday.com

DiFebo’s Bistro at Bear Trap Dunes Keynote Speaker: Deborah Brenner, Author & Founder of Women of the Vine

Custom sponsorships available at a variety of price points. For more information: 302.504.1326 or sales@DelawareToday.com CARMAN

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NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOOTBALL SPECIALS! ONLY AT THE BAR!

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TUESDAY TACO NIGHT $2 Tacos & Pitcher Margaritas $17 Bar only Wednesdays: Ladies Night! ½ Price Margaritas & Sangria at the Bar Only 9pm-1am Tequila Thursdays Tequila Tastings IN THE BIZ NIGHTS Wed. thru Sat. from 10pm-1am $3 Svedka Drinks, $3 Miller Lite Drafts, Margaritas Pitchers $19.99, $4 Corona & Corona Light, 1/2-Price Nachos

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76 NOVEMBER 2013 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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MAGAZINE

this issue

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• November Arts Stuff • Zaikka’s Dynamic Duo • Riverfront Events Calendar

NOVEMBER 2013 Vol. 5

ISSUE 5

10/24/13 10:19 AM


NOVEMBER 8

NOVEMBER 22

GET YOUR TICKETS FOR THE BEST SEATS IN TOWN FOR SHOWTIMES & TICKETS VISIT

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Produced by

all rights reserved

TSN Publishing, Inc. President Gerald duPhily

Contributing Editor Bob Yearick

Creative Director Matthew Loeb Catalyst Visuals, LLC.

Graphic Designer

November 2013 volume 5, issue 5

4 Business Dynamic Duo The husband-and-wife team behind Zaikka find hard work and flavorful, healthy food are a winning combo. By Krista Connor

6 The Arts

Tasty Menu of Art Stuff From Arden Gild to Delaware Symphony, November offers a full plate of entertainment. By Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald

Tyler Mitchell Catalyst Visuals, LLC

Advertising Sales Jim Hunter Miller Marie Graham

Contributing Writers Matt Amis, Barb Bullock, Krista Connor, Josephine Eccel, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Larry Nagengast, Scott Pruden

Contributing Photographers Joe del Tufo, Tim Hawk Les Kipp, Matt Urban

7 Cover Story Wilmo Rock Circus Budding music acts get their chance to shine on the big stage at World Cafe Live. By Krista Connor

Departments 2

“in” Calendar

8

Riverfront Map & Attractions

11

Downtown News

Cover illustration by Tyler Mitchell.

For editorial and advertising information: p (302) 655-6483 f (302) 654-0569

TSN Media, Inc. 307 A Street Wilmington, DE 19801

ABOUT THE “IN” CAMPAIGN

Wilmington is truly in the middle of it all, and the “in” campaign is a celebration of the accomplishments we continue to achieve as a community to make our city stronger and more attractive. From neighborhood and business development to our arts and cultural scene, the people of Wilmington are working together to support our city’s ongoing growth and prosperity.

ABOUT WILMINGTON MAGAZINE

The mission of Wilmington Magazine is to capture, through stories and images, the ongoing energy present in the city. We aim to inform readers, both inside and outside Wilmington, of the city’s residential, financial, and cultural progress while remaining entertaining and vibrant. 1

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A &

WHAT’S ‘IN’ FOR

NOVEMBER 2013

MUSIC

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FOOD & DRINK

NOW - SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16

NOW - SUNDAY, JANUARY 26

NOW - WED, NOVEMBER 27

NOW - SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3

Erica Loustau: Exodus: Canaries Fleeing the Coal Mine

The Wizard of Oz Children’s Educational Exhibition

Laura McMillan: Surfacing

Fringe Wilmington

Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts 200 S. Madison Street • 302.656.6466 bit.ly/15LJGsL

Delaware Children’s Museum 550 Justison Street • 302.654.2340 bit.ly/GAc99i

The Station Gallery 3922 Kennett Pike • 302.654.8638 bit.ly/15LJGsP

Various Locations #inWilm Journey Beyond the Edge! • 302.576.2100 bit.ly/GAc8lM

T NOW - SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3

Annie

NOW - SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3

The Addams Family

SAT, NOV 2 & SUN, NOV 3

SAT, NOV 2 - FRI, NOV 8

Spank! The Fifty Shades Parody

Wilmington Beer Week

Delaware Children’s Theatre 1014 Delaware Avenue • 302.655.1014 bit.ly/15LJF8f

Dupont Theatre 11th & Market Streets • 302.656.4401 bit.ly/18WKrxZ

The Grand • 818 N. Market Street 800.37.GRAND • bit.ly/17Zw9Ie

Various Locations #inWilm More than 35 craft brewers will be showcased! 302.655.6483 • bit.ly/18Przi8

