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Also In This Issue Our Town Series: Hockessin Casapulla's Celebrates 60 Years Heavy Seas Rides Wave of Success

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Questions For Wilmington's Next Mayor AUGUST 2016 CO M P L I M E N TA R Y VOL. 29 | NO. 6

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SIP. SAMPLE. SHOP. STROLL. 2nd Annual Celebration of All Things Trolley

Beer, Wine & Spirit Tastings * Small Plates * Sidewalk Sale Street Entertainers * Live Music * Games & Prizes Saturday, Sept. 24 * 1-5pm

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39 Out & About Magazine Published each month by TSN Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Mailing & business address: 307 A Street, Wilmington, DE 19801

our staff Publisher Gerald duPhily • jduphily@tsnpub.com Director of Publications Jim Hunter Miller • jmiller@tsnpub.com

Director of Digital Media & Distribution Marie Graham Poot • mgraham@tsnpub.com Creative Director & Production Manager Matthew Loeb, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. matt@catvis.biz Graphic Designer Tyler Mitchell, Catalyst Visuals, LLC. tyler@catvis.biz Contributing Designer Ryan Alexander, Catalyst Visuals, LLC

Contributing Writers Mark Fields, Pam George, Paula Goulden, Rob Kalesse, Michelle Kramer-Fitzgerald, Robert Lhulier, Dan Linehan, Karl Malgiero, Allan McKinley, John Murray, Larry Nagengast, Scott Pruden, Eric Ruth, Matt Sullivan

69 what’s inside START

WILMINGTON

9 The War on Words 11 F.Y.I. 12 By the Numbers 15 Worth Trying 17 Part 2: The Arts as Activism

49 Art on the Town 52 Theatre N 54 On the Riverfront

LEARN 10 From WilmU to CNN

FOCUS

17 Manufacturers of Hope Peer-run behavioral health nonprofit Creative Vision Factory utilizes art as a means of recovery for its members.

DRINK LISTEN

64 Tuned In 67 Analog-A-Go-Go Kickoff Party 21 Mayoral Candidates Talk 28 Our Town Series: Hockessin 35 Q&A with Wendell Smallwood 69 Café Society 71 Six-pack Cinema 39 60 Years of Subs & Steaks 43 Versatile Mr. Mustard 73 Where to Watch the Game 45 Delaware Burger Battle

WATCH

EAT

PLAY

21 5 Questions with Mayoral Candidates Our five questions included a variety of topics not covered thoroughly during the campaign thus far.

28 Hockessin: Affluence & Activism The communitymaintains an ‘old town feel.’ By Larry Nagengast

35 The Interview with Wendell Smallwood The rookie from Delaware prepares to earn playing time with the Eagles, his favorite NFL team. By Bob Yearick

39 60 Years of Subs & Steaks Casapulla & Sons started on Labor Day, 1956. They’ve been laboring over their legendary sandwiches ever since.

Special Projects Sarah Green, John Holton, David Hallberg Editorial & advertising info: 302.655.6483 • Fax 302.654.0569 Website: outandaboutnow.com Email: contact@tsnpub.com

By Rob Kalesse

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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By Krista Connor

59 Riding the Wave of Success 63 Sips

Contributing Photographers Joe del Tufo, Tim Hawk, Les Kipp, Anthony Santoro, Javy Diaz, Matt Urban

Interns Emma Driban, Evie Kortanek

FEATURES

Associate Editor Krista Connor • kconnor@tsnpub.com

28

Contributing Editor Bob Yearick • ryearick@comcast.net

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ASAP AT THE BEACH?

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A writer/editor’s slightly snarky and relentless crusade to eliminate grammatical gaffes from our everyday communications

Compiled from the popular column in Out & About Magazine

THE WAR ON WORDS A monthly column in which we attempt, however futilely, to defend the English language against misuse and abuse

Department of Redundancies Dept. Two from the sports world: • Geno Auriemma, Connecticut women’s basketball coach, commenting on the passing of legendary coach Pat Summitt: “She was a precursor of things to come.” Precursor: “Something that comes before something else.” • Neal Rudel, of the Altoona (Pa.) Mirror: “James Franklin was upbeat in seeing Moorhead’s first public debut.” Can’t wait for his second debut. And one from the news desk: • Jim Donovan, co-anchor on CBS channel 3, talking about the body count in a recent mass shooting: “There’s little doubt it is going to escalate upwards.” Y’think, Jim? It won’t escalate downwards? Media Watch • Lara Spencer, co-host on Good Morning America, committed the dreaded double is: “The cool thing is is that . . .” • The News Journal, quoting John Flaherty: “Delaware is no different then most states when it comes to binding of delegates on the first ballot.” John should have said “from,” but I’m assuming he said “than,” which TNJ mistranslated to the much worse then. • Deion Sanders on Twitter: “Pat Summitt & Buddy Ryan, architects of their prospective sports.” That would be respective sports. Deion attended Florida State to play football, not attend English class. •Zach Berman in the Philadelphia Inquirer: “Pederson said Carson Wentz would continue to get an equal amount of reps as Sam Bradford and Chase Daniel. . . Pederson has made sure there was an even amount of work with the first-, second- and third-team offense.” Zach was wrong the first time (it’s number of reps) and right the second. • Abbey Mastracco, also in the Inky: “The sound that comes from Mickey Moniak’s bat emanates through the ballpark.” The sound emanates from his bat and reverberates through the ballpark. • A reader sends this from a Washington Post advice column: "For years she's been recounting people with the story of how..." Our reader notes that, “since only census-takers re-count people, the writer should have said either ‘regaling people with’ or ‘recounting the story.’” • After losing an on-air debate, Mike Missanelli of 97.5 FM said, “I went out on my sword.” You fall on your sword; you go out on your shield. The first is essentially sacrificing yourself for a greater cause, the second is fighting to the bitter end.

By Bob Yearick

More on Commas Last month we discussed misplaced commas in relation to quotation marks (they go inside the quotes) and missing commas when addressing someone (E.g., “thanks, Mary,” not “thanks Mary”). Now let’s tackle the unnecessary comma in a person’s title, in such sentences as “The meeting was called to order by Chairman of the Board, Don Smith.” Many people insist on inserting a comma before the title. Note to them: don’t. Literally of the Month Karen Heller in the Washington Post: “This is a golden age of comedy, literally.” She went on to list several comedians who are making big bucks. Maybe if they were paid in gold. But even then . . . How Long, Oh, Lord, How Long? (In which we chronicle the abuse of that most misused punctuation mark, the apostrophe.) On a recent foray into upstate Pennsylvania I came across the two signs pictured at right. The wooden one is typical of erroneous signs that appear outside many homes. This is a simple plural—Eichenlaubs. No apostrophe. As for the other sign, I wonder: Why doesn’t “LPS” rate an apostrophe? If you’re going to be wrong, at least be consistently wrong. And what's with the capital S? Seen any obvious errors on signs, menus, brochures, etc.? Grab a picture and send it to War.

Follow me on Twitter: @thewaronwords

Seen a good (bad) one lately? Send your candidates to ryearick@comcast.net

Word of the Month

louche Pronounced loosh, it’s an adjective meaning disreputable or sordid in a rakish or appealing way.

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NEED A SPEAKER FOR YOUR ORGANIZATION? Contact me for a fun power point presentation on grammar: ryearick@comcast.net.

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LEARN

AND, ACTION! FROM WILMU TO CNN WilmU alumnus, Rashad Goldsborough.

W

ant to know what Wolf Blitzer is really like? Ask Wilmington University doctoral candidate Rashad Goldsborough, who calls the CNN anchor “very downto-earth, very engaging and intelligent,” adding with a smile, “In fact, he’s known as the Obi-Wan Kenobi of CNN.” Goldsborough heard the Jedi Master reference often during his internship at CNN headquarters in Atlanta last summer. The 27-year-old University of Delaware graduate, who also holds a master’s from WilmU, has parlayed that internship into a full-time position at the network’s New York City bureau. The job comes with a backbreaking schedule, beginning at 8:45 p.m., when Goldsborough catches a train from Wilmington to New York’s Penn Station, arriving around 11 p.m. With two hours to kill before his 1 a.m. starting time, he usually grabs something to eat and reads his e-mails, checks news websites, and works on assignments for his doctoral program. Then it’s off to his job as production assistant on CNN’s Early Start (4–6 a.m.) and New Day (6–9 a.m.). Says Goldsborough: “My responsibilities include formulating a daily list of guests for both shows, contacting car services to confirm they will pick up guests at the correct time, printing out the show scripts before the start of each show and during commercial breaks, and handing them to the anchors.” He clocks out at 9 a.m. and hustles back to Penn Station to catch the 9:35 to Wilmington. His mother picks him up at the station during her lunch break, and they sometimes stop to eat on the way home, where he manages five or six hours of sleep before

starting the routine again. Including travel time, he estimates his workday is 18 to 19 hours. Goldsborough has put in long days throughout his life because he has had to deal with both ADHD and dyscalculia — basically math dyslexia. Living with the conditions, he says, “has been a learning experience. It means that I’ve had to work twice as hard to be just as good as everyone else.” Beginning in middle school, Goldsborough regularly asked teachers to stay after class to help him with assignments and often chose to study over attending friends’ birthday parties. Judging by his academic achievements, he has more than compensated for his disabilities. He was a double major at UD —political science with a concentration in global studies, and English, with a concentration in film studies. His WilmU master’s is in administration of justice, with a concentration in homeland security. His doctorate will be in organizational learning, leadership and innovation, with a dissertation on institutional dysfunction, particularly in healthcare. Goldsborough says that his internships and his education at UD and WilmU have given him a unique perspective on the television and movie business. “I can now take those mediums, historically seen as platforms for entertainment, and use them to provide content that thoroughly critiques political leaders,” he says. “This may encourage my audiences to survey the effectiveness of social structures, thus impacting their worlds.”

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F.Y.I. Things worth knowing Compiled by Evie Kortanek

WATER CIRCUS COMES TO TOWN!

F

rom Thursday, Aug. 18, to Sunday, Aug. 21, Cirque Italia will perform its one-of-a-kind show at Fort DuPont in Delaware City on a stage holding 35,000 gallons of water, with performers from around the world. The water circus includes contortionists, acrobats, jet ski acts, high wire feats and more. For more information, visit cirqueitalia.com.

COMPETITIVE SURFING'S COMEBACK

C

alling all surfers: this fall, the Delaware Surfrider Foundation will host Delaware’s first Diamond State Surf Classic to help bring competitive surfing back to Delaware. Combining a festival environment with a friendly competition, the Sept. 24-Nov. 20 classic promises a great time at the beach, located at the Northside of the Indian River Inlet. Surfrider, a non-profit organization, is dedicated to the preservation of the world’s oceans through its activist network. Participation for this event ranges from ages 10 to 60+ and is limited to 100 people. All boards are welcome except stand-up paddleboards. For more information, visit delaware.surfrider.org.

GREAT DAMES SPONSORS POWERFUL CONVERSATIONS

"W

hat matters to you?" is the question the Great Dames organization is asking women during its seminars this fall. Great Dames aims to inspire and embolden women in the workplace and their personal lives by connecting passionate women in activities, volunteering, and inspiring conversations like their upcoming talks. The discussions will focus on Wisdom Across Generations, Igniting Your Passion and Purpose, and Creating Change Through Policy. The talks will take place at Harry’s Savoy Grill & Ballroom several Mondays this fall – Oct. 3, Nov. 7 and Dec. 5. For more information, visit Great-Dames.com/Events.

AN IMPACTFUL DONATION

B

oys & Girls Clubs of Delaware will expand their STEM education programs thanks to a grant of $10,000 from PPG Industries. The company supports the Boys and Girls Club’s nationwide mission to enable all young people to fulfil their potential and pursue career opportunities. The Boys and Girls Clubs’ programs empower 30,000 youth in locations with limited educational opportunities. For more information, visit bgclubs.org.

DELAWARE SYMPHONY GETS GRANT, GIVES BACK

T

he Longwood Foundation has awarded a grant of $300,000 to the Delaware Symphony Orchestra (DSO), an essential part of Delaware’s culture since 1906. The DSO will be implementing its three-year Strategic Plan to expand its influence and accessibility throughout Delaware by re-introducing outdoor performances, expanding educational programs, and partnering with nonprofit organizations to form a connection with underserved populations. From orchestra to outreach, the DSO is determined to use its resources and generous grant to do as much as it can for the community. For more information, visit delawaresymphony.org.

DELAWARE DONOR DASH

Y

ou can support transplant initiatives during the Delaware Donor Dash 5K on Saturday, Aug. 6. The Gift of Life Donor Program, Christiana Care Health System, and the Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children have teamed up again to host the Third Annual 5K run/walk to emphasize the importance of tissue and organ donors in our community. Entry fee is $25, and registration opens at 7:30 a.m. The 5K starts at 8:30 a.m. For more information, visit events.donors1.org.

NEW CASTLE STARTUP GETS GOV. GRANT

T

he U. S. Department of Energy recently awarded a grant of up to $10 million to White Dog Labs, a startup business located in New Castle, to develop “MixoFerm” technology, which aims to minimize carbon emissions. The new technology could significantly abate the worldwide energy crisis. For more information, visit whitedoglabs.com.

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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The number of hot dogs allegedly eaten by Babe Ruth between games of a doubleheader, earning him the title “most likely to win a hot-dog-eating contest among current and former players.”

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The average number of hot dogs, in thousands, a baseball vendor sells per season.

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63 The percentage of baseball fans who listed hot dogs as the one ballpark food they could not live without.

12,000 The average number of calories consumed per day by Olympic swimming champion Michael Phelps.

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The number of chicken wings, in billions, eaten during Super Bowl 50.

The average number of miles a baseball vendor walks per game.

12 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Worth Trying Suggestions from our staff, contributors and readers

Constitution Yards

Mini-Cannoli from Toscana To Go

The new seasonal beer garden is the perfect addition to the Riverfront. Located at Justison Landing and open seven days a week, the summer go-to destination offers backyard games, classic barbecue fare and of course, a variety of beers and cocktails. Grab a summer ale and get in line for giant Jenga!

I went with my mom to pick up dinner from Toscana To Go, and after I bugged her enough she let me get a dessert. But she would only let me get the cannoli because they were small and only cost $1.50. I was nervous because she said there was cheese inside, and that kind of sounded gross. I didn’t like it. I LOVED it! The outside was like a thin cookie, the inside was sweet and creamy, and there were chocolate chips sprinkled on it. You have to try one.

—Krista Connor, Associate Editor

—Oliver Poot, 1st grader and Wilmington Resident

Quinn’s Café

Movies on Tap

Whenever I go out to breakfast with family or friends, my first instinct is to go to Quinn’s. The eatery has been around for a while, but became known as Quinn’s Café in 2011. This Hockessin favorite tends to be a little crowded on the weekends, but the delicious food is made to order so it’s always worth the wait (quinnscafe.com).

When the good folks at Premier Wine & Spirits sat down with our friends at Penn Cinema, they conjured up some sweet synergy. The meeting’s magic resulted in the “Movies on Tap” series at Penn Cinema, which pairs cult-classic films with seasonal offerings of local breweries. For film geeks, it’s a great opportunity to see some popular movies of the past on the big screen in a fun setting. For beer freaks, it’s a chance to meet area brewmasters and get a taste of their latest concoctions. That these nights raise money for local charities is simply icing on the cake. Caddyshack with Mispillion River Brewing, Ghostbusters with Yards Brewing Co., Pulp Fiction with Evil Genius Beer Company and The Blues Brothers with Blue Earl Brewing Co. were big hits. This month, it’s The Goonies with 2SP Brewing Co. on Wednesday, August 17. To reserve your seats, go to penncinema.com.

—Emma Driban, Intern

—Jim Miller, Director of Publications

Have something you think is worth trying? Send an email to Jim with your suggestion to jmiller@tsnpub.com

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THE ARTS AS ACTIVISM:

START

This is the second in a series of profiles about creating social change through artistic expression.

