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The 'Hotel' Comforting Families in Trying Times

30 Events for 30 Years

Local Brewers & New England IPAs

G R E AT E R W I L M I N G T O N

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MARCH 2018 COMPLIMENTARY

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NOVEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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April 16-21 Mark Your Calendar Now

2018

A Week of Prix-Fixe Dining at Wilmington’s Premier Restaurants 8th and Union Kitchen | Bull Bay Caribbean Cuisine | Chelsea Tavern | Café Mezzanotte Columbus Inn | Domaine Hudson | Ernest & Scott Taproom | Gallucio’s Italian Restaurant Harry’s Seafood Grill | La Fia Bistro | Merchant Bar | Mikimotos Asian Grill + Sushi Bar Piccolina Toscana | The Green Room | Tonic Bar & Grille | Ubon Thai Cuisine Walter’s Steakhouse | Washington Street Ale House

LUNCH: 2 courses $15 | DINNER: 3 courses $35

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6 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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2 INSIDE 2

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Out & About Magazine Vol. 31 | No. 1

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Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

49 Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net Senior Editor & Media Manager Krista Connor • kconnor@tsnpub.com Creative Director & Production Manager Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. matt@catvis.biz Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. tyler@catvis.biz Contributing Designer Ryan Alexander, Catalyst Visuals, LLC Contributing Writers Adriana Camacho-Church, Mark Fields, Pam George, Rob Kalesse, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Dan Linehan, Mike Little, Dillon McLaughlin, John Murray, Kevin Francis, Larry Nagengast, Kevin Noonan, Scott Pruden, Leeann Wallett

Contributing Photographers Jim Coarse and Joe del Tufo/Moonloop Photography, Tim Hawk, Anthony Santoro, Matt Urban

73 START

EAT

9 The War on Words 11 F.Y.I. 12 Worth Recognizing 14 What Readers Are Saying 15 Instagram Challenge Winners 17 High School Entrepreneurs 21 Healing Through Play 25 Ronald McDonald House 29 Neighbors to Nicaragua

49 Stitch House Brewery 53 Bites

LEARN 10 Jason’s Legacy

FOCUS

WATCH 55 Cabaret, Jazz & More 59 Film Reviews

LISTEN 63 For the Record with Grace Vonderkuhn 65 5 Questions with Drive-By Truckers 70 Tuned In

DRINK

31 From the Publisher 73 New England IPAs 32 Magic Moments 79 Sips 38 30 Events for 30 Years 40 Significant Local Anniversaries

WILMINGTON

PLAY

81 Swing Into Spring

42 In the City 44 On the Riverfront

17 High School Entrepreneurs Using a three-hour-a-week model, Wilmington’s Dual School provides a nourishing environment for young innovators. By Larry Nagengast

25 The Ronald McDonald House Volunteers are essential to Ronald McDonald House as it hosts loved ones of seriously ill children. By Larry Nagengast

31-38 O&A Celebrates 30 Years How it all got started, magic moments, 30 events to celebrate 30 years and more.

73 New England IPAs Hazy New England IPAs are getting a boost from local brewers, including West Chester’s Levante.

Special Projects Sarah Green, David Hallberg, John Holton Interns Mathew Brown-Watson

FEATURES

By Scott Pruden

Editorial & advertising info: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 outandaboutnow.com • contact@tsnpub.com MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

SI, We Hardly Know Ye What has happened to the once rigid grammatical standards at Sports Illustrated? First there was this recent gaffe in a subtitle, caught by daughter Danielle: “The Vikings have two rabid receivers who could care less who’s delivering their slants and curls.” As readers of this column know, the correct phrase is couldn’t care less. Then, not long afterward, there were two miscues in a story by Jenny Vrentas: • “They were both a couple years away from turning 40.” That should be couple of, unless you’re referring to two people (the couple walked down the street). You have a couple of something, not a couple something. • “The Browns’ Berea facility permeated with the same ‘Do Your Job’ mantra . . .” Permeate means “spread throughout” or “pervade,” and in this sentence, should be preceded by was. Better to turn the sentence around: “The same ‘Do Your Job’ mantra permeated the Berea facility.” More Media Of course, SI is not the only member of the media that is grammar-challenged. A few recent examples: • Mike Missanelli, 97.5 talker, recently discussed “the amount of arrests” made after the NFC Championship game in Philly. We love Mike, but he continually mangles the language. It’s number of arrests, Mikey. • Earl Holland, in the sports pages of the News Journal, predicted the Eagles would beat the Vikes, 28-21, and added: “The Eagles’ defense will come to the rescue in aide of Nick Foles.” “In aide” is both redundant (“come to the rescue” already covers it) and wrong here. An aide is a personal assistant. Aid is the word Earl was groping for. • Actor Dylan McDermott, quoted in Entertainment Weekly: “I think it stops with he and I.” Like many people, Dylan can’t bring himself to acknowledge the preposition and use the proper him and me. Just doesn’t sound sophisticated, you know?

By Bob Yearick

• John Smallwood in the Philadelphia Inquirer: “St. John’s does not have the offensive acumen to fight all the way back from a decent deficit to a team the quality of Villanova.” Never mind the questionable use of decent; acumen means the ability to make good judgments and quick decisions, as in “business acumen.” We’re pretty sure that’s not what John had in mind. • A crawl on CNN noted that “White House fights to squash concerns about Trump’s mental health.” That’s quash. • Kansas City Chiefs Coach Andy Reid, commenting on new Chicago Bears coach Matt Nagy: “He puts his own flare on things.” That’s flair—unless Andy was implying that Nagy wears 1970s-style pants. • Margie Fishman in a News Journal story on Bill Russo, communications director for Joe Biden: “Russo graduated UD in 2009.” Say it with me, media: Colleges graduate students, not the other way around. It's graduated from! • And finally, a reader spotted this from a delawareonline story: “Joe Senall, left of Hockessin and Liz Snyder of Middletown pay homage to Tom Petty who died this past year at the Hummers Parade in Middletown.” Of the comma-challenged sentence, the reader says: “I didn't know that Petty was in the parade at the time of his death.” Literally of the Month Commentator on a Saturday morning AM radio show: “The New England Patriots are literally a house of cards about to collapse.

How Long, Oh Lord, How Long? (In which we call out misuse of that most abused punctuation mark, the apostrophe.) Someone on the McDaniel Crest website recently offered “Free National Geographic’s.” Department of Redundancies Dept. Reader Maria Hess cites a classic case of redundancy in a radio commercial for Wilmington’s Columbus Inn that begins, “Being a successful professional is hard work, and it isn’t always easy.” True enough; hard work is, by its very nature, not easy.

NEED A SPEAKER FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION?

Follow me on Twitter: @thewaronwords Contact me for a fun PowerPoint presentation

Word of the Month

senectitude Pronounced si-NEK-ti-tood, -tyood, it’s a noun meaning old age.

on grammar: ryearick@comcast.net.

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

Buy The War on Words at the Hockessin Book Shelf, on Amazon, or by calling Out & About at 655-6483.

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LEARN

Marc Anderson delivers a check to the Kent County Stallions on behalf of the Jason Anderson Foundation for Youth Sports.

JASON’S LEGACY Finding Hope and Creating Opportunity in the Face of Tragedy

You are Different. So are we.

wilmu.edu/StartNow

Experience the WilmU difference. Apply today, start May 14.

T

ragedy struck Marc Anderson’s family in January 2015 when his son Jason died in a car accident. Just 33 years old at the time of his passing, Jason Anderson was a rising star in the field of sports marketing and management, having worked for the Syracuse Sky Chiefs, The New Orleans Saints, and Dover Motor Sports. In addition to his parents, Jason left behind a brother, wife, and young son. Amid indescribable pain, Marc Anderson focused on two ways to rise above the grief he felt over losing his child. One was his work as an adjunct professor at Wilmington University’s College of Business. He found that teaching distracted him, albeit temporarily, from his anguish. The second distraction has now become a passion. Anderson, along with his wife Claire, their son Eric, daughter-in-law Kati, and grandson Ryan established the Jason Anderson Foundation for Youth Sports. The Foundation seeks to help children participate in a sport of their choice, especially those children who, due to family circumstances, may not have the funds available for these activities. A philanthropic venture tied to youth sports was the perfect choice to honor the memory of a young man who was not only an avid sports fan and participant but also gave back to his community to through volunteer work for the Autism Society of Delaware, the Brain Injury Association of Delaware, the Delaware Sports Commission and the Delaware Chamber of Commerce. As its website states, the Foundation will “ensure Jason’s memory lives on and that his strong connection to the positive effects of sports participation can be shared by all children.” In its inaugural year, the Foundation awarded $8,000 in grants to several youth sports organizations throughout Delaware, including Dover Little League, Henlopen Soccer Club, and Duffy’s Hope and has expanded its partnerships to include the Greater Lewes Foundation, the Slam Dunk to the Beach Annual Tournament, and the Delaware Sports Commission. “Any parent who has lost a child will tell you it’s the worst thing that can ever happen to you,” says Anderson. “But having this organization makes me feel like this is what Jason would want. I think he’d be proud.”

10 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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F.Y.I. Things worth knowing Compiled by Mathew Brown-Watson

DAM FEATURES WYETH, RUSKIN

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tarting March 10 and continuing until May 27, the Delaware Art Museum will showcase works of Andrew Wyeth (1917–2009) alongside Victorian era art critic and amateur artist John Ruskin (1819–1900). Both men closely observed their natural surroundings to derive artistic inspiration. Ruskin, credited with anticipating the environmentalism movement, noted that the principal role of the artist is "truth to nature," a role perhaps best demonstrated by the works of Wyeth. For more information on this and other events upcoming at the Delaware Art Museum, visit delart.org.

ORCHID EXTRAVAGANZA AT LONGWOOD

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arch is the final month to take advantage of the Orchid Extravaganza at Longwood Gardens in the four-acre Conservatory. The event, which ends Sunday, March 25, showcases nearly 5,000 different vibrant orchids artistically arranged in exquisite displays. Special features include Longwood’s largest-ever orchid baskets, an oncidium waterfall display, and, back by popular demand, the orchid meadow. Guests also will be treated to the sight of Longwood’s rare sky-blue poppies in bloom. Longwood Gardens is located at 1001 Longwood Rd., Kennett Square, Pa. For more about this event, call 610-388-1000, or visit longwoodgardens.org.

DEL. HISTORY MUSEUM MARKS WWI CENTENNIAL

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t has been 100 years since the conclusion of World War I, one of the world’s most tragic and brutal conflicts. To commemorate this centennial event, the Delaware History Museum has put together an exhibition titled The First State on the Front: WWI and the Road to Victorious Peace. The exhibit will showcase artifacts provided by the Delaware Historical Society, including a soldier’s muddy boots and garrison cap, a flag from a Gold Star family, letters to loved ones, scrapbooks, victory medals and a wealth of wartime posters. The event will be ongoing to Nov. 9, Wednesday to Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 504 N. Market St., Wilmington. For more information on this event and others like it, visit dehistory.org.

SAVING THE NINTH STREET BOOK SHOP

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avid Teague, a children's book author and professor in the University of Delaware's Associate in Arts Program in Wilmington, and Roger Festa, an online marketing professional, are trying to preserve Ninth Street Book Shop, a fixture in downtown Wilmington for more than four decades. Partnering with local art groups and others, the two men envision a place that goes beyond the precepts of the average bookstore, a place that serves the community and offers the patron an experience and not just a sales transaction. Their efforts began with the retirement of the Ninth Street Book Shop’s previous owners, Jack and Gemma Buckley, who had kept the doors open for 41 years. The Buckleys had been unsuccessful in finding a buyer when they retired in January, and thus had to close the doors. Teague and Festa are now finding resources and fostering the interest needed to preserve the legacy of Ninth Street Book Shop. Commenting in the Wilmington News Journal, Festa said, “I’m confident in Wilmington. I’m confident in the city. I’m confident in the legacy that was left behind. Whether or not it’s me and David or something else, I know something is going to happen."

LAFATE GALLERY CELEBRATES WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH

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n Friday, March 2, LaFate Gallery in Wilmington will host the Women’s History Month Group Art Show. From 5 to 8 p.m. the works of Regina Katz, Eunice LaFate, Rue Lam, Jo Redbird and Rettie Windfield will be displayed in the gallery, 227 N. Market St. Special guest Debbie Silverman, of Delaware Women for Inclusion, also will be in attendance. For more information, call 656-6786.

HARRIET TUBMAN DAY CELEBRATION

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elebration of Harriet Tubman Day is set for Saturday, March 10, in downtown Wilmington. This will be the second annual celebration of the abolitionist and humanitarian who escaped slavery and subsequently rescued approximately 300 slaves through the Underground Railroad. There will be more participating organizations this year, and a myriad of things to see, do and learn. The event begins with a proclamation by Mayor Michael Purzycki at 10 a.m. and ends with the Women of Consequence event at the Baby Grand from 3 to 5 p.m. For more information on purchasing tickets to Women of Consequence, visit thegrandwilmington.org.

BIGGS SHOWCASES AINA NERGAARD-NAMMACK

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he Biggs Museum of American Art is featuring the award-winning work of Aina Nergaard-Nammack until March 25. Nergaard-Nammack, who lives in Lewes, is best known for her large, bright color abstractions. She has traveled extensively, honing her craft in studies around the world. Nergaard-Nammack uses nonrepresentational forms that are designed to flow as part of a rhythmical interplay. The exhibition is weekly, Tuesday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Sunday, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., each week at 406 Federal St., Dover. For more information, visit biggsmuseum.org. MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WORTH RECOGNIZING

Community Members Who Go Above & Beyond

JANET SAUNDERS:

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or the past nine years, Janet Saunders has taught adults who do not know how to speak, read, and write English how to communicate. “I come from England,” says Saunders. “I know how difficult it is to move and live in another country, but it’s difficult enough not knowing the language.” As a volunteer for Literacy Delaware, Saunders, who lives in Wilmington, meets oneon-one with English language learners from Korea, China, the Caribbean or Latin America at local libraries throughout the week. And for two hours on Monday and Wednesday mornings, she leads a class at West End Head Start on Wilmington’s West Side. Besides English learners, and as part of LD’s mission, Saunders has also tutored adults who read at or below fifth grade level. Low communication and reading skills limit a person’s economic, health, and social benefits, says Saunders. “The intent is to give the learners enough basic skills to handle their most essential needs. It helps the community as a whole to have competent people who can hold jobs and thus improve the lives of their children. It’s a benefit for everyone.” According to the international non-profit ProLiteracy, one in six U.S. adults lacks basic literacy skills. Cindy Shermeyer, LD executive director, says it’s about the same in Delaware. Studies also show that children of parents with low literacy skills have a 72 percent chance of being at the lowest reading levels themselves. Currently LD has 80 volunteer tutors and 150 students. Thirty percent are basic learners while 70 percent are English language learners. Over 2,900 students have received free assistance since the non-profit’s inception in 1983. The statewide organization trains volunteers who are mostly retirees from careers such as marketing, banking, information technology, law and nursing. They teach basic English skills and/or basic reading, writing and math skills. The organization relies on fundraisers, grants and private donations. Saunders, a former chemist, moved to the United States in 1959. She retired as a computer programmer in 1999 while living in Plymouth Meeting, Pa., and became a U.S. citizen in 2002. When she moved to the First State in 2009, a friend told her about Literacy Delaware, and she has been a volunteer ever since. “I get a great deal of satisfaction from feeling that I have helped people improve their lives,” Saunders says. When she's not busy tutoring, she is registering learners, helping with tutor orientation, or with social and fundraising events. “She (Saunders) is amazing in her compassion, commitment, and dedication to this entire adult literacy endeavor,” says Shermeyer. “Her learners love her.” An English learner, Esneyder Lopez, 52, says he’s taking full advantage of the free program and its volunteers. The Wilmington resident started taking classes five months ago to improve his job prospects. A successful business owner in Colombia, Lopez left everything behind eight years ago because of unsafe conditions in the South American country. He says the classes have helped him increase his confidence and he’s no longer afraid to leave his home. “I can communicate. I no longer fear making mistakes, life is a lot simpler.” He’s also a diabetic, and he says he can now understand his doctor’s diet recommendations. “If not for the program, my life would be very difficult,” Lopez says.