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 8PM

WED, NOVEMBER 6, 5:30PM

FRI, NOV 8 - SUN, NOV 10, 11AM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 7PM

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DSO Crosswinds

Stache Bash

50th Annual Delaware Antiques Show

DCCA’s Fall Fundraiser: eat.drink.ART

Gold Ballroom at the Hotel du Pont 42 West 11th Street • 800.37.GRAND bit.ly/GCFy3b

Kelly’s Logan House Benefitting Supporting Kidds 1701 Delaware Ave. • 302.235.5544 bit.ly/1767lOC

Chase Center of the Riverfront 815 Justison Street • 800.448.3883 bit.ly/18UcnPB

Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts 200 S. Madison Street • 302.656.6466 bit.ly/16kf27C

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 7PM

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 8PM

SAT, NOVEMBER 16, 8PM

TUES, NOVEMBER 19, 7:30PM

Artful Zumba

Swear and Shake w/ The Honey Badgers

D.V.S* w/ Jimmy Dunstan Trio

baby grand • 818 N. Market Street 800.37.GRAND • bit.ly/GAcqc7

Arden Gild Hall • 2126 The Highway 302.475.3126 • bit.ly/15LK4aJ

CoroAllegro presents: Hail, Bright Cecilia!

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Delaware Art Museum 2301 Kentmere Parkway • 302.571.9590 bit.ly/1aq86GM

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Aldersgate United Methodist Church 2313 Concord Pike • 302.478.2575 bit.ly/159vh6Y

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10/24/13 8:55 AM


ART IS IN: EXHIBITS OPENING & CLOSING THIS MONTH #INWILM Delaware Art Museum

• For the Love of Art: Teaching Artists of the Red Clay School District opens Nov 2 • The Topography of Oz opens Nov 29 302.571.9590 • 2301 Kentmere Pkwy

Open Mic Night every Tues. 9pm-1am Oddity Bar • 500 Greenhill Ave. • 302.668.1078

The Grand • 818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17TH Family Sunday

4W5 Blues Jam • World Cafe Live at The Queen • 500 N. Market St. • 302.994.1400

DCCA • 200 South Madison St • 302.656.6466

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19TH

Gordon Lightfoot

The Grand • 818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

Workshop for Artists

DCCA • 200 South Madison St • 302.656.6466

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7TH

Delaware Center For Horticulture

Art Salad 12-1pm Thursdays

Delaware College of Art & Design

Market Street Music Thurs. Noontime Concert: Center City Chorale

Demonstration: Winter Containers

DCCA • 200 South Madison St • 302.656.6466

• Gina Bosworth's Alpine Images opens Nov 1 302.658.6262 • 1810 N. DuPont St.

TheDCH • 1810 N. DuPont St. • 302.658.6262

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20 TH The Sermon! • World Cafe Live at The

1st & Central Church Presbyterian 1101 N. Market St. • 302.654.5371

• Six x Six: Women Photographers of the MidAtlantic Exhibition opens Nov 1 302.658.6262 • 1810 N. DuPont St.

Queen • 500 N. Market St. • 302.994.1400

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST

How Art Transforms Law

Delaware Art Museum 2301 Kentmere Pkwy • 302.571.9590

Mezzanine Gallery

• Bill Wolff Exhibition opens Nov 1 302.577.8278 • 820 N. French St.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8

Somerville Manning Gallery • Rikki Morley Saunders closes Nov 16 302.652.0271 • 101 Stone Block Row

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1ST

Market Street Music: Wilmington Handbell Ensemble • 1st & Central

Church • 1101 N. Market St. • 302.654.5371

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Floral Arranging Make & Take Workshop: Cornucopia!

An Evening w/ Aaron Neville

The Grand • 818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

TheDCH • 1810 N. DuPont St. • 302.658.6262

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9TH

Art IN The IN the Show: Ark: AnPoint, INteractive Click, Zoo Preview

Fight For Air Climb

The Look of Love: Eye Miniatures from the Skier Collection thru Jan 4

benefitting American Lung Association 1201 N. Market St. • 302.737.6414

Open Studio thru Nov 3

Scout Day • Brandywine Zoo 1001 North Park Drive • 302.571.7747

Winterthur • 5105 Kennett Pk. • 800.448.3883 Delaware Children’s Museum 550 Justison Street • 302.654.2340

Brandywine Zoo Tavern Party • Chelsea 1001 Park Dr. •• 302.571.7747 821 N.North Market Street 302.475.9880 x 31