The peer-led mosaic project at the Rick VanStory Resource Center. Photo courtesy of the Creative Vision Factory

MANUFACTURERS OF HOPE Peer-run behavioral health nonprofit Creative Vision Factory utilizes art as a means of recovery for its members By Krista Connor

T

he space at 617 N. Shipley St. buzzes with activity—artists talking, teasing each other, drawing, drinking coffee— while Michael Kalmbach, founding director of the Creative Vision Factory, points out a completed peer-led project: a wall-length, patchwork quilt-style mural on canvas, a venture led by CVF members and completed by inmates at the Baylor Women’s Correctional Institution. Member paintings and drawings line the walls. In the rear art room and Kalmbach’s office are blueprints and tiles intended for mosaic projects at the Rick VanStory Resource Center and Christina Cultural Arts Center. Funded by the State of Delaware’s Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, the peer-run Creative Vision Factory opened five years ago as a way to better serve members of society

struggling with or recovering from mental health and addiction disorders. And the organization’s focus—recovery through visual, literary and performing arts—serves as a powerful tool of expression and social integration, Kalmbach says. Although he is an Intro to Arts Theory professor at Delaware College of Art and Design and a 2008 graduate of the University of Delaware’s Master of Fine Arts program, Kalmbach considers himself a peer of the people he serves. A recovered drug and alcohol addict, he recently reached 14 years of clean and sober living. “Luckily for me, I’m able to identify as a peer from prior experiences, and have been working in the arts community long before that,” he says. “It’s been fun.” ► AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Funding Born of a Lawsuit

With almost 500 individuals welcomed through CVF’s doors since it opened in 2011—that’s approximately 60 per week—his job also entails a lot of hard work and dedication, and as the first state-sanctioned organization like this in the area, it’s an evolving concept. Funding originated from a lawsuit against the state’s psychiatric center for being out of compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. “It’s legalese for ‘don’t warehouse people,’” Kalmbach says. “There have been people living at state hospital for 15-20 years, or innocents detained, that could be out in the community. This lawsuit brought in some federal funds to say that progress had to be made during settlement agreement.” Part of that agreement included incorporating peer support into the state’s mental health system. Kalmbach says the CVF model is based on a concept formed during a wave of mental health system revolutions in the 1970s, however simplistic it may be: if you want to connect, don’t build societal walls. “We want to serve and work with people as they are, rather than perpetuating an art therapy model with a capital ‘T’ which automatically insinuates ‘I’m well, you’re sick,’” Kalmbach explains. “We’re dropping the capital ‘T.’” The country’s oldest center for artists with disabilities, the Creative Growth Art Center, in Oakland, Calif., was formed 30 years ago. Some of its members have been featured in the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, gallery spaces in Paris, and international art fairs—potentially paving the way for aspiring artists like CVF members. MANUFACTURERS OF HOPE continued from previous page

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Creativity as a Recovery Tool

“There’s a ton of talent that is already here, but there just wasn’t a program or system here to recognize that,” says Kalmbach. Now, through the CVF, numerous members who may have never had the opportunity to pursue art have sold works to UD, shown in galleries across the state and in Philadelphia, and are featured in art magazines. “Having something you can do in which you control the pace can be a powerfully adaptive way to combat other hardships,” Kalmbach says. “People come into this place with really strange and wonderful creative practices, faced with enormous CVF member Eric Carpenter adds pieces to the RVRC mosaic wall. economic and health challenges, but despite all of that are making amazing art. They have developed this because they have to; it’s part of their survival mechanisms.” Take the Baylor patchwork quilt, for example. The only instruction given to the women was to paint something light on one side of each individual’s square and dark on the other, Kalmbach says, and each woman created vastly different art. Now, not only is there a finished work, but because of the connection, some of the women who have been released from prison are involved with CVF. The quilt itself will be displayed at the Brandywine Festival of the Arts Sept. 10-11, in addition to other venues, followed by a permanent installation at Baylor this winter. Meanwhile, work on the mosaic project for Rick VanStory Center, a psychiatric recoveryoriented peer center, will continue through this month. The mosaic will be displayed at the center, at the intersection of Martin Luther King Boulevard and Justison Street. The Christina Cultural Arts Center mosaic—on the backside of the building facing Shipley Street—will be completed in September, in time for the CCAC’s 70th anniversary. Open Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., the CVF’s open-door policy allows leaders to observe functionality.

Photo courtesy of the Creative Vision Factory

Continuing the

18 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Opening Doors to Social Mobility Kalmbach says he could be breaking up a fight on Shipley Street on a weekday morning, and by the afternoon be at an art lecture with CVF members at Winterthur. The art community encompasses “this amazing social mobility,” Kalmbach says. CVF residential neighbor, visual artist and volunteer consultant Nancy Josephson agrees. “Here, we let art be the bridge, and it’s happening right there in real life and real time,” Josephson says. “It’s a remarkable way to bring together two sides of the art community.” Josephson moved to North Market Street in 2002 with her husband and local musician David Bromberg. The couple opened a shop at 601 N. Market, David Bromberg Fine Violins, LLC, and live in the apartment upstairs. Josephson wandered over to the CVF after it was founded in 2011 and ended up getting involved with the program, leading workshops, and training members to lead workshops, which “has been phenomenal,” she says. Through these creative works, CVF members have an opportunity to make a little money—and build relationships, skills and also network. “My connection became much more involved after the Newsweek ‘Murdertown’ article came out,” says Josephson. “As an artist, I felt isolated and didn’t know what I could do. Then the idea of creating a product might be a way in which a couple of people could make money as well as a statement.” That’s how a current project—bullet casing earrings, now sold at the CVF—was born, and Josephson and peer leader and staff member Chantal Matthews ran with the concept. While membership—which really just means “showing up”—is open to anyone, in order to be a peer leader a member must show signs of active recovery or improvement. One of the CVF’s current public project foremen, Brook Miller, started out last year just looking for a place to have his mail forwarded. Now, he’s leading group workshops at venues like the Delaware Art Museum. Connecting with neighbors and the local community is currently an important factor, Kalmbach says. He wants to help educate the public on what the CVF is doing, and to encourage people to advocate within local government for more spaces like the CVF. People can also show support by attending exhibitions and commissioning CVF members to do projects. The Creative Vision Factory impact, it seems, is mutual. For Josephson, the program has given to her as much as she’s poured into it. “I’ve forged deep relationships that are also educational—I have a broader perspective,” she says. “And at the core, this program gives a voice to people who are frequently silenced.”

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Not everybody who comes to the CVF has a behavioral issue, and some people aren’t in active recovery, Kalmbach explains— some may still be in active addiction. “If people come here just to get out of the heat or cold and grab a cup of coffee, so be it. In AA we joke around, ‘If you keep going to a barber shop, you’re going to eventually get a haircut.’ And here, if you keep showing up, you’re eventually going to make something. We dangle the carrot, saying, ‘If you want to do this, go for it, and maybe earn some money on a job.’ This can start as a consistent space to count on being safe and start to rebuild some stuff.” On a practical note, Kalmbach says that if someone has more time to do one thing, it’s less of one other thing he or she is doing. More art equals less maladaptive behavior, less petty crime, less loitering, he says.

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BITTER HOMES & GARDENS PRESENTED BY THE BEARDED LADIES THURSDAY, AUGUST 18 | 6:30 PM Don’t miss this botanical spectacle and outdoor cabaret! Flowers, ferns, weeds, and vegetables will sing and dance their way through the Museum’s Copeland Sculpture Garden. Cash bar and food available for purchase in the Thronson Café. 2301 Kentmere Pkwy | Wilmington, DE 19806 302.571.9590 | delart.org

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WE ASKED, THE MAYORAL CANDIDATES RESPONDED Our five questions included a variety of topics not covered thoroughly during the campaign thus far

T

he race for mayor of Wilmington will be decided on Tuesday, Sept. 13—the date of the primary election. As everyone in the city (and county, and state) knows, whoever wins the Democratic primary will be the next mayor. No Republican has registered to run for the office in a city whose electorate is overwhelmingly Democratic. As a service to Out & About readers, we posed five questions to each of the eight Democratic candidates and the lone Independent. The questions were created in the spirit of what O&A is—a lifestyle magazine with strong emphasis on arts, culture and a thriving Downtown. They are questions that have not been asked numerous times in other interviews or debates, and they were worded in a way that we hoped would elicit thoughtful answers. Candidates received the questions in late June and were given more than two weeks to respond. Thus, they had time to ponder and develop their answers—no pressure, no gotcha moment. We asked that answers be kept to no more than 100 words, although that word count was sometimes exceeded. As a result, some answers were edited to fit available space. Below are the questions, followed by the candidates’ answers. Candidates appear in the order in which they responded. 1. How would you describe our city to a friend or colleague who has never visited Wilmington? 2. Describe a specific accomplishment benefiting the City of Wilmington for which you take the most pride. 3. Out & About feels the arts and culture scene is one of the city’s strengths. What plans do you have to help the scene reach the next level? 4. What is the city’s role in attracting more people to live, work and visit Downtown? 5. If you were not a candidate for mayor, which of the declared candidates would you support? Why? (Name only one.)►

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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5 Questions with WILMINGTON’S MAYOR DENNIS P. WILLIAMS

A unique and culturally diverse community facing major challenges WE SHALL OVERCOME if we change our mindset and work together for the greater good of all citizens of Wilmington.

I would describe Wilmington as a city on the move with enhanced arts and entertainment venues (e.g., The Queen, the Grand, the Penn Cinema theaters, a minor-league baseball team and more).

I often describe Wilmington the way others who visit us describe it. It is a beautiful city with an attractive Downtown, a magnificent Riverfront, an appealing array of neighborhoods, and compelling public spaces. It has great cultural institutions for a city its size, a young tech community, a vibrant arts culture, a number of entertainment venues and some great restaurants. Like many aging cities, it has too many people who live in poverty and our crime rate is a drag on our community’s success and economic growth. But our crime is a symptom of neglected neighborhoods and public policy failures which are fixable with the right policy decisions and initiatives. Wilmington has the potential to become one of the nation’s great small cities.

If I were describing Wilmington to a friend, I would share that we’ve started defining a new Wilmington. We started working to build safe and strong neighborhoods. We are creating sustainable job opportunities for local residents. We opened our doors to welcome new businesses and development projects that have created new economic growth across the city. We introduced new arts and cultural events and free music festivals to bring a vibrant energy Downtown. We started establishing new opportunities for our youth through job programs, internships and countless extracurricular activities. Wilmington is becoming a city that is approachable, fun and vibrant.

2. Describe a specific accomplishment benefiting the City of Wilmington for which you take the most pride.

My decades of community work with Wilmington students as a special education teacher and my work with historically black colleges and universities as evidenced on my Channel 28 TV show at 8 p.m. on the third Thursday of every month. Most importantly, I am NOT a machine politician. I am an independent factor dedicated to serving all of the people of Wilmington.

The development of the arts district, especially The Queen theater and the variety of entertainment it brings to Downtown Wilmington.

After leading the Riverfront Development Corporation for 20 years it is hard not to list the many accomplishments of the RDC as things of which I am most proud: $1 billion of development, the Riverwalk, the Tubman Garret Riverfront Park, 7,000 people working in Wilmington and 1,400 living here. The IMAX, the Westin, the many restaurants and the Peterson Refuge. But maybe the greatest contribution I have made is as chairman of the Hope Commission, leading the construction of the Achievement Center where men coming out of prison finally have a chance to successfully reintegrate into our community.

I take the most pride in creating more opportunities for city youth by increasing the city’s Summer Youth Employment Program and Mayor’s Scholarship Program. Over the past three years, my administration continues to increase the funding for and number of participants in the Summer Youth Employment Program. In 2013, 425 youths worked in the program; in 2014, 487 youths participated; in 2015, 520 youths participated; and in 2016, with the support of Bank of America, 548 youths will participate in the Summer Youth Employment Program. My administration has also more than quadrupled the funding for the Office of the Mayor’s Scholarship program.

NORMAN D. GRIFFITHS

1. How would you describe our city to a friend or colleague who has never visited Wilmington?

STEVEN WASHINGTON

MIKE PURZYCKI

continued from previous page

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THEO K. GREGORY

MARIA D. CABRERA

Wilmington is a diamond in the rough. It is a friendly and great place to live and work, it is situated in the middle of some of the most popular cities in the U.S. and you can live here for a fraction of the cost. I am confident that we are a city on the move to a better and safer quality of life for all residents. Just know Wilmington is a place with nice people, a growing Riverfront for entertainment and a Downtown that has the capacity to grow an arts community where the sky is the limit to its potential.

The first thing I would say is that our greatest asset is our people. I was born and raised in Wilmington, which is where the importance of service was instilled in me. Growing up, neighbors treated me like their own son and I learned change happens when we each do our part. This sense of community responsibility and engagement is why I believe Wilmington has the opportunity to be the proof point for the nation for how to turn a city around. I would tell my friend that Wilmington is a city full of opportunity.

Wilmington is a small urban paradise. Its diversity is reflected in its neighborhoods, restaurants, nightclubs, parks and many spring and summer festivals. We are, in fact, the City of Festivals.

I love Wilmington. I raised four children here. We are the city of untapped potential. We have a thriving arts scene. Our neighborhoods come together to celebrate good times as well as times of crises. We have potluck dinners in a small café or porch parties with neighbors. We are close to major cities, for those who need to conduct business in this region. We have two rivers, beautiful parks and neighborhoods. We are affordable in terms of buying property, taxes and rentals. We are the city of festivals! We highlight our jazz greats like Clifford Brown, legends like Bob Marley, as well as our ethnic backgrounds. Many of our neighborhoods are tightknit. And although we need to expand those values into our blighted areas, we are the city of opportunity!

We are small, but look at what we have to offer! Arts, innovation, culture, location, and a diverse population of passionate people. In close proximity to a majority of the country’s population, the corporate capital of the world, Wilmington has a great business environment and a spectacular growing cultural scene.

During my career in the Delaware State Senate, a chance meeting at a Memorial Day parade with former Gov. Russ Peterson led to my sponsorship on June 25, 1992, of Senate Resolution #62 that created the "Blue Ribbon Task Force to Make Recommendations Concerning the Future of the Brandywine and Christina Rivers.” On June 14, 1993, Gov. Carper issued Executive Order #8 and continued vision for the rivers task force that led to a $300 million investment by the state—the rest is history through 2016.

Outside of the titles of “husband” and “father,” the title that will always mean the most to me is “coach.” I co-founded Delaware ELITE, a leadership development program designed for inner city youth and for the past 10 years offered students access to skills training, cultural events, educational opportunities and internships. I worked with students, many of whom experienced trauma in their lives, to move into high school, college, and now into careers. Wilmington needs to focus more on its young people if we ever hope to stop cycles of violence and poverty.

In my efforts to ensure the development and education of our children, I initiated and led efforts in the creation of the Police Athletic League Activities Center, Maurice J. Moyer Academy (Public Charter School), an athletic field in Eden Park as well as renovations and enhancements to P.S. DuPont athletic field. As president [of Wilmington’s City Council] I created nonprofit Education Voices, Inc. to advocate for special needs students in public education.

I served the city in the mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs, then at the Grand Opera House as director of education and community relations, and now as at-large Council member. I believe my greatest accomplishment has been making an impact on economic revitalization through the arts and special events, expanding upon the city events, creating new ones, and growing existing programs at the Grand. As a Council member I have been active in problem-solving and implementing legislation around public safety and quality of life.

I believe neighborhoods are the foundation of a city. Our neighborhoods should be strong, clean, safe and bursting with culture and small business. This is why I am most proud of my work in developing neighborhood planning councils and community associations. The needs of each neighborhood are so different; Wilmington is not a one-size-fits-all city, we need to be rolling up our sleeves with the residents in each neighborhood and putting plans in place to address their specific needs.

KEVIN KELLEY

EUGENE YOUNG

MAYORAL CANDIDATES BOB MARSHALL

’S

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5 Questions with WILMINGTON’S MAYOR DENNIS P. WILLIAMS

MIKE PURZYCKI

NORMAN D. GRIFFITHS

STEVEN WASHINGTON

continued from previous page

3. O&A feels the arts and culture scene is one of the city’s strengths. What plans do you have to help the scene reach the next level?

WE must first change our city culture from the politics of exclusion to the politics of INCLUSION based on EDUCATION, appreciation and communication. As mayor, I will work closely with Wilmington's artistic, cultural, professional and academic community to encourage a vibrant, lively and attractive cultural scene.

If I am fortunate enough to be elected the next mayor, I will carefully review the city's current efforts to support the arts and with input from the arts community, move forward to reach the next level. I believe that the arts and cultural events are very important to the community and after I get my arms around our current efforts, work to include appropriate city officials and the arts community as well as other stakeholders to move this important part of Wilmington's future ahead.

I agree that one of Wilmington's strengths is its arts and culture scene. The only way we are going to move it to the next level is if the city administration is a true partner with our arts organizations. We all must be working towards a common goal—introducing more and more audiences to the diverse arts experiences our city has to offer. I have said many times that the mayor of Wilmington has the second loudest megaphone in the state. I will use this megaphone to promote our great city and its fabulous arts organizations, all across our region.

I believe embracing and engaging with the arts community will further the arts scene in Wilmington. As mayor, my administration has supported existing arts institutions. For example, giving $50,000 to help save the Delaware Symphony Orchestra and more than $200,000 to the Grand Opera House to produce “Summer in the Parks,” a program of free arts and cultural activities in parks across Wilmington. We also work to create new arts and culture activities, such as the first-ever Rodney Square Summer Stage concert series, a free concert series taking place in the heart of Downtown Wilmington, where attendees are able to enjoy free, live performances.

4. What is the city’s role in attracting more people to live, work and visit Downtown?

Ensuring safe and wellmaintained streets and other public infrastructure. Making Wilmington more businessfriendly by removing arbitrary regulatory barriers and improving city government's efficiency and attitude towards economic development and entrepreneurship by personally working with business leaders, job creators and innovators at all levels, large, medium and small. I will take a more INDEPENDENT and innovative communitybased, post-political approach. As mayor, my office door will be open to all people.

I believe the City has such a role. Curbing violence is number one on my priority list. People must feel safe in visiting venues in the city. As stated in a prior response, I would look carefully at the marketing efforts of the city currently and improve them as needed to promote the arts to people, not only in the Downtown area, but all over New Castle County. This is not to suggest that I believe all current efforts need to be swept away and replaced. I would want to build on what we're already doing and based on what I find, suggest improvements or new direction if appropriate.

The city government is responsible for creating the environment that attracts investment, artists, restaurateurs and entrepreneurs. This includes a safe, welcoming environment, economic supports for start-up businesses and employment incentives to encourage economic clusters to locate along the Riverfront and Downtown. Apartment development has been very successful to date. We need to encourage additional developers to build in the city by streamlining our approval process. Lastly we continue to make the Downtown the dining and entertainment center of New Castle County.