Photo Cindy Shermeyer

Literacy Delaware volunteer improves lives of languagechallenged adults

— Adriana Camacho-Church 12 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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6 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WHAT READERS ARE SAYING sign up f our

Wine Dinners 3/22 Taste $65 per 4/26 Heitz $85 per

of It aly per son Wine Dinner per son

Luck of the ish unch Sunday, March 18th make your reservations

Easter unch Buffet April 1st, 10 AM - 4 PM $40 Adults, $20 Kids (4-10)

Sing Parties - now booking -

Bridal Showers & Baby Showers Rehearsal & Engagement Dinners Baptism & Communion Brunches Saturdays & Sundays 302-571-1492

2216 Pennsylvania Ave Wilmington, DE 19806 www.ColumbusInn.net

About 50 Ways Delaware Gives Back A list of good things happening in the state (By O&A staff, Feb. 2018) Thank you for the reminder of so many wonderful people doing wonderful, caring, community-building things across Delaware. Thank you also for highlighting the work of Delaware Wild Lands! We’re honored to be included in your list, especially since our large-scale land holdings are all south of Wilmington. Keep up the good work—informing and inspiring us. — Wendy Scott, Development & Marketing Manager, Delaware Wild Lands About Of Chocolate Bars & Cacao Farmers Local couple takes on chocolate-making with Double Spiral Chocolate (By Krista Connor, Feb. 2018) Fantastic article. It covers everything I ever wanted to know about chocolate. I've tasted the Double Spiral Chocolate and have given it as gifts. Keep up the good work. — Dotty Verne Well written article about a delightful, tasty cottage industry. Stuart and Mhairi’s chocolate are well worth buying—and absolutely addicting! — Diane Brocklesby About Worth Recognizing: Shawn Moran Delivering meals and smiles for nearly three decades (By Adriana Camacho-Church, Feb. 2018) What a nice surprise to see a full page about Meals On Wheels in the February issue. I just picked up a copy in our local café and was thrilled to see Shawn Moran featured in the Worth Recognizing section alongside a great article on the Meals On Wheels program and all it means to the volunteers and the seniors. — Anne Love, Executive Director, Meals On Wheels Delaware About The Rewards of Helping Others Helping others is beneficial to the volunteer, too (By Adriana Camacho-Church, Feb. 2018) Thank you for the beautiful article. I love the way in which you mixed anecdotal information with research to tell the stories of volunteers. You captured the essence of what Roger and I do during our visits—particularly those at the memory care unit. Thank you for the effort you put forth in bringing this article to life. I am touched. — Denise Lopes

HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY? SEND US A MESSAGE! contact@tsnpub.com • OutAndAboutNow.com

14 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WINTER

Photo Duane Loveland

INSTAGRAM CHALLENGE And the Winners Are… We asked readers to submit their best pictures of the beauty of the First State in winter. Out of the almost 200 fantastic submissions, these shots best captured what we were looking for.

Photo Deb Felmey

FIRST PLACE @mrloveland • Duane Loveland, Elsmere Photo taken at Breck’s Mill Area, Hagley “This shot is part of a photo project I started in the fall. My goal is to capture the changing seasons from this location. I got the inspiration for the project from a Bob Ross painting. Finding the right angle for this shot just required a little bit of walking along the side of the road until I could lean out over the stone barrier far enough to get clear of the trees along the river bank.” SECOND PLACE @dlfelmey • Deb Felmey Photo taken at Fowler Beach “Snowy owl visiting at Fowler Beach—one of the coolest reasons to brave the cold this winter.”

Photo Jesse Walker

THIRD PLACE @jrhimself302 • Jesse Walker, Wilmington Photo taken at Alapocas Run State Park “The picture is from right after a heavy snow storm. I hiked down to this location in the snow to get this shot, which was worth it.” First place receives one Delaware Nature Society household membership, and runners-up will get gift cards to Iron Hill and Penn Cinema movie tickets. The contest was sponsored by Delaware Nature Society. Thanks to everyone who participated!

MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EYE ON NATURE ANDREW WYETH AND JOHN RUSKIN MARCH 10 – MAY 27, 2018 This exhibition was organized by the Delaware Art Museum with assistance from the Ruskin Foundation (Ruskin Library, Lancaster University, UK) and The Andrew and Betsy Wyeth Collection (Chadds Ford, PA and Rockland, ME). Support was provided by the Johannes R. and Betty P. Krahmer American Art Exhibition Fund, M&T Bank, Wilmington Trust, and the Hallie Tybout Exhibition Fund. Additional support provided, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com. Image: Sycamore Tree, Study for Pennsylvania Landscape, 1941. Andrew Wyeth (1917–2009). Ink and watercolor, 29 3/4 x 39 3/8 inches.Delaware Art Museum, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. William E. Phelps, 1964. © 2018 Andrew Wyeth/ArtistsRights Society (ARS), NEW YORK.

2301 Kentmere Parkway | Wilmington, Delaware 19806 | 302.571.9590 | delart.org

Become Fluent in Wildflowers Stroll through gardens of wildflowers, grow your knowledge in our classes, or enjoy a family-friendly event. We’re open Wednesday–Sunday, beginning April 4.

Upcoming Events: Annual Wildflower Celebration Sunday, April 29 10 am–4 pm Free admission National Public Gardens Day Friday, May 11 10 am–4 pm Reduced admission

mtcubacenter.org/out 3120 Barley Mill Rd. Hockessin, Delaware

16 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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CREATING HIGH SCHOOL

ENTREPRENEURS Students Michael Wiciak and Miracle Olatunji (second and third from right) with Dual School leaders (from left) Paul McConnell, Zach Jones, Catherine Lindroth and Meghan Wallace.

Using a three-hour-a-week model, Wilmington’s Dual School provides a nourishing environment for young innovators By Larry Nagengast Photos by Jim Coarse & Joe del Tufo

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igh school kids going to class in a downtown office building? It sounds strange, but this is Wilmington, where, in the last four years, charter schools have taken over three former MBNA/Bank of America buildings as well as the onetime headquarters for Blue Cross-Blue Shield of Delaware. But what’s going on at 1313 Innovation, the business incubator space on the first floor of Hercules Plaza, is quite different from anything tried before in Delaware education. Called Dual School, the pilot project is being financed by Delaware real estate entrepreneur Paul McConnell, whose business owns and manages Hercules Plaza. Its creators are Catherine Lindroth, the out-of-the-box thinker who developed the Summer Learning Collaborative to elevate educational experiences for low-income kids who spend their summers at community center camps, and Meghan Wallace, a onetime aide to former Gov. Jack Markell. Its entrepreneurial mindset is enhanced by staff and graduates of the University of Delaware’s Horn Program in Entrepreneurship, and its inspiration comes from High Tech High School in Chula Vista, Calif., whose

fulltime curriculum Dual School is trying to capture in a threehour-a-week model. For the fall semester, 13 students recruited from seven schools—two private Catholic, three charters, one magnet and one traditional high school—left their regular classrooms and headed to 1313 Innovation, where they not only learned how to become entrepreneurs, they also got to work on projects they created for themselves, along the way making valuable contacts with experts in those fields. To understand Dual School and what’s behind it, start with McConnell, who has been promoting entrepreneurial ventures at Hercules Plaza for at least five years and who has supported unconventional ventures on behalf of low-income kids, like Nativity Prep, the tuition-free private middle school for boys on the city’s West Side. McConnell firmly believes a strong education system is essential to successful economic development. “Cities and states where education and economic development are connected are the ones that are flourishing,” but it’s not happening yet in Delaware, he says.

MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Michael Wiciak's rotorless drone prototype was developed at Dual School.

PLUG-IN PROGRAM

Dual School could be a first step toward making that happen. From its modest start in September, McConnell and Lindroth hope that the Dual School concept can be refined as it expands. Their goal is to create what’s known as a “plugin” program—an academic component created by an outside entity that can plug into the established curriculum at any high school that wants to use it. The first test of the plug-in approach is now under way. In addition to having a second group of students meeting at 1313 Innovation for the spring semester, Dual School is piloting its offering with a class at William Penn High School in New Castle. Dual School’s approach provides students with both motivation—by letting them pick their own projects—and challenge—by giving them control over how the work gets done. Zach Jones, a 2017 UD Horn graduate who is serving as Dual School’s interim executive director, says there are three ingredients to the school’s “secret sauce”: students work together on projects they really care about; they make connections with professionals who are experts in their project area; and they learn how to rapidly make prototypes, and revise them on the fly, as they move forward with their projects. Take, for example, Salesianum School senior Michael Wiciak, who read about a toddler who lost an eye in November 2015 when the child’s retina was sliced by a drone’s propeller blades. He spent the semester trying to build a rotorless drone that uses indirect propulsion, hiding the motors and propellers inside the frame to create a device that is safer for its users. Through his project mentor and connections at High Tech High, whose staff members served as consultants on Dual School development, Wiciak hooked up with Tom Ayling, a director at Aerial Applications, a drone manufacturer and service provider in Philadelphia. “I had the best phone call ever with him as he told me to keep going because of the potential my project has, and he has put me in contact with some top engineers around the area,” Wiciak says. By late January, Wiciak had developed a prototype for his drone, which was on display at Dual School’s semester-ending Discovery Day in the atrium at Hercules Plaza.

SOLVING “ADULTS’ PROBLEMS”

Wiciak’s work is an example of what McConnell sees as students “trying to solve what I would call ‘the adults’ problems.’” New Castle County Executive Matt Meyer dropped in on the Discovery Day program and made a related observation. “This is the future,” Meyer said after checking out the projects. “Business leaders should be looking at their ideas.” Several other Dual School participants developed projects that, while not necessarily tackling “adults’ problems,” addressed issues that adults would like to see the education system solve. Siawaa Antwi, a junior at Freire Charter School, recognizing the problems her mother and others in lower-income families had paying their bills, developed a financial literacy class for low-income youth. “There is so much to learn,” she says, mentioning “checking accounts, investing, bitcoins,” and pledging to spend her spring refining her prototype, making the curriculum less of a lecture and more of a conversation.

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Student Miracle Olatunji and her project were featured on a Forbes magazine website.

Miracle Olatunji, a senior at the Charter School of Wilmington, addressed an issue that has long challenged students and their parents: identifying the summer experiences, internships and scholarships that best fit a student’s talents and aspirations. She has created a newsletter for her project, called OpportuniMe. It already has more than 230 subscribers and she is now building a website to expand its reach. What started as a project focused on New Castle County could have relevance throughout the region, and perhaps from coast to coast, she says. Olatunji’s initiative and creativity led to a profile on a Forbes magazine website in January. “I started small. Now I’m able to think bigger,” she says. She talks confidently about value propositions, efficiency, quality and accessibility. “I want to turn this into a mission-driven company,” she adds. Her next step: writing a business plan. Like most of her Dual School peers, Antwi says what she appreciated most was the opportunity to work on her own project while being surrounded by supportive mentors and peers. “You care more, you do more, if it’s yours,” she says, adding, “they don’t put pressure on you. They support you.” At the start, no one was quite sure what they were getting into. “For the first five weeks, I had no idea where the program was going,” says Dorcas Olatunji, Miracle’s younger sister and a sophomore at the Charter School of Wilmington, “but I knew I was surrounded by people who would help me get there.” Her project started out as an examination of issues related to prejudice but morphed into the development of a series of activities that could be used during school homeroom periods to break down communications barriers between different groups of students. Parents felt the same way. “At the first parent meeting—the only parent meeting—we had, it was really nebulous. It seemed like it was not very well designed,” said Tammy Rossi, Noah’s mother. “It was fascinating to watch” her son move forward with his project, she said. “It was an amazing experience, something he wouldn’t have gotten in school.”

BENEFITS OUTWEIGH FEARS

Officials at the participating students’ schools had some concerns when they first learned about Dual School. Afterward, they indicated that the benefits outweighed any fears they might have had. Ryan Mitchell, director of college guidance at Newark Charter School, said he worried that students would miss regular class time for an entire afternoon one day a week. But he found that the students learned differently—and may have learned more—in the nontraditional, off-campus setting. ►

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Thirteen students from seven schools are currently attending Dual School.

“They connect to visionary thinkers and gain new levels of insights. They learn how to get big-time projects off the ground,” he says. And, as it turned out, the students were responsible enough to make up any missed classwork with no negative impact on their grades. “It might not work for all schools,” says Eric Anderson, vice president (the equivalent of principal) at the Charter School of Wilmington, “but every school has a population that would benefit from it.” Erin McNichol, who has been teaching innovation and creativity classes at Ursuline Academy for two years, served on the Dual School planning team and has continued with the program as a mentor. Dual School provides a strong complement to Ursuline’s current offerings, she says, and has the added benefit of “getting kids outside the classroom” as part of their learning experience. Dual School, says Lindroth, is “fundamentally transforming, an extremely powerful tool that districts and schools can use to bring their curriculum and experiences into the 21st century.” For now, the project faces two interrelated challenges: securing corporate and foundation support to grow the program and proving to the state’s education community that its model is workable—both in terms of fitting into school schedules and demonstrating that it merits becoming a class for which students gain credit toward graduation. That could take a couple of years. If Dual School successfully makes its case, its leadership team —Lindroth, Wallace and Jones—sees multiple paths forward. The program could continue to operate as it has at 1313 Innovation, but with multiple groups of students meeting there each week. Or it could assemble a cadre of teachers who could move from school to school, teaching several classes a week. A third option would be for Dual School to become a teacher-training organization, providing professional development and mentoring to teachers working at area high schools. And, they say, developing a variety of classes, all with entrepreneurship at their core, is also possible. However it develops, McConnell insists that the program will do all it can to meet the needs of low-income students who are seldom exposed to entrepreneurial opportunities. “We need to put these kids into the right environment with the right opportunities,” he says. “They’re just as smart as anyone else.” And if it works…well, the idea of promoting economic development by creating a school project in a corner of a high-rise office building won’t seem strange at all. 20 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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HEALING THROUGH PLAY Dr. Carol Bouzoukis utilizes toys and drama therapy to help kids cope with trauma, disorders and more

By Krista Connor Children express themselves best through play, says Bouzoukis. Photo Jessica Stellon

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hildren’s play and drama psychotherapist Dr. Carol Bouzoukis, known to parents as “the child whisperer,” is the lone adult in a room surrounded by her tools of choice: toys. Shelves weigh heavy with Legos, Barbies and a miniature castle, which here, under the care of Bouzoukis, transcend their original plasticky purpose; Pokémon characters line the window sill, while a pirate ship, doll house, the occasional toy cannon and a bean bag chair fill in the remaining corners of the small Greenville office. The toys inspire the imagination of Bouzoukis’ clients, starting from age 3 to pre-teens. And more important, the kids will subconsciously—or consciously—use the toys as symbols that tap into their struggles, which can vary from parental divorce to trauma, abuse, school or social anxiety, tantrums, or others in a long list of disorders. This idea is explored in the third book Bouzoukis is writing (title pending), revolving around play therapy tools. It explains how these simple objects take on a new meaning in the hands of a child, which really is at the core of play therapy. “The bean bag chair can become a tsunami, ocean, water, it can even represent me or a parent,” she says. For now, though, therapist, internationally-recognized author and drama coach Bouzoukis, who has owned her own practice, Play Therapy Delaware, for more than two decades, is caught in a rare moment of quiet as she sips a cup of tea. Her first book, entitled Pediatric Dramatherapy: They Couldn’t Run, So They Learned To Fly, focused on the treatment of chronically ill children, while the second, Encouraging Your Child’s Imagination, prompts children and schools to create

original and improvised plays. She’s the recipient of a slew of degrees and accolades, including a doctorate from New York University with an emphasis in Child Dramatherapy and a Master of Fine Arts degree in Child Drama from the University of North Carolina—Greensboro. Play therapy dates to the 1950s, and its evolution hasn’t gone unnoticed by therapists and members of the public alike; these days mainstream pediatricians and schools don’t hesitate to recommend the treatment for a troubled child. Child-centered and child-directed, this means that patients come into the room and choose what they want to do, what kind of toys they’ll play with, what they’re going to explore. “Some people are a little confused about play therapy,” says Bouzoukis. “It’s not that they come in and play and I lure them into talking about what’s wrong. That’s a misconception.” It’s simpler than that, she explains. The children play with toys or with a sandbox, and Bouzoukis observes. “With the sandbox, kids will select from themed objects— people, animals, trees, bridges, caves—and put them in the sand to create a picture,” she says. “When they’re doing that, they’re projecting anything that’s on their minds—worries, conflicts, anxiety, stress.” Once they set up the scene, kids can give it a name, act it out, or create various scenarios. The same goes for regular toys. Bouzoukis, who typically meets with patients once a week, will analyze the behavior and look at the themes of the play, symbols and metaphors of what the child selects. But there’s never any intervention or prompting on her part. ► MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Play therapy usually helps the patient achieve healing without intervention from a specialist.

“What happens is that while they’re working through their issues and their conflicts, eventually they’ll start to find resolution themselves,” says Bouzoukis. “Then I talk to the parents and give them tips on parenting or help them look at the situation through a child’s eyes.” Sometimes kids do talk during a session, but whether they do or don’t isn’t important; what is important is that they can communicate nonverbally, says Bouzoukis. Kids often carry on a storyline from week to week. For example, if they engage two pirate ships in battle, the war could represent their parents’ divorce, or a “fight” within the children when they don’t feel good about themselves, says Bouzoukis. Children often show signs of regression by playing with baby toys or by trying to “feed” Bouzoukis toy food. Of course, Bouzoukis has a no-violence policy, but she says you never know what will happen when emotions churn. Years ago, one patient was dealing with abandonment issues after his mom dropped him off at his father’s for the weekend and never came back. “Two years later, he had me pretending to be mom,” says Bouzoukis. “I had this refrigerator box the kids liked to play in, and he threw it and walloped me in the head, and my ear was bleeding.” After some time with their kids in play therapy, parents notice changes in observable behaviors: tantrums stop, kids with anxiety lose their anxious ticks or habits. “Parents say the kids are so happy when they leave here, and they take that out into the world with them,” says Bouzoukis. “The child gets to work it all through with the play, and I’ve done this long enough to see the effectiveness of this work with children. I’m very lucky to do what I do.” For more, visit playtherapydelaware.com, or contact Bouzoukis at cbouzoukis@gmail.com or 777-1110. Play Therapy Delaware is located at 2 Greenville Crossing, Suite 244, 4001 Kennett Pike, Greenville.

MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Gretchen Parisi and Dan Szymanski in the kitchen of the Ronald McDonald House of Delaware.

A ‘HOTEL’ THAT COMFORTS FAMILIES IN TRYING TIMES Volunteers are essential to Ronald McDonald House as it hosts loved ones of seriously ill children By Larry Nagengast Photos by Jim Coarse

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arah Funaiock describes the Ronald McDonald House of Delaware as “a very specialized hotel,” and that’s not solely because of its client base, the families of seriously ill children who must go to the Nemours Alfred I. DuPont Children’s Hospital across the street for treatment. What helps make the 50-room residence special is that it has only seven people employed full-time to keep it running. “Most of the dayto-day operating parts of the house are accomplished by volunteers,” says Pam Cornforth, the organization’s president and CEO. Volunteers who check in families when they arrive, volunteers who show the families to their rooms, volunteers who answer the phone, make coffee and even bring the food and cook dinner for an average of 85 people every night. “We couldn’t do what we’re doing without them,” says Funaiock, the house’s volunteer coordinator. “They’re part of a team that operates in a very special environment.” The volunteer army is 430 members strong, she says, and they

When it comes to charitable contributions, many people find that a gift of time is more meaningful and can have a greater impact than a cash contribution. In the coming months, Out & About will continue to profile some of these volunteers, along with the program in which they serve. The series is run in cooperation with the state Office of Volunteerism, and we hope it will show readers how they can improve their communities by volunteering their time and talents. For information about volunteering opportunities throughout the state, visit VolunteerDelaware.org.

provide “heart and soul, and a lot of things we take for granted that bring comfort to families.” And there are plenty of families to serve. In 2017, 1,726 families stayed at the house, with the average stay a little over 10 days, Cornforth says. Many families stay a couple of days at a time, while others, depending on their child’s condition, may stay seven or eight months, perhaps longer. No matter how long a family stays, it’s up to the volunteers to make them comfortable, so they’re rested and ready for whatever the next day brings. “I’m strictly a kitchen volunteer,” says 54-year-old Gretchen Parisi, a freelance healthcare writer from Kennett Square, Pa. Every other Wednesday morning, she arrives at the house to “clean every nook and cranny, every microwave, every counter. I clean out the refrigerators when a family checks out.” She says she finds it rewarding “to make families’ time here as pleasant as it can possibly be under the circumstances.” ► MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Dana DeMuth, a 55-year-old from Landenberg, Pa., who, like Parisi, has volunteered at the house for three years after a career of working for nonprofits, shares her colleague’s sentiments. While taking a break from cleaning the kitchen, she asserted that “if you’re able to give, you should volunteer. I’m fortunate that I have the time to be able to help.” While Parisi and DeMuth are regulars on the cleanup team who pitch in wherever else they’re needed, there’s no telling what Dan Szymanski might be doing on any given day. Szymanski, 60, from Bellefonte, “is our uber volunteer,” Parisi says. Indeed, the retired oil refinery equipment operator estimates he now puts in about 750 hours a year at the house—and he started 15 years ago. His service is so valued that last year he was named the winner of the house’s Big Shoes to Fill Award. The recognition includes naming one of the house’s guest rooms in his honor for a year. “I may be here a lot,” he says, “but I’m not allowed to sleep in it.” Szymanski is at the house three days a week, sometimes for two or three hours, sometimes for eight. It depends on what’s needed on a particular day. “He’s great. He knows so many parts of the house,” says Katie Johnson, the operations manager. Cleaning the kitchen, working the front desk, setting up and taking down holiday decorations, helping at special events, driving families to the hospital, the supermarket or the mall, even giving tours—Szymanski can do it all. “He gives a great tour,” Johnson says, noting that Szymanski’s commentaries have resulted in the recruitment of numerous new volunteers and committee members for the house.

A LIFE-CHANGER

Volunteering at the Ronald McDonald House changed his life, Szymanski says, transforming him “from a selfish person to a very giving person.” “Community service is something people say they want to do, and it often gets put on the back burner,” he says. “Then, when I was 43, my parents died, my brother had a brain tumor, I lost my job, I got a divorce, so my whole life collapsed.”

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He left a big house in Middletown and was living in a subsidized rental housing unit when he called a friend, Diane Thompson, who was then the house’s operations manager. “I came up here one day, to play my guitar for the kids, not knowing there aren’t too many kids here during the day, and they wouldn’t let me out the door,” says Szymanski. “They heard I could fix things, and they say, ‘before you leave, can you fix this?’ Fifteen years later, I’m still here.” Working at the house makes Szymanski and other volunteers thankful. “When I first saw boys 8 years old who were excited because they weren’t going to have any more chemo, I started to realize that I would be OK,” he says. While Szymanski, DeMuth and Parisi may be typical of the house’s volunteers, the program’s support comes in many different ways. Teen volunteers, many of whom start through a 10-week summer program, are welcomed, especially since many enjoy working on craft projects or playing games with the siblings of children being treated at the hospital. Groups provide a notable service by cooking dinner each night. Sometimes it’s a business group, or a family, or a social club, or even a team of nurses from the hospital, but it usually takes a team of about 10 people who buy the food, bring it to the house, prepare it in the oversized kitchen and serve an average of 85 people a night. Staff members give the dinner crew serving tips before they arrive and explain the basics of safe food preparation before they start cooking, Funaiock says. She is proud that the house’s volunteers seem to serve as the program’s greatest ambassadors, often recruiting another family member, a roommate or a friend or neighbor to join the team. “When they see what our families are going through, they immediately know that they are bringing comfort. It’s not that they’re solving a problem, but they’re going one step toward helping them,” she says. “They know they’re part of something bigger, a community coming together to help these families.”

SEEKING VOLUNTEERS The Ronald McDonald House is seeking volunteers who can make a regular commitment to a minimum of two three-hour shifts each month for six months to one year. The house has a particular need for adult volunteers, post-high school, over 18 years old, on weekend shifts, from 6-9 p.m. Friday through 6-9 p.m. Sunday. Enrollment begins March 1 for summer teen volunteers, who are asked to commit to serving one three-hour shift weekly for 10 weeks. More details are available at the Ronald McDonald House website, rmhde.org, or by contacting Sarah Funaiock, s.funaiock@rmhde.org. BUY A SHAMROCK SHAKE, HELP RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE If you stop at a McDonald’s restaurant this month, top off your Big Mac or Happy Meal with a Shamrock Shake. You’ll be helping the Ronald McDonald House. The campaign is the result of a partnership among Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Eagles and McDonald’s that led to the opening of the first Ronald McDonald’s House in Philadelphia in 1974.

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(302) 777-1110 • PlayTherapyDelaware.com MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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28 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo courtesy of Neighbors to Nicaragua

START

Selveggio, third from right, with, from left, Maycól Michell Garcia Gutierrez, Neighbors to Nicaragua director in Nicaragua, and Board Members Sarah Brooks, Michael Lucey, Francesca Vavala, Carol Selvaggio, Board Chair Ally Warhol, and board member Michael Keenan.

Nicaragua’s Good Neighbor Wilmington’s Chuck Selvaggio and his nonprofit are improving conditions in the impoverished Central American country By Mathew Brown-Watson

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huck Selvaggio, a former teacher at Salesianum School and Nativity Preparatory School of Wilmington, traveled to Nicaragua to learn Spanish in 2011. Fortunately, the trip turned into something much more. He was immediately struck not only by the rampant poverty and the number of homeless youth, but also by the resilience of the Nicaraguan people. Upon returning home, he created the charity Neighbors to Nicaragua in April of that same year, and he recruited friends, family members, and former colleagues to volunteer their time and money to support grassroots organizations working to improve the education and infrastructure of the communities he had visited. Today, Selvaggio is the executive director of the charity, in addition to working as a full-time massage therapist from his home studio in Wilmington. Selvaggio and his charity quickly began the process of supporting several Nicaraguan schools by raising money for supplies and medicine. His efforts also resulted in Americans sponsoring children of promise by funding their education, giving a strong chance to worthy students who otherwise would never have had the opportunity to get a decent education.

“I have never met someone as selfless as Chuck, and I’m inspired by his amazing example of how one person can make a difference in the lives of so many,” says Michael Lucey, co-owner of Hockessin's Six Paupers, Brandywine Hundred's Ulysses Gastro Pub and the Rehoboth Beach Forgotten Mile Ale House. Lucey experienced the deplorable conditions in Nicaragua firsthand on a trip with Selvaggio, and like many others was inspired by his example. As a result, Lucey became a member of the Board of Trustees for Neighbors to Nicaragua. The scope and focus of the organization has grown since its inception in 2011. Its most recent accomplishment was the completion of a new school on Jan. 30. The project originated with Board Chairperson Alison Warhol, a scrum master in the Technology Department at Barclays Bank. She recognized the need and potential the school could provide to locals ranging in ages 5 to 50. Selvaggio and Warhol oversaw the completion of the school, called Centro de Oportunidad (Center of Opportunity), which will train students in vocational skills, math and computer competency. Along with six other board members, they attended the opening of the school. ► MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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START NICARAGUA’S GOOD NEIGHBOR continued from previous page

Selveggio speaking to a group of Nicaraguan children during one of his many visits to the country.

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“Our goal for the students at Centro de Oportunidad is to provide them with sufficient basic skills to either continue with a traditional education or to gain employable skills through experience,” says Selvaggio. In addition to the educational support, the school also will provide lunch-time meals, which for most of the students may be the only meal they receive all day. The school was completed thanks to a $30,000 donation by Rockefeller Philanthropy Trust, and the annual budget of $35,000 is currently paid by the Matthew Haley Trust. “Grassroots donations are the lifeblood of Neighbors to Nicaragua, and the growth of our support base determines the continued success of our mission,” says Selvaggio, who explains that no volunteer or board member receives a salary, and all travel to the region is paid for by the volunteers themselves, so all donations go directly to Neighbors to Nicaragua. The charity will host an Oldies Night concert at Wilmington Elks Lodge, 1310 Carruthers Dr., on Friday, March 2, from 7 to 11 p.m. Tickets are $35 per person, or you can reserve a table of 10 for $350. All proceeds from ticket sales and donations will benefit Neighbors to Nicaragua. Each ticket includes two complimentary alcoholic beverages and buffet style fare. For reservations, contact Sarah Brooks at selvaggiosarah@gmail.com or call 983-5794. For more information on how you can help Neighbors to Nicaragua, visit the website, NeighborsToNicaragua. com, or the Facebook page.

MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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The 'Hotel' Comforting Families in Trying Times

30 Events for 30 Years

Local Brewers & New England IPAs

From The Publisher

FOCUS

G R E AT E R W I L M I N G T O N

CE

LE

B

TE RA

S

THIRTY'S SOMETHING

MARCH 2018 COMPLIMENTARY

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uring a staff meeting in preparation for this anniversary issue, editor Bob Yearick insisted now was the time— after all these years—to reveal to readers what the TSN, in our corporate name TSN Media, represents. I figured the story behind the letters would be about as interesting to readers as what I had for breakfast. So, I rejected the suggestion as being self-absorbed. But the staff countered, taking turns to support Yearick’s argument. Turns out, each had been asked more than once about the acronym. Plus, Facebook is the place to reveal what you had for breakfast. So, I reconsidered. Not because I really believed readers were dying to know the story behind three letters, but because it was a good opportunity to share my view on why Out & About has survived for 30 years. But first, for those who must know, TSN stands for The Softball News, a publication I started back in 1983 as a moonlight enterprise when I was a sportswriter for a small weekly in Maryland. It was my first taste of independent publishing and a lifelong lesson in the travails of being butcher-baker-candlestickmaker. To say it was a mom-and-pop operation would have been exaggerating my staff size by 100 percent. I sold the ads, designed the ads, covered the games, wrote the stories, wrote the headlines, laid out the magazine, then with the magic of wax and a razor blade, pasted the halftones and galleys on graph paper and did a late-night sprint to the printer and returned the next morning to pick up the publication and help deliver it. This happened every two weeks during the season. Obviously, the experience didn’t scar me for life because in 1988 I began publishing Out & About while still producing The Softball News. Two publications merited a corporate name, so I chose the initials of The Softball News for one simple reason: I thought they were lucky. When The Softball News debuted in ‘83, we were the newest of approximately 50 softball-specific publications in the country. In less than a decade, that number was seven. We were one of the seven. The secret to that survival? Recognizing an audience and adding energy to their passion. We engaged the audience in ways they found flattering and entertaining. We didn’t just compile scores and standings, we told colorful stories, had dynamic photography, and treated the sport like it

was the biggest thing since WWF. We shined a spotlight on weekend warriors by naming Players of the Week, Teams of the Week and Top 10 rankings. And just to stir up the rivalries, every headline was a pun: “Herman’s Meats grills Goldey Beacom Alumni,” “Casapulla’s peppers Brandywine League foes.” In fact, we were able to raise the profile of the game enough that we even had a short-lived TV show on local cable. Five years later, we took that same energy into Out & About, ignoring the naysayers who complained there wasn’t enough going on in Wilmington to support our endeavor. In fact, during our first six months, more than a few area businesses told us quite candidly—and without animus—they doubted we’d last a year. Undaunted but far from overconfident, we stayed true to our mission and convinced enough talented writers, photographers and artists that with their help we could be a valued storyteller. Compelling local stories told by local talent has been the key to our success. That and our genuine commitment to the community. From the beginning we didn’t just chronicle the scene, we worked to expand it. When we saw a worthy enterprise in need of a hand, we tried to lend it. When we noticed a void, we worked to fill it. In fact, we batted around a lot of ideas regarding the proper way to commemorate this anniversary. A bash for the decades was considered. In the end, we chose to stay true to our personality—more about the community and less about us. The result, with apologies to ESPN, is our very own 30 For 30...30 events to commemorate 30 years (see page 38). Ambitious, for sure, but it’s a fitting way to showcase many of the partnerships Out & About has developed over the years— partnerships indispensable to our longevity. Thirty years? Go figure. To think that I’ve now spent half of my life publishing this magazine is, personally, astonishing. But it’s also quite rewarding to reach this milestone, to know the community still has value for your contribution. That’s something Out & About has never taken for granted. And something we never will. — Jerry duPhily MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

MAGIC MOMENTS 1988-1997 1

4

3 1. Legendary UD Football Coach Tubby Raymond. Photo Butch Comegys/1992 2. Jude McDonald in front of iconic Jimmy's Diner in Newark. Photo Butch Comegys/1991 3. Former Blue Rocks and Phillies Hall of Famer Robin Roberts throws out the first pitch of the first game at Frawley Stadium. Photo Butch Comegys/1993 4. The first event ever covered by Out & About Magazine, the 1988 St. Paddy's Day Parade. Photo Lindsay duPhily 5. Sixties legend Davey Jones of The Monkees at Pulsations nightclub on Route 1 near Concordville. Photo Lindsay duPhily/1991

2

5

9

6

7 8

6. Fur-fueled David Byrne at The Stone Balloon. Photo Tim Hawk/1992 7. George Bush, Sr., then a presidential candidate, at Battery Park in Historic New Castle. Photo: Butch Comegys/1988

8. The legendary Phillies broadcast team of Richie Asburn, Andy Muser and Harry Kalas at Veterans Stadium. Photo Lindsay duPhily/1993

9. City Policemen Gordy Transue and "Red" make fast friends with a trio of city youngsters. Photo Butch Comegys/1991 32 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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1

2

1. Donald Trump tells New Castle's Dave Tiberi "you won that fight" after Tiberi's loss to James Toney, which spurred a Congressional investigation into boxing. Photo Butch Comegys/1996

2. U2 frontman Bono at Philly's Franklin Field. Photo Ralph Freso/1997

3. Former Wilmington Mayor James Sills with Bill and Hillary Clinton during the 1994 campaign. Photo Lindsay duPhily/1994

4

3

7

The

wk/1992

6

attery . 4. Warren Zevon at The Stone Balloon.

dcast y Muser Stadium.