Soul Sessions Album Release w/ Richard Raw • World Cafe Live at The

Queen • 500 N. Market St. • 302.994.1400

American Moderns Gallery Talks

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22 ND

Delaware Art Museum 2301 Kentmere Pkwy • 302.571.9590

Melt the Witch thru Nov 3

Delaware Children’s Museum 550 Justison Street • 302.654.2340

Group Hayrides thru Nov 16 • Bellevue State Park • 800 Carr Road • 302.761.6963

2301 Kentmere Pkwy • 302.571.9590

Art is Tasty • Delaware Art Museum 2301 Kentmere Parkway • 302.571.9590

Lunchtime Live with Dan Orlando

Debo Band • Arden Gild Hall

Fridays 12-2pm World Cafe Live at The Queen 500 N. Market Street • 302.994.1400

Steven Wright • The Grand

800 N. Market Street • 800.37.GRAND

baby grand • 818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23RD Art IN the Ark: Point, Click, Zoo

Brandywine Zoo 1001 North Park Dr. • 302.571.7747

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10 TH

Art IN Life ofthe an Ark: Animal Point, Rehabilitator Click, Zoo

Brandywine Zoo Creek State Park 1001 41 Adams North Dam ParkRd. Dr.• •302.577.3534 302.571.7747

Family Exploration Day: American Moderns • Delaware Art Museum

Green Room at the Hotel du Pont 11th & Market Streets • 302.594.3154

leave 5:45pm from DCCA, last return approx. 8:30pm • 302.576.2135 • 200 S. Madison St.

The Last Bison w/ Ballroom Thieves

2126 The Highway • 302.475.3126

Centennial Afternoon Tea 3pm daily Art on the Town • Various Locations Buses

Art is After Dark: Holiday Greeting

Cards • Delaware Art Museum 2301 Kentmere Pkwy • 302.571.9590

The Cake Boss LIVE: The Family Celebrations Tour • DuPont Theatre World Blues: Taj Mahal, Vusi Mahlasela & Fredericks Brown w/ Deva Mahal The Grand • 800.37.GRAND

2301 Kentmere Pkwy • 302.571.9590

PB & Jams: Erin Lee & the Up Past

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12TH

Bedtime Band • World Cafe Live at The Queen • 500 N. Market St. • 302.994.1400

Baby & Me 9:30am e/o Tues thru Dec 10 Brandywine Zoo • 302.571.7747

OperaDelaware Teen LabPoe: A Dream Within A Dream

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13TH

& Nov 24 • OperaDelaware Studios 4 S. Poplar St. • 302.658.8063

Music Masters: A Woodwind Wingding • The Music School of Delaware

ZeroHour LIVE • Spaceboy Clothing

617 N. Market Street • 302.225.9781

Joe Ely in The Round with Ruthie Foster And Paul Thorn

4101 Washington Street • 302.762.1132

A Chorus Line thru Nov 3

The Grand • 818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

The Act Of Drinking Beer With Friends Is The Highest Form Of Art

New Candlelight Theatre 2208 Millers Road • 302.475.2313

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2 ND Kid’s Class

Meet the Artist! Monthly Gallery Talks w/ Eunice LaFate • Blue Ball Barn 1914 W. Park Dr. • 302.577.1164

Philly Dance Band Rock Bellevue Barn 800 Carr Road • 302.761.6963

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24TH

DCCA • 200 South Madison St • 302.656.6466

Aladdin and Other Enchanting Tales

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14TH

The Grand • 818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

Market Street Music Thurs. Noontime Concert: Ismar Gomez & Wan-Chi Su

Saturdays 10:30am-12:30pm thru Nov 9 DCCA • 200 South Madison St • 302.656.6466

Delaware Valley Chorale: Mozart, Love & The Universe • 1st & Central

1st & Central Church Presbyterian 1101 N. Market St. • 302.654.5371

Church • 1101 N. Market St. • 302.654.5371

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH

Green Willow Folk Club Concert Series: Comas • Blue Ball Barn

Bonnie Raitt w/ Paul Brady

1914 West Park Drive • 302.456.3242

The Grand • 818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15TH

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 3RD 3000 Creek Road • 302.239.2385

Bruce in the USA: Tribute to Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band

The Grand • 818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

Clint Black • The Grand

818 N. Market St. • 800.37.GRAND

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INtuitive Drawing for Non Artists

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29TH

Owl Prowls • Brandywine Creek State Park 41 Adams Dam Rd. • 302.577.3534

Steamin' Days • Marshall Steam Museum

Clay Date • Delaware Art Museum 2301 Kentmere Pkwy • 302.571.9590

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16TH

Tuesdays 2am thru Nov 26 Delaware Center for Horticulture 1810 Dupont Street • 302.658.6262

TodZOOler & PreK Programs 9:30am e/o Tues thru Dec 10 • Brandywine Zoo 1001 North Park Dr. • 302.571.7747 Flight Club every Tuesday 5:30-7:30pm