Under my leadership, Wilmington is becoming a center for new small businesses, an attractive place for a new wave of residents moving Downtown and along the Riverfront, and a municipality operating a more effective government. However, we must also ensure our city is rich and full of arts and culture. Year after year, my administration has filled the streets and parks with free concerts, live musical performances and block parties. Our production of live music festivals, film events, holiday celebrations and monthly art shows will continue to encourage more people to experience Downtown Wilmington.

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MAYORAL CANDIDATES

The next mayor of Wilmington needs to prioritize arts development throughout our city, from Browntown to Hilltop, and from Southbridge to the North East. What we need to do is help jump start growth by taking proven models of publicprivate partnership and investment and, through close collaboration with community groups and civic associations, explore ways that these models can be custom tailored to celebrate the unique character, and address the unique challenges, of our many and diverse neighborhoods. City government needs to ensure that opportunities are available to facilitate partnerships and empower our neighborhoods so they can lead the way.

As mayor I will enhance our Office of Cultural Affairs. I will ensure that the office is connected to all of the art communities. I will ensure that the art venues and opportunities are plentiful and diverse.

As mayor, I would work to make sure the Mayor's Office of Cultural Affairs reestablishes The Wilmington Arts Commission or an arts roundtable for all arts organizations and request their input in our strategic plan. In Delaware, $9.9 million is generated through the arts. The Office of Cultural Affairs would lend the necessary support and serve as a clearinghouse for services and possible grant dollars to not only local arts organizations but businesses and individual artists. Expanding arts programs into the community and bringing more entertainment into the city will help revitalize our economy and neighborhoods. The Office of Cultural Affairs should not be competing with the community it serves but working hard for that community in enhancing the arts in Wilmington!

Supporting arts is a key aspect of the resurgence of our city. We need to be doing more to support the arts community and we need to start by taking a critical look at the Office of Cultural Affairs. Is it providing what the community needs? We should be letting the arts community drive our direction here, and give them better access to resources to achieve what is possible. We also need to make sure that we stay open-minded and current on what “the arts” mean. Trends change, and we need to be supporting what creative things our young people are doing. We need to support the arts in all areas of the city, not just Downtown.

The city's role I believe is based on a need to think big, recognize the state government is a necessary partner to grow a vibrant Downtown with people living, entertainment and green space. My strong recommendation is for the city elected officials, city, county and state business community leaders to urge Gov. Markell to adopt and appoint as recommended in Senate Resolution #12 a "Blue Ribbon Task Force to Make Recommendations Concerning the Future of Downtown Wilmington.” This resolution reflects the same state policy approach that led to the Riverfront Development.

The Downtown suffers from a lack of housing stock, limited walkability and perception of high crime that impacts development and ultimately the city’s economic and social health. The city needs to take a more active role in programs like the Downtown Development District, which makes it possible to attract real estate investors by incentivizing them to invest in revitalization projects in underserved areas. Programs like this help to leverage public and private investment to boost the development of the Creative Arts District, create new housing opportunities, and better connect communities to create a flourishing Downtown area.

The mayor must be the voice and ambassador for the city. The Office of Economic Development must work closely with all communities in this effort. We must have such things as events, attractions and incentives that will encourage people to live, work and visit Downtown as well as other neighborhoods.

The Mayor should be the number one cheerleader in attracting businesses, as well as people to reside in our city. The city needs to be more user-friendly for businesses and residents through incentives to businesses and residents versus fines and predatory enforcement. This should be a priority of the next administration. We need to stabilize distressed neighborhoods that are adjacent to Downtown. The only way to do this is by addressing public safety issues within these neighborhoods. Investment in those neighborhoods is crucial, and so is elimination of the criminal activity that takes place there.

We need to make the environment in Wilmington one that is inviting. Right now, with the current parking situation, for example, we are sending a message that we don’t want your business. Providing better support to the arts community is one critical way, but also to the innovation community to modernize our city and make it a place where creative people with big ideas want to spend their time.

KEVIN KELLEY

MARIA D. CABRERA

I'm not an expert but I appreciate the value and importance of the arts and culture for our city. Within the last few months I learned and made an effort to secure a state-owned land for a Rock Garden Downtown on West 7th Street and secured from the Senate/ House Capital Improvement Committee $70,000 for the Wilmington Renaissance Corporation to sponsor a city-wide neighborhood mural program. The concept is to create canvas murals that can reflect the proud history and rich cultural heritage of all Wilmington. Most recently, I supported Delaware Fashion Week, created by Maria Beauchamp.

EUGENE YOUNG

THEO K. GREGORY

BOB MARSHALL

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There are three qualities I believe are essential to being an effective mayor. They need to have a proactive long-term strategy of where they want Wilmington to be 10, 20, 30 years from now. They need to create new policies that drive towards this long-term strategy. Finally, they need to be engaged with all areas of the community (e.g., civic, business, faith, legal, academic, labor, etc.) to bring about this vision. I believe all the other candidates care deeply about our city, and also believe I have the right balance of skills in all three of these areas.

If I did not run I would vote for a candidate with the calm of Norman, the neighborhood knowledge of Kevin, the youthful exuberance of Eugene, the city government knowledge of Theo, the legislative experience of Bobby, and the tenacity of Maria. What a candidate! Then again, this candidate would still lack the experience of building and operating a grand and successful development project.

I’d rather not answer this question as all have something to offer and the vetting process has not concluded. It’s premature to answer, so I’m an undecided voter in this regard.

The reason I am running for Mayor is because when I stood back, waiting for someone to convince me as to why I should not run, no one stood out among this field. If I had to choose one candidate, I would choose Kevin Kelley. I believe that Kevin and I are the candidates most connected to the community, with the most foot power in our neighborhoods. We are passionate about serving the community, and always out there, no matter how dangerous or dark it is. Our city needs a leader that communicates, who is accessible, and is their voice. Not an administrator, a leader! We are not the same, nor is our plan for the city identical. In spite of that, we share many of the same values, and that's why I would support him.

MAYOR DENNIS P. WILLIAMS If [the current candidates] were my only choices I would have to come up with a write-in.

KEVIN KELLEY

MIKE PURZYCKI

NORMAN D. GRIFFITHS If I were not a candidate for mayor, I would support an individual with experience, accomplishment and a broad view that looks beyond the present to what Wilmington can be in growing into an arts destination for people all over our region.

MARIA D. CABRERA

(Chose not to answer.)

None of the above. This is a major reason why I am running!

THEO K. GREGORY

BOB MARSHALL

5. If you were not a candidate for mayor, which of the declared candidates would you support? Why? (Name only one.)

EUGENE YOUNG

5 QUESTIONS WITH WILMINGTON'S MAYORAL CANDIDATES continued from previous page

STEVEN WASHINGTON

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(Chose not to answer.)

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O U R

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This is the third in a series of profiles about communities throughout Delaware.

HOCKESSIN: AFFLUENCE AND ACTIVISM The unincorporated community near the Pennsylvania border thrives through a sense of harmony, maintaining an ‘old town feel‘ By Larry Nagengast

J

oe Lake has a pretty good memory, which is what you’d expect for the president of the Hockessin Historical Society, but he can’t remember which national magazine, way back in the 1960s, labeled Hockessin as one of the “10 best places to live” in the nation. Chances are that a good number of the community’s 13,000-plus residents would accord Hockessin that same honor today. Hockessin, if it were incorporated, would be the fifth most populous city or town in Delaware—ahead of Smyrna and behind Middletown, Newark, Dover and Wilmington. It would be ranked number one in terms of affluence. According to figures posted on City-Data.com, Hockessin’s median income is more than double the state’s median, and median home value is 79 percent above the state median. And, save for the ubiquitous Walgreen’s and Wawa logos, it can boast a business community that is almost entirely locally owned and operated. “It’s close to Wilmington. It’s close to Kirkwood Highway. But it’s not Kirkwood Highway. It’s very suburban without being far away from the city,” says Kenny Wynn, who has lived in Hockessin for 48 of his 54 years and has spent a good part of the last 25 years organizing the community’s signature event, the Fourth of July parade, fireworks and community relay races. “It’s great to see everyone come together. Sometimes I think you see 16,000 people,” says Wynn. Overcast skies and the threat of thunderstorms kept the crowd down this year, but the parade attracted at least one resident of nearby Greenville, Vice President Joe Biden. ► ◄ Alexis I. du Pont High School's marching band was among the participants in Hockessin's annual Fourth of July parade. Photo Ana Yevonishon/Expressions Photography

AUGUST JUNE 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo Tim Hawk

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Seventh-generation farmer Jim Mitchell, with Woodside Creamery's Jersey cows.

AGRICULTURE – AND AROMAS

Longtime residents like Lake and Wynn remember a different Hockessin, an agricultural community occasionally susceptible to the overpowering aroma emanating from the mushroom farms along Valley Road and north to the Pennsylvania line. “In the summer, a lot of high school kids got jobs on the farms, baling hay and picking corn,” Lake recalls. “We’d work all day in the fields, then after dinner go for a nice cool swim” at the pool the NVF Co. built at its plant in nearby Yorklyn. The pool’s operations were underwritten by NVF and the Hockessin-Yorklyn Lions Club—and a pass good for the entire summer cost only a dollar, he remembers. Plans to develop the area’s last remaining mushroom farm—a 20-acre property on the north side of Valley Road—were filed with New Castle County last month, says Fran Swift, president of the Greater Hockessin Area Development Association (GHADA), an umbrella group that comprises representatives from 40 or so civic associations in the area, many of them constructed since 1967, when Swift’s father, Francis, became GHADA’s first president. The development boom in the last quarter of the 20th century filled in most of the prime acreage in Hockessin – bordered roughly by Barley Mill Road on the east, Limestone Road on the west, the Pennsylvania border to the north and plenty of zigs and zags on the south. For much of that time, GHADA was a reactive organization—one that battled developers as they sought to put more homes and shops in the area, says Ken Murphy, the group’s president from 1998 to 2006. But, as development subsided, civic leaders adjusted their focus and helped create an informal governance system that well serves an unincorporated community that has no elected officials of its own. Murphy is the head of the Hockessin Planning Partnership, whose members include Swift, representing GHADA; Lake, as head of the historical society; and Peg Castorani, president of the Hockessin Business Association, a hyperlocal version of a chamber of commerce. They meet periodically to discuss community needs, and to keep each other up to date on their activities.

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The Partnership itself tends to keep a low profile. “If we do anything, the mother hen cannot take the credit,” Murphy says. “It’s better to do things through the member organizations. Our strength lies in the strength of those individual units.” In addition, Murphy, Swift and Lake serve on the Hockessin Design Review Advisory Committee, an arm of the New Castle County government responsible for reviewing land development applications to make sure they comply with Hockessin’s master plan.

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Photo courtesy of Creations Gallery

John Sherman, owner of Creations Gallery, sits on a hammock chair outside his shop.

This collaborative approach has helped Hockessin develop two thriving business districts—the old village core along Old Lancaster Pike and the Lantana Square Shopping Center, a mile to the west at the intersection of Limestone and Valley roads. “The population is very conducive to the business we have,” says Brody Glenn, manager of the Harvest Market, a natural foods retailer that opened on Lancaster Pike in 1995. “We tend to have people who care about their health, and Hockessin and Greenville are among the wealthier parts of Delaware,” he says. On top of that, “the Hockessin Athletic Club is down the street, the Kennett YMCA isn’t far, and we catch a lot of traffic from commuters between Pennsylvania and Wilmington.” One of Hockessin’s biggest business boosters is John Sherman, owner of Creations Gallery in Hockessin Corner, a rustic shopping area off Old Lancaster Pike. He has come and gone twice—and regrets both departures. In 1992, he opened his shop, which features American-made handcrafted gifts, furnishings and accessories in wood, metal, glass and ceramics, in the old Garrett Snuff Mill in Yorklyn. After three years, he moved to Powder Mill Square in Greenville, staying there until 1999, when he left after a dispute with his landlord. Dan Lickle, owner of both the Snuff Mill and Hockessin Corner, convinced Sherman to relocate to Hockessin. After 10 successful years, he says, “I had a brain fart” and decided to move to the Shoppes at Louviers in Newark. “It turned out to be a disastrous decision.”

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THE HOCKESSIN-NEWARK “WALL”

It didn’t take him long to discover that “there might as well be a concrete wall between Hockessin and Newark.” Hockessin residents seldom go to Newark to shop, and Newark residents seldom shop in Hockessin. Sherman estimates that the move cost him 80 percent of his customers. “Dan [Lickle] made me a great offer to come back” three years ago, and Sherman didn’t hesitate. “I love Hockessin. It’s a great community. It’s definitely my customer base,” he says. However, he admits, somewhat sheepishly, that while the Newark-Hockessin route may not work for shoppers, he makes that jaunt every day between home and work. ► AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Rebecca Dowling, owner of the Hockessin Book Shelf, also on Lancaster Pike, finds the area’s demographic ideal for her shop, and she broadens her reach by hosting reading groups and partnering with other businesses. Dowling, one of the first employees when Paul and Maureen Piper opened the shop in 2001, bought the business when the Pipers retired to Hawaii in 2008. “We have spectacular readership,” she says, citing two major demographics: the abundance of families who buy board books for toddlers and summer reading assignments for teenagers and the senior citizens living comfortably in the area’s retirement communities. She organizes book groups for fans of mysteries, romance novels and contemporary fiction, and regularly hosts book signings for local and nationally published authors. Through the Hockessin Business Association, she partners with other retailers and nonprofits, often by featuring books tied to the interests of whomever she is partnering with. One of her most popular activities is a summer story hour for children at the Woodside Farm Creamery. “We’ve been doing that for five years,” she says. One session in early July drew more than 100 people.

FUN FOR THE KIDS

While some of the business association’s greatest contributions to the community have come through its collaboration with other groups and participation with the New Castle County government and the state Department of Transportation in planning safety and beautification projects along Lancaster Pike and Old Lancaster Pike, Castorani happily talks about activities that put smiles on the faces of local residents, especially the children. Before Halloween, the association sponsors a three-day weekend of activities. Then, in December, at the Hockessin Library, they present an interactive version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas. With the animated film playing on a large screen, business owners take on some of the roles themselves, and they invite the audience to join in.

36 OCTOBER 2015 | | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM 32 AUGUST 2016

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William Hoffman, head chef of The House of William and Merry.

“It’s ‘the Grinch meets the Rocky Horror Picture Show,’”says Greg Vogeley, owner of the Drip Café, a breakfast and lunch destination in Lantana Square that has grown so popular in three years that he is now doubling his seating space. He made the decision to expand because his familydominated Saturday and Sunday morning breakfast crowd kept coming in earlier and earlier “to beat the rush” and it has gotten to the point that the waits have become too long for parents with fidgety kids. “We’re confident in our growth,” says Vogeley, even though he faces competition from nearby Starbucks and Brew HaHa! coffee shops and two eateries somewhat similar to his, the Perfect Cup and Quinn’s Cafe. “We want to make this the best it can be. That’s the most important thing right now,” he says. “We don’t want to get ahead of ourselves.” While Drip Café has become one of Hockessin’s popular destinations for those who eat out early in the day, the community has plenty of options for fine dining in the evening. The Back Burner has long been a popular destination, and newer additions include the Redfire Grill, Six Paupers and Two Stones Pub. Down Lancaster Pike to the south is Capers and Lemons. After three years of looking for a building where they could live and operate a restaurant, William Hoffman and Merry Catanuto homed in on an old farmhouse on Old Lancaster Pike that had most recently been used as a hair salon and rental property. It was just what they wanted—an upscale community ideal for raising a family with a location that could attract local residents but also diners from Greenville, Centreville, Wilmington and Kennett Square. So, in 2011, they opened the House of William and Merry.

CARVING THEIR OWN NICHE

“Every year we’re growing more and more,” says Catanuto, who runs the front of the house while her husband is in charge of the kitchen. Her only lament is that the community isn’t busy enough in the middle of the day to generate thriving lunch traffic. Offering seasonal new American cuisine prepared by Frenchtrained chefs—“fine dining but not in a pretentious way”— Catanuto says “we’ve carved out our own niche” in a competitive dining environment. And she relishes the competition. “It’s good for everybody’s game,” she says, “and it brings more people to the area.” ►

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AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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In addition to diversity in retail and dining, some of Hockessin’s appeal comes from its recreational options—notably its library, the county-owned Swift Park, the Hockessin Athletic Club, the PAL Center and a series of bicycling and walking trails developed in the past 10 years. The community’s significant contributions to Delaware and national history also cannot be overlooked. For history buffs, Lake says, “this town is a pot of gold, with so many nuggets in it that it’s unbelievable.” In September 1775, British troops marched up what is now Limestone Road from Cooch’s Bridge south of Newark to Chadds Ford for the Battle of the Brandywine. British officers commandeered the use of the David Brown farmhouse just over the state line for use as a temporary headquarters. Fifteen years later, priests from Maryland established the Coffee Run Mission, later known as St. Mary’s Church, the first Catholic church in the state, on Lancaster Pike. The old church was gutted by arson in 2010, but Trinity Church, an independent Christian denomination, hopes to preserve the structure as it builds on the site. Tweed’s Tavern, an 18th-century inn where George Washington once dined, was threatened with demolition in the 1990s by a state plan to widen the intersection of Limestone and Valley roads. Hearings before New Castle County’s Historic Review Board slowed the demolition process. Eventually, the tavern was moved twice, and it now sits in a park on Valley Road, a short distance east of Limestone Road. The Hockessin Historical Society owns the building and broke ground last winter on a meeting and exhibit center next door. Hockessin also played a significant role in the historic Brown vs. Board of Education decision in 1954 that found racial segregation in public schools unconstitutional. Not far from the original Tweeds Tavern site once stood the home of Shirley Bulah, an African-American child who had to travel past white schools in order to reach Hockessin School 107C, on Millcreek Road, the site of a state historic marker. Shirley Bulah was identified as the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit that started in Delaware’s Court of Chancery and eventually became part of the Brown decision. More recently, Lake notes, two of the first subdivisions in suburban New Castle County, North Star and Horseshoe Hills, were built in the early 1950s near Hockessin to meet the demand for convenient housing for DuPont Co. engineers working at the Louviers facility in Newark. Hockessin may have many more residents than it did a generation ago, Castorani says, “when you could literally pull out of Sanford School onto Lancaster Pike without looking left or right.” But, through all its changes, its essence hasn’t changed. As Catanuto puts it, “it still has the old town feel.”