Photo Tim Hawk/1994

5. Newark's Jeff Grady during the construction of Frawley Stadium. Photo Butch Comegys/1988 6. Local favorite Ben LeRoy of The Snap.

sue s with

Photo Butch Comegys/1988

5

7. A young and untainted Lance Armstrong at the Tour Dupont. Photo Tim Hawk/1991 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

MAGIC MOMENTS 1998-2007 1

3

2 1. Hometown hero George Thorogood in Newark. Photo Tim Hawk/2000 2. Gov. John Carney, then a U.S. Congressman, meets winners of the Dino Days Contest. Photo Tim Hawk/2003 3. Bishop Desmond Tutu and Sen. Joe Biden share a laugh at the 2000 Common Wealth Awards. Photo Pat Crowe/2000 4. An anxious crowd pours into Kahunaville after waiting hours to enter an Aaron Carter concert. Photo Lindsay duPhily/2001

4

6

5. An ornery Rocky Bluewinkle surprises Blue Rocks fan Mike Tetreault. Photo Don Blake/2005

7 8

6. Danny Glover at the MLK Celebration on Wilmington's Riverfront. Photo Don Blake/2006

7. Keeping the peace at the 2000 Halloween Loop, a costumed tradition that is now 38 years old. Photo Don Blake/2000

8. Jack White of the White Stripes at The Grand. Photo Matt Urban/2007

5 34 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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10

4

1

3 2

1. Southside Johnny with David Bromberg at The Grand. Photo Don Blake/2004

2. Sophia Danner enjoys the Clifford Brown Jazz Festival with mom Wendy. Sister Tori is not so interested. The CBJF celebrates its 30th anniversary this June. Photo Tim Hawk/2007

3. Youngsters jump for joy at the St. Anthony's Italian Festival. Photo Don Blake/2005 4. Jack and son Connor O'Neill at Wilmington's annual St. Patrick's Day Parade. Photo by Lindsay duPhily/2001

5

8

6

9 7 5. A young Martin O'Malley (later Maryland's governor) at O'Friel's Irish Pub. Photo: Tim Hawk/2001

6. Philly Wing Bowl. Photo by Tim Hawk/2000 7. Venus Williams thanks the Delaware Smash crowd at DuPont Country Club. Photo David Howell/2005

8. Morgan Freeman at the Hotel du Pont. Photo Don Blake/2001

9. Tommy Conwell at the Stone Balloon's closing party. Photo Rob Gibson/2005 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

MAGIC MOMENTS 2008-2018

1

3

2 1. Anderson Cooper addresses a packed house at the University of Delaware. Photo Joe del Tufo/2009 2. Presidential candidate Barack Obama works the crowd in Rodney Square, Wilmington. Photo Joe del Tufo/2008

3. The first familes at Wilmington Train Station en route to the 2008 Inauguration. Photo Les Kipp/2008

4. Vice president Joe Biden at Return Day in Georgetown. Photo Joe del Tufo/2008

4 MARCH 2009

COMPLIMENTARY

VOL. 22 NO.8

OCTOBER 2009

VOL. 24 NO. 1

COMPLIMENTARY

MARCH 2011

It's Been How Long?

A Quarter Century

OutAndAboutNow.Com

OutAndAboutNow.Com

VOL. 22 NO. 1

OUT-AND-AB OUT.COM

COMPLIMENTARY

Halloween Loop Invades City! Thousands roa Wilmington! m Lock your doors! Stay calm!

ho Look W ’s 21

25

Inside

& The Queen Live World Cafe pg 13

The Breakfast

ISSUE

Our Silver Anniv

PLUS:

the m the from se fro cheese m chee ream er & ccrea caper cap

E

DCCA Turns 30 Meat & Greet | The Sky Drops

ont Pont du P t l du Hotel at Hote m at Room en Roo Green Gre

Q&

>>> America's Next Great Baker speaks >>> New paths for Diego Paulo

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PLUS:

D Ce OG sa WH r IS A , Mil PE pg la R 10 n E R

>>> The coffeehouse explosion shelf >>> Craft beer finds success on the

Bondsmen Speak for $600 Million | Bail Out This! Gary Pfeiffer and the Search Wine Trail | On the Brandywine Valley The Changing Face of Little Italy

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9/24/2009 4:47:22 PM

of Literary Samplin

gs

Magic Moments Photo Salute: 1988-20 13 25 Years of Movies Worth Remembering

1

ersar y Issue VOL. 26 | NO. 1 COMPLIM ENTARY

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5. Vocalist Mike Oliver, age 11, gives it his all during a School of Rock performance in New Castle. Photo Tim Hawk/2015

6. Chip Porter (l) & Brad Riesau at Shine A Light. Photo Joe del Tufo/1993

7. Actor/musician John Gallagher, Jr., a Wilmington Drama League product, in a hometown show at Arden Gild Hall. Photo Joe del Tufo/2014

5 6

8. A United Healthcare train of cyclists lead the peleton down the home stretch of the Wilmington Grand Prix. Photo Frank Tirrell/2014

8 36 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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1 3

2

3 1. Spike Lee at the YMCA of Delaware's Black Achievers Awards. Photo Joe del Tufo/2008 2. Elton John at UD's Carpenter Center in his first Delaware appearance. Photo by Joe del Tufo/2008 3. A sea of spectators waving and singing in unison has become commonplace at Firefly. Photo by Joe del Tufo/2017 Local Eateries Serving Up Sustainability

Also In This Issue

Issue Our Outdoors ands

ow Long?

Saving Sacred

erary Samplings

O&A's Favorite

ute: 1988-2013

5

Talking Garden

Remembering

Our Summer

Woodl

Crafty Hopp

Spots for Brunch

s with NPR's Mike

enings & Suds

Iron Hill: A Culina

McGrath

11th Annual

Is Wilmington Now A Tech

Beer Issue Worth Sippin

ry & Craft Beer

Newark Food

Fall Fun for Everyone

Mecca?

Empire

& Brewfest

G R E AT E R W I L M INGTON

n

p ri n g it Spir of S Events to cure the winter blues

Ma

And what it coul

MAY 2013 TA R Y CO M P L I M E N

PM 4/23/2013 4:42:31 2/20/13 5:32 PM

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o l ve s a

l o t m o r e t h a n j u s t ta m i n g t h

e be

ast

COMPLIMEN TARY

VOL. 29 | NO. 1

JULY 2014 CO M P L I M E N TA R Y 07_Cover.indd

g inv

OCTOBER 2017

MARCH 2016 CO M P L I M E N TA R Y

3 VOL. 26 | NO.

NO. 1 TARY

apin

Our area is rife with myth and legend

Exploring bee r styles from around the world

d mean for us

nsc

HAUNTED DELAWARE

Spring

BGeoense?

ue

Reviving Wilmington’s Gambrinus

Area Bread Shops

Special Sectio

pages 48-53

ve Where Ha all the

Seasonal Menu Trends

Our Town Series: Newark

g

Shining A Light of Generosity

VOL. 27 | NO. 5

1

2/22/16 4:08 PM

1

5

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6

4 4. Wilco and Jeff Tweedy in a historic appearance at Frawley Stadium. Photo Joe del Tufo/2009 5. The Spinto Band at the Arden Music Festival. Photo Joe del Tufo/2013 6. World Cafe Live (now The Queen) debuted in 2011, bringing new life to a Wilmington landmark vacant since 1959. Photo Tim Hawk/2013 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS

Become Fluent in Wildflowers

THIRTY EVENTS CELEBRATING THIRTY YEARS! MARCH

FRIDAY, MARCH 2 Art Loop Celebration

Stroll through gardens of wildflowers, grow your knowledge in our classes, or enjoy a family-friendly event. We’re open Wednesday–Sunday, beginning April 4.

Upcoming Events: Annual Wildflower Celebration Sunday, April 29 10 am–4 pm Free admission National Public Gardens Day Friday, May 11 10 am–4 pm Reduced admission

SATURDAY, APRIL 14 Heart of the Home Kitchen Tour with Junior League of Wilmington mtcubacenter.org/out 3120 Barley Mill Rd. Hockessin, Delaware

SUNDAY, APRIL 29 Wildflower Celebration at Mt. Cuba Center

MAY

SATURDAY, MARCH 3 Shine A Light Concert at The Queen

APRIL 16-21 14th Annual City Restaurant Week

SATURDAY, MAY 5 Cinco De Mayo Loop & Market Street Party

SATURDAY, MARCH 10 St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Loop

APRIL 26-MAY 5 City Theater Company’s Tax-Free Comedy Festival

SUNDAY, MAY 6 Point-to-Point Party

THURSDAY, APRIL 26 INSpire Talks: Why Wilmington

May 18-20 Wilmington Grand Prix

APRIL

FRIDAY, APRIL 13 Opening Weekend Party at Blue Rocks 38 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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JUNE

JUNE 8 & 9 Separation Day Celebration

JUNE 20-23 Clifford Brown Jazz Fest

SATURDAY, AUGUST 25 Burger Battle

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27 39th Halloween Loop

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER

THURSDAY, SEPT 13 Farmer & The Chef

SATURDAY, NOV. 3 Urban Bike Project’s Crisp Classic

FRIDAY, SEPT. 21 Oktoberfest Loop

NOV. 5-10 10th Annual Wilmington Beer Week

JULY

SATURDAY, JULY 14 Trailfest at Peterson Environmental Center

DECEMBER

FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JULY 20-21 Ladybug Festival

SATURDAY, SEPT. 29 4th Annual Taste of Trolley Square

SATURDAY, DEC. 1 The Grand Gala

OCTOBER

SATURDAY, JULY 21 15th Annual Newark Food & Brewfest

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6 RiverTowns Ride & Festival

FRIDAY, DEC. 7 Movies on Tap @ Penn Cinema

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20 Blue Jean Ball

FRIDAY, DEC. 14 Santa Crawl

AUGUST

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11 Downtown Brew-Fest

MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY! Other signif icant anniversaries to celebrate!

Art on the Town

30 YEARS

230 YEARS

City Theater Company

Wilmington Drama League

25 YEARS

Clifford Brown Jazz Festival

30 YEARS

West End Neighborhood House

135 YEARS

Delaware Humanities Forum

40 YEARS

Dover Downs International Speedway

50 YEARS

Kozy Korner Restaurant

LaFate Gallery

25 25 YEARS YEARS Pizza by Elizabeths

25 YEARS Junior League of Wilmington

100 YEARS Toscana To Go

25 YEARS Wilmington Renaissance Corporation

25 YEARS

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City of Newark

85 YEARS

The Playhouse on Rodney Square

City of Wilmington

Dover Days Festival

Delaware Art Museum

Greater Wilmington CVB

Harry’s Savoy Grill

105 185 YEARS YEARS

85 105 YEARS YEARS 30 40 YEARS YEARS

LET US CATER TO YOU. From dinner parties to office get-togethers to weddings,

Slam Dunk to the Beach

5 YEARS

let Janssen’s make your event special. We offer full-service catering, event planning, party rentals, floral arrangements,

Rehoboth Art League

25 YEARS Walter’s Steak House

and more. Contact our catering director today at (302) 654-9941 x3.

25 YEARS Winterthur Point-to-Point

40 YEARS

WWW.JANSSENSMARKET.COM 3801 KENNETT PIKE, GREENVILLE, DE 302.654.9941

2/22/18 5:24 PM


r e u c s e r

Unleash

the

within with

March 2018 • #inWilm

Rebecca Ashton Parsons & Gaby The Mill Space

LEGO Shipbuilding Contest

Shine A Light On ‘68

$5 Movies at Penn Every Tuesday

St. Patrick’s Day Parade/Loop March 10

Brandywine Zoo Spring Opening March 10

Five for Fighting w/ String Quartet March 10

Alicia Olatuja March 11

Not Your Grandma’s Terrarium Night

Murder Mystery

Opera Uncorked: Cabs & Cabalettas

Eggstravaganza Breakfast & Hunt March 18

Easter Bunny Express

Young Ik Jang & Bo-Kyung Hwang March 24

Langhorne Slim

March 2

Basil Restaurant

The Drowsy Chaperone 2 for specials March 17 - April 22

March 3

March 14

March 24-31

March 16 & 17

March 16 & 18

March 30

inWilmDE.com 03_WilmSection.indd 11

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THE CITY

CLIFFORD BROWN JAZZ FESTIVAL AND WILMINGTON ART LOOP ALSO CELEBRATE 30 YEARS IN THE CITY Wilmington seems awash in music festivals these days—from David Bromberg’s Big Noise, to the annual People’s and Blues festivals, to the popular and growing Ladybug Music Festival, which brings a wealth of female talent to the streets of Downtown each summer. But the crown jewel of them all is the annual Clifford Brown Jazz Festival, now celebrating its 30th year of honoring Wilmington’s favorite son, the famed bebop trumpeter Clifford Brown, whose life was cut tragically short by a car accident in 1956. The region’s premier jazz festival has been held each June in Rodney Square since 1989, and has grown into the largest, free, multiday jazz festival on the entire East Coast. Over the years the festival has hosted the likes of Nneenna Freelon, Ivan Lins, David Sanborn, Earl Klugh, and Patti Austin, as well as Wilmington’s own Nadjah Nicole and Jawanza Kobie. Brown’s “Joy Spring” and “Daahoud,” which have become jazz standards, are often played in tribute. Thousands gather each summer just blocks from where Brown was born and raised to help keep the influential musician’s memory alive. Called by some “the greatest trumpeter that ever lived,”

Also celebrating its 30th anniversary this year is the Wilmington Art Loop, the City’s signature arts and creative community experience. A free, monthly, self-guided exhibition of visual art displayed at art galleries, studios, museums and alternative art spaces in and around Wilmington, Art Loop brings together art lovers from across the City and region to the revitalized Downtown District and outlying neighborhoods. Exciting and unique offerings abound, beginning on the first Friday of each month. Some venues offer opportunities to meet the featured artists while enjoying refreshments and, on occasion, live entertainment is provided. Art Loop Wilmington’s website, launched last fall, serves as a hand-held guide to the Loop that is easily navigable by gallery location, artist or type of venue. Visit the site here: www. artloopwilmington.org. Both the Clifford Brown Jazz Festival and the Wilmington Art Loop are operated through CityFest and the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs.

“Congratulations to Out & About on 30 years of helping to promote Wilmington as a premier destination to live, work, and enjoy life to the fullest. Here’s to the next thirty.” — Mayor Mike Purzycki 42 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

2/22/18 10:49 AM


YOUTH CAREER PROGRAM ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Mayor Mike Purzycki and Parks & Recreation Director Kevin Kelley have announced the opening of registration for Wilmington’s 2018 Youth Career Development program. The application form, along with eligibility requirements and other details, can be found on the City’s website at www.WilmingtonDE.gov/parksjobs, or applicants can call the Department of Parks & Recreation at 302.576.3822. The City hopes to employ 475 youths in jobs and internships in the public, business and community sectors. Mayor Purzycki said he wants all participants and those who employ our young people to stress the importance of appearance, timeliness, achievement and retention of information as ways to reach career goals. The Mayor said the Youth Career Development program is an important jobplacement and internship effort that will help City young people develop valuable work skills and prepare those same young people for a successful future. “We’re excited about this program and the opportunity to provide our City’s youth with a solid foundation for both personal and professional growth while also instilling in them an appreciation of the value of service to one’s community,” said the Mayor. One new feature of the revamped program is the two-track path to summertime employment: competitive internships and the traditional lottery drawing. This year interested individuals can apply for one of at least 100 internships, and participants will be selected through an open and competitive interview process. The internship application deadline is March 16, and participants will be notified prior to the lottery drawing in May.

NEWS YOU CAN USE! 15,000 PARKMOBILE TRANSACTIONS IN 4 MONTHS Less than four months after its launch, Parkmobile has served its 15,000th customer in Downtown Wilmington.“Now it is more convenient for citizens to come downtown for meetings, errands, and other daily activities, and these simple conveniences help make a city more livable,” said Mayor Purzycki. The administration has been analyzing Parkmobile and other data to help understand how street parking can be managed better to benefit small businesses, residents, and visitors. Parkmobile is the most widely used mobile parking solution in the country and is available at nearby locations including Bethany Beach, Dewey Beach, Rehoboth Beach, and Lewes Beach as well as in Philadelphia, New York City, and Washington, D.C. Visit wilmington.parkmobile.us to learn more about Parkmobile in Wilmington. MAYOR’S BUDGET ADDRESS On Thursday, March 15, Mayor Mike Purzycki will present his annual budget address to City Council at 6 p.m. in the Louis L. Redding City/County building at 800 North French Street. The Mayor will outline his proposed General Operating Budget and the City’s Water/Sewer Budget for FY2019 (beginning July 1, 2018). The presentation is open to the public and will be carried live on WITN—Channel 22. For the latest on arts and entertainment and great places to eat and drink in Wilmington, visit inwilmde.com.

ST. PATRICK’S PARADE A CITY RITE OF SPRING As the winter weather breaks, and snow and ice are replaced by songbirds and the sweet aroma of budding trees and flowers, one other surefire sign of spring in the city is the Mayor of Wilmington painting a green stripe down King Street to mark a portion of the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade route. Now in its 43rd year, the Irish Culture Club of Delaware’s 2018 St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Hooley will kick off at noon on Saturday, March 10, from 4th and Kings streets and proceed to the grandstand at Rodney Square. Mayor Purzycki invites all citizens to get their Irish on at Saturday’s parade and enjoy many of the exciting changes happening Downtown.