Chelsea Tavern • 821 N. Market Street

find more at { inWilmingtonDE.com }

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Wanda Sykes

Giving on Tap benefitting Meals on Wheels Delaware • Two Stones Pub 2502 Foulk Road • 302.439.3231

• Kerry Harrison & Ken Mabrey thru Nov 29 • Steve Baris’ Exurban Archipelago thru Nov 3 • Sublime Creatures: The Animal-Human

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5

Crowne Plaza Hotel 630 Naamans Road • 610.401.5057

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6TH

Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts

Hybrids of Hunter Clarke opens Nov 16 302.656.6466 • 200 South Madison Street

A Tajci Concert Experience: "Awaken”

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30 TH

Trinity Parish Bazaar • Trinity

Episcopal • 1108 N. Adams St • 302.652.8605

Art INSigning Book the Ark:&Point, Photography Click, Zoo Exhibit

Mannheim Steamroller Christmas

Brandywine The Station Gallery Zoo 1001 3922 North KennettPark PikeDr. • 302.654.8638 • 302.571.7747

DuPont Theatre 11th & Market Streets • 302.656.4401

Hagley Walking Tour

200 Hagley Road • 302.658.2400

Market Street Music: Pyxis Piano Quartet • 1st & Central Church 1101 N. Market St. • 302.654.5371

MUSIC

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FOOD & DRINK

10/24/13 8:56 AM


Sandeep and Anu Nagpal opened a second Zaikka—which translates to “flavor”—in August. Photo Danielle Quigley

Its two locations offer fresh, healthy meals that usually come in under 600 calories

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By Krista Connor

or first-time entrepreneurs who want to start a successful business, here are a few tips from husbandwife restaurant owners Sandeep and Anu Nagpal: Be humble. Be positive. And not so surprisingly, be willing to work very, very hard. Every weekday since 2011, they’ve had their sleeves rolled up 14 hours a day—that’s 70 hours a week—orchestrating Zaikka Indian Grill at two Wilmington locations. They opened the first spicy hit two summers ago on Market Street, and the second location on King Street this past August. “If you want to own a restaurant, you should be able to do each and every thing,” says Anu. “You should be able to do anything from cleaning and mopping to dishes to being able to cook.”

The concept for Zaikka, which translates to “flavor,” took about nine months to build—a slow, patient, but ultimately rewarding process. The couple experimented with a variety of recipes passed down by parents and grandparents, and decided that although they wanted their restaurant to be Indian-themed, they didn’t want to serve traditional Indian food with ingredients like heavy cream and butter, and they didn’t want to open as a common Indian buffet. “We wanted to bring something different,” says Anu. “That’s what brought both our passions together.” From the start, fresh, healthy food on a simple build-ityourself menu was their prime focus.

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10/24/13 3:55 PM


Sandeep and Anu arrived in the U.S. from India 12 years ago (Anu earned her MBA in Colorado) but the couple didn’t meet and marry until 2009, when they moved to Bowie, Md. Sandeep was working and Anu took culinary and hospitality management classes in Bowie, but Wilmington had the perfect small downtown feel they craved for their business venture. So two years later they packed up and headed to Wilmington. They had previously worked in restaurant environments, but had never taken on an entire enterprise. Since starting the business, though, they’ve learned that running the show has its advantages. As owners and cooks, they’re not dependent on outside chefs or cooks, an independence Anu calls “the biggest plus point.” “Within a month we didn’t have any particular issues running the restaurant,” she says, and they already have ideas for a third Zaikka in Newark or Philly. “If you have good employees and the right attitude, it’s long hours, yes, but it’s not that difficult.” The Nagpals’ time is divided between both establishments. They start their morning with a quick check-in at the Market Street location (a simple task, since their apartment is located on the floor above), where employees follow the couples’ recipes. Then they continue to the King Street Zaikka for the rest of the day. “We don’t believe in micro managing,” Anu says. “If you have the right employees, if they’re doing their job, you don’t have to worry about it.” Zaikka draws its customers by word of mouth, which the owners have found more effective than advertising, because the Nagpals believe that once you’ve tasted the fresh food you’ll definitely come back and tell your friends, too. “Zaikka is like an everyday meal, where you can eat it and not feel guilty,” says Anu. For more information, visit www.zaikka.com or www. internationalsubs.com.