34 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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A fifth round pick, Smallwood played his high school ball at Red Lion Christian Academy in Bear and Eastern Christian Academy in Elkton. Photo courtesy of Drew Hallowell/Philadelphia Eagles

THE O&A INTERVIEW: WENDELL SMALLWOOD The rookie from Delaware prepares to earn playing time with the Eagles, his favorite NFL team By Bob Yearick

D

elaware’s own Wendell Smallwood realized a childhood dream in April when he was chosen by the Philadelphia Eagles in the fifth round of the NFL draft. Smallwood, originally from Wilmington, played his first three high school seasons at Red Lion Christian Academy in Bear before finishing at Eastern Christian Academy in Elkton. He went on to West Virginia, where he had an impressive senior year in 2015. He was named the Mountaineers’ offensive player of the year while earning All-Big 12 second-team honors after scoring 12 touchdowns and setting career highs with 1,519 yards on 238 carries, for an average of 6.4 yards. Also a threat as a receiver, he had 68 career receptions for 618 yards (9.1 avg.), finishing fifth all-time among running backs in WVU history in both receptions and receiving yards.

In the latest Eagles depth chart, Smallwood is listed third at running back behind no. 1 Ryan Matthews and Darren Sproles. West Virginia used him largely as a safety valve in the flats, rarely asking him to protect the quarterback, so experts have speculated that this inexperience as a pass protector could limit his playing time in his rookie season. While he needs to improve that part of his game, he could see significant playing time if Matthews, who has a history of injuries, misses some time. O&A caught up to Smallwood not long after the Eagles final OTA (optional team activities) and prior to the opening of training camp on July 24. Speaking by phone from his new digs near Lincoln Financial Field, Smallwood discussed his NFL experience thus far, his support system, and his plan to complete his education. ► AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FOCUS THE O&A INTERVIEW: WENDELL SMALLWOOD continued from previous page

Photo courtesy of Brent Kepner/WVU

SAVE THE DATE!

Last season at West Virginia, Smallwood ran for 1,519 yards on 238 carries, for an average of 6.4 yards.

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O&A: Were you an Eagles fan growing up? WS: Yes. Brian Westbrook, Deuce Staley—I remember watching them growing up. And Shady (McCoy, now with the Buffalo Bills), of course. I was kind of star-struck when I met Deuce. O&A: Yes, Deuce is your position coach now. How is he as a coach? WS: He’s a great coach. And I think he’s the reason I’m an Eagle. [He scouted me] and he really liked me. O&A: What has been the most surprising aspect of moving from the college game to the NFL? WS: Just the way the coaches pay attention to really little stuff, details. Everything matters. It makes the difference between winning, losing and whether you play. Even some offthe-field stuff, like being somewhere on time for appointments and events, is important to them. O&A: How about the speed of the game? WS: It’s definitely faster. I would say it’s similar to the transition from high school to college. And there are more schemes, more defenses hiding things. But the more reps I got, the more it slowed down. O&A: How have they divided the reps in practice so far? Are you getting nearly the same number as Matthews and Sproles? WS: I got a lot of reps, especially when Sproles was gone. I’ve been running with the twos and threes, and the ones a little bit. I’m on all the special teams except punt returns. The special teams coach thinks I can do it at a fast level. I did the same thing in my freshman year in college. O&A: Has there been any hazing of you rookies? WS: No. Our team might be one of the best when it comes to that, based on some of the rookies I know and talked to. We do have to fill up the refrigerator, mostly with Gatorade and water, and we have to bring them [the veterans] candy. They like candy. O&A: So you won’t have to sing the West Virginia alma mater during training camp? WS: I may have to, but if I do I won’t mind at all. O&A: Do you know the alma mater? WS: No, I’ll have to learn it. O&A: What’s Head Coach Doug Pederson like? WS: He’s a cool guy. He’s straight up with you. And he pays attention to everything you do, even when you think he’s not watching. And he’s open to doing things different ways if that’s what’s comfortable for us. O&A: So would you call him a players’ coach? WS: Definitely.

36 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Photo courtesy of Pete Emerson/WVU

SAVE THE DATE!

Smallwood plans to get the 18 credits he needs for a criminology degree from WVU.

O&A: How are you interacting with the other backs? Are the veterans helping you or is the competition too intense for that? WS: I’ve been talking to each and every one of the other guys. They take me out to eat, and they definitely are looking out for me. Anything I need to know, they tell me. There’s definitely competition, we all want to start, but we’re just like one unit, not individuals, just trying to win games together. O&A: How’s your weight? Have you bulked up for the NFL? How about your speed? What’s your 40 time? WS: No, I haven’t put on weight. I’m at about 210. They want me between 205 and 210. I ran a 4.44 at the Combine and my pro day time (at West Virginia) was 4.38. O&A: What’s your support system like—family, advisors, former coaches? WS: I talk to the coaches from Eastern Christian every day, and also to Dave Sills (who was a key figure in the football programs at both Red Lion and Eastern Christian). I talk to my parents, even though they aren’t together. And I talk to my running backs coach from college every day—Ja’Juan Seider. O&A: Have you had much interaction with fans, here or in Philly? WS: Yeah, they’ve been great. I just did an autograph session at Concord Mall and I’ll be going to the ice cream festival (at Rockwood Park). A lot of people in Delaware have my information and I try to do what I can when they contact me. O&A: I know you’ve addressed this previously with the media, but can you comment on the issues from your past—the witness intimidation and the tweets about Philly? (In 2014, Smallwood was charged with trying to get a witness in a murder case to recant her statement implicating his friend. The charge was eventually dropped. Also, after he was drafted, Eagles fans discovered some crude tweets he posted in 2011 that were critical of Philadelphia, in the context of a rivalry between inner-city youth there and in Wilmington. Smallwood quickly took down the account). WS: The charge came down to there was never any evidence against me. All the charges were dropped. I never did try to intimidate anyone. I was just caught up in a bad situation, and I was 100 percent cooperative with the police. With the tweets, I was young and I sure don’t feel that way about Philly. I took full responsibility for it. I’ve always been around the city and I love the city. O&A: Do you have your degree from West Virginia, and if not are you planning to earn it? What was your major? WS: I’m 18 credits short of a degree in criminology. I plan to take three credits this fall and plan to get my degree. I’ll take courses throughout my career until I get it. It never occurred to me not to do that.

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EAT

Annlynn, Lou, Rose and Lou Casapulla with one of their classic Italian subs. Photo Joe del Tufo

60 Years of Subs and Steaks Casapulla & Sons started on Labor Day, 1956. They’ve been laboring over their legendary sandwiches ever since. By Rob Kalesse

O

pening and running a successful family business takes more than capital, knowhow and the cooperation of siblings, aunts and uncles. It requires skilled employees, customer service that outshines the competition, and a little serendipity along the way. The odds are daunting. According to the Small Business Administration, just over half of small businesses survive more than five years, and about a third of them survive for more than 10 years. The numbers dwindle from there. But for Casapulla & Sons, the legendary sub shop that has served the town of Elsmere for six decades, the numbers don’t tell the whole history. Their story, of an Italian immigrant who started a small grocery store that grew to one of Delaware’s best-known eateries, is one that spans 60 years and a whole lot of sandwiches.

A Delaware Institution Luigi Casapulla emigrated from Caserta, Italy, in the 1920s, and some 30 years later, after starting a family, he decided to open a small “corner store” just north of Kirkwood Highway in Elsmere. Before long, due to competition from neighboring supermarkets, Casapulla decided to switch gears and offer submarine sandwiches. Luigi’s son Lou Casapulla has been there for every year of business, and has seen it all. He began working at the shop at age 13, when he would cut rolls and slice deli meat after school, and he still opens the shop most days. He even remembers the first day they opened for business. ►

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT 60 YEARS OF SUBS AND STEAKS continued from previous page

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40 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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“I remember it was Labor Day of 1956, because I’ve always said, ‘We opened on Labor Day and we’ve been laboring ever since,’” says Casapulla, sipping a Miller Lite after finishing his prep work on a warm July Wednesday afternoon. Laughing, he explains that he only indulges in a beer at work after he's clocked out. And anyway, as he says, “I mean, I can’t get fired.” From the first day, Casapulla says, the business has been all about consistently offering top quality products at a fair price, while engaging with the community it serves. He’s made countless friends over the years, including a certain Italian lady who, along with her husband, also made their mark on the local deli landscape. “I remember—and this is gospel— that Lois Margoloet used to come in here probably twice a week,” says Casapulla. “After she opened Capriotti’s in 1976, a reporter asked why she and her husband went into business, and she said she got tired of having to drive to Elsmere for a sandwich at Casapulla’s!” He says that since the day the store opened, the Italian sub has been the most popular sandwich, and that he’s “probably prepped and made thousands” in his time behind the counter. While business has slowed a bit over the years, many of the same loyal customers still visit more than once a week. Annlynn Casapulla Scalia, granddaughter of Luigi and niece of Lou, says she’s seen some of the same faces on the other side of the counter since she started working at the shop in 1977. Back then, things were a little different. “I remember my grandfather told me to just keep my head down and keep making sandwiches during the lunch hour,” says Scalia, finishing a Wednesday lunch rush. “But you couldn’t help share a laugh with some of the regulars, or ask them how they were doing, or how their mom or dad were holding up. It’s a neighborhood spot, so it always felt natural.” One of those longtime customers is David Baylor, who today has stopped in for one of his favorites, the Casapulla’s cheesesteak. Baylor, a retired Delaware state trooper, has been eating at Casapulla’s for about 50 years, and loves the place and the family that runs it. OCTOBER 2015 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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HAPPY HOUR should start at lunch time (yeah, we thought so too)

FRIDAYS ONLY Photo Joe del Tufo

12PM - 6PM

serving grilled oysters @ 3PM Lou prepares tomatoes for the day's sandwiches.

“When I was in the Navy, I served in Virginia Beach, Pensacola, San Antonio; no matter where I was stationed, when I was on leave, this is the first place I visited when I returned home,” says Baylor. “I think people’s tastes change, but this place doesn’t. It’s been consistently good and had the same great flavors for years— probably a big reason why I keep coming back.” Before heading out of the shop, Baylor gives Lou a bear hug and thanks him for another delicious sandwich. “This place really is like family to me. It’s my go-to spot; it’s an institution.” Baylor says he’s become like a Casapulla family member himself. In fact, his daughter, Sydney, works at the Glasgow location.

The Family Franchise You’ll find six Casapulla’s sandwich shops from North Wilmington to Rehoboth, and every one is family-owned, not a franchise. According to Lou, if there was ever any interest in expanding farther in Delaware or past its borders (a la Capriotti’s), tradition demands that a family member would have to be at the helm. David Casapulla has been serving sandwiches at Casapulla’s North on Concord Pike since he opened the doors in 1992. He has fond memories of training under his grandfather, Luigi, and the two put in a lot of hours together. The family aspect has always been important to the Casapulla crew, and David continues the tradition at his own store. “When I went out on my own about 25 years ago, I wanted to keep going a lot of the good from the original store,” says David. “So we took care of every single person that walked through our doors. Over the years, three of my kids have worked here, including my daughter, Rachel, and my son, David II, who work here now.” Come Labor Day weekend, the staff at the original Casapulla’s plans on partying with their own extended family of relatives, friends and community members. They will have tents outside the location in Elsmere, lots of homemade food on hand, even live entertainment. And of course they’ll also be making plenty of sandwiches.

Private Dining & Events NFL Ticket Coming Soon East & West Coast Oysters Giant Jenga Outdoor Bar & Patio Live Music 1707 Delaware Ave, Wilmington, DE 19806 Phone: (302) 384-7310 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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42 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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E

R S E AT V E IL

TH

EAT

M

r.

d

Slather it on hot dogs or use it in chili, beef stew and in dressings

M u s ta

r

By Robert Lhulier

I

f a food can possess gender, perhaps there is no manlier ingredient than mustard. Often indelicate and forward, mean Mr. Mustard is the companion condiment to many a brutish manwich, from the classic Reuben and Cuban to bratwurst and knockwurst, and hot dog or soft pretzel. With a scent as distinctive as roasting peanuts and freshly popped popcorn at the ballpark, it is known as America’s silver medal spice (next to the most commonly used peppercorns). Most of the mustard we know is in the form of a condiment. But this prepared concoction is actually derived from the seeds of the mustard plant. The same family as Brassica or Sinapis genera, mustard plants are close relatives to a surprising variety of common vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, turnips and cabbage. Most prepared mustard contains an acidic liquid, and so the combination of spice and acid wakes up the taste buds, as well as the nostrils. The Romans were the first to grind the spicy seeds into a spreadable paste and mix it with a flavorful liquid—usually wine or vinegar. Egyptian pharaohs stocked their tombs with mustard seeds to accompany them into the afterlife. French monks, who

mixed the ground seeds with "must," or unfermented wine, inspired the word “mustard,” which stems from the Latin mustum ardens (roughly, “burning wine”). In cafes and bistros all around France, mustard in a crock is placed on the table next to the salt and pepper.

Dijon Debuts

After conquering the Gauls, the Romans brought mustard seeds with them, and these seeds took root in the fertile soil of France’s Burgundy region. By the 13th century, Dijon, the capital of Burgundy, had emerged as a hub of mustard production, creating the groundwork for the invention of the region’s signature “Dijon mustard” in 1856. A new flavor dimension was added to old recipes when the change of the acid element in mustard from vinegar to verjuice—the acidic juice of unripe grapes—took place. This change became so easy to copy that the recipe couldn’t be confined to a single city. Today, Dijon mustard can be made anywhere in the world. But many mustard lovers can tell you their affair with the condiment began with their first taste of the mustard that made Dijon famous. ► AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT THE VERSATILE MR. MUSTARD continued from previous page

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Dijon isn’t the only place with a favorite local mustard. The American variety, the yellow, squeeze-bottle stuff from French’s and Coleman’s, is actually a marketing success story. The familiar shade of yellow to which mustard lends its name owes its hue not to mustard seeds themselves but to the vibrantly colored turmeric added for an extra kick of spice and brightness, thus mutating the traditional recipe further. Crushed mustard seeds alone vary from a pale yellow to a dark brown, depending on their variety, but “turmeric yellow” wasn’t likely to sell as well. Other common regional mustard varieties include English, “French mustard” (actually invented in England as a less-spicy alternative to English mustard), Bavarian sweet mustard, Italian fruit mustards (mostarda), Midwestern beer mustard, Creole mustard and so many wildly different German mustards that the phrase “German mustard” is essentially meaningless.

Invigorating the Palate

For chefs, mustard is very versatile. As a condiment it adds depth of flavor and invigorates the palate with a punch of flavor. As an element in dressings, mustard can emulsify, or merge, the oil and vinegar, stabilizing the mixture into a smooth mixture that more easily coats its ingredients. I use it to finish, or season, everything from a pot of chili or beef stew to soups and cream sauces. Like the bay leaf, it should add a subtle hint of flavor so that you cannot identify the actual flavor added, only the sensation of that addition. As a fundamental blend of spices and acidic liquid, neither of which have the potential to truly spoil, mustard is a shelfstable food. Refrigeration is advised to keep mustard’s spicy kick from dissipating too quickly, but it isn’t strictly necessary. The mustard’s flavor will decline over time, but unless rogue food particles have gotten into the container, there’s nothing to worry about. So pass the Poupon, man, and enjoy! Robert Lhulier is proprietor of Robert Lhulier Cuisine, personal chef services.

44 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

Come EnjoyOur Patio! Warmer Weather is Here!