ART LOOP

DECEMBER 1ST & APRIL, 2018 March 2, 2018 artloopwilmington.org

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

CALL

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1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Harry’s Seafood Grill / Riverfront Market, HARRYS-SAVOY.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. FireStone Roasting House, FIRESTONERIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk 11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. The Delaware Contemporary, DECONTEMPORARY.ORG

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13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM Starbucks on the Riverfront Riverfront Pets, RIVERFRONTPETS.COM 14. Del Pez Mexican Gastropub, DELPEZMEXICANPUB.COM Goju Training Center, GOJUROBICS.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG Riverwalk Mini Golf, RIVERWALKMINIGOLF.COM 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM 18. Public Docks

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Visit RiverfrontWilm.com for info on events happening at the Riverfront! 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM 20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/

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DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG 27 Riverfront Commuter Lot, RIVERFRONTWILM.COM/PARKING 28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29. CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM 30. The Residences at Harlan Flats, HARLANFLATS.THERESIDENCES.NET 31. Altitude Trampoline Park, ALTITUDEWILMINGTON.COM 32. The Westin Wilmington, WESTINWILMINGTON.COM River Rock Kitchen, RIVERROCKKITCHEN.COM 33. Delaware Humane Association, DEHUMANE.ORG 34. Kalmar Nyckel Shipyard/Fort Christina Park, KALMARNYCKEL.ORG Photo by Joe del Tufo

2/21/18 3:57 PM


Y E P, S U M M E R I S A R O U N D T H E C O R N E R

RIV

E R WA L K

MINI G LF

Ride the river, minigolf, free concerts, food.

riverfrontwilm.com

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Keep food out of your recycling bin. Learn ways to recycle right at RecycleRightDE.org.

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bigfishrestaurantgroup.com

CHARCOAL HOUSE & SALOON

March 10-17

LOTS OF IRISH FOOD, MUSIC AND DANCING

AND DON’T FORGET THE BREWS

Join u s for Marc h Madn ess

It’s the only time you don’t need a plane ticket to be in Ireland 302.658.4600 • WWW.KIDSHELLEENS.COM • #HHGROUPIE 48 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

market street joins the craft brew revolution Stitch House is scheduled to open this month on Market Street.

Brainchild of two Wilmington natives, Stitch House combines microbrewery and pub By Rob Kalesse Photos by Moonloop Photography

i

n 2016, the Brewers Association—a not-for-profit trade association dedicated to small and independent American brewers—reported that, on average, Delawareans drink 11.1 gallons of craft beer annually, good for sixth in the nation. Additionally, since 2007, the BA has tracked the number of breweries operating in each state, with Delaware's total jumping from just seven to more than 20 in that span. Obviously, Delaware’s beer drinkers not only support the craft industry, but with each passing year, they're thirsty for more. Enter Stitch House Brewery, which will give Wilmington’s Market Street its own microbrewery. Expected to open early this month, Stitch House is the product of local entrepreneurs Dan Sheridan and Rob Snowberger. The Delaware natives will join forces with Head Brewer Andrew Rutherford, who worked for more than a decade at Yards Brewery in Philadelphia.

Sheridan has been around the Delaware dining scene for quite a while, having worked at La Fia on Market Street, after which he opened Locale BBQ Post as well as the Wilmington Pickling Company. Snowberger, meanwhile, is a former Navy SEAL who also attended the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. The two grew up together in Wilmington and were raised by fathers who worked for the city. “We’d talked about opening a place together for years, but Rob was the first one to see this site at 829 Market through his connections with the Buccini/Pollin Group (BPG),” says Sheridan. “When I first took a look at the building, I knew there would be a lot of work to do. Fitting out four floors to fit apartments and a huge brewpub and brewery was an enormous undertaking.” (Stitch House encompasses the first floor and part of the basement for storage, while BPG outfitted the upper two floors for apartments to lease.) ► MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

MARCH MADNESS!

MARKET STREET JOINS THE CRAFT BREW REVOLUTION continued from previous page

track your

brackets on our

15 4kHDtvs! Book your PRIVATE viewing party in the TONIC salon! Dedicated bartender Exclusive flat screens Special menus

302.777.2040 | TonicBarGrille.com | 111 WesT 11Th sT. LIVE MUSIC THURSDAYS, FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS

Saturday March 17th 9PM – 12AM

The full-scale restaurant will seat upwards of 170, including 40-plus in the bar area and a back room for private dining.

seating for 170-plus

That work would include months of renovations and construction on a building erected in 1909 that had served, at various times, as a coal house, ice house, tailor shop, and even a linen shop. Sheridan and Snowberger, after discovering the building’s past lives, decided on Stitch House, as a tribute to its history. The result is a full-scale restaurant that will seat upwards of 170, including more than 40 in the bar area and a back room for private dining. “The guys at BPG told me they wanted to open up a microbrewery on Market Street, to specifically cater to all that was going on downtown, especially the huge Residences at MidTown Park project right outside our back door,” says Sheridan. “Once I understood the scope of that project, I went with it.” According to Buccini/Pollin, the Residences at Mid-Town Park will feature 200 luxury studio, one-bedroom and twobedroom apartments, with a 511-space parking garage below and 12,000 square feet of ground floor retail along Shipley Street. The parking garage is expected to open this month, and the first phase of the apartments is expected to be ready in June, with the remainder finishing up over the summer. Once Sheridan and Snowberger embarked on their new culinary journey, they quickly began scouring the area for an experienced brewer looking for a new challenge. Fortunately, they were able to woo Rutherford, a 10-year veteran at Yards. “I was in a rut and needed a change, so I began entertaining the idea of making a move and maybe recapturing a little creative freedom in the brewery,” says Rutherford. “The guys came to me with their plan for Stitch House and we just jelled. This is a good fit and I’m really excited to see what we can accomplish on Market Street.” Sheridan and Snowberger are ecstatic to have been able to bring on Rutherford, who put in many 18- and 20-hour days leading up to the restaurant’s opening. “The guy is a machine,” says Sheridan. “He’s super talented and we are beyond excited to have him on our team.” Rutherford says that to start, Stitch House will fill nine of its 12 taps with house brews, including a lager, pilsner, stout, IPA and pale ale, among others. The remaining three taps will be filled with local brews, and they will only offer draft beer, rather than any outside bottles or cans.

50 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Head Brewer Andrew Rutherford previously brewed for 10 years at Yards Brewing Co.

Adds Sheridan: “Our hope is to have all the taps filled with our own beers by late in the spring, and then begin offering crowlers (large cans) to customers, so they can take our beer with them.”

adding a smoker

As for the menu, Sheridan, a chef by trade, will focus on catering to the downtown lunch crowd; several sandwiches, burgers and paninis will be featured, as well as skillet dishes like dips, nachos, and even scallops and the increasingly popular sautéed Brussels sprouts. While they’re forgoing a pizza oven (found at many brewpubs), Sheridan says an on-site smoker will contribute heavily to the menu. “I don’t necessarily want to do barbecue, because I leave that to Locale BBQ, but I do want to offer a lot of good smoked meats that will be seasoned and prepared to specifically pair with our beers,” he says. “The skillet dishes are designed for sharing and will fall into the comfort food category because we want to establish a laidback vibe here.” The interior features murals and beer menu boards designed by Against the Grain Arts, of Wilmington, a logo designed by Snowberger’s sister, Molly, and design work by Stokes Architecture, of Philadelphia. Many of the high-top bar tables and booths were crafted by the Challenge Program, a Wilmingtonbased organization that offers at-risk teens the opportunity to learn life skills like carpentry and construction. Stitch House will be open seven days a week and possibly for brunch on the weekends. Sheridan says they will offer some sort of discounted parking validation at the Parking at MidTown garage, as well as some other Colonial Parking garages in the city. They are also looking into the possibility of offering valet service on weekends.

Many of the tables and booths were crafted by the Challenge Program. MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Presented by the

5 MILE RUN/WALK

SATURDAY, MARCH 24 Run/Walk begins at 9 a.m. Tastings begin at noon. www.enjoydowntownnewark.com/winedine

CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 30TH GUYS! THANKS FOR ALL YOUR SUPPORT OVER THE YEARS.

52 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT NEW NAME AND HOME FOR HONEYBEE

BITES Tasty things worth knowing Compiled by Mathew Brown-Watson

REHOBOTH BEACH 27TH ANNUAL CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL

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ehoboth Beach will celebrate the 27th Annual Chocolate Festival on Saturday, March 10, at the Atlantic Sands Hotel and Conference Center. From its inception, the festival has been a success, expanding beyond just a simple chocolate contest to a significant restaurant promotion. The contest is still the focal point of the festival, featuring professional entries competing in eight dessert categories, which include brownies, cake, pie and more. Proceeds from the event, which begins at 11 a.m., go directly to feeding hungry children throughout the state of Delaware through the Harry K Foundation School Food Pantries, Backpack Program and the Baby Pantry. For more information about the event and the various ticket purchasing options, visit harrykfoundation.org.

H

TOP CHEF CONTESTANT OPENS PIKE CREEK RESTAURANT

O

ne of the more memorable contestants of the hit reality show Top Chef, Fabio Viviani, will open a 140-to-160-seat restaurant later this year in Linden Hill Station, in Pike Creek. Raised in Florence, Italy, Viviani was charming and charismatic while on the Bravo Network show, earning acclaim from the likes of noted chef and world traveler Anthony Bordain. Viviani says he is “very pleased” at the prospect of making his mark on the Delaware restaurant scene. His 4,800-square-foot restaurant, to be called Chuck Lager's Tavern, will feature mainly classic American dishes, elevated by Viviani’s Italian flare. He hopes to begin welcoming patrons to the new establishment by August or September.

oneyBee Seasonal Kitchen and Market has not only changed its name (it was formerly Delaware Local Food Exchange), it has moved to a new home—11A Trolley Square. With an array of local organic foods aimed at the health- and sustainabilityconscious grocery shopper, HoneyBee fits right into the trendy Trolley Square shopping experience. And patrons are usually greeted by a delicious aroma emanating from the kitchen. For more information on what’s going on at the HoneyBee Kitchen and Market, visit the Facebook page.

NEW MENUS, FRESHER LOOK AT HOTEL DU PONT

‘YOU TELL ME’ PIZZA COMING SOON TO CHRISTIANA

W

C

hile maintaining its historic elegance and original charm, the Hotel du Pont has taken on a fresher look that includes enhancements to the Green Room dining experience and new menus for each of the dining spaces. The menus offer inventive dishes, coupled with reinvented and beloved mainstays by Executive Chef Keith Miller. “Our new menus were developed to highlight our focus on local and regional flavors and ingredients, including partnerships with Cassaday Farms in Monroeville, N.J., and King Farms in Cochranville, Pa.,” says Miller. “Each innovative dish is developed and executed with the quality and elegance you expect from the Green Room but with a modern and approachable interpretation.” More information on dining and special occasions at the hotel can be found at hoteldupont.com.

oming to the Christiana Fashion Center this May or June is MidiCi, a build-it-yourself pizza parlor that is part of a growing nationwide trend. MidiCi features a counter service ordering system, standard in fast food chains, that allows patrons to customize their pizza as it moves down the line toward the oven, or they can choose a signature creation. This concept is reflected in the name MidiCi, which in Italian means “you tell me.” Although not the first to incorporate this kind of pizza ordering service, MidiCi is raising the bar on the average pizza experience by using flour, tomatoes and meats imported from Italy. The pizzas are cooked in a wood-fired oven as opposed to the more common convection oven. An olive tree inside the restaurant adds another touch of Italy. For more information, visit mymidici.com. MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Liberty Comedy Presents Fabulously Funny Females

The Dixie Dregs

THUR | MAR 8 | 8PM | $31

THUR | MAR 8 | 8PM | $51-$59

Ladies of laughter don’t hold back in riotous night of comedy

One Night In Memphis: Presley, Perkins, Lewis, and Cash

FRI | MAR 9 | 8PM | $34-$40

Steve Morse and the original lineup reunited after 40 years

Presley, Perkins, Lewis, and Cash in one rocking concert tribute

Five For Fighting with String Quartet

Red Hot Chilli Pipers

Seldom Scene

SAT | MAR 10 | 8PM | $33-$38

FRI | MAR 23 | 8PM | $38

Bagpipes with attitude!

A popular bluegrass band for over four decades

Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular

Jay Ungar and Molly Mason

The Music Factory

SAT | MAR 24 | 8PM | $34

SUN | MAR 25 | 2PM | $33

State-of-the-art laser lighting illuminates the best of Pink Floyd

Fiddle-guitar duo honors American acoustic music

Coming April 6

FRI | MAR 16 | 8PM | $32-$38

Piano-centric pop singer-songwriter charms with emotionally rich lyrics

SAT | MAR 31 | 8PM | $28 Two men bring out the size of a full band in this entertaining night of song

T h e MAV ER I CKS

TheGrandWilmington.org | 302.652.5577 | 302.888.0200 818 N. Market Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

Follow us on: This program is supported, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Arden Concert Gild, The Green Willow, Brandywine Friends Endowment of Oldtime Music, Latino Community Council are valued partners for many performances in the 2017-18 season. for theand Arts.the The Division promotesAdvisory Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com.

All tickets subject to box office service charges. Artists, dates, times and programs are subject to change.

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Photo Joan Marcus

WATCH

The cast of Cabaret — (L-R): Conor Schultz, Christopher Haley, Staci Jo Johnston, (back) Elizabeth Flanagan, Kari Nelson, Erik Schneider (Emcee), Adriana Milbrath, Anya Gibian, Kyra Christopher, Diego Diaz, Matthew Janisse.

march brings cabaret, jazz, noontime concerts The arts in Wilmington offer music—inside and outside By Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald

t

his month, The Playhouse on Rodney Square transforms into the infamous Kit Kat Klub, as Cabaret takes the stage March 13-18. Based on Roundabout Theatre Company’s Tony Award– winning production, Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall’s version of Cabaret marks the first visit to Wilmington for this Broadway revival. Mendes and Marshall are the original director and codirector/choreographer, respectively, Get ready to be welcomed to the notorious nightclub where the emcee, Sally Bowles, and a sexy, raucous ensemble nightly titillate, tantalize and entice crowds to “…leave your troubles outside.” But as the atmosphere in pre-World War II Germany grows tenuous, will Berlin’s decadent nightlife be enough to get through? This renowned musical—book by Joe Masteroff and music and lyrics by John Kander and Fred Ebb—originally opened on Broadway in 1966 and London’s West End in 1968. Cabaret has since enjoyed many revivals (London in 1986, 1993, 2006 and 2012; Broadway in 1987, 1998 and 2014) and, of course, the memorable 1972 film starring Liza Minnelli. It features some of the most

recognizable songs in theater history, including the hallmark “Cabaret,” “Willkommen” and “Maybe This Time.” This all-new production launched in December 2017 in Worcester, Mass., with tour direction by BT McNicholl, tour choreography by Jennifer Werner and original costume design by William Ivey Long. The company of 21 quadruple-threat performers (actors, singers, dancers and musicians) features Erik Schneider as the animated Emcee, Bailey McCall Thomas as British chanteuse Sally Bowles and University of Delaware alumnus Carl Pariso as American writer and Sally’s tortured love, Clifford Bradshaw. During his time at the University of Delaware, Pariso studied Music Composition and Theatre Performance and performed with The REP, Chapel Street Players and UD Chorale. He now makes his home in New York City. Cabaret opens for a press preview on Tuesday, March 13, and runs through Sunday, March 18. Tickets start at $40, and discounts are available for seniors and groups of 10 or more. Call The Playhouse Box Office at 888-0200 for discount information or visit ThePlayhouseDE.org to purchase tickets online. ► MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

CALLING ALL SOLO MUSICIANS! 2 0 1 8 MUSIKARMAGEDDON

Saturday, April 7 live @ the baby grand Local Singer/Songwriters will compete in a head-to-head contest to determine the area’s best talent

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, MARCH 9 Musikarmageddon.com

Prizes include Recording Session at Studio 825, an Out & About Article, and an Appearance on WSTW’s Hometown Heroes!