Photo Danielle Quigley

The menu contains fewer than 10 proteins, ranging from hormone-free chicken and grass-fed braised lamb to tofu and chickpeas, preceded by three start options (rice bowl, naan roll or salad greens) and followed by four choices of curry and a selection of toppings. A handful of sides, beverages—including beer, wine and Indian drinks—and two desserts wrap up the primarily gluten-free menu. By keeping the menu simple and small, fresh food can always be served, Anu believes, like crowd favorites chicken tikka masala—chicken in a slow simmered tomato sauce—or the lamb bowl (slowly cooked braised lamb). “We’re all about fresh and healthy,” she says, adding that the majority of their meals fall below 600 calories. Chicken tikka masala, for example, at a traditional Indian restaurant would contain about 800-900 calories in the chicken tikka sauce alone, because it’s usually made with heavy cream and butter. In traditional Indian cooking, meats, too, are higher in fat, because the meat is cooked in its sauce, keeping the fat in. At Zaikka, meats are cooked and drained separately. “We have the more healthy version,” Anu says. Most of the spices and rice are shipped from India, but the majority of the food is sourced from this area, with the chicken coming from Mountaire Farm in Millsboro and tofu from Nature’s Soy in Philadelphia. Additionally, a new concept is available at Zaikka called iSubs—Globally Inspired. Made at a separate counter, iSubs are internationally inspired hand-crafted subs, wraps and salads. iSubs protein includes unprocessed meat, vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free options. Subs and salads are made with fresh marinated chicken breast, flavored tofu, vegetarian chicken and freshly made falafel. All sandwiches are made to order, and bread is delivered daily from LeBus Bakery in Philadelphia.

Zaikka patrons choose from a simple, build-it-yourself menu that contains less than 10 proteins.

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10/24/13 10:31 AM


A Delicious Menu of Art Stuff

BY MICHELLE KRAMER-FITZGERALD

In honor of this month’s Out & About theme of “Winter Brews,” I’m providing a list of rich and varied “art tastes” for sampling. From classical to world funk, from the Gold Ballroom to Arden Gild Hall, from the tantalizing tastes of Italy to the kicky kitsch of Route 66, this month’s art flavors will surely satisfy even the most particular palate. Come and consume the Arts in Wilmington!

EARLY MONTH “APPETIZERS” THE MUSIC SCHOOL OF DELAWARE PRESENTS CULTURAL CROSSROADS: SPREZZATURA, THE MUSIC AND CULTURE OF ITALY This multi-faceted event starts with pre-concert workshops on Italian cuisine, language and folk dancing and proceeds to a concert featuring Paganini’s famous Caprices for solo violin, scenes from Italian operas and guitar arrangements of Italian Renaissance music from noted regional musicians Christopher Braddock, guitar and mandolin; Daniel Carunchio, piano; Alessandra Cuffaro, violin; Catherine Short de Arce, soprano; Jerry Polman, baritone; Douglas Seth, guitar; Matthew Smith, guitar. In addition, artist Mario Passarello features his themed works. Sunday, Nov. 3, 3 pm at The Music School of Delaware, 4101 Washington St. Tickets, $10; $5 students and seniors. Call 762-1132. DELAWARE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS CROSSWINDS What’s better than sipping a glass of bubbly in the magnificent gem of the Gold Ballroom? When it’s perfectly blended with music by the DSO, of course. This month as part of the Chamber Series, Vaughan Williams’ Oboe Concerto— often considered his most successful work in this form—and Dvorak’s Serenade for Strings, featuring the rich sounds of DSO principal oboist Jeff O’Donnell, fills this opulent room. Tuesday, Nov. 5, 8 pm at the Gold Ballroom in the Hotel du Pont. Tickets are $60 and they go fast. Get yours today at ticketsatthegrand.org.

A DUAL DUEL OF “ENTREES”

You’ll have to make a tough choice here, but both menu items are worthy specials. ARDEN CONCERT GILD PRESENTS DEBO BAND Named one of NPR Music’s 50 Favorite Albums of 2012, Boston-based Debo Band takes traditional Ethiopian sounds and whips them into a dish where funk, soul and free jazz swirl together. Formed in 2006, Debo Band is an 11-member group led by Ethiopian-American saxophonist Danny Mekonnen and vocalist Bruck Tesfaye. Saturday, Nov. 9, 8 pm at Arden Gild Hall, 2126 The Highway in Arden. Tickets are $22 (Gild Members $18). Purchase them at brownpapertickets.com.

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DELAWARE CENTER FOR THE CONTEMPORARY ARTS PRESENTS EAT.DRINK.ART Eat, drink, and ART it up in an exciting evening celebrating great tastes from the road, inspired by the cuisine from Route 66 eateries. In the spirit of its fall exhibit, CUR(EAT), DCCA has cooked up a menu of great food, drinks, music and, of course, art. A silent auction and artwork auction tops off the evening. Dress in your finest Rt. 66 Roadhouse Retro—anything from denim to diamonds. Saturday, Nov. 9, 7 pm at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, 200 S. Madison St. Tickets are $90-$130. Buy them now at thedcca.org/eatdrinkART.

