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November | December 2019 OurHealthRichmond.com

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th

ANNUAL

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS 426 DOCTORS AND PROVIDERS IN 77 SPECIALTIES 2019

2019

2019

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HEALTH TRENDS: WHAT WERE THEY THEN AND WHAT ARE THEY NOW?

DISCUSSING POLITICS AND RELIGION DURING HOLIDAY DINNERS: CAN IT ACTUALLY BE DONE DIPLOMATICALLY?

A GOOD BEDSIDE MANNER GOES MUCH DEEPER THAN A REASSURING SMILE


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2019

ANNUAL

Greater Richmond's

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER Awards

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FEATURES

NOVEMBER • DECEMBER 2019

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FIRST EXPRESSIONS: A GOOD BEDSIDE MANNER GOES MUCH DEEPER THAN A REASSURING SMILE Doctors and medical providers are forced to do more with less, including time – with every minute considered precious and invaluable by themselves and their patients. Altogether, it makes having a relationship built on trust, an understanding of mutual expectations and effective two-way communication more important than ever.

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GREATER RICHMOND'S 7TH ANNUAL BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS Join us in congratulating 426 of Greater Richmond's most esteemed doctors and providers in 77 specialties for being recognized in the 2019 Best Bedside Manner Awards.

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DEPARTMENTS NOVEMBER • DECEMBER 2019

10 The Pulse | People. Places. News to Know. 14 – Virginia Surgical Institute: A Partnership for Independent Care. Virginia Surgical Institute’s structure allows for autonomous medical decisions with the convenience of a healthcare organization.

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Health Scene | Happenings. Who’s Who. Trending.

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It’s inevitable that trends come and go. What’s popular today will be a memory tomorrow. And while it’s true that some practices do prove to have staying power, they still evolve with the changing times.

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Q&A on Health | Questions. Answers. Knowledge.

Healing Words | Listen. Learn. Communicate. Discussing Politics and Religion During Holiday Dinners: Can It Actually Be Done Diplomatically? Politics and religion have long believed to be two topics we should avoid sharing opinions on – especially at family gatherings. But an expert at James Madison University weighs in with a different perspective, suggesting doing so correctly may spark more conversations that can turn out to be more productive than divisive.

Over 2,000 participants of all ages joined together to help raise more than $178,000 for the Down Syndrome Association of Greater Richmond (DSAGR) during their 13th Annual Step UP for Down Syndrome 5K and Family Festival.

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Health Trends | What Were They Then, and What are They Now?

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Funny Bone | Spot the Seven Differences

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NOVEMBER • DECEMBER 2019

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The Pulse

INFORMATION • EVENTS • AWARENESS

New Partnerships, Ventures and Acquisitions

New Leadership Announcements

Bon Secours Mercy Health Announces Intent to Acquire Three Community Health Systems

New CEO Appointed for Henrico Doctors’ Hospitals

Bon Secours Mercy Health, one of the 20 largest health systems in the nation and the fifth-largest Catholic health system in the US, has signed an asset purchase agreement with affiliates of Community Health Systems, Inc. (CHS) to transition ownership of Southside Regional Medical Center (Petersburg), Southampton Memorial Hospital (Franklin) and Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center (Emporia) to Bon Secours Mercy Health.

HCA Virginia has named Ryan Jensen the new chief executive officer of Henrico, Parham and Retreat Doctors’ Hospitals.

When the transaction is complete – likely by the end of the year – the three hospitals will join the ministry’s strong tradition of providing quality, compassionate health care across the region, which will result in a strong service network of care for the communities in southeastern Virginia. “We are very pleased to have the opportunity to add three strong, dynamic hospitals to our southeast Virginia footprint,” says John Starcher, Bon Secours Mercy Health president and CEO. Bon Secours Mercy Health is focused on providing high-quality care to residents across Virginia and beyond. Clinical and operations leaders will work together to ensure that the patient is at the center of all care and services provided. The three facilities will join the Catholic tradition of Bon Secours Mercy Health, continuing to provide quality care to patients of all faiths and traditions. In the coming months, both parties will work together to finalize a definitive agreement, obtain applicable approvals and complete integration plans for the coming year. While there is no specific date outlined and no purchase price revealed, both Bon Secours Mercy Health and affiliates of CHS expect to complete this transaction by the end of 2019. More information: Visit www.bonsecours.com.