Sponsored by:

MARCH BRINGS CABARET, JAZZ, NOONTIME CONCERTS continued from previous page

christina cultural arts center hosts wilmington debut of jazz songstress

Christina Cultural Arts Center continues its streak of presenting well-known regional and national musicians in the intimate setting of its Clifford Brown Performance Space. On Sunday, March 11, Christina welcomes jazz siren Alicia Olatuja in her area debut. The St. Louis–born Olatuja—who rose to fame after her 2013 performance at President Obama’s second inauguration—released her first solo album, Timeless, in 2014. Her influences include gospel, soul, jazz and classical genres and she has performed with such renowned artists as Chaka Khan, BeBe Winans and Christian McBride. Christina Executive Director H. Raye Jones Avery notes that during the 2017 MidAtlantic Jazz Touring Network members’ conference, Olatuja was recognized by Newport Jazz Festival musical director McBride as one of the newest “voices to experience.” “The outstanding endorsements resonating from her performance at the inauguration and directly from Christian McBride led us to the obvious choice to invite Alicia to Christina Cultural Arts Center's Jazz Touring Network performance season this year,” says Avery. “Alicia’s lush tone and welcoming stage presence will surely draw audiences into her magnetic personality and performance.” Tickets for this up-close-and-personal performance are only $20 and are available at ccacde.org through March 10. Olatuja’s engagement with Christina is made possible through The Jazz Touring Network of Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation with support of the National Endowment for the Arts' Regional Touring Program. Alicia and her band have performed throughout the country at venues like the Jazz Standard, Vermont Jazz Center, Sioux Falls JazzFest, Rockport Jazz Festival, Markham Jazz Festival, Monty Alexander Jazz Fest and the Harlem Stage Gatehouse.

market street music welcomes spring with musical diversity

Market Street Music opens its spring performance season with three full-length Festival Concerts and a dozen Thursday Noontime Concerts, all beginning this month. Leading off the Noontime Concert calendar is a Thursday, March 1, spring celebration by Center City Chorale, aptly entitled “Jubilate!” The weekly series continues through May 10 with genre-spanning artists, including duos of clarinet/ piano and violin/piano; a banjo soloist; and a sneak preview of OperaDelaware’s April/ May Puccini festival. Admission for all Thursday Noontime Concerts is a suggested donation of $5. The Festival Concert lineup is equally diverse, beginning with a Sunday, March 4, 3 p.m. return performance by popular chamber ensemble Pyxis Piano Quartet. Pyxis, known for a sold-out series at the Delaware Art Museum, will present a program of piano quartets by Surinach and Chausson. On Friday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m., Market Street Music welcomes another repeat performance, by Ayreheart Renaissance Music. Founded by Grammy-nominated lutenist Ronn McFarlane, Ayreheart brings the lute—known as the most popular instrument of the Renaissance Era—into the 21st century with the all the energy and flair of a rock concert. This dynamic three-piece ensemble performs music from the Renaissance, interspersed with traditional Scottish and Irish tunes and Celtic- , Renaissance- and Americana-inspired originals. Finally, the talented Mastersingers of Wilmington present an All-German concert of works by Bach, Buxtehude and Mendelssohn to round out the season on Saturday, May 19, at 7:30 p.m. All Market Street Music performances are held at First & Central Presbyterian Church, on the corner of Rodney Square across from the Hotel du Pont. Tickets for Festival Concerts are $20 ($10 for students) at marketstreetmusicde.org or $25 at the door.

56 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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“Tipsy” takes on a whole new meaning when you drink and drive. And after you’re busted, you’ll get a suspended driver’s license, pay thousands of dollars in fines and receive possible jail time. A DUI will always cost you. It’s not worth it. Don’t let a DUI redefine you. Find a safe ride home.

ArriveAliveDE.com/DriveSober

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Recline

ON

THE

RIVERFRONT

Res er ve your se at s at www.pe n n cin e ma.co m

56 FEBRUARY 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

Game Night

3

STARS µµµµµ Rachel McAdams as Annie and Jason Bateman as Max in Game Night. Photo Hopper Stone / Courtesy of Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. & Ratpac-Dune Entertainment LLC

STUPID FUN Comedy thriller delivers with inconsequential game night humor By Mark Fields

A

s unmemorable as a game of checkers, as insubstantial as party charades, but as fun as a round of drunken Scattergories. Game Night, a new comedy thriller from the people behind Horrible Bosses and Vacation, will barely stay in your brain long enough for you to get to the car, but nevertheless, it’s good, stupid fun. Jason Bateman and Rachel McAdams play Max and Annie, a thoroughly cute yet fiercely competitive married couple. To exercise their love of competition (well, in truth, winning), the two have a standing weekly date with two other thoroughly cute couples for game night. Into this benign situation comes Max’s older brother, Brooks (Kyle Chandler), who has succeeded in the game of life to a degree that fosters sibling resentment in Max.

Brooks co-opts game night with a wild role-playing kidnapping adventure that quickly if predictably spins out of control. Add a priceless Faberge egg, a mobster called the Bulgarian, and a creepy cop as a next-door neighbor, and we have ourselves a raucous comedy. Bateman and McAdams have just the right light touch for this kind of borderline comedy. They manage the ruder, darker elements with a grace that prevents the movie from becoming unredeemable (as The Hangover often did). Chandler approaches his caricature of a role with gusto and conviction. But the highlight of the cast is Jesse Plemons as the incredibly sinister-sad neighbor Gary. Recently divorced and desperate, excluded from the boardgame fun, Gary longs to be a part of something, anything. Plemons brings the right blend of mania and melancholy to the part. ► MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH STUPID FUN continued from previous page

The reviews

say it all…

“Best Wine List, Philadelphia”

– Open Table

“Must Visit Restaurant”

– The News Journal

“Best Overall Restaurant in Philadelphia Suburbs”

– Open Table

“Best of Delaware”

– Delaware Today

“Extraordinary”

– Zagat

Directors John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein, who have both cut their teeth as comedy writers, show the right blend of grounded and ridiculous to keep the action moving, and the dialogue is well-seeded with great toss-off jokes. The banter is fast, the coincidences implausible, and the humor frequently unnecessarily coarse or morbid. But none of that really matters. In the era of The Hangover and Seth Rogen-Judd Apatow comedies, the goal is admirably simple: create a diverting, entertaining, somewhat risqué few hours in the cinema. The sights are set fairly low, but Game Night manages to achieve and even surpass them.

Photo courtesy of Marvel Studios

1314 N. Washington St., Wilmington, DE 19801 • 302.300.3723 DOMAINEHUDSON.COM

Chadwick Boseman in Black Panther.

BLACK PANTHER 5 STARS µ µ µ µ µ

Much has been written about this landmark superhero movie, and as the record-setting grosses continue to pile up, the coverage (and thoughtful analysis) will likely keep on coming. Beyond its cultural significance, Black Panther is tautly scripted, beautifully designed and photographed, and stunningly executed. If you have any interest in the genre, even if you’ve felt that recent entries have been disappointing, go…just go. Also opening in March: It’s adventure and thriller season! Ava Duvernay’s eagerly-awaited A Wrinkle in Time (March 2); Alicia Vikander in a remake of Tomb Raider (March 16), a new stop-action animated headtrip from Wes Anderson, Isle of Dogs (March 23); and Ready Player One, Steven Spielberg’s tribute to classic arcade games (March 30). 60 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo courtesy of Participant Media

A Fantastic Woman

4

P L AYI N G THIS MONTH Nemours Building 1007 N. Orange Street

March 2 - 4

STARS µµµµµ Daniela Vega plays Marina Vidal in A Fantastic Woman.

A FANTASTIC WOMAN Chilean director Sebastian Delio has an abiding empathy for women in situations of turmoil and marginalization. His prior film, Gloria, was a touching meditation on a 58-yearold divorced woman’s desire to find a place in the world as a vibrant, romantic sexual being though the culture repeatedly warns her to remain invisible. In his new film, A Fantastic Woman, Delio again visits a marginalized woman. In this case, it is Marina (Daniela Vega), who finds herself thrust out of the way when her older lover Orlando unexpectedly dies. Marina is trans (as is the actress Vega who plays her so movingly), and she is immediately omitted, questioned, judged, even investigated. She wants only to grieve her partner, and society wants her to disappear. Without being preachy, Delio manages to bring a political and social issue into great focus and human perspective, by telling the stories of people instead of taking an abstract position. He finds the humanity in Marina, and by extension, in all of us. Playing at Theatre N in March: Catch up on Oscar nominees. Darkest Hour and Call Me By Your Name (March 2-4); Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri (March 9-11); The Shape of Water and Phantom Thread (March 16-18).

Darkest Hour

Call Me By Your Name

Fri 2, 5:30 Sat 12:45, 7:30 Sun 2:10

Rocky Horror Picture Show

Fri 8:30 | Sat 4 Sun 11am, 5

Sat 11 pm

March 8 - 11

Concert For George

Three Billboards

In The Fade

Fri 2, 5:30 | Sat 4, 7:30 Sun 12, 6:15

Thursday 7pm

Fri 8:30 Sat 1 | Sun 3:15

March 16 - 18

The Shape of Water

Fri 2, 8:45 Sat 12:45 | Sun 3:15

Phantom Thread

Rocky Horror Picture Show

Fri 5:30 Sat 4, 7:30 | Sun 12, 6:30

Sat 11 pm

March 21, 23- 18

web / print / video Opera: Tosca

Happy End

Wednesday 6pm

Fri 2, 8:30 Sat 4 | Sun 6

Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool Fri 5:30 Sat 1, 7:30 | Sun 12, 3

March 30 - April 1

catalyst.design

A Fantastic Woman

Big Time

Fri 2, 8:30 | Sat 4 | Sun 12

Fri 5:30 | Sat 1, 7:30 | Sun 3, 6

For more information and tickets, visit

TheatreN.com MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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STEP AFRIKA! A high energy step, tap and modern dance experience APRIL 13 | 8 PM

2018 PERFORMANCE SERIES STEP AFRIKA! EIGHTH BLACKBIRD NORMAN DAVID AND THE ELEVENTET MARC BAMUTHI JOSEPH OKWUI OKPAKWASILI JONAH BOKAER CARTOON CHRISTMAS TRIO KENDRICK SCOTT TRIO PYXIS

2301 Kentmere Pkwy | Wilmington, DE | 302.571.9590

PURCHASE TICKETS AT DELART.ORG

62 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

FOR THE RECORD

Grace Vonderkuhn WITH

“For the Record” is a periodic feature in which musicians discuss what they’ve been listening to lately.

From left, bassist Brian Bartling, Vonderkuhn and drummer Dave Mcgrory. Photo Ryan Williams

By Krista Connor

T

he electric charge of Grace Vonderkuhn is spreading wildly, and with her first full-length album Reveries out Feb. 23, she’s already been featured by NPR, WXPN’s The Key, and a half dozen other media. The album, put out by EggHunt Records, is a gritty, mad dash of noisy garage rock plunging into melodic catharsis, backed up by bassist Brian Bartling and Dave Mcgrory on drums. Reveries is available on vinyl, cassette and digitally on iTunes, Amazon, Bandcamp, Spotify and more. In March, Vonderkuhn and her band will tour the Mid-Atlantic region and beyond, most notably playing at South By Southwest in Austin as official showcase performers (March 9-16). Locally, catch her at Wilmington’s 1984 on Thursday, March 29. O&A caught up with Vonderkuhn before her spring tour, and she shared her music career’s five most formative, influential albums.

T. Rex — Electric Warrior

One album that really influenced me in my late teens is Electric Warrior. I remember the first time hearing the song “Cosmic Dancer.” I was waiting tables on a slow day and it came on. I thought it was Bowie at first, but I soon found out that it was Marc Bolan serenading me. I felt like I was transported into another reality. After that I delved into the whole album and fell in love with the sound. It’s true glam rock with dashes of psychedelic riffs and it’s all tied together with Bolan’s vibrato and spacey lyrics. It just grooves. ►

MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

We Buy Records! Our Local Family Business Buys Vinyl Record Collections

FOR THE RECORD WITH GRACE VONDERKUHN continued from previous page

Call us at (302)368-7738 for details

Announcing the opening of

The CD Library Over 9000 CDs in stock Prices start at $1.99 each! 54 E MAIN ST., REAR, NEWARK, DE WWW.RAINBOWRECORDSDE.COM - (302) 368-7738

Pixies — Doolittle

It probably doesn’t come as a surprise to people that have heard my music that the Pixies are one of my favorite bands. Although I enjoy most of their discography, I wanted to highlight their album Doolittle because it was my gateway drug into late ‘80s/early ‘90s alternative rock. This album is stacked with hits and there are so many mood changes, it’s no wonder it’s hailed as some of their greatest work. I really could sing their praises all day, but I’ll probably just listen to Doolittle again instead.

Autolux — Future Perfect

Here’s another lifechanging album for me. Autolux redefined what a three-member rock band could be. It comes down to their dynamics and the ability to use quiet and space to build up heavy parts into lethal rock. Plus, there are some deeply satisfying guitar and bass tones and entrancing vocal harmonies. I highly recommend listening to Autolux.

Elliott Smith — Either/Or

I’ve never heard an Elliott Smith song I didn’t like, but this particular album is close to my heart. This is deeply introspective and, well, sad music. Smith was a master wordsmith and one could write a dissertation on the meaning of his lyrics. He was also heavily influenced by the Beatles and I love the juxtaposition of his pop chords and heartbroken content. If you must explore your darkness, Either/Or is an ideal soundtrack.

Sex Pistols — Nevermind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols

Sex Pistols opened up a new world for me when I was a teenager. Along with The Clash, they sparked my interest in ‘70s U.K. punk and led me to bands like Buzzcocks and Generation X and later post punk bands like Public Image, LTD., Joy Division, and Magazine. Loud, fast, angsty music is truly cathartic and energizing.

64 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Danny Clinch

LISTEN

Patterson Hood (center), Mike Cooley (right-of-center) and the rest of Drive-By Truckers roll up to The Queen on Wednesday, March 28.

5 QUESTIONS WITH

PATTERSON HOOD OF DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS By Jim Miller

S

everal talented musicians at some time or another have gone along for the ride with Drive-By Truckers. Among them: singer-songwriter Jason Isbell; his former wife, bassist Shonna Tucker; pedal steel player John Neff, and keyboardist Spooner Oldham, who used to record with the legendary Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section (more on that later). But at the core of the group, taking turns driving the truck, have always been the band’s co-founders, Mike Cooley and Patterson Hood, who have been playing together for ages, even before the band started in 1996. We caught up with Hood by phone last month, in advance of Drive-By Truckers’ March 28 show at The Queen. He sounded jovial and energized. It was seven dates into the band’s 2018 tour and just a few nights after their concert in Portland, Ore., which has become Hood’s home after moving there with his family in July 2015—far from his longtime residence in Athens, Ga. “I love Portland,” Hood says, adding that the transition from Athens was relatively easy. “They’ve got more in common than they do different, honestly. Obviously Portland’s a much bigger

city, and I’m enjoying that a lot. But they have a very similar vibe. Athens has more in common with Portland and Brooklyn and Austin than it does most small southern towns.” Drive-By Truckers is on a roll at the moment. The band is touring for the second time on the success of its most recent album, 2016’s American Band, which not only was one of their most critically-acclaimed albums—appearing on many bestof-the-year lists – but also one of their most overtly political. Sample lyric: “Ronnie Reagan must be spinning his grave; Putin’s on the rise, Ukraine’s under siege; Fascism’s knocking and Trump says ‘Let them in.’” “This record has legs,” Hood says. “We’re out touring right now, and the route we’re on is really similar to what we did [right after American Band]. We’re playing a lot of the same rooms, and, in some cases, bigger rooms. And in every single town, attendance has been up.” On that note, here is Hood, talking about the power of songwriting, recording, and his long-standing relationship with his musical partner, Cooley. ► MARCH JUNE 2018 2017 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

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5 QUESTIONS WITH PATTERSON HOOD OF DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS continued from previous page

Drive-By Truckers play to an enthusiastic crowd during their 2016 tour for English Oceans.

O&A: You really do have southern music in your blood. Your dad, David Hood, was the bass player for The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section and later was a co-founder of Muscle Shoals Sound Studio. What was it like growing up in that environment, with all these famous bands coming in and out (of the studio) and your dad being a southern rock legend in his own right? Hood: Yeah, I was well aware of what was going on. I really kept up with it as much as I possibly could because I was really interested in it. I always wanted to do this, too. But, at the same time, I wasn’t really there. I was at home; I was a kid; and I wasn’t really allowed to be [at the studio]. Getting info from my dad about what was going on was sometimes next to impossible. I’d have to find out from other means [chuckling]. Because Dad was very much into keeping home separate. He was old school. In his day, you didn’t take work home with you. I hardly saw him pick up an instrument at home or anything like that. He really didn’t want me to go into music, either, so he wasn’t particularly supportive of me doing it for a long time. Probably up until Southern Rock Opera. [The band’s third album, released in 2001.] O&A: Soon after Southern Rock Opera, you recorded Dirty South in FAME Studios, which is where your dad and The Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section got their start. Was that an attempt by you to tap into or reconnect with that southern rock history? Hood: Yeah, you know, I grew up practically down the street! I mean I always had wanted to record there. So once we had the means to do it, we just did. I still now want to record at 3614 now that they’ve reopened that [3614 Jackson Highway, the location of Muscle Shoal Sound Studio, which his father helped start and run]. I really want to go record there. Just as I have a list of places I hope we can record, you know, before time runs out. We got to record at Electric Lady a couple years ago, and that was cool. And we made our last record at Sound Emporium, and that was really great. So I’ve got this list of legendary studios that I’d like to capture while they’re still around.