Battle for Burger Supremacy It’s set for Aug. 27, at the Cauffiel House High noon, Saturday, Aug. 27. That’s when the top pattyflippers from all over Delaware will gather at the Cauffiel House on Philadelphia Pike for the fifth annual Delaware Burger Battle. By mid-July, 13 competitors had signed up. There are usually 16-18 entrants, and at press time, founder JulieAnne S. Cross was expecting more. About a third of the entries are newcomers, according to Cross. “[It] helps to keep the event fresh, while veteran competitors keep the event consistent,” she says. Some of the rookie entries are Tonic Bar and Grille, Firebirds Wood Fired Grill, Nordstrom Grill, and Delaware Park Racetrack & Casino. Returning champs Chelsea Tavern (2015 Critics’ Choice Winner) and Maiale Deli & Salumeria (2015 People’s Choice Winner) will defend their titles. As usual, there will be three awards: The People’s Choice winner, determined by the votes of event-goers; the Critics’ Choice Winner and Best Alternative Burger, both chosen by a panel of “foodielebrities.” Though the competition is friendly, it’s also serious. The new names in the game will have to face off with some of the previous winners, which should give credence to the name Burger Battle. Cross says she is thrilled to be returning to the historic Cauffiel House in Bellevue State Park. “As far as I know, there are no other food events held there and it’s a real cultural gem,” she says. “Cauffiel was the du Pont family’s real estate agent, and he picked a stunning piece of property with a vista that’s unusual for our area.” This rain-or-shine event is open to all ages. It’s free for children under 5, $9 for ages 5 to 12, $25 ($35 at the door) for teenagers and $50 ($60 at the door) for those 21 and older. Attendees get great grub and delicious drinks, and the rewarding feeling of doing a good deed, because proceeds go to the Ministry of Caring, which provides over 180,000 nutritious meals annually to those in need. In the last four years, more than $28,000 was raised at the battle. For more information, visit deburgerbattle.com. —Emma Driban

Buy Your Tickets Now!

Sept. 10th Tickets on Sale Now OdessaBrewFest.com

Every Saturday:

Live Music on the Patio!

6th-Keli Vale 13th-Tony Mowen 20th-Mixx Unplugged 27th-Boyd Holmes Sunday Brunch 10am-2pm $4 Make Your Own Bloody Mary Bar

302.376.0600 109 Main Street, Odessa, DE 19730 Mon: 11:30am-9pm • Tues - Thurs: 11:30am-10pm Fri-Sat:11:30am-11pm • Sun: 10am-9pm

www.cantwells-tavern.com AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Spicy garlic stir fry with chicken is a popular Honeygrow dish.

Great Weather Is Here! Come Enjoy Our Patios at All 3 Locations!

Come Try Our Seasonal Craft Beers Over 22 Beers on Tap at the Polly Drummond and Peoples Plaza Locations!

THURSDAYS

MONDAYS

½ Price Appetizers All Day

TUESDAYS

½ Price Burgers All Day $1.50 Domestic Drafts after 7pm

All You Can Eat Shrimp $12.99 after 5pm, Prime Rib $18.99 SHOWTIME TRIVIA All Locations!

WEDNESDAYS

All You Can Eat Wings $11.99 after 5pm

DJ DANCE PARTY

SATURDAYS

$1.00 Off Craft Bottles All Day

SUNDAYS

Beef and Beer $8.99, Steak Night $12.99

All Locations!

Buy Your Tickets Now!

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: 108 Peoples Plaza (Corner of Rtes. 40 & 896) | Newark, DE | 302-834-6661 8 Polly Drummond Shopping Center | Newark, DE | 302-738-7814 800 North State Street | Dover, DE | 302-674-0144

www.mcglynnspub.com

FRIDAYS

Prime Rib $22.99, $2.50 Taylor’s Grog 7pm-close

for The Odessa Brew Fest

Sept. 10, 2016

Be our friend on Facebook!

www.odessabrewfest.com

GALLUCIO’S DAILY SPECIALS & NIGHTLY ENTERTAINMENT!

Mondays

3 Course Meal $25 includes App, Soup or Salad, and Entrée (5-9pm) Anthony Gallucio & The Retreads 10-1am

Tuesdays

Family Night Kids under 10 eat FREE (Kids Menu) ”Q’s” Day Open Mic w/ Shawn Qaissaunee. 8-11pm

Wednesdays

½ Price Pizza (5-10pm) Quizzo w/Keith 8-11pm

Thursdays

½ Price Burgers All Day! Live Jazz Series 8-11pm

Happy Hour M-F 2-6pm Check out our craft selection! Just $4 during Happy Hour.

Take-Out Party Trays Available

Fridays

½ Price Bottle of Wine (5-10pm) With purchase of 2 Dinner Entrees Open Mic w/ Anthony Gallucio Acoustic 6-9pm

Saturdays

All-Star Karaoke 9-1am

Sundays

23oz. Yuenglings and Miller Lite Drafts *ALL NIGHTLY SPECIALS IN-HOUSE ONLY

Sunday Brunch! 10am-2pm

1/2-Price Burgers Every Thursday!

Book Your Private Parties Today!

1709 Lovering Ave • Wilmington • (302) 655-3689 • Gallucios-de.com

46 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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EAT

CALLING ALL VEGANS

I

BITES Tasty things worth knowing

Compiled by Emma Driban

nterested in becoming vegan or just want to try it out? Visit Delaware’s Vegan Festival on Saturday, Aug. 13, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Rodney Square in Wilmington. The free event offers food tastings, natural products, cooking demos, speakers, a children’s fun zone and live entertainment while promoting the great taste and even greater health benefits of a vegan diet. Whether a dedicated vegan or interested bystander, this festival is the perfect place to dig into the vegan lifestyle. For more information, contact Paul Flowers at 256-3239.

INDIAFEST 2016 THE FARMER AND THE CHEF SOUTH

T

he Farmer and The Chef South is an annual fundraiser benefitting the mission of the March of Dimes. This year’s event is Thursday, Sept. 1, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at the Clubhouse at Baywood Greens in Long Neck. A ticket pays for a night of entertainment, including food prepared by local chefs using products from local farmers, Dogfish Beer and music by Diamond Groove. Tickets are $55 at the door and $45 when pre-purchased. The premise of the event is to create sustainable relationships between local farmers and chefs and promote healthy eating. To purchase tickets and for more information, visit thefarmerandthechef.com/south.

O

n Sunday, Aug. 28, visit the Bob Carpenter Center in Newark for IndiaFest 2016. The celebration allows guests to indulge their palates with amazing Indian cuisine. Attendees can also shop for jewelry, clothing and crafts from a variety of vendors and enjoy the rhythms and dances of the cultural show, which includes a beauty pageant and karaoke. IndiaFest is $5 (free for children under the age of 6) and will take place from 12 to 10 p.m. For more information, visit iaadelaware.org/events.

LET US CATER TO YOU. From dinner parties to office get-togethers to weddings, let Janssen’s make your event

CHINESE AMERICAN FESTIVAL

T

he Chinese American Community Center in Hockessin will host three days of celebration, family fun and delicious food at the Delaware Chinese Festival 2016 on the weekend of Aug. 12-14. The goal of the event is to foster understanding and appreciation of Chinese culture and heritage. Festival hours are Friday, 5 to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 6 p.m. Attendees will experience authentic cuisine, Chinese performances, folk dance and martial arts. Visit chinesefestival.org for more information.

special. We offer full-service catering, event planning, party rentals, floral arrangements,

MIDDLETOWN’S ANNUAL PEACH FESTIVAL

W

ho could deny a perfect, juicy peach, let alone an entire festival of them? On Saturday, Aug. 20, Middletown will celebrate its love for peaches with its 23rd annual Old Tyme Peach Festival. Kicking off with a parade at 9 a.m., a whole day of peach pie contests, crafts, music, games, food and other entertainment will ensue. For more information, visit middletownpeachfestival.com.

and more. Contact our catering director today at (302) 654-9941 x3.

WWW.JANSSENSMARKET.COM 3801 KENNETT PIKE, GREENVILLE, DE 302.654.9941

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Get full details for hundreds of events going on around town!

inWilmingtonDE.com

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CITY OF WILMINGTON

On the Town

“Grand Vocabulary: Contemporary American Illustration” exhibit at The Delaware Contemporary.

w

HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE REFRESHMENTS

K

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

DT

DOWNTOWN LOOP

WE

WEST END LOOP

NW

NORTH WILMINGTON LOOP

NC

NEW CASTLE LOOP

THE WILMINGTON ART LOOP FRIDAY, AUGUST 5 5 - 9 p.m. artloopwilm.org

ALSO IN THIS SECTION: This Month at Theatre N

cityfest

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Downtown Loop

artloopwilm.org

THE WILMINGTON ART LOOP FRIDAY, AUGUST 5 5 - 9 p.m. On the Town

cityfestwilm.com/artloopwilmington cityfest

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO THE ART LOOP. STEP 1: Select exhibitions that interest you. STEP 2: Map out your choices and select transportation. You may want to walk, drive or take the downtown DART Trolley. A limited number of seats are available on the Art Loop shuttle. Please reserve your seat by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov.

STEP 3: Meet local and regional artists while enjoying the newest exhibitions to open in Wilmington and the surrounding areas.

The Delaware Contemporary 200 S. Madison Street Wilmington, DE 302.656.6466 • thedcca.org Opening reception for “Grand Vocabulary: Contemporary American Illustration,” a group exhibition curated by John Shipman, and “Jessie & Katey,” by Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn; participatory art project led by artist Carol Maurer (help create a new largescale work of art!); open artists’ studios; store discounts; Rolling Revolution food trucks; and cash bar featuring $3 Dogfish Head craft beers. We’re a Pokestop! Art Loop reception 5-9 PM. On view Tues, Thurs, Fri, Sat - 10 am-5 PM; Wed, Sun - 12 - 5 PM through August 30th.

STEP 4: Enjoy one of Wilmington’s excellent restaraunt or nightlife locations. Please visit the food and drink section of inwilmingtonde.com.

STEP 5: Repeat the first Friday of every month!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS WHERE DOES THE ART LOOP START? The Art Loop is a self-guided, go-at-your-own pace tour that can start at any of the locations listed in this guide. There is no designated route for the Art Loop.

HOW DO I APPLY TO EXHIBIT ON THE ART

ArtzScape by Lady C Productions 205 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE www.aladycproductioncompany.com Motions Metallic Musicians by Demitrius “Motion” Bullock will consist of canvasses that showcase his love of music depicted in images that have a futuristic flair. Art Loop reception 6 – 9 PM. On view by appointment only. Contact Connie Drummond at 267.679.2711.

LOOP? Participating galleries book and curate the exhi-

bitions and should be contacted directly at the contact information provided in this guide.

HOW DO I TAKE THE ART LOOP SHUTTLE? Reserve one of the limited number of seats by calling 302.576.2100 or email artloop@WilmingtonDE.gov. The bus will pick-up and drop-off at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts.

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Zaikka Indian Grill 209 N Market Street Wilmington, DE www.zaikka.com Metal and Blues, Local painter John Brake offers a vibrant collection of splattered color on canvas throughout February. Join him and classical guitarist Joshua Hendrix until 8 pm. Art Loop Reception 5 – 8PM. On view Monday – Friday 11A – 8 P through August 30th. A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

7/22/16 12:59 PM


Downtown Loop

artloopwilm.org LaFate Gallery 227 N. Market Street Wilmington, DE arteun@aol.com www.lafategallery.com Art that Celebrates the Individual, bridges differences, & creates unity from diversity. Eunice LaFate’s Catalog of Selected Works & Writings. Art Loop reception 5-8 pm. On view Tue - Thurs. 11am – 5 pm, Fri-Sat 10 am – 6 pm through August 31st.

LOMA Coffee 239 Market Street Wilmington, DE 302.893.2000 • lomacoffee.com Rising Phoenix by Madeline. Art that represents social justice and diverse beauty. Art Loop Reception 5:30 – 8:30 AM. On view Monday – Friday 6AM – 5PM; Saturday 7AM – 2PM through February 26.

Cherne’ Altovise 316 N Market Street Wilmington, DE 302.565.7710 chernealtovise.com The works of James Wyatt, Ken Carly, William Marrero and Ny’Cier Jefferson. Art Loop Reception 5-8 PM. On view Monday thru Saturday 10 A – 6PM through August 5th.

Redding Gallery Louis L. Redding City/County Building 800 N. French St. Wilmington, DE 19801

DAVID NORBUT PHOTOGRAPHER

WHAT’S #INWILM THIS MONTH

Recent works of Yvette Johnson. Art Loop reception 6 – 8 PM. On view Mon – Fri 8:30 – 4:30 PM.

Better Block Mon, Aug 1 - Wed, Aug 3

The Music Man Wed, Aug 3 - Sun, Aug 28

Connected: Wonder & Whimsy

August Quarterly Sun, Aug 21 - Sun, Aug 28

Mezzanine Gallery 820 N. French Street Wilmington, DE www.artsdel.org Color Pops, Su Knoll Horty, The Delaware Division of the Arts is pleased to present Color Pops, a selection of new paintings by Su Knoll Horty. Art Loop reception 5 – 7 pm. On view Mon – Fri 8:30 am – 4:30 pm through August 12th.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

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Thursday, August 4

Get full details for these events, plus hundreds more: inWilmingtonDE.com

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Theatre N at Nemours

theatren.org

PRICES: $8 | general admission $6 | seniors and children 302.576.2565 Monday - Friday 1007 N. Orange Street Wilmington, DE 19801

302.571.4075 Nights & Weekends theatren.org CHARIOTS OF FIRE

PG | 2 hr 3 mins | August 1 Mon. 7pm Two British track athletes, one a determined Jew and the other a devout Christian, compete in the 1924 Olympics.

MY LOVE, DON’T CROSS THAT RIVER

NR | 1 hr 26 mins | August 5-11 Fri. 2pm | Sat. 8pm | Sun. 4pm Tues. 7pm | Thurs. 4pm Korean – English Subtitles A couple who have lived together for 76 years faces the last moment of their marriage.

AS TIME GOES BY IN SHANGHAI NR | 1 hr 30 mins | August 5-8 Fri. 5pm | Sat. 2pm | Sun. 7pm Mon. 7pm

The Peace Old Jazz Band from Shanghai prepares for a journey to the North Sea Jazz Festival in a movie about the vital power of music and a unique insight into Chinese history.

THERE IS A NEW WORLD SOMEWHERE

NR | 1 hr 42 mins | August 5-11 Fri. 8pm | Sat. 5pm | Sun. 1pm | Tues. 4pm Thurs. 7pm Sylvia returns to her Texas hometown for a friend’s wedding. There she meets Esteban, an electrifying stranger. He dares her to join him on a road trip through the Deep South.

YARN

NR | August 12-15 Fri. 1pm | Sat. 5pm | Sun. 1pm, 7pm Tues. 7pm | Wed. 4pm | Thurs. 4pm Meet the artists who are redefining the tradition of knit and crochet, bringing yarn out of the house and into the world. Reinventing our relationship with this colorful tradition, YARN weaves together wool graffiti artists, circus performers, and structural designers into a visually-striking look at the women who are making a creative stance while building one of modern art’s hottest trends. 52 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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*Theatre N reserves the right to change the film schedule at any time. Please visit our website at www.theatren.org for the most up to date information for all film and events at Theatre N.

WEINER DOG

R | 1 hr 30 mins | August 12-17 Fri. 5pm | Sat. 8pm | Sun. 1pm Wed. 7pm A dachshund passes from oddball owner to oddball owner, whose radically dysfunctional lives are all impacted by the pooch.

WHEN ELEPHANTS WERE YOUNG

NR | 1 hr 30 mins | August 12-16 Fri. 4pm | Sat. 2pm, 8pm | Sun. 4 Tues. 4pm | Wed. 7pm | Thurs. 7pm English & Thai with Subtitles A young man and his young elephant street beg in gritty Bangkok amid the controversial elephant business that threatens their survival, until the opportunity comes to release the elephant to the wild.

BAG IT

NR | 1 hr 18 mins | August 18 Thurs. 7pm An average guy makes a resolution to stop using plastic bags at the grocery store. Little does he know that this simple decision will change his life completely. He comes to the conclusion that our consumptive use of plastic has finally caught up to us, and looks at what we can do about it. Today. Right now.

TICKLED

R | 1 hr 32 mins | August 19-25 Fri. 2pm | Sat. 5pm | Sun. 7pm Tues. 4pm | Wed. 7pm | Thurs. 4pm Journalist David Farrier stumbles upon a mysterious tickling competition online. As he delves deeper he comes up against fierce resistance, but that doesnt stop him getting to the bottom of a story stranger than fiction.

THE MEDDLER

PG-13 | 1 hr 40 mins | August 19-25 Fri. 5pm | Sat. 8pm | Sun. 1pm Tues. 7pm | Wed. 4pm | Thurs. 7pm An aging widow from New York City follows her daughter to Los Angeles in hopes of starting a new life after her husband passes away.

SHERLOCK HOLMES 2 hrs 8 mins | August 22 Mon. 7pm

Detective Sherlock Holmes and his stalwart partner Watson engage in a battle of wits and brawn with a nemesis whose plot is a threat to all of England.

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO OUT & ABOUT MAGAZINE

7/22/16 2:05 PM


#DIGIN TO THESE DELICIOUS EVENTS:

Beer:30 Thursdays Thursdays, Aug 11 & 13

Delaware On Tap Saturday, August 13

Breakfast with the Beasts Friday, August 19

Delaware Burger Battle Saturday, August 27

BRIAN MARINE SALES & OUTDOOR ENTHUSIAST

Full details for these events & hundreds more at: inWilmingtonDE.com

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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NOW OPEN!