DELISH FINISHES TO YOUR MONTH (before Turkey Day feasts, anyway)

MARKET STREET MUSIC’S FESTIVAL CONCERT FEATURING PYXIS PIANO QUARTET Pyxis Piano Quartet is always a high-demand dish in town, so when they expand their performance footprint and return to Market Street Music, it’s like getting an extra dessert. Violinist Meredith Amado, violist Amy Leonard, cellist Jie Jin, and pianist Hiroko Yamazaki are known for their engaging music-making. They regularly perform to sold-out crowds at the Delaware Art Museum, so this concert—including works by Beethoven and Delaware composer Ingrid Arauco—is sure to be “86’d” early, so don’t miss it! Saturday, Nov. 16, 7:30pm at First & Central Presbyterian Church, 1101 N. Market St. Tickets are $15 online or $20 at door; student tickets are $10 and age 14 and under are admitted free. Purchase at marketstreetmusicde.org. DELAWARE CENTER FOR HORTICULTURE PRESENTS CONTAINERS @ THE DCH Dress up your home for the approaching holidays with advice from Scott Arboretum’s horticulturist Josh Coceano. Josh teaches you some artsy flair to enhance your home’s winter appeal by creating beautiful seasonal displays with plants that can withstand winter’s harshest weather, with a demonstration of plant selection, color, texture and container design. Tuesday, Nov. 19, 1 pm, The Delaware Center for Horticulture, 1810 N. Dupont St. Tickets are $25 for members and $35 for non-members. Get tickets at thedch.org. Want more ArtStuff? Follow me and Dewey the Art Dog @ArtsinMedia or visit INWilmingtonDE.com for a variety of menu suggestions now and throughout the season.

10/24/13 10:33 AM


Twenty-plus bands will fill The Queen’s stages for the third annual event on Nov. 30

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By Krista Connor

ome one, come all, to the Biggest Show in the Small Wonder: Wilmo Rock Circus, the full-venue music menagerie at The Queen. Hosted by Gable Music Ventures in association with Planet Ten and World Cafe Live at The Queen, the third annual indoor festival is set for Saturday, Nov. 30. More than 20 of the area’s best up-and-coming rock and alternative bands will offer non-stop music, beginning at 6 p.m. The bands will appear on all The Queen’s stages. The main stage in the downstairs theater will be the “Big Top Stage”—the festival’s main attraction. Between sets on the main stage, short sets from acoustic acts on the balcony’s Sideshow Stage will be projected downstairs on the big screen. Meanwhile, Upstairs Live will be the High Wire Stage. Boardwalk-style food will be available, as well as beer and drink specials. Carnival art, face painting, and more family-friendly fun add to the circus theme. Acts include rockabilly heavy hitters The Bullets and alternative rock band The Great SOCIO, along with 2013 Musikarmageddon winners Glim Dropper, and Newark-based Universal Funk Order. “Last year was such a successful year for Rock Circus we expanded our reach to a broader geographical area,” says Gayle Dillman, co-founder of Gable Music Ventures. Among this year’s performers are Baltimore bands Brooks Long & The Mad Dog No Good, Sweet Leda, and The Rez. In addition to The Great SOCIO, Philadelphia will be represented by The Late Saints, Madalean Gauze and Soraia. Founded in 2011 as an all-ages pop-up microfest and originally staged in a former retail space on the Riverfront, Wilmo Rock Circus was partially inspired by the trend of brands and artists establishing “pop-up shops” in major cities such as Los Angeles and London, where a short-term retail store or art exhibition pops up and disappears just as quickly. Dillman says she hopes the event will top 800 attendees—that’s 200 more than last year’s crowd. “I am looking forward to being surrounded by creative, original music and people who love music and coming to Wilmington to be a part of the dynamic revitalization,” she says. “This night is a live music sampler of not only who is popular but who is unique—a group of bands you would never find on the same bill.” Doors open at 5 p.m. Tickets are $14 online and $17 at the door. Street parking is free after 6 p.m. For tickets and more information, visit www.wilmorockcircus.com. 7

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10/24/13 5:10 PM


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1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Harry’s Seafood Grill / Riverfront Market, HARRYS-SAVOY.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. FireStone Roasting House, FIRESTONERIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk

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11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, THEDCCA.ORG 13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM 14. Kooma, KOOMASUSHI.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM

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18. Public Docks 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM 20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM

Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/ DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG 27 DART Park-n-Ride Lot 28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29: CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM Photo by Dick Dubroff of Final Focus Photography