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O&A: Do you find that recording at different studios affects the vibe or the final output to the point that it influences the overall theme of the record? Hood: Oh, yeah. I’m sure it does. Everything affects it. At the same time, we made one of my favorite records in my living room. So it has to do with so many things as far as what we bring to the table. But the room can certainly affect things, positively or negatively, depending on the experience. O&A: You and Mike Cooley co-founded Drive-By Truckers in 1996. But before that you were in a band together called Adam’s House Cat, which Musician magazine had listed as one of its Top Ten Unsigned Bands back in the late ‘80s. What was it that brought you and Mike together, creatively? Hood: Boredom and being broke. We met as roommates. I moved in with a guy I knew from college, and Mike was his other roommate. And that’s how we met. He had a guitar, and I had a guitar. We were broke, so we didn’t have money to go out. We’d buy a case of really cheap beer and sit in the living room and pick and jam. I’d always written songs, so I was eager to mostly play my songs anyway, and he didn’t really want to play a bunch of covers. He kind of thought it was cool that I had a bunch of songs. Even before any of us were worth a shit at it, I liked what he did with my songs. I liked his approach ►

66 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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2/22/18 11:21 AM


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MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

to what I was writing. He attacked them in a way that I thought was very 5 QUESTIONS WITH PATTERSON appropriate for what I wrote. It was HOOD OF DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS kind of counter-intuitive because he continued from page 66 would almost always do the opposite of what I heard in my head, but I liked that. Shit, we’ve been playing together for 33 years! This is our fourth band. We had two bands between Adam’s House Cat and Drive-By Truckers that were, like, dismal failures. But we just kept coming back to it. It worked. Ironically, we didn’t necessarily get along back then. It wasn’t like we were unstoppable close friends. We were close, because we played together forever. But it was kind of a—I don’t want to say stormy close—but we were like brothers who didn’t necessarily get along. I’ll put it that way. It was that kind of relationship for a really long time. We were roommates for three different points of time, but we weren’t necessarily good roommates, either [laughs]. We were roommates that sometimes wanted to kill each other. It’s all really funny now because I would say we’re super close now. We get along great now. But that was kind of the last piece of the puzzle. We figured out how to play together long before we learned how to get along [laughs]. O&A: You guys recorded the single “Perilous Night” in November. A lot of people have been talking about how political it is, how strongly worded it is. Then you donated proceeds of the 7-inch single to the Southern Poverty Law Center. How does it feel to do that—to come out and really say how you feel and, at the same time help an organization that you believe in like that?

Hood: Right. I mean to me that’s kind of the whole point to what we do. Writing was something I did because it made me feel better. It was a way for me to express what I was thinking about: either what was bothering me, or pissing me off, or hurting my feelings, or making me sad or depressed or whatever. Occasionally what makes me happy. But usually it’s a way of dealing with the more negative things. So to be able to back it up with some modicum of action was good. Our donation to the Southern Poverty Law Center isn’t going to be a game-changer [laughs] Unfortunately. I wish it was. But at least I think we’re doing what we can. We try to support various good causes. There’s no shortage of people who need support. We’ve been raising money for Nuci’s Space, a suicide-prevention non-profit from Athens, for 20-plus years now. That’s always been our pet cause. But it’s good we’re able to add a few more things, too. This is the second thing I’ve done for the Southern Poverty Law Center. I did a song for them about a year ago—a solo thing—that was for a little EP they put out with Bonnie Prince Billy, myself, William Tyler and a couple of other artists. Really good artists. I was really proud to be part of that. And it was the perfect use for a song like “Perilous Night,” because I’m not trying to profit from our country’s current failure of judgment [laughs]. I’m trying to support my family, but I’m happy to do whatever I can that helps fund the resistance. I really didn’t see that song as being part of the next record. It’s more of an epilogue to the last record. Patterson Hood and Drive-By Truckers play The Queen on Wednesday, March 28. For more info and tickets, go to TheQueenWilmington.com.

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68 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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2/21/18 8:14 PM


MARCH MUSIC at Kelly’s Logan House Now featuring early shows from 7-10 p.m. every Friday night with original local music. #livemusicforearlybirds 3/03 – The Knotty G’s, The Honey Badgers, and Edgewater Avenue 3/09 – Logan House Jazz Club 3/16 – Nalani & Sarina with Rad and Kell

3/23 – Bluegrass at Logan House featuring Edgewater Avenue and the White Cheddar Boys 3/30 – Blues & BBQ

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LISTEN

TUNED IN Not-to-be-missed music news DAVID BROMBERG’S BIG NOISE FESTIVAL

Mark your calendars for June 8-9, when the annual David Bromberg’s Big Noise Festival, the Mid-Atlantic’s premier Americana festival, is back at Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park. This year, the gathering has expanded to two days instead of just one to accommodate all the notable acts. This year’s festival includes David Bromberg & The Big Band, Los Lobos, Railroad Earth, Dumpstaphunk, Bettye LaVette, Amy Helm, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, David Wax Museum, The National Reserve and more. Another new component is “The Grove,” which will have a small acoustic stage and feature increased selections of wine and spirits. The festival also will include food trucks, a beer garden, vendors and more. One-day tickets start at $28 and VIP tickets start at $125. They sell out quickly. Get them early at bignoisefestival.com.

ROB ZINN’S NEW ALBUM

Area trumpeter and musical mainstay Rob Zinn will release his sophomore album, Walk the Walk, on Friday, April 6. Big names in music are all over the record. For example, the album is produced by double Grammy-winning producer Paul Brown, while Philadelphia native and sax player Andrew Neu is featured on the first single, “Walk The Walk,” and another track. Brown is featured on two tracks and sax player Michael Paulo is featured on another. “Paul and I also wrote five of the songs on the album,” says Zinn. “It was recorded and produced in California, so it has a West Coast groove and vibe. Very smooth contemporary jazz but it also has a cool, bluesy, soul, R&B feel as well on several songs. After all, Paul worked with Luther Vandross, so soul and R&B are in his producing blood.” The album has received rave reviews. Says critic Ronald Jackson: “The entire album is simply chock full of swells, lulls, subtle funk, and great grooves you can only get from one who knows his/her way around not only their instrument but the music they have chosen to honor. Trust me, Zinn’s feel for what he does and what you want is crystal clear here. This cat truly walks the walk and is here to stay. Grab this one and celebrate that he has chosen to be part of this wondrous experience we call contemporary jazz.” Zinn will perform songs from the album at a record release party at the Nomad in Wilmington on Friday, March 2. The record will be available early only for those in attendance, then released internationally through Amazon, iTunes, Google Play, cdBaby, Spotify, Apple Music and more, in April. For more information, visit robzinn.com.

70 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo courtesy of Live Nation

THE ENGLISH BEAT MEETS THE QUEEN

One of the earliest and most important ska revivalist groups, Birmingham, England’s the Beat, formed in 1978 (the band had to change its name to the English Beat in the U.S. to avoid confusion with a band of the same name). Still going strong, the band will play at The Queen Theater on Friday, March 2, at 8 p.m. In past years the multiracial band carved a distinct sound through alternating lead vocals by guitarist Dave Wakeling and punk rapper Ranking Roger, supported by a band consisting of Andy Cox (guitar), David Steele (bass), and Everett Moreton (drums). The addition of 50-year-old saxophonist Saxa, who originally played with Prince Buster and Desmond Dekker, gave the band credibility and fleshed out its sound. They ended up releasing the hit single “Tears of a Clown,” a version of the Smokey Robinson classic, and in 1980, the band decided to form its own label, Go-Feet. What followed were more wildly popular and politically-charged singles like “Mirror in the Bathroom,” “Stand Down Margaret,” and more. The band moved farther in a politicallydriven direction. Musically, the Beat slowed down the tempo for a more traditional reggae sound showcased on 1981’s Wha’ppen, but switched gears with 1982’s pop-oriented Special Beat Service. Through a series of ups and downs, a revolving door of musicians and more, Wakeling has kept the band alive through the decades. Doors open at 7 p.m. Get tickets at thequeenwilmington.com.

HOMEY AWARDS 2018

The contenders are announced and the stage is set for WSTW 93.7FM Hometown Heroes’ 12th annual Homey Awards Ceremony and Concert. The event, on Sunday, March 4, at 7 p.m. at Arden Gild Hall, will feature dozens of local artists, producers and more. Dozens of area names have been nominated for titles, and here are some of them: Song of the Year: Camille Peruto, “Crooked Roads”; E. Joseph and The Sparrows, “Rabbit Hole”; Hoochi Coochi, “Give It To Me”; Minerva, “Stand Tall”; The Quixote Project, “Country Pie.” Best Band: E. Joseph and The Sparrows, Hoochi Coochi, The Joe Trainor Trio, Minerva and The Quixote Project Album of the Year: Aaron Nathans & Michael G. Ronstadt, Hang on for the Ride; The Blues Reincarnation Project, A Hint of Blues; Camille Peruto Music, From the Sea to the Sky; Jessica Graae, Blue Heart; The Quixote Project, Land of Plenty. Event performers are Michele Lynn, WaveRadio, Richard Raw, Universal Funk Order and June Divided. Also, the five Song of the Year nominees will be invited to perform their nominated songs. For updates, visit wstw.com/hometown-heroes.

URBAN SHAMAN ATTACK SHOW

Area jazz group Urban Shaman Attack will play at SqueezeBox Records in Wilmington, on Saturday, March 24, at 3 p.m. This is their first show since releasing their new album, Character Assassination, on Spotify, iTunes, and other digital platforms. The concert is free, and the band will sign CDs. Their last album before Character Assassination, How to Build a Spacekraft, reached no. 13 on the iTunes new jazz release charts in November 2017 after spending nine months in the top 50. “We hope that this new album will surpass that success,” says keyboardist Dwayne Todd. MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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HAVE YOU HEARD OF SOMETHING?

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2/21/18 8:22 PM


ts redien g n i y t i al Top qu eative chefs cr for our

Luxury b for Ben eard cream Muse Sepho ra!

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CHARITABLE GIVING "Pints for Half Pints": where every pint poured donates $1 to the best Children's Hospital in the World - AI Nemours! Meals on Wheels DE: supported through meal deliveries and years of On-site & Off-site events. Sponsor and supporter of the Delaware ProStart program for aspiring chefs. Newcastle DE Little League. Because sometimes the electric bill shows up 4 years late, and is just too much to handle for a group of 10 year olds! American Red Cross: we donated more than $20,000 to the 2013 Oklahoma Tornado disaster and this past year’s very destructive Hurricane Season.

Many local farm to table affiliations, none more important than partnering and supporting the University of Delaware and its student farming division. DSA Delaware, Buddywalk supporter. Food Bank of DE: continuing to support the goal of "no one goes hungry". Milton DE Little League: When a team goes to the Little League World Series tournament, you send pallets of Gatorade and water! Go DE! Beer Pong for a Cause (formerly Beer Pong for Boobies), Komen for the Cure, Tyanna Foundation. You have supported all three ways of Saving the Ta-Tas. And we are looking for more ways. Continually.

WE THANK OUR TWO STONES PUB GUESTS!

NOVEMBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Sunshine on a Cloudy Day

Hazy New England IPAs—once hard to come by—are getting a boost from local brewers, including West Chester’s Levante By Scott Pruden Photos by Joe del Tufo

A patron of Levante Brewing Company holds up a glass of Cloudy & Cumbersome IPA in the brewer's taproom.

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74 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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M

y wife and I have a game we play. Perhaps there’s someone in your life with whom you play it, too. It’s called “can I have a sip of that?” It’s usually played when I’m drinking beer and she’s drinking wine. She asks for a sip from my pint or bottle, hoping what she finds might be to her liking. Since I am invariably drinking an India pale ale, I usually warn her: “You won’t like it. It’s pretty hoppy.” Nine times out of 10 she agrees, after scrunching up her face at the upfront bitterness and handing the vessel back. It’s not an unusual scenario in the beer world. Maybe it’s a non-beer drinker looking to branch out, or someone who started his beer drinking at college keggers with fizzy, soda-like pilsners. Either way, that first hoppy slap in the mouth of an IPA was offputting and perhaps dissuaded someone who was honestly trying to broaden his or her taste from expanding further. It was almost as if brewers, for the longest time, were issuing a challenge, with each IPA coming out with more of a hops punch than the last. Drinkers, it seemed, were being dared to take a bitter hit, say thank you and then get up for more. But along the way, brewers in Vermont were taking a different tack. In 2011, at The Alchemist brewery in Waterbury, there emerged a new brew called Heady Topper, which flipped the script on an IPA’s typical hops flavor. It was a brew that, while still technically an IPA, presented something far different from what most craft beer drinkers were used to. Instead of a clear amber color, crispness on the tongue and bitter bite, this new IPA, which poured cloudy, proffered front notes of floral, fruit and citrus, and a creamy, dessert-like mouth feel. Once word got out, the lines started to form. Drawn by murmurings in the beer world, fans of the new IPA—who, seeking to distinguish it from its more bitter West Coast version, began calling it Vermont or New England IPA—lined up for the hard-to-get canned releases. Nearby brewers got wind and reverse engineered their own versions of this new variation on the venerable IPA.

Picking up on the Trend

With the emergence of what has come to be known as the New England IPA, however, those reluctant beer drinkers who up till now suspected the craft beer world was a hop loversonly affair might change their minds. And fortunately for those who’ve already discovered the creamy, cloudy delights of this evolution in the beer world, local breweries and beer drinkers are picking up on the trend. Beer aficionado Dana Dillon is a perfect example. The resident of Lincoln University, Pa., just over the state line from Newark, grew up in Ohio as a drinker of wine and “crap beer—mostly because wine was too expensive,” she says. Later, she moved up to more flavorful—but still corporate—beers like Killian’s Red and Blue Moon. But it wasn’t until she moved to Pennsylvania and discovered Downingtown’s Victory Brewing that she fell in love with craft brewing. “Victory was my gateway,” she says. “I was like, ‘There are good things?’” As she worked her way into craft beer culture, it didn’t take long for her to get word of Heady Topper and—because it has never been sold outside of a 25-mile radius from the Vermont brewery—its almost forbidden delights. Fans formed queues for canned releases like they were camping out for Springsteen tickets, traveling across states and trading for cans when they couldn’t make the journey, turning the pursuit of a true New England IPA into something akin to Jason and the Argonauts chasing down the mythical golden fleece.

The hazy appearence, with creamy and tropical flavors, are characteristic of New England style IPAs.

But in the early days before Heady Topper became such a commodity, it met with something of a marketing problem. It was cloudy. “People are used to clear beers and [the brewery] didn’t want you to pour it in a glass if you hadn’t had it because it was cloudy,” Dillon says. “But then people got used to that cloudy thing and it’s sort of taken off from there. They’re very drinkable, and I think that makes it a little more accessible to people who think they might not like IPAs. It can have such a variety of flavor—you can have coconut, citrus, strawberry— and it fits in better with that style than a hoppy West Coast IPA.” While the quest for home-grown New England IPAs continues (The Alchemist has instituted a three four-pack limit on Heady Topper purchases), nearby brewers have begun their own experiments in the New England style.

Taking It to Its Limits

Along Philadelphia’s Main Line, Ardmore’s Tired Hands Brewing Co. has begun offering a couple of styles that, while not labeled as such, hew to the new traditions of the New England IPA. American pale ale HopHands throws in oats and three kinds of hops with a juicy finish that suggests notes of citrus, honeysuckle and kiwi. And not be outdone, Tired Hands has, with its Fruit Punch Milkshake IPA, taken the style to its limits, with oats, hibiscus and lactose sugar added in the brewing process. The nearlyfinished brew is conditioned with Madagascar vanilla beans and a variety of tart fruit purees, then dry hopped with Mosaic and Citra varieties. Down the road in West Chester, Pa., the brew masters at Levante Brewing have crafted their own takes on the New England IPA with their Cloudy and Cumbersome, Spring Till and Tickle Parts varieties. ► MARCH MARCH 2018 2016 || OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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State Line Liquors

SUNSHINE ON A CLOUDY DAY continued from previous page

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St. Paddy’s Dinner Corned Beef & Cabbage Dinner with Potatoes and Soda Bread.

Only $9.49 per person, We ran out last year...please order early! Order by Tues 3/13. Pickup Thurs 3/15 to Sat 3/17.

Come in and explore our eclectic range of meats! We carry many items that are not commonly found in local supermarkets, like our traditional italian meats and game birds!

302.994.4467 | 4723 Kirkwood Hwy. Midway Plaza

www.Bachettis.com

Levante Brewing Company's Cloudy & Cumbersome IPA has been so popular that they brew it almost weekly.

The first batch of Cloudy and Cumbersome, cooked up in the brewery’s one-barrel (31-gallon) brew kettle, was Head Brewer Greg Harris’ attempt to recreate the flavors of a Dark ‘n Stormy cocktail in beer form, says Assistant Brewer Spencer Holm. The original batch started with a wheatand-oat-heavy malt base aged in a rum barrel, which was then finished with lime leaves, ginger and additional hops. “It was such a big hit that we scaled up the original malt base, got rid of the ginger and lime leaf and kicked up the hops,” Holm says. That was the fall of 2016, and the initial demand was so great that the brewery found it impossible to keep up. The variety went into a periodic brewing schedule, but staff noticed that customers in the taproom were enjoying it on tap, in growlers and in on-demandcanned “crowlers.” At the same time, local bars and restaurants that stock Levante’s draft selections were looking for a locally-brewed New England IPA to serve. “It’s hard to find a New England IPA available for production, so since then we’ve been brewing it almost every week,” Holm says.