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1. Amtrak Station 2. Opera Delaware Studios/City Theater Co. 3. Wilmington Youth Rowing Assn., WYRA.ORG 4. Tubman-Garrett Riverfront Park 5. Residences at Christina Landing 6. Harry’s Seafood Grill / Riverfront Market, HARRYS-SAVOY.COM 7. Delaware Theatre Co., DELAWARETHEATRE.ORG 8. FireStone Roasting House, FIRESTONERIVERFRONT.COM 9. Cosi at the Barclays Crescent Building, GETCOSI.COM 10. Hare Pavilion/Riverwalk 11. AAA Mid-Atlantic Travel Center, AAAMIDATLANTIC.COM 12. The Delaware Contemporary, THEDCCA.ORG

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13. Justison Landing, Currie Hair, Skin & Nails, CURRIEDAYSPA.COM Veritas Wine & Spirits, VERITASWINESHOP.COM Starbucks on the Riverfront 14. Kooma, KOOMASUSHI.COM Goju Training Center, GOJUROBICS.COM 15. Delaware Children’s Museum, DELAWARECHILDRENSMUSEUM.ORG Riverwalk Mini Golf, RIVERWALKMINIGOLF.COM 16. Joe’s Crab Shack, JOESCRABSHACK.COM 17. Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant, IRONHILLBREWERY.COM 18. Public Docks 19. Big Fish Grill, BIGFISHRIVERFRONT.COM

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Visit RiverfrontWilm.com for info on events happening at the Riverfront! 20. Frawley Stadium, BLUEROCKS.COM Delaware Sports Museum & Hall of Fame 21. Chase Center on the Riverfront, CENTERONTHERIVERFRONT.COM 22. Dravo Plaza & Dock 23. Shipyard Center Planet Fitness, PLANETFITNESS.COM 24. Timothy’s Restaurant, TIMOTHYSONTHERIVERFRONT.COM Molly’s Old Fashioned Ice Cream, MOLLYSICECREAM.COM Ubon Thai Restaurant 25. Wilmington Rowing Center, WILMINGTONROWING.ORG 26. Russell W. Peterson Urban Wildlife Refuge/ DuPont Environmental Education Center, DUPONTEEC.ORG

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27 Riverfront Commuter Lot, RIVERFRONTWILM.COM/PARKING 28. Penn Cinema Riverfront IMAX, PENNCINEMARIVERFRONT.COM 29. CrossFit Riverfront, CFRIVERFRONT.COM 30. The Residences at Harlan Flats, HARLANFLATS.THERESIDENCES.NET 31. Stratosphere Trampoline Park, WILMINGTONTRAMPOLINEPARK.COM 32. The Westin Wilmington, WESTINWILMINGTON.COM River Rock Kitchen, RIVERROCKKITCHEN.COM 33. Delaware Humane Association, DEHUMANE.ORG Photo by Joe del Tufo

7/22/16 2:09 PM


E FR

E CONCERT

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THURSDAY EVENINGS 7-8:30 P.M. | DRAVO PLAZA | SHIPYARD CENTER AUGUST AUGUST AUGUST AUGUST

4 11 18 25

VOODOO DEVILLE THE CRAWDADDIES ELIZABETH KNECHT BEST KEPT SOUL

RIVERFRONTWILM.COM

HA E R WA L K

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ZELS

WA

$8.00 PER PERSON KIDS 3 AND UNDER FREE

6

20

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MINI G LF

M O N D AY – T H U R S D AY 1 0 A M – 9 P M F R I D AY A N D S AT U R D AY 1 0 A M – 1 1 P M S U N D AY 1 2 P M – 8 P M DITION AD

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R I V E R WA L K M I N I G O L F. C O M

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T U E S D AY - T H U R S D AY : 1 0 A M - 3 P M F R I D AY : 1 0 A M - 8 P M S A T U R D AY & S U N D AY : 1 0 A M - 5 P M

D E L AWA R E CH I L D R E N S M U S E U M . O RG

DE RI

THE RIVE

R

D A I LY S H U T T L E S E R V I C E

Round-trip service on the taxi is $7 for adults and $5 for children. Board at one of six taxi stops located within walking distance to nearby attractions and restaurants.

FA M I LY N I G H T S

Bring the family every Tuesday & Thursday night during June, July and August for a fun experience.

W E D N E S D AY S O N T H E WAT E R

Enjoy a 1 hour wine tasting on the river, Wednesdays in July and August. 50 MARCH 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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W I L M I N GT O N R I V E R TA X I . CO M

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2

HEALTHY STARTS HERE

JOIN TODAY!

www.ymcade.org Financial assistance is available.

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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JOIN US THIS MONTH FOR TH

E…

Gameday F unday watch every game!

HAPPY HOUR should start start at at lunch lunch time time should

NFL "Sunday Ticket" Food & Drink Specials

(yeah, we thought soso too) K I C K(yeah, O weFthought F P Atoo)R T Y !

16 Craft Draughts

FRIDAYS ONLY

FRIDAYS Wednesday, AugustONLY 24th, 6-10pm 12PM 6PM 12PM - 6PM Atserving Trolley Square Oyster grilled oysters 3PM - House 7PM

14 HDTVs

serving grilled oysters 3PM - 7PM

Chances to WIN TICKETS to Analog A-Go-Go on Sept 17th! Chances to WIN Dogfish Swag and Other Cool Stuff!

PAJAMA PAJAMA

BR RU UN NC C HH B

Rare and Seasonal

11AM-3PM 11AM-3PM

roll outBrew of bed bed come over! over! Dogfish on Tap! roll out of && come

Saturdays & & Sundays Sundays Saturdays

Specialty Dogfish Craft Cocktails! ’ n s o t L g a n r i g mington’s Largeesst Wiillm t W Bloody Mary Bar Bloody Mary BarGiant Jenga Tournament!* & featuring our our house house infused infused spirits spirits & featuring

Sunday Brunch starting

september

CRUSHES

Pickle Vodka Vodka Pickle Old Bay VodkaLIMITED $10 ADMISSION Old Bay Vodka Cucumber Vodka Tickets @ dogfish.ticketleap.com/kickoff Cucumber Vodka T A ILLSS Jalapeno Tequila Jalapeno Tequila CCOOCCKKT A I Sunday’s Brunch Brunch Features Features Sunday’s Live Acoustic Music Live Acoustic Music

BEER

Special A La Carte Menu Bloody Marys Mimosas Burgers

302.384.7310 302.384.7310 1707 Delaware Delaware Ave Ave 1707

Wilmington, DE DE Wilmington,

trolleysquareoysterhouse.com trolleysquareoysterhouse.com

* To Enter the GIANT JENGA TOURNAMENT Contact Vanessa Before Aug. 12th: Vanessa@TrolleySquareOysterHouse.com

302.777.2040 | TonicBarGrille.com 111 West 11th Street | Downtown Wilmington

58 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

Riding A Wave Of Sudsy Success Photo courtesy of Heavy Seas Beer

Heavy Seas, one of Baltimore’s best craft beer producers, has taken Delaware by storm By Rob Kalesse

U

nfortunately for craft beer lovers, not every IPA, porter or Belgian sour produced in the world—or even our own Mid-Atlantic backyard—makes its way to the Delaware market. And those that do find a landing spot at your local watering hole sometimes get eaten up by the competition, much like the sugars that are devoured by yeast in the brewing process. But just because the first attempt isn’t a success doesn’t mean a second effort shouldn’t be launched. After all, brewing beer requires a lot of trial and error, because not every brew that comes out of the fermenter is a gold medal winner at the Great American Beer Festival. For Heavy Seas, trial, error and eventual success in the Delaware market spanned roughly a decade. After attempting to crack the First State open in 1997—and exiting just a few years later—the Baltimore-based brewery re-branded itself (from Clipper City), expanded its capacity, and began making its mark on the local beer scene around 2010. Today, Heavy Seas is one of the more prominent regional breweries featured at liquor stores and restaurants in Delaware. And with the recent advent of its collaborative Partner Ships series, Heavy Seas continues to ride a wave of sudsy success.

Better the second time around

Hugh Sisson has been working in the brewing business for more than 25 years, initially as Maryland’s first pub brewer from 1989 to 1994, then as the founder of Clipper City Brewing Co. In all that time, he says a couple of things have helped him stay sane through the ebbs and flows of craft beer popularity. “First off, I never lost my sense of humor, which is important, considering the hits you take as a small business owner,” he says. “And you must have a good grip on numbers, to ensure that you make it over the long haul and sustain yourself in this industry.” Both of these traits came into play in the early 2000s, when Sisson decided, after a short run, to pull his beers from the Delaware market. After a decade of consistent growth, Heavy Seas returned in 2010, followed by an influx of capital, and expansion of the brewery. “Since we’ve come back, our Delaware business has grown at a pretty nice clip,” says Sisson. “We had a 90 percent growth rate in 2015, and I think that really speaks to the affinity for craft beer in Delaware. Our big focus is the Delmarva Peninsula, so being able to dial it up in areas like the Delaware beaches and farther north in Wilmington and Newark is key for us.” AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

State Line Liquors

RIDING A WAVE OF SUDSY SUCCESS continued from previous page

Family owned & operated Since 1937 — 4 Generations!

www.statelineliquors.com

Stocking over 3000 different beers • Singles, packs & cases Special Events and Tastings Visit us on the web for details

Gourmet Food & Cheeses

RANKED #3 Best Beer Retailer in the USA ratebeer.com

Offering the areas largest variety of seasonal beers.

GROWLER BAR 35 TAPS! 1610 ELKTON RD, Route 279 . ELKTON, MD OUTSIDE MD. (800) 446-WINE, IN MARYLAND (410) 398-3838

Open 7 days a week

BBC

TAVERN & GRILL

4019 KENNETT PIKE GREENVILLE, DE 19807 302.655.3785 BBCTAVERNANDGRILL.COM

Mike Slattery, owner of The Delaware Growler in Newark, knows the Heavy Seas lineup as well as anyone. As an employee of Standard Distributing, which handles all Heavy Seas beers in Delaware, Slattery got a firsthand taste of how Heavy Seas went from dealing with supply issues, to meeting growing demand, to their current state of widespread availability. “Their brands were always popular and at times difficult to get,” says Slattery. “Once they were readily available, though, they began to gain momentum. The Loose Cannon IPA has been a flagship and their most recognizable beer, but the seasonals are always heavily sought after.” When Head Brewer Chris Leonard arrived in 2013, Heavy Seas increased production by about 15 percent. An upgraded brew house in late 2014 also enabled the company to increase production from 36,000 barrels to 44,000 barrels in 2015. Leonard says a more consistent product flow has helped meet demand and develop new retail avenues. “When I came on, Hugh had made a plan to try and serve the rest of our backyard, geographically speaking,” says Leonard. “We’ve purchased new tanks and upgraded our bottling line, and have been able to produce the same quality beers, which is the most important factor.”

Collaborative craft through the Partner Ships

Great Menu Casual Atmosphere Gift Certificates Available

Phillies Games BEERS 16 DRAUGHTS AND MORE During THANall 80 MICRO PABST 16OZ POUNDERS! & Olympics on Fridays & Saturdays. BRAND NEW WINE LIST! FRESH SQUEEZED HALF-PRICE WINES EVERY JUICE BAR ALL WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT!

SUMMER!

FRESH SQUEEZED JUICE BAR ALL $5SUMMER TALLLONG! BACARDI DRINKS $7 vodka fresh orange, grapefruit & lemon crushes during happy hour

During Happy Hour and Weekend Phillies Games: Off Micro Draughts $8 FRESH$1LIME 50¢ Wings and Half-Priced Nachos MARGARITAS

Leonard has been brewing beer for more than 20 years now, including the bulk of his career as brewmaster at the General Lafayette Inn outside Philadelphia. But it wasn’t until about 10 years ago that he was introduced to the idea of collaborating with other breweries and brewers. “I love it, because it’s an opportunity to get to know the other brewers and how they operate,” says Leonard. “It’s a chance for our brewers to pick the brains of other breweries, see where we can play off each other’s strengths, and it benefits the customer with a new seasonal or one-off.”

60 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Celebrating Years! Photo courtesy of Heavy Seas Beer

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Hugh Sisson, founder of Clipper City Brewing, leads a brewery tour.

Thus far in the Partner Ships series, which began earlier this year, Heavy Seas has joined forces with Maine Beer Company to produce a Red IPA, Stone Brewing for a Brown IPA, Troegs Brewing Company for a hoppy bock beer called “Hoppelbock,” and up next, the Rye Wit with Terrapin Brewing Company, out of Athens, Ga. Brewing Team Leader Henry Jager says he wanted to follow the traditional witbier recipe, which includes spices like coriander and fruit such as bitter orange (Hoegaarden is the classic example), but naturally, he wanted to make it their own. The addition of rye and several varieties of American hops and a secondary fermentation in white wine barrels makes for an interesting result. “A little bit of white wine, rye, wood, orange, coriander and grapefruit, along with Cascade, Amarillo and Saaz complementing each other and the beer as a whole, made for a nice finished product,” says Jager. “It’s not too hopped up, but there’s just enough to let you know it’s there without being a distraction.” At his Main Street shop, Slattery sells several Heavy Seas beers on draft and in bottles. He applauds the Partner Ships series, which, like many breweries of late, links Heavy Seas with other breweries to create a series of collaborative beers. “I’m looking forward to the release of the Rye Wit as the next beer in the line of Partner Ships series, which has brought a lot of excitement to the brand,” says Slattery. “It’s aged in white wine barrels for 16 weeks, with the addition of coriander, bitter and sweet orange peel, and grapefruit peel. It’s a creative balance that’s sure to be a hit and sell out quickly.” Nick Slemko, an assistant general manager in charge of the beer list at Ulysses Gastropub in North Wilmington, has been fortunate enough to try all three Partner Ships beers so far. “I wish we could have all their Partner Ships beers on extensively, but when we get them, they go quickly,” says Slemko. “Really, though, we stock beer according to what will sell, and Heavy Seas beers are easy to sell.” In addition to The Delaware Growler, the Rye Wit—as well as many other Heavy Seas beers—will be available at ABC Liquors in Bear, Peco’s Liquors in Wilmington, Kreston’s in both Middletown and Wilmington, Total Wine in Milltown and Claymont and Atlantic Liquors in Rehoboth Beach.

Enjoy these daily specials

ALL MONTH LONG! s Mondays: 15% OFF Craft Beer 6-Pack $50 Tuesdays: 15% OFF Whiskeys over

ne Wednesdays: 15% OFF 750mls of Wi Thursdays: $2 OFF Growler Fills

Huge Selection Mix Your Own 6-Pack Friendly Staff wilmington 522 Philadelphia pike -

uors.com 302.764.0377 - pecosliq AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KRESTON

DRINK

WINE & SPIRITS

Grainiac

Celebrating 84 Years

Visit Our State-Of-Art Growler Station…

Beer Craft beer reviews from Grain’s Jim O’Donoghue

THIS MONTH:

Ballast Point Grapefruit Sculpin IPA

B

allast Point's Grapefruit Sculpin IPA from San Diego is one of those beers you just have to try. Finally starting distribution in Delaware this July, that should be a much easier task. Grapefruit Sculpin is a spin off of Ballast Point’s extremely successful Sculpin IPA. The addition of grapefruit goes perfectly with the Sculpin IPA’s already citrusy hop flavors and even with a 7 percent ABV this is one of most refreshing beers I have had this summer. If you like this one you should also try Uinta's Hop Nosh Tangerine IPA. – Jim O’Donoghue

FILL. DRINK. REPEAT.

Large section of Craft Bottles & Cans A Delaware Tradition Since 1933 MIDDLETOWN 448 E. Main Street Middletown, DE 19709 Tel: (302) 376-6123

WILMINGTON 904 Concord Avenue Wilmington, DE 19802 Tel: (302) 652-3792

Proud Sponsor of the

62 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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DRINK

SIPS

Here's what's pouring Compiled by Emma Driban

BREWS OF HISTORY IN ODESSA

T

he Historic Odessa Brewfest is an annual fundraising event for the Historic Odessa Foundation; a non-profit organization whose mission us to ensure the legacy of the Historic Houses of Odessa. This year’s Brewfest will be on Saturday, Sept. 10. VIP tickets, at $70, allow attendees to begin tasting limited-quantity beers at noon. The $50 general admission ticket allows holders to enter at 2 p.m. Designated driver tickets will also be available at the gate for $15. More than 50 breweries from across the country will participate in this rain-or-shine event. No one under the age of 21 will be admitted. Visit odessabrewfest.com for more information or to purchase tickets in advance.

CELEBRATE THE HISTORY OF CRAFT BREWING

J

oin the Friends of Wilmington Parks on Saturday, Sept. 3, from 5 to 9:30 p.m. at the Blue Ball Barn as they host a celebration of the past, present and future of Delaware craft brewing. Local historians John Medkeff, Tony Russo and Bob Fullmer will present a history of brewing in the First State. Their presentation will be followed by a craft beverage sampling from more than 20 participating breweries, wineries, cideries, meaderies and distilleries, plus gourmet sandwiches from WiLDWiCH food truck, and multiple raffle baskets. The event also offers a chance to meet local artisans and artists. Attendees must be 21 or older, and photo ID is required. Ticket prices range from $15 to $45 depending on which of the six options you choose. Proceeds from ticket sales and raffles will benefit the “Restore the King” initiative and Wilmington State Park’s School Programs Scholarship Fund. For more information, visit brewstory2016. eventbrite.com.