New Programs and Expansions VCU Health Launches Health and Wellness Podcast This fall, VCU Health launched Healthy with VCU Health – a podcast designed to provide patients, families, health care teams and community members the information they need to take control of their health. In Healthy with VCU Health episodes, VCU experts share practical tips and the latest in technology, innovation and evidence-based research so patients can make informed decisions when it comes to their health care. New episodes are released weekly and range in topics from planning the ideal childbirth, to an organ transplantation process, to sickle cell disease, to breast cancer care and more. More information: Listeners can enjoy available episodes on all major streaming platforms or in the VCU Health podcast library at www.VCUHealth.org/podcast.

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Jensen, who began his new role on November first comes to Henrico Doctors’ from Universal Health Services’ (UHS) Desert Springs Hospital in Las Vegas, where he served as chief executive officer. Prior to this, he was CEO at Memorial Hospital of Salem County in New Jersey from 2014 through 2017. “Ryan has established a reputation for focusing on strong culture, physician Ryan Jensen alignment, quality, and growth,” says Tim McManus, president of the HCA Capital Division. “I am confident that his leadership and exceptional commitment to patient care will benefit the community we serve.” Jensen received his Masters of Health Services Administration from The George Washington University and a Bachelor of Science from Brigham Young University. I am grateful for the opportunity to partner and work alongside the talented physicians, staff, and leaders at Henrico, Parham and Retreat Doctors’ Hospitals. These hospitals play such a significant role in delivering safe, high quality care to the communities they serve and I am excited to build upon the success they have achieved. Ryan Jensen, chief executive officer of HCA Virginia

A native of New Jersey, Jensen and his family are excited to be back on the east coast. He replaces Will Wagnon, who served as CEO from 2013 to 2019. More information: Visit www.henricodoctors.com.

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New Programs and Expansions Johnston-Willis Hospital Introduces New Initiative Designed to Reduce Administration of Opioids HCA Virginia’s Johnston-Willis Hospital has introduced a new initiative through its Emergency Department that focuses on alternatives to opioids (ALTO) as a first resort in treating pain. ALTO is a program of the National Academy of Medicine’s action collaborative on countering the U.S. opioid epidemic to reduce the misuse and abuse through alternative pain management strategies. The program is designed to help providers positively impact the opioid epidemic through administering non-opiate medications that have been proven to be equally as effective as opioids for pain management. Our goal is to effectively manage the pain of our emergency patients and to return them to a maximum quality of life, without the need to introduce opioids and the inherent risks that come with these highly addictive medications. We are committed to the health and safety of our patients and look forward to the positive impact this can have on our community. Ajit Singh, MD, chief medical officer of Johnston-Willis Hospital

According to National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Drug Abuse, there were 1,241 drug overdose deaths involving opioids in Virginia—a rate of 14.8 deaths per 100,000 persons, compared to the national rate of 14.6 deaths per 100,000 persons. Earlier this year, Chippenham and Johnston-Willis Hospitals also partnered with local law enforcement as part of the first ever enterprise-wide initiative called “Crush the Crisis,” which focuses on helping combat the misuse of opioids. A team of hospital representatives set up a collection site at Swift Creek Emergency Center, where community members were able to turn in unused and expired opioids for safe disposal. National prescription drug take back days are typically offered twice a year, in April and October. April 25, 2020 is the next National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, however, many national level and local pharmacies offer drop-off boxes for the safe disposal of leftover prescription medications. “We believe this is an important step in reversing the opioid epidemic in Central Virginia,” says Dr. Singh. “This issue is impacting far too many members of our community and it is time that we begin to lead the change.” More information: Visit www.johnstonwillismed.com or for a listing of year-round drug disposal locations, visit takebackday.dea.gov.

CORRECTION In the “Living with Chronic Conditions” article of the September/October 2019 edition of OurHealth Richmond featuring Albert Williams, Mr. Williams’ age was incorrectly listed. His correct age is 58.

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The Pulse

• NEWS TO KNOW

New Leadership Announcements Bon Secours Names New Richmond Market President Bon Secours has named Faraaz Yousuf as the Richmond market president, effective December 1, 2019. Yousuf will report to Brian White, Bon Secours Mercy Health Atlantic Group president.

2019

“Faraaz is an integrative and dynamic leader with strong interpersonal skills that will drive business and community outcomes while ensuring the patient is at the center of every decision,” says White. “He has the benefit of building upon a firm foundation of excellence in Richmond and the market’s strong commitment to the health and well-being of our patients and the Richmond community.”

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Faraaz Yousuf