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10/24/13 9:03 AM


NOVEMBER

RIVERFRONT EVENTS CANOEING THE RIVER AND MARSH* November 2, 10-2pm Canoe along the Christina River and its winding channels in search of wildlife. DuPont Environmental Education Center DuPontEEC.org DELAWARE FUTURES 5K* November 2 Race begins at 9am. Benefits Delaware Futures. Joe’s Crab Shack Races2Run.com OBLATES OF ST. FRANCIS DE SALES 18TH ANNUAL BLACK TIE FOR WHITE COLLARS* November 2, 7pm Please join us for an elegant evening of fine dining, a dessert bar and dancing the night away with the Strangers band! Chase Center on the Riverfront Oblates.org 50TH ANNUAL DELAWARE ANTIQUE SHOW OPENING NIGHT PARTY* November 7, 5-9pm Meet and mingle with the dealers, enjoy privileged early access shopping amidst exceptional antiques, and enjoy the fun! Chase Center on the Riverfront Winterthur.org/DAS ENVIRONMENTAL BOOK CLUB November 7, 6pm Join a lively discussion of selected books relating to our natural world. DuPont Environmental Education Center DuPontEEC.org 50TH ANNUAL DELAWARE ANTIQUES SHOW* November 8-November 10 One of the nation’s most highly acclaimed antiques shows celebrates its 50th anniversary with a spectacular showcase of art, antiques, and design! Chase Center on the Riverfront Winterthur.org/DAS 10TH ANNUAL DISABILITY BALL* November 8, 6-11pm This event brings together many different disabled communities, not only to have a good time, but, perhaps, to create a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Chase Center on the Riverfront DisabilityBall.com

*FEE REQUIRED

INSIDE THE OPERA STUDIO: OPERA UNDRESSED* November 8, 6:30pm & November 10, 2pm This informal “greatest hits” program offers something for everyone. Music Director Jeffrey Miller guides the audience through a wonderful evening of hits, and out of the way gems, performed by some of today’s most exciting singers - up close and personal. Opera Delaware OperaDE.org

GPS TREASURE HUNT* November 17, 10-12pm Experience a modern day treasure hunt along the Christina River! Geocaching is a worldwide game of hiding and seeking a cache of riches using a global positioning system. After a GPS tutorial, awaken your inner pirate to find a series of geocaches hidden along Wilmington’s Riverwalk. DuPont Environmental Education Center DuPontEEC.org

ATI METAL WALK AND 5K RUN* November 9, 9am Join us for our first-ever Metal Walk on the East Coast! 5K Metal Walk & 5K run, along with our annual Chili Cook-Off and tasting! This celebration event is dedicated to raising funds for children with physical impairments. Frawley Stadium ATIPT.com

BOARD-GAME-A-GO-GO November 17, 12-3pm Bring classic board games into the third dimension as you create a sculptural playground based on the exhibition Exurban Archipelago by artist Steven Baris. Make your own giant game pieces and get playing, or create game-inspired artwork using mixed-media techniques. Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts TheDCCA.org

EAT.DRINK.ART DCCA’S FALL 2013 FUNDRAISER* November 9, 7-11pm Join us for an exciting evening celebrating great tastes from the road inspired by the cuisine from Rt. 66 roadside eateries. Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts TheDCCA.org RED FOX RANGERS DAY CAMP* November 11, 8:30-3:30pm Spend your day exploring the mammals of DEEC. Look for animal tracks and preserve them with plaster. Touch animal furs and hike through the marsh to look for evidence of beaver, raccoons and white tail deer. Do any other mammals frequent the marsh? We need your help to find out! DuPont Environmental Education Center DuPontEEC.org THE ACT OF DRINKING BEER WITH FRIENDS IS THE HIGHEST FORM OF ART November 13, 5-7pm DCCA will host Tina and Rick Betz with representatives of the Delaware Sports League in our Constance S. and Robert J. Hennessy Project Space Gallery this fall with local celebrities encouraging great conversation in Tom Marioni’s beer bar installation. Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts TheDCCA.org GIRLS ON THE RUN NEW CASTLE COUNTYFALL 5K* November 16, 9am The Girls on the Run 5k race is the culmination of the 10 week program. We invite you, your family and friends to join us at the 5k as we celebrate our girls’ success. Dravo Plaza GirlsontheRunDE.org

FANTASTIC MR. FOX* November 21, 10-11:30am Enter the world of the red fox. Make a sly mask, read the parable of the fox and grapes and leap for a snack! It’s an hour of “pure wild animal craziness” according to Mr. Fox! DuPont Environmental Education Center DuPontEEC.org 3RD LIMEN HOUSE GRATITUDE RUN* November 24 Race begins at 8am Dravo Plaza Races2Run.com HOWARD HIGH SCHOOL INAUGURAL STRIDES FOR SUCCESS* November 30, 10am Benefits Academy of Finance at Howard School of Technology. Dravo Plaza Races2Run.com