MOVIES ON TAP: 2SP & THE GOONIES

O

nce a month join Premier Wine & Spirits at Penn Cinema for its interactive tasting series “Movies on Tap.” For $20, attendees get to taste a sample and learn about a beer from a local brewing company. The ticket also covers the price of popcorn and a cult-classic film on the big screen. On Wednesday, Aug. 17, at 6:30 p.m., the event features a tasting from Hockessin’s 2SP and a showing of The Goonies. Proceeds will go to a charity of the brewer’s choice. Visit penncinema.com for a list of upcoming movies and to purchase tickets.

WINE SPECTATOR RESTAURANT AWARDS

W

ine Spectator’s Restaurant Awards highlight restaurants around the world that offer the best wine selections. The magazine’s award program has three levels: the Award of Excellence, the Best of the Award of Excellence and the Grand Award. Five Delaware restaurants were recognized this year. Caffé Gelato in Newark, Eden in Rehoboth Beach and Sullivan’s Steakhouse in Wilmington received Awards of Excellence, along with 2,411 other restaurants around the globe. This means they offer at least 90 wine selections from an assortment of quality producers. Domaine Hudson and the Green Room, both located in Wilmington, earned Best of the Award of Excellence. This demonstrates that they have wine lists with excellent breadth across multiple winegrowing regions, superior presentation, and offer 350 selections or more. Wine Spectator is the world’s leading authority on wine, making these accolades rather prestigious.

RIVER TOWNS CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL

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n Saturday, Oct. 1, help celebrate historic New Castle and Delaware City at the third annual River Towns Ride & Festival. The highlight of this oneday joint event between the waterfront towns is the Craft Beer Festival, which lasts from noon to 5 p.m. The festivities will occur in Delaware City’s Battery Park and on The Green in New Castle. More than 16 craft breweries will participate. For more information about the festival and the other activities, visit rivertownsfestival.com.

AUGUST MUSIC

at Kelly’s Logan House

FRIDAY, 8/05

Spokey Speaky - 10 p.m.

Jose Estados • Tiki Bar - 6 p.m. DJ • Tiki Bar - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 8/06

DJ Gifted Hands - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 8/12

Kooligans - 10 p.m.

Andrew Moorer• Tiki Bar - 6 p.m. DJ • Tiki Bar - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 8/13

DJ Gifted Hands - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 8/19

Poor Yorick - 10 p.m.

Joel & Mike • Tiki Bar - 6 p.m. DJ • Tiki Bar - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 8/20

DJ Gifted Hands - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY, 8/26

Tweed - 10 p.m.

Amanda & Jeff • Tiki Bar - 6 p.m. DJ • Tiki Bar - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, 8/27

DJ Gifted Hands - 10 p.m.

1701 Delaware Ave. Wilmington, DE 19806 (302) 652-9493

LOGANHOUSE.COM AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

TUNED IN Not-to-be-missed music news FREE WEEKLY CONCERTS They’ll be held at several Delaware State Parks Enjoying relaxed summer nights just got a lot easier, and a lot less expensive, with the Summer Concert Series at Delaware State Parks. The series offers a perfect place to sit back, relax, and enjoy the sounds of summer at no cost (excluding park entrance fees). The concerts are held once or twice a week at several locations statewide including Bellevue, Delaware Seashore, Holts Landing, Killens Pond, Trap Pond, White Clay Creek, and Rockford Tower. This August, the statewide series will feature The Shakers, Helixx, Jah People, and many more musicians performing a wide variety of music. For more information, visit destateparks.com.

SONGS FOR FREEDOM MUSIC FESTIVAL Fundraiser is Aug. 13 The annual Songs for Freedom Music Festival will come to New Castle on Saturday, Aug. 13, to support Delaware’s Meet Me at the Well Foundation, which rescues and educates women who have been subjected to sex-trafficking, and advocates selfreliance and self-confidence for all women and girls. The festival will include dozens of female performers, including Block Taylor, Fuzion Sol and Heaven’s Thunder. The event, at The Commodore Center, will also offer food and craft vendors, face painting, and a carnival game area. Tickets are $25 at the door with specials for families and children. For more information, visit thewellde.org.

DELAWARE TEEN IDOL Finals are Aug. 5 at the Playhouse In AIDS Delaware Teen Idol, teens perform original works focused on current youth issues such as HIV/AIDS awareness, drug and alcohol prevention, sexual abuse, fatherhood and other chosen topics. Participants may perform songs, raps, poems, skits, or simply give a speech. The competition’s finals will be Friday, Aug. 5, at the Playhouse on Rodney Square. AIDS Delaware Outreach and Education services incorporate Delaware’s youth in advocating solutions to pressing worldwide problems. Tickets are $7. For more information, visit aidsdelaware.org.

CELEBRATING HOPS WITH HIP-HOP Argilla Brewing’s IPA Day fest Join Argilla Brewing Company in celebrating IPA Day on Thursday, Aug. 4, two days before international IPA Day. The event will feature live hip-hop music and IPAs on tap, including Session Pale Ale and Totally Falconer Oat IPA. The event will begin at noon with the Weekday Warriors performing. For more information, visit argillabrewing.com. 64 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WAILERS HERE TWICE IN AUGUST Reggae band performs Aug. 18 and 27 The Wailers, the world’s premier reggae band, will come to Delaware twice this month: Thursday, Aug. 18, at the World Cafe Live at the Queen in Wilmington, and Saturday, Aug. 27, at the Freeman Stage at Bayside in Selbyville. Bob Marley and The Wailers have sold over 250 million albums, and since Marley’s passing the band has continued touring worldwide, performing 200 or more dates a year. For more information, visit wailers.com.

COMING SOON TO

UPSTAIRS LIVE ALL SHOWS AT 8PM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED GABLE MUSIC VENTURES PRESENTS FREE!

AUG 3, 10, 17, 31 - 7PM

AUG 5 JOHN FLYNN A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR NEW BEGINNINGS – NEXT STEP 11 SHILOH HILL MATT WHEELER

12 JEREMIAH TALL

NATHAN ALLEBACH 13 DALA JESSE RUBEN

The Susquehanna Floods

TreeWalker

MUSIKARMAGEDDON FINAL COUNTDOWN Victors in the first two rounds of the 10th annual band battle will square off at the October finals Wilmington’s 10th annual battle of the bands, Musikarmageddon, kicked off with a close match on July 8 at Kelly’s Logan House, with Perryville, Md., blues and folk rockers The Susquehanna Floods coming out on top against Magnetic North and Wild Virtu. “The judges said there were only five points between the winning band and another. That’s about as close as it gets,” says Susquehanna Floods lead guitarist Zachary Crouch. The second round on July 16 at Oddity Bar saw TreeWalker take the title against The Fuzzy Snakefoot and Chill and the Rabbits. Hailing from Elkton, Md., the indie rockers are humble about their win. “Chill and the Rabbits played a very energetic set and The Fuzzy Snakefoot put on quite a show,” says vocalist and guitarist Kirby Moore. “They are both cool bands and we didn’t envy the judge’s job—I mean how do you judge art?” The next rounds will take place on Thursday, Aug. 11, at 1984, featuring Galaxy 13, Cassettes and Hoochi Coochi, and Thursday, Aug. 18, with Arden Kind, Anatomy of an Outcast and Rusty Blue at the World Cafe Live at The Queen. The winners from each round will compete in the finals for the Musikarmageddon X championship on Saturday, Oct. 15, at the baby grand. Members from Susquehanna Floods and TreeWalker view the competition as a means to support Wilmington’s creative community—and they point out the need for music to be at its strongest, due to national and international current events. “This competition has definitely brought some incredibly creative people together in this magical way,” says Crouch. “You can really tell that everyone participating is interested in helping bring music into people’s lives. In troubled times like this, music could be the best medicine and we think music sends a pretty positive universal message.” Says Moore: “With so much divide and negative energy in the world today, and in much of the media, we hope to bring people together to be entertained and enjoy a little spirit of community.” For tickets and more information, visit outandaboutnow.com/musikarmageddon.

18 MUSIKARMAGEDDON X 19 JUANITO PASCUAL 20 THE THROW BACK SERIES PRESENTS THAT 70’s SHOW 21 JOHNNY WINTER ALL STAR BAND 24 YARN 26-27 BETA HI FI EMERGING MUSIC FESTIVAL (7PM) SEP 7 MIKE PETERS PRESENTS THE ALARM SPIRIT OF ‘86 8 FAMOUS OCTOBER 9 JONATHAN EDWARDS 10 BURNING BRIDGET CLEARY 18 DANIELLE MIRAGLIA, KYLE SWARTZWELDER 24 LINDA GAIL LEWIS OCT 14 THE MELTON BROTHERS BAND 15 CALIFORNIA GUITAR TRIO 28 KARLA BONOFF 29 JASON DIDNER AND THE JUNGLE GYM JAM COSTUME PARTY! FAMILY SHOW (11AM) 500 N MARKET ST W I L M I N G TO N , D E (302)994.1400 WORLDCAFELIVE.COM

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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E V I L sic

u nthly m o m f o A series : TED BY PRESEN

parties

Cool Spring Park N Jackson St & West 10th St, Wilmington

Farmers market Thursdays 4-8 p.m. Fresh Food - Music - Community

local & live

AUGUST 12th: Bellefonte Cafe 804 Brandywine Blvd, Wilmington

w/ Steve Pepper & Friends

LS PBR SPECIA ! L NIGHT .co w o

m

AL

Music at the Market every week 5-7 p.m. August 4 kooligans August 11 nick everett duo August 18 Betty and the Bullet

O

n utA

dA

t bou

N

August 25 Kids’ Day with Cris and Lou Cool Spring Farmers Market County Executive Thomas P. Gordon Department of Community Services Division of Community Resources

66 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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LISTEN

ANALOG-A-GO-GO KICKOFF PARTY

Giant Jenga tournament, specialty brews and more precede Sept. 17 festival

The suds are rising for Dogfish Head’s Analog-A-Go-Go Festival at Bellevue State Park on Saturday, Sept. 17. Join the momentum at the Analog-A-Go-Go Kickoff Party at Trolley Square Oyster House on Wednesday, Aug. 24, from 6-10 p.m. Participants will have chances to win tickets to Analog, along with Dogfish swag and other cool stuff. And it’s not a Dogfish party without rare and seasonal Dogfish brews on tap and specialty Dogfish craft cocktails. “They have such a passion for unique, quality brews and we are thrilled to be featuring some of their hard-to-find and limited release editions here,” says general manager Erik Holzbaur. The night will be kept appropriately off-centered with a giant Jenga tournament. For those interested in competing, email vanessa@trolleysquareoysterhouse.com before Aug. 12. Six years ago, the Analog festival was born and has been held annually at Dogfish’s Milton brewery until now. This year, the festival is undergoing major changes “in celebration of all things indie craft,” Dogfish founder Sam Calagione says. The biggest change is venue—from downstate to Bellevue State Park just outside Wilmington—to accommodate a lineup and crowds expected to be bigger than ever. Live music, a cask beer festival featuring 10-15 breweries, a craft spirit garden, a marketplace, and local and regional food will be featured. Bands include headliners Built to Spill, plus Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Talib Kweli, Ra Riot, Beach Slang, and Fiancé, bringing to Bellevue indie rock, New Orleans-style jazz, hip-hop, punk and experimental pop representative of the “off-centered” Dogfish brand. Tickets to the party, which are limited and $10 each, are at kickoff.ticketleap.com. For more information, visit trolleysquareoysterhouse.com and analogagogo.com. —O&A

CRAFT BEER

16 drafts, 60+cans/bottles

LOCAL BANDS local produce CRAFT COCKTAILS

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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Tickets On Sale Now

Penn Cinema + Escape to the movies

| www.penncinema.com

Escape to the movies at Wilmington’s only locally-owned and independently operated multiplex, featuring 15 state-of-theart screens including the state’s only IMAX® Theatre. 302.656.4314 | 401 S. Madison Street | Wilmington, DE 19801

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BEER & WINE! OVER

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©2016 WARNER BROS. ENT. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. TM & © DC COMICS. IMAX© IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF IMAX CORPORATION.

70 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH

Café Society

2

STARS µµµµµ Bobby (Jesse Eisenberg) and Vonnie (Kristen Stewart) in Café Society. Photo Sabrina Lantos/2016 Gravier Productions, Inc.

CAFÉ SOCIETY = DEJA VU Woody Allen’s latest leaves a bitter aftertaste By Paula Goulden

D

irector Woody Allen (Midnight in Paris, Annie Hall, Bullets Over Broadway and many more) has reached a point in his long career where it’s hard for him to avoid repeating himself, and in Café Society he doesn’t even try. His latest is a retread of the themes and character types that Allen has explored many times before, leaving the viewer with a definite sense of déjà vu. Initially, Café Society is an engaging tale of Bobby Dorfman (Jesse Eisenberg, The Social Network), a nice Jewish boy who tires of life in the Bronx during the Great Depression and moves out

west. Using family connections, Bobby goes to work for his Uncle Phil (Steve Carrell, The 40-Year-Old Virgin), a highly successful Hollywood agent who represents the biggest movie stars. But Phil can’t tear himself away from his deal making to mentor or even entertain Bobby, so he fobs off his nephew on his secretary, Vonnie (Kristen Stewart, The Twilight Saga). She shows the newbie around, and of course, Bobby falls for her even as she tells him about her boyfriend. Meanwhile, Uncle Phil confides to Bobby that he’s falling in love with a younger woman as he vacillates over whether to leave his wife. Sound familiar? AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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WATCH CAFÉ SOCIETY = DEJA VU continued from previoius page

Seeing 1930s Hollywood from a naïve young man’s point of view has promise, since it’s a tale told much less frequently than the female version of the story, and there’s a sweetness in Bobby that makes us care about him—at first. But director Allen isn’t interested in real emotion in this movie, preferring the shiny surfaces the movie’s title calls to mind. (“Café society” is the term used to describe the flamboyant nightlife of the Great Depression which, despite its glamour, had an undercurrent of illegality and desperation.) So Bobby’s sweetness evaporates with his innocence, and he moves back to New York to find success managing a glitzy new nightclub owned by his gangster brother Ben (Corey Stoll, Midnight in Paris). Audiences have seen other versions of most of the Café Society characters in the movies that Allen has been making for almost 50 years (from Take the Money and Run to Magic in the Moonlight). This time, however, the “ick” factor predominates, from beautiful young women with much older men to Bobby’s brother who repeatedly rubs out people, seemingly with impunity. And while the stereotype Jewish characters in many of Allen’s previous movies were portrayed with equal parts exasperation and affection, in Café Society these stereotypes shade into bitterness as bickering turns into hostility. Movie buffs will enjoy the name-dropping of classic movie stars and clips from films of Hollywood’s golden era, but those bits of fun aren’t enough to counteract the bad taste this movie leaves. It’s possible that Woody Allen has run out of things to say, as he jumps from one cliché to the next in Café Society. The fact that Allen created many of these clichés in his earlier movies doesn’t excuse his lack of originality here. He has made fresh movies in the not too distant past, like Midnight in Paris (2011), so I’m inclined to give him the benefit of the doubt. Yes, Café Society disappoints, but I would still see Allen’s next movie to find out if he somehow still has the chops to come up with new ideas and new characters.

70 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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SIX-PACK CINEMA

WATCH

SIX DECADES OF ANGST AND LAUGHS A look at Woody Allen films through the ages By Mark Fields Café Society, the latest feature from writer-director Woody Allen, joins an impressive body of work that now spans six decades. Allen, who first emerged in the media spotlight as a comedy writer and stand-up, quickly evolved into a thoughtful, if uneven, filmmaker who could produce equal measures of laughs and tears with his meditations on the quirks of human interaction. Further, Allen has a penchant for attracting A-list acting talent, many of whom go on to win Oscars for it. These films, one each from the last six decades, are well worth watching, whether for the first time or a repeat viewing.

Midnight in Paris (2011) Owen Wilson plays Gil, a romantic, restless screenwriter on vacation in Paris with his no-nonsense fiancée Inez (Rachel McAdams). One night while wandering the cobblestone streets of the City of Light, Gil stumbles onto a strange portal into the past and re-sparks his imagination with the literary lights of a bygone era. But Gil’s fantasy soon takes him further and further from his current life. The nostalgic comedy, in a style familiar to Allen enthusiasts, features rhapsodic cinematography of Paris and a period jazz score. Also starring Kathy Bates, Marion Cottilard, Adrien Brody, Tom Hiddleston and Alison Pill.

Match Point

(2005)

Chris, a financially struggling tennis pro ( Jonathan Rhys Meyers), is teaching lessons in an upscale London club when he befriends one of his students and gets introduced into a businessman’s family in modern, luxe London. Seduced by the ease and comfort of their affluent lifestyle, Chris begins to date their daughter while also finding himself drawn to an American actress engaged to his friend. His fiscal and moral dilemma in this dark comedy has shattering consequences. Also featuring Scarlett Johansson, Emily Mortimer, Matthew Goode and Brian Cox.

Sweet and Lowdown

(1999)

Emmet Ray is a womanizer, spendthrift, drunk, and, surprisingly, talented musician who sees himself as the secondgreatest jazz guitarist after the legendary Django Reinhardt. This fictional biopic, set in the 1930s, follows the tortured life of Ray (Sean Penn). He falls in love with a mute woman, Hattie (Samantha Morton), but sabotages the relationship because he mistakenly believes that great artists must be free of romantic entanglements. Both Penn and Morton were Oscar nominees for their performances in this lesser but still rich Allen dramatic comedy. The cast includes Uma Thurman, Anthony LaPaglia, Denis O’Hare and outré film director John Waters.