76 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KENO COMING SOON!

LABATT BLUE

13

.99

18 - 16 oz Cans

2SP

8

Delco Lager .99 6 - 12 oz

Cans

MURPHY’S Even though cans of its New England IPAs typically sell out, Levante Brewing Company usually has them on draft for customers to try in its taproom.

Low Bitterness

As for its appeal, Holm notes that the first thing that always comes to mind is the low bitterness, despite the IPA’s reputation for the opposite. That’s a result of adding the hops later, preserving the flavor profile while not allowing it to break down over the brewing process. The variety’s signature creaminess is achieved through the combination of specialty grains, such as oats and wheat, and by adding lactose sugar to the boil. “It may seem like dumping a lot of hops in later would be the golden ticket, but what we’re trying to do is find a balance between the varieties of hops and the malt interaction, so all the ingredients are still noticeable,” Holm says. “It just seems to hit the spot taste-wise kind of across the board, whether it’s summer and you want something refreshing or whether it’s winter and you want some kind of tropical escape,” he says. “It’s much more approachable. It’s really hard to find an alienating quality of this style.” The appeal of Levante’s New England IPAs isn’t going unnoticed, with locals and “beer tourists” now forming lines outside the brewery on release days for cans of Cloudy and Cumbersome much like those at the Vermont breweries that launched the trend. Holm says he’s beginning to see cans traded online and in invitation-only beer groups on Facebook. But waiting in line for canned beer and enjoying a draft in Levante’s taproom are two different experiences, and Holm says the brewery considers keeping on-site customers coming back to relax over a pint or two. So even though canned releases of Cloudy and Cumbersome typically sell out, it and several other New England IPA varieties are usually available on draft. Asked to theorize about the legs of the New England IPA trend, Holm hesitates, but does note that aspects of the New England IPA style have influenced brewers not just to recreate it, but to take elements and apply them to other styles. “The style is going to continue to get more refined as the drinkers determine what they enjoy most,” he says. “It’s definitely the drinker that dictates what breweries end up brewing.”

Irish Stout .99 10 - 14.2 oz

18

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NOT AVAILABLE IN DELAWARE! GUINNESS

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www.BrewersOutlet202.com Route 202 – One Mile N. of DE/PA Line Mon–Sat 9–9, Sun 10–5 • 610-459-8228

WE DELIVER!

NOON-9PM — 7 DAYS PER WEEK

CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK’S DAY Saturday, March 17th

Opening at 9am for Irish Coffee, Green Beer, Bloody Marys and Breakfast Pizza 201 N. Market Street, Wilm.

ChickysPizzaPub.com • (302) 660-8787 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KRESTON WINE & SPIRITS

Celebrating 85 Years

F irestone 2SP OSKAR NEW HOLLAND

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78 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

BRICK WORKS EXPANDS TO SOUTHERN DELAWARE

SIPS

Here's what's pouring Compiled by Mathew Brown-Watson

DOGFISH HEAD TO BE A SPONSOR AT JAMES BEARD AWARDS

D

ogfish Head Craft Brewery will be a sponsor for this year's James Beard Awards, which have been described as the “Oscars of the Food World.” Dogfish Head will be proudly pouring its iconic off-centered brews at the Chef’s Night Out event and the James Beard Awards Gala on May 6 and 7 at the Lyric Opera in Chicago. Dogfish Head founder and CEO Sam Calagione, the 2017 winner of James Beard’s Outstanding Wine, Spirits or Beer Professional award, believes the Beard Awards elevate the stature of independent craft brewers everywhere. Dogfish Head has achieved success by brewing outside the German beer purity law (Reinheitsgebot), which allows only the use of hops, barley and water in the brewing process. Dogfish accomplishes this by adding complementary ingredients and focusing on beers that are designed to be paired with great food. This approach has garnered attention not only on the craft brewing scene, but also within the culinary world. The Beard sponsorship can only enhance the brewery’s reputation. For more on the latest at Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, visit dogfish.com.

S

myrna’s Brick Works, the highly regarded collaboration of restaurant-meets-brewery, is expanding southward to Sussex County later this year. A joint venture of Milford-based enterprises Abbott’s Grill and Mispillion River Brewing, Brick Works opened in June 2016, and received acclaim for both the dishes on the menu and the beer brewed on site. The new location is planned for Long Neck and will be part of a new development on Silicato Drive called “Taormina Square.” Brick Works will be an anchor for the development.

CROOKED HAMMOCK EYES MIDDLETOWN IN 2019

FREE THE GRAPES!

T

he “Free the Grapes” campaign is gaining traction in Delaware. Complete with its own website, the campaign is designed to bring attention to Delaware law that prohibits the purchasing of wine for delivery to the customer’s residence directly from the winery. Delaware lawmakers, who have been trying to address the issue for years, have finally come up with House Bill 165, which would overturn the prohibition, which does not apply in surrounding states. The bill is currently undergoing the hearing process in the House. It has widespread support, and petitions for signatures are circulating. For more information on the status of the bill, how you can help and how this issue is changing at the national level, visit freethegrapes.org.

T

wo successful years at its location in Lewes has convinced Crooked Hammock Brewery to open a new location in Middletown. The expansion is a move that came in part because of Crooked Hammock clientele from the northern half of the state who argued that the new location would be just as successful as the Lewes brewpub. La Vida Hospitality, which owns Crooked Hammock, decided Middletown would work best for the family-friendly brewery, in part because it’s a growing area with young families. The new 7,000-square-foot building, which isn’t scheduled to open until the first quarter of 2019, will be in Westown, adjacent to the Holiday Inn Express and Grotto Pizza on Auto Park Drive. It will have inside seating for about 175 people—including a screened porch, a dining room and a bar area—and room for about 100 more in outside dining areas. There also will be a brewery. The project is currently awaiting approval from the mayor and council of Middletown.

TWIN LAKES GPA CANS GET NEW LOOK

T

he famous Greenville Pale Ale created by Twin Lakes Brewing is back on the shelves of liquor stores in the tri-state area with a new look designed to reflect a more modern image while keeping the iconic light green color. The updated cans will be distributed throughout Delaware, Pennsylvania and Maryland. You can pick up a six-pack of this well-loved ale at many locations that will soon be listed on the Twin Lakes Website. For more information about this or other events at Twin Lakes Brewing, visit twinlakesbrewery.com. MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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PLAY PLAY

The Wilmington Blue Rocks open their season on Thursday, April 12. First pitch is 6:35 p.m. Photo Joe del Tufo

SWING INTO SPRING! These 11 events celebrating area music, outdoor fun, art, dining, sports and nonprofits are sure to get you out of hibernation Art Loop

Shine A Light On 1968

Friday, March 2, 5 p.m. Downtown Wilmington inwilmingtonde.com The Wilmington Art Loop continues to bring together art lovers as well as the broader community to experience downtown. Three featured Out & About cover artists, Terrance Vann, Patrick Warner and Eunice LaFate, will display their works in celebration of O&A’s 30th Anniversary. At Chelsea Tavern, guests can enjoy complimentary hors d’oeuvres in honor of Warner, who recently announced his retirement after 22 years in the graphic design industry due to his muscular dystrophy. Beer sales from the event will go to the Myositis Support and Understanding Association.

Saturday, March 3 The Queen Theater 500 N. Market St. lightupthequeen.org The annual fundraiser Shine a Light on the Queen has become a musical spectacle worth seeing, and this year’s 1968 theme is sure to entertain. Utilizing a “Musical Chairs” approach, musicians will swap in and out of their respective groups to play classic hits from 1968, adding their own distinct sound and feel. Shine A Light On 1968 will celebrate psychedelia, Motown, Rock and more, paying homage to a year that lit the fuse for the explosion of one of the most memorable music eras of the last century. The event will benefit the Light Up the Queen Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving the Queen Theater. ► MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Opening at 9am on St.Patrick’s Day!

Come Celebrate

St. Patrick’s Day With Us!

$2.75 Green Bud Light Drafts, $5 Irish Car Bombs, Corned Beef and Cabbage MONDAYS

½ Price Appetizers All Day

TUESDAYS

½ Price Burgers All Day

$1.50 Domestic Drafts after 7pm

WEDNESDAYS

THURSDAYS

All You Can Eat Wings $12.99 after 5pm

$1 Off Craft Draft Beers 7pm-Close

108 Peoples Plaza (Corner of Rtes. 40 & 896) | Newark, DE | 302-834-6661 8 Polly Drummond Shopping Center | Newark, DE | 302-738-7814 800 North State Street | Dover, DE | 302-674-0144

All You Can Eat Shrimp $12.99 after 5pm Prime Rib $18.99

FRIDAYS

Prime Rib $22.99

after 5pm

after 5pm

$3 Taylor’s Grog 7pm-close

Be our friend on Facebook!

GET YOUR IRISH ON! Irish Food Menu Starts March 1st

Commemorative St. Patrick’s Day Shirts Available! Enjoy Live Irish Bag Pipers Polly Drummond 6:30pm Peoples Plaza 8:30pm Dover 6:30-7:30pm

SATURDAYS

SUNDAYS

$1 Off Craft Bottles Beef and Beer $9.99 All Day Steak Night $13.99 Prime Rib $22.99 after 5pm

www.mcglynnspub.com

Congrats on

30 YEARS, Out & About!

Irish Dancers Sat. March 10th Parade Day! Sat. March 17th St. Patrick’s Day!

MARCH MADNESS

Weber Grill Giveaway! BEST RIBS!

2038 FOULK ROAD, WILMINGTON DE • 302 475-1887 www.stanleys-tavern.com 82 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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PLAY SWING INTO SPRING continued from page 81

St. Patrick’s Day Parade Saturday, March 10, noon Downtown Wilmington Sláinte! The 43rd annual parade hosted by the Irish Culture Club of Delaware will proceed along King Street, past the grandstand at Rodney Square, and end near 14th Street, where the hooley will be held.

28th Annual St. Paddy’s Loop Saturday, March 10, 7 p.m. 12 Wilmington venues outandaboutnow.com Following the parade, Delaware’s largest St. Patrick’s Day party will take place at 12 area hotspots—Catherine Rooney’s, Chelsea Tavern, Club Lavish, Dead Presidents, Ernest & Scott Taproom, Gallucio’s Café, Grotto Pizza, Kelly’s Logan House, The Queen, Timothy’s on the Riverfront, Trolley Square Oyster House and Trolley Tap House. The 28th annual St. Paddy’s Loop is partnering with Lyft to provide a ride discount code on all wristbands, which are $10 and can be purchased at any of the venues.

Heart of the Home Kitchen Tour Saturday, April 14, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wilmington, Newark, Hockessin, Southern Chester County jlwilmington.org This self-guided tour will showcase some of the finest kitchens in the Wilmington area. Approximately 15 kitchens will be on display, each with unique design, distinct features and quality craftsmanship. Since 2004, the proceeds from the Heart of the Home Kitchen Tour have supported the Junior League of Wilmington’s communityminded mission and programs.►

MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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PLAY SWING INTO SPRING continued from page 83

25/Mo.

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CONGRATULATES OUT & ABOUT ON THEIR 30TH ANNIVERSARY!

NOW AVAILABLE IN CANS!

Our Tasting Room is open to the public every Wed. through Sun. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect place for private parties, corporate and charity events!

LIVE MUSIC EVERY WEDNESDAY 5-8 PM

84 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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City Restaurant Week April 16-21 Various Wilmington locations cityrestaurantweek.com Annual showcase of Wilmington’s fine dining scene as 15 restaurants take part in City Restaurant Week, offering prix-fixe $15 lunches and $35 dinners. These showcased dining establishments are all owner-operated—which means there won’t be a chain restaurant in the bunch.

Voted Best Restaurant in North Wilmington

Wildflower Celebration at Mt. Cuba Center Sunday, April 29,10 a.m-4 p.m. 3120 Barley Mill Rd., Hockessin mtcubacenter.org Become fluent in the language of wildflowers at this annual event. Springtime blooms are magnificently displayed once again, offering views of native plants, gardens, gardening demonstrations and more.

Cinco de Mayo Loop and Market Street Party Saturday, May 5, 8 p.m. Wilmington area outandaboutnow.com Celebrate the date by taking part in the Cinco de Mayo Loop and Market Street Party. Dress up in festive attire and enjoy the great flavors and sounds of Mexico at local venues. A one-time cover charge will grant access to all participating clubs.

Point-to-Point at Winterthur

1716 Marsh Rd, Wilmington • (302) 691-3456 ulyssesgastropub.com

St. Paddy’s Loop:

Saturday, March 10th @ 7pm

Sunday, May 6 Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library 5105 Kennett Pike, Wilmington winterthur.org Celebrate the 40th Annual Point-to-Point event at Winterthur, where elite horse racing, kids’ activities, festive tailgating, and hospitality tents featuring elegant luncheons are sure to entertain.

1709 Lovering Ave Wilmington (302) 655-3689 Gallucios-de.com

Wilmington Grand Prix May 18-20 Downtown Wilmington wilmgrandprix.com The Wilmington Grand Prix, one of the premier criterium-style bike races in the U.S., will celebrate its 12th anniversary this year. The technical nature of the course is recognized by racers and enthusiastic fans alike, making this track a mainstay on the USA Cycling’s (USAC) National Racing Calendar. And the entertainment, food and drink options for bystanders are not to be missed.

Party Trays Available for Your

March Madness Party!

March Madness Special $3.50 Miller Lite and Yuengling 23oz. Drafts During All the Games!

Happy Hour

Monday- Friday 2pm-6pm $ 4 Craft Drafts $ 5 App and Munchie Menu

Stop In On St. Paddy’s Day! Corned Beef and Cabbage Specials All Day

Karaoke with All Star Entertainment! 9-1am OCTOBER MARCH 2017 2018 || OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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MOR EW AYS TO

signs that change lives

1010 N. Union St Wilmington, DE 19805

GR O

W

YO UR B

US IN ES S

TM

302.654.2498

86 MARCH 2018 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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28th Annual presents the

SAT. MARCH 10, 7PM Special Discount Code On Your Loop Wristband!

12 CLUBS • $10 COVER

Delaware’s BIGGEST St. Paddy’s Celebration! CATHERINE ROONEY’S • CHELSEA TAVERN CLUB LAVISH • DEAD PRESIDENTS • ERNEST & SCOTT TAPROOM GALLUCIO’S CAFE • GROTTO PIZZA • KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE THE QUEEN • TIMOTHY’S RIVERFRONT TROLLEY SQUARE OYSTER HOUSE • TROLLEY TAP HOUSE

OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM • 302.655.6483

ShamrockShuttle2018_OA_Ad.indd 1

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Congratulations to our “Friends for Life,”

on their 30th Anniversary! That deserves a high paw!

Next time you’re Out & About, please stop by our Adoption Centers in Wilmington or Rehoboth Beach, and make your own friend for life. Tatiana and Gerret Copeland Animal Care Center (Wilmington)

Rehoboth Adoption Center

Hours: Tuesday - Friday, 12 PM - 7 PM Saturday & Sunday, 12 PM - 5 PM

Hours: Monday - Friday, 10 AM - 5 PM Saturday & Sunday, 10 AM - 4 PM (Please call for seasonal hours)

701 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801 (302) 571-0111

18675 Coastal Highway, Rehoboth DE 19971 (302) 200-7159

DelawareHumane.org

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15031-PTP 2018 Ad Out and About March 2018.qxp_Layout 1 2/12/18 1:01 PM Page 1

40TH ANNIVERSARY Sunday, May 6

E

njoy a glorious day of steeplechase racing at this year’s 40th Annual Winterthur Point-to-Point. Pack a festive tailgate spread and get ready to enjoy one of the Brandywine Valley’s most stylish sporting events!

Photos center and abo ve by

Fournier Photos above by Ben

Bob Leitch

There are many ways to enjoy the

Ruby Anniversary of Point-to-Point! • Plan a terrific tailgate party! Tailgate parking spaces

and wristbands available online at ptptailgate2018.com or through the Winterthur mobile app (find it on the app store or access it on our website). Or call 302.888.4994.

• Purchase a Celebration Tailgate Tent to make your own party. • Be entertained at the Anniversary Hospitality Tent and watch the races from your seat at the finish line!

• Join Kid Shelleen’s and Tito’s Outpost for Texas-style hospitality in a private tent on the rail.

For more information on all Point-to-Point activities and to purchase admission, call 800.448.3883 or visit winterthur.org/ptp. Sponsored by

Advance sales only. Rain-or-shine event. No refunds. All wristbands must be purchased by May 5. Adult general admission $40. No wristbands will be mailed after April 27. Children under 12 free with wristbands. Discount for Winterthur Members. Proceeds benefit the continued maintenance and preservation of the garden and estate at Winterthur.

Winterthur is nestled in Delaware’s beautiful Brandywine Valley on Route 52, between I-95 and Route 1. 800.448.3883 • 302.888.4600 • winterthur.org

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28 OCTOBER 2017 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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