ONGOING EVENTS ART SALAD Thursdays, Noon - 1pm Art Salad is a free lunchtime discussion forum. Artists, historians, educators, and curators share multi-point perspectives into the world of contemporary art. You are welcome to bring a lunch or order from our visiting food truck partners. Offered jointly with University of Delaware’s Osher Lifelong Institute. Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts TheDCCA.org

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CITY NOTES

BigIdeasWilmington.com

The International Economic Development Council (IEDC) is a nonprofit organization that supports economic developers in building sustainable communities. The IEDC believes that with the right tools, economic developers everywhere can create a vision for the future, stimulate consensus and prepare their communities for 21st century success. WRC Managing Director Carrie Gray attended the IEDC’s 2013 Annual Conference in Philadelphia Oct. 6–9 to share her expertise and explore strategies for making Wilmington a more vibrant city. She served on the Conference Host Committee and, at one of the many sessions, co-presented “The Pitch: How to Channel Mad Men’s Don Draper in Recruiting Retailers to Urban Business Districts.” Carrie spoke about Wilmington’s redevelopment challenges and successes. WRC also led a session with 25 IEDC conference attendees from around the country. Entitled “Wilmington, Delaware: A Tale of Two Unique Redevelopment Initiatives,” the session comprised a three-hour tour that showcased the economic development initiatives along Market Street, including the Grand Opera House, the Delaware College of Art & Design and the beautifully restored (World Cafe Live) Queen Theater. The group then visited Lincoln Square and 2nd & LOMA. Lastly,

the rebirth of Wilmington’s Riverfront was highlighted with a driving tour of that area’s residential and commercial developments, including Christina Landing, Christina Tower, The River Tower, Christina Crossing, The Joseph A. Biden Wilmington Train Station, Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park, Justison Landing and the Shipyard Shops. The tour ended with a presentation at Penn Cinema. Chris Buccini of the BPG Group, Hal Real from World Cafe Live at The Queen, Harold Gray and Jeff Flynn from the City of Wilmington’s Office of Economic Development, Debbie Schwartz from LOMA, Megan McGlinchey and Mike Purzycki from Riverfront Development Corporation (RDC), Jennifer Bush from the Delaware Children’s Museum, Rick Gessner from Capital One 360, and Downtown Visions Ambassadors all participated in the tour and presentations. The next day, an IEDC group visiting from Australia and New Zealand spent half a day with the WRC staff and also toured Market Street, LOMA and the Riverfront, with presentations from WRC and RDC. All of the visitors were impressed with the progress Wilmington has made and left with vivid impressions of how best practices in economic development can transform an urban area.

— Barb Bullock

STAFF PICKS Every month we highlight a few happenings in the City. Our favorites for November: Wilmington Beer Week in Downtown Wilmington, Nov. 2-9

Fringe Wilmington in Downtown Wilmington, Oct. 30–Nov. 3

This event is a weeklong celebration of craft beer, featuring Greater Wilmington’s premier craft beer restaurants. More than 35 craft brewers will be showcased. Special events include Delaware Beer Night, Meet the Brewer, Tap Takeovers, Firkin Parties, Prix-Fixe Menus, and more. More information: WilmingtonBeerWeek.com

Fringe Wilmington is a celebration of unconventional and experimental art that gives artists of all creative disciplines an opportunity to explore the outer edges of their art. This year’s festival will feature nearly 200 local, regional and national artists showcasing performance art, visual arts, cinema and an extreme filmmaking competition. More information: fringewilmingtonde. com/festivalInfo

Wanda Sykes at the Grand Opera House, Saturday, Nov. 16 Wanda Sykes has been called “one of the funniest standup comics” by her peers, and ranks among Entertainment Weekly’s 25 Funniest People in America. In October of 2009, her second HBO stand-up special, “I’ma Be Me,” premiered. In it she tackled topics like the first black president, gay cruises, being a new mom, and aging. The special was nominated for two 2010 Primetime Emmy awards: Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special and Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Special. Sykes returns to The Grand after a sell-out performance in 2011. More information: thegrandwilmington. org/Productions/1314-Season/Wanda-Sykes

The Cake Boss Live: The Family Celebrations Tour at the DuPont Theatre, Saturday, Nov. 9 Join America’s favorite baker, Buddy Valastro, for an all-new show of cakes, stories and fun. In this live interactive event, TLC’s Cake Boss will share stories from his highly popular TV shows (Cake Boss, Next Great Baker) and his family at Carlo’s Bakery. Buddy will answer audience questions and, most important, will give lots of live cake and cupcake decorating demonstrations, sharing tips and techniques in a high-energy experience for the whole family. More information: inwilmingtonde.com/events/ cakeboss

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Out & About Magazine November 2013