Crimes and Misdemeanors

(1989)

One of the most potent of Allen’s signature blends of laugh-out-loud comedy and starkly moving drama, Crimes and Misdemeanors retains its profundity nearly 30 years later. Two stories intertwine as an esteemed doctor takes stark measures to keep an affair under wraps while a hapless documentarian finds himself stuck making a film about a person he despises. One seemingly-throwaway scene at a cocktail party perfectly distills the chasm between the two men’s moral lapses. Starring Martin Landau, Woody Allen, Mia Farrow, Alan Alda, Angelica Huston, Claire Bloom and Jerry Orbach.

Manhattan

(1979)

The central relationship in this film—between an older man (Allen) and a teenage girl—took on a skeevy subtext when Allen was revealed to have taken up with his young step-daughter. That’s unfortunate, because this gorgeous black-and-white love letter to New York City and its eccentric citizens might otherwise be more celebrated than it is. The man in question is a divorced and self-loathing (of course) television writer simultaneously in love with teen Tracy (Mariel Hemingway) and also his best friend’s mistress, Mary (Diane Keaton). Also featuring Meryl Streep, Michael Murphy, Anne Byrne and Wallace Shawn.

Take The Money and Run

(1969)

One of Allen’s first features and a clear representative of his full-bore slapstick comedy phase, this hysterically funny movie tells the story of Virgil Starkwell (played by Allen), a pathetically unsuccessful bank robber. Lacking a coherent narrative through-line, the film is really a series of sketches and punchlines strung together by the merest thread. (Personal favorite: Starkwell played cello in his high school marching band…let that fully sink in). Take The Money and Run was a “mockumentary” years before the form was supposedly created by This is Spinal Tap and Waiting for Guffman. AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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FULL RACK or COMBO

ONLY

Tuesday Rib Special:

$

17

Cool Off

at the Mexican Post!

.99 In House Only

Official

Staff Favorite Spot!

In the Biz? Join Us for $3 Drink Specials including GM Shots & Food Specials Wed-Sun: 10pm-Close

302.478.3939 | 3100 Naamans road | MexicanPost.com | facebook.com/Mex.Post 72 AUGUST 2014 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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PLAY

WHERE TO WATCH THE GAME August brings college football and intriguing preseason NFL action back to a bar near you! Because of the multitude of options—who has the most TVs? Best beers on tap?—we’ve come up with this directory to guide you through the selection process. Compiled by Evie Kortanek

8TH & UNION KITCHEN 801 N. Union St., Wilmington; 654-9780 8thandunion.com Number of TVs: 4 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 30 Crowd Favorites: Buffalo cauliflower, grilled wings, pad thai, and brisket & steak pho.

AJ’S RESTAURANT AND TAVERN 114 N. Broadway, Pennsville, N.J.; (856) 678-2306, Visit Facebook page Number of TVs: 9 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 35+ Crowd Favorites: Sweet chili wings, smokey mountain burgers, cheesesteaks, and bacon wrapped scallops.

BBC TAVERN & GRILL 4019 Kennett Pike, Greenville; 655-3785 bbctavernandgrill.com Number of TVs: 7 Beers on Tap: 15 • Bottled Beers: 60-75 Crowd Favorites: Nachos, caprese salad, house-made meatloaf, and BBC Burger.

BUFFALO WILD WINGS Multiple locations: Bear, Dover, Limestone Rd., Middletown, Newark, Rehoboth buffalowildwings.com Number of TVs: 42 Beers on Tap: 24 • Bottled Beers: 18 (Also features Sports Lottery at Bear, Dover, Limestone Rd., and Middletown locations) Crowd Favorites: Boneless or traditional wings in any of 16 signature seasonings or sauces.

CHELSEA TAVERN 821 N. Market St., Wilmington; 482-3333 chelseatavern.com Number of TVs: 3 Beers on Tap: 31 • Bottled Beers: 200+ Crowd Favorites: Wood burning oven pizza, Chelsea cheeseburger, and BBQ pork nachos.

COLUMBUS INN 2216 Pennsylvania Ave., Wilmington; 571-1492 www.columbusinn.net Number of TVs: 5 (and a projector screen) Beers on Tap: 8 • Bottled Beers: 27 Crowd Favorites: Tempura fried tuna roll and crab stuffed heirloom tomato.

DEER PARK TAVERN 108 W. Main St., Newark; 369-9414 deerparktavern.com Number of TVs: 25 Beers on Tap: 24 • Bottled Beers: 31 Crowd Favorites: Wings, mix combo, and nachos.

DELAWARE PARK 777 Delaware Park Blvd., Wilmington; 994-6700 delawarepark.com Beers on Tap: 5-6 • Bottled Beers: 15 Three bars – Club 3, The Cove, and the Sports Bar – all featuring plenty of pro football action plus the Sports Lottery Crowd Favorites: Flame-broiled cheeseburgers, dollar hot dogs, cheese pizzas from Picciottis, wing zings, jalapeno crab fritters, crab fries, crab cakes, and lobster.

ERNEST & SCOTT TAPROOM 902 N. Market St., Wilmington; 384-8113 earnestandscott.com Number of TVs: 10 Beers on Tap: 22 • Bottled Beers: 31 Crowd Favorites: Blackened mahi tacos, loaded fries, and burgers.

FIRESTONE ROASTING HOUSE 110 W. St., Wilmington; 658-6626 firestoneriverfront.com Number of TVs: 24 Beers on Tap: 8+ • Bottled Beers: 30 Crowd Favorites: Firestone original pizza, spinach tomato ricotta pizza, and FireStone burger.

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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2016

A groupie of

winners Best Restaurant in N. Wilmington

Best Waterview Dining Best Seafood

CHARCOAL HOUSE & SALOON Best Burgers

www.HARRYSHOSPITALITYGROUP.cOm

#HHgroupie

74 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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GALLUCIO’S 1709 Lovering Ave., Wilmington; 655-3689 gallucios-de.com Number of TVs: 7 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 15 Crowd Favorites: Pomodoro pizza, california turkey reuben, sautéed seafood medley, stromboli, and homemade lasagna.

GRAIN CRAFT BAR + KITCHEN 270 E. Main St., Newark; 737-2931 grainonmain.com Number of TVs: 12 Beers on Tap: 24 • Bottled Beers: 60 Crowd Favorites: Fried pickles, street tacos, and cubano.

GROTTO PIZZA 16 locations in Delaware grottopizza.com

Hot Wings

&

Cold Beer

WING NIGHT Tues & Wed 7 PM – Close

Number of TVs: 15-25 Beers on Tap: 6-14 • Bottled Beers: 16-22 Crowd Favorites: Boneless wings, appetizer combo, and broccoli bites.

IRON HILL BREWERY & RESTAURANT – WILMINGTON 620 Justison St.; 472-2739 ironhillbrewery.com Number of TVs: 4 Beers on Tap: 14-17 • Bottled Beers: 7 Crowd Favorites: Cheesesteak eggrolls, crab cake sandwich, petite filet mignon, and scallops.

IRON HILL BREWERY & RESTAURANT – NEWARK 147 E. Main St.; 266-9000 ironhillbrewery.com Number of TVs: 4 Beers on Tap: 12-20 • Bottled Beers: 9 Crowd Favorites: Voodoo chicken pizza, crab cake sandwich, and house nachos.

KELLY’S LOGAN HOUSE 1701 Delaware Ave., Wilmington; 652-9493 loganhouse.com Number of TVs: 17 TVs including a big screen Beers on Tap: 20 • Bottled Beers: 90+ Crowd Favorites: Buffalo wings, chili nachos, and dirty bird grilled cheese.

10

$

2

$

10 Traditional or Boneless Wings

hot, mild, inferno, sweet red chili, honey bbq

Domestic Pints of Ice Cold Beer

Pennsylvania Ave | Newark Concord Pike | Middletown Bar only. Valid at Concord Pike, Pennsylvania Ave., Newark, Middletown, Dover, Seaford and Milford locations only. Certain restrictions may apply.

For a full location listing visit

GrottoPizza.com

AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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25/Mo.

$

*Plus Enrollment Fee

‘80s Era Video Games Classic Pinball • Skeeball 21 Beers on Tap • Area Craft Brews

WE

LIVE MUSIC!

[ KirkwoodFitness.com ] NORTH WILMINGTON 1800 Naamans Road, Wilmington, DE

(302) 529-1865

Celebrating Historic New Castle & Historic Delaware City

MUSIC FANS JOIN US THURSDAY, AUG 11TH

Featuring Live Performances From:

Saturday, Oct. 1 s t (11: 30am-5pm) RiverTownsFestival.com

Galaxy 13 – Cassettes Hoochi Coochi

2511 W. 4th Street, Wilmington 302-384-6479 • 1984wilmington.com

76 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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KID SHELLEEN’S 14th & Scott, Wilmington; 658-4600 kidshelleens.com

JOIN US FOR, LIVE MUSIC, STEAMED CRABS, & AWARD-WINNING WINGS!

Number of TVs: 7 Beers on Tap: 10 • Bottled Beers: 40+ Crowd Favorites: Shelleen’s nachos, buffalo wings, and chicken quesadilla.

A J’s

MCGLYNN’S PUB

Three locations: Polly Drummond, People’s Plaza, Dover mcglynnspub.com Number of TVs: 22 with NFL Package, all games all week Beers on Tap: 32 • Bottled Beers: 40+ Crowd Favorites: Wings, nachos, burgers, and prime rib.

RE STA U RA N T & TA VE RN AUGU A ST BAND CALENDAR TB

Pre-se

ason football

SPECIALS!

50¢ wings on sunday! • $1.50 Bud Light Drafts • 10 tvs!

Deck open year ‘round!

MEXICAN POST

Lunch Specials every day - Full line of Craft Beer on tap

3100 Naaman’s Rd., Wilmington; 478-3939 mexicanpost.com Number of TVs: 5 Beers on Tap: 5 • Bottled Beers: 24 Crowd Favorites: Fajitas, chimichangas, and nachos.

steak & seafood specials thursday—sunday 1 1 4 N . B R O A D WAY, P E N N S V I L L E , N J – ( 8 5 6 ) 678 - 2306

TWO STONES PUB Three locations: Newark (294-1890), Wilmington; (439-3231) & Kennett Square (610-444-3940) twostonespub.com Number of TVs: 6-10 Beers on Tap: 20-25 • Bottled Beers: 40-90 at each location Crowd Favorites: Fry piles, hog wings, and chicken wings.

STANLEY’S TAVERN 2038 Foulk Rd., Wilmington; 475-1887 stanleys-tavern.com Number of TVs: 40 Beers on Tap: 25 • Bottled Beers: 66 Crowd Favorites: Award-winning baby back ribs, wings, and tavern nachos. (Also features Sports Lottery)

Your dog’s life just got better! Daycare

Supervised Open Play Climate-Controlled Rooms

Boarding

Live Webcams Extended Open Play at Night

Spa

Professional Grooming Spa Packages Self-Serve Dog Wash Nail Trims & Baths

319 New Road Elsmere, DE 302-998-7877

STONE BALLOON ALE HOUSE 115 East Main Street, Newark; 266-8111 stoneballoon.com Number of TVs: 4 Beers on Tap: 16 • Bottled Beers: 50 Crowd Favorites: Beef & bacon lollipops, keg fries, and short rib pot roast.

www.dogtopia.com daycare • boarding • spa AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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w

The Deer Park Tavern

AUGUST

Entertainment Schedule EVERY THURSDAY & FRIDAY:

DJ Willoughby

SATURDAYS:

WEAT

H

GREAER IS Enjoy T!

Brunch!

t wo - s t

our or y dec

k!

6th-Cherry Crush 13th-Brixton Saint 20th-Radio Halo 27th-Marlboro Road

SUNDAY NIGHT: Chorduroy

Sun @ 9am / Sat @ 10am - Newark’s Largest Bloody Mary Bar & Breakfast Specials! TUESDAYS ½ Price Burgers ALL DAY! $4 Double LIT’s

MONDAYS ½ Price Appetizers (5pm-Close)

302.369.9414 | 108 West Main Street, Newark www.deerparktavern.com

WEDNESDAYS - MEXICAN NIGHT! ½ Price Nachos & Quesadillas ALL DAY! $3 Coronas & Margaritas • $1.50 Tacos

THURSDAYS ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Wings (5pm-Close) ½ Price Burgers (11:30am-3pm) • $2 Rail Drinks

Buy Your Tickets Now!

for The Odessa Brew Fest Sept. 10, 2016

Be our friend on Facebook!

www.odessabrewfest.com

ONLY 4 BANDS WILL MAKE IT TO THE OCT. 15 FINALS

12 12 OF OF THE THE AREA’S AREA’S BEST ORIGINAL BEST ORIGINAL BANDS BANDS COMPETE IN 4 SHOWS COMPETE IN 4 SHOWS

live @ the baby grand

JOIN US THIS MONTH FOR THESE SHOWS AND VOTE! Go to Musikarmageddon.com for updates & set times!

Thursday, August 11, 9pm-12am At 1984

Galaxy 13

Cassettes

Hoochi Coochi

Thursday, August 18, 9pm-12am At World Cafe Live (upstairs)

Arden Kind

Anatomy of an Outcast

Rusty Blue

Additional Partnerships with:

1984,Gable Music Ventures, Kelly’s Logan House, Oddity Bar, Rainbow Records, Spaceboy Clothing, TribeSound Studios, World Cafe Live at The Queen, WSTW’s Hometown Heroes

78 AUGUST 2016 | OUTANDABOUTNOW.COM

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chboxde

@thebrun

Annua

l

y Famil Found

i

fu

at

ng

tur

Cre

e

n atio

Kenny

Saturday, August 27 a su le s ta i n a b

Benefits

Ministry of Caring

deburgeRbattle.com

CaufFiel House, 1016 PhiladelphiA PikE, Wilmington, DE

Fill your place your Emmanuel vote Benefits thebelly, Ministry of Caring’s and raise money to alleviate hunger. Dining Room, which feeds over 180,000

RED GRILL

re

STEAKHOUSE

nutritious meals a year to Delaware’s hungry All

Ages

at no cost, and with no questions askeD.

MFG Wilm. DE | 2016 08_Inside.indd 18

Designed by

7/22/16 3:06 PM


Presented by

Historic Odessa Brewfest All Proceeds Benefit Historic Odessa

Saturday, September 10, 2016 202 Main Street I Odessa, DE On the grounds surrounding the Historic Houses of Odessa across the street from Cantwell’s Tavern

Beer from over 40 Breweries • Live music by Spokey Speaky, Rainbow Full of Sound, and more! Locally Sourced Food • Selections and Themed Stations • Boutique Wines • Cigar Rollers • And more...!

Tickets available online: www.odessabrewfest.com VIP Tickets: $70

l General Admission: $50 l Designated Driver Tickets Available at Gate: $15

Participating Breweries* 3rd Wave

Cisco

Flying Dog

Long Trail

Rogue

Sly Fox

Troegs

16 Mile

Dogfish Head

Flying Fish

Mispillion River New Belgium

Starr Hill

Twin Lakes

21st Amendment

Fordham & Dominion Heavy Seas

Sea Dog

DuClaw Elysian

Shiner

Stewarts

Uinta

Shipyard

Stone

Victory

Oskar Blues

Sierra Nevada

Stoudts

Weyerbacher

Otter Creek

Sixpoint

Tall Tales

Yards

Allagash

Eurobrew Imports

Belukus Imports

Evil Genius

Brooklyn

Evolution

No Li NorthCoast

Lagunitas Lancaster Brewing

*Subject to change

For more information: 302-378-4119 www.odessabrewfest.com www.historicodessa.org

www.cantwells-tavern.com

Event Sponsors:

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Thursday Specials!

Sunday

2 off All American Whiskey $ 3 Select Craft Bottles Ribs & Tots Specials

$

3 Seasonal Beers $ 5 FireStone Crushes Appetizer Specials $

Monday

Live music outside, Tuesday to Sunday, visit our web site for the full August schedule

3 20oz Domestic Drafts Slider Specials

$

Nacho Average Tuesday

live music

3 Corona & Corona Lights $ 5 House Margaritas $5 Nachos & Tacos

$

THURSDAYS

Wine Down Wednesday

outside, under the tent!

5 Select Wine by the Glass ½ Price Select Bottles of Wine ½ Price Pizzas $

Johnny Phatt Acoustic 6pm - 9pm

All American Thursday

3 Select Craft Bottled Beer 2 off all American Whiskey Rib & Tater Tot Specials

$ $

Friday

3 Miller Lite Bottles $ 5 Absolut Vodka Mixes $

Saturday

Radio Halo 9pm - 12am

3 Miller Lite Bottles $ 5 Captain Mixes

$

daily

SPECIALS

SERVED 4pM – CLOSE

Open 7 Days/Week Lunch Served Mon. – Fr. 11:30 Happy Hour Mon. – Sun. 4-7 Weekends Open Sat. & Sun. At 2

BANQUET ROOMS & PATIO LOUNGES

indoor and outdoor

BAR & PATIO

302.658.6626 :: FireStoneRiverfront.com :: 110 West St., Wilmington, DE 19801

08_Inside.indd 18

Celebrate Any Occasion Delicious Flexible Menus Group Reservations For All Sizes Contact Sarah: sarah@firestoneriverfront.com facebook.com/FireStoneWilmington

7/22/16 3:04 PM


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5/24/16 4:13 PM

Out & About Magazine August 2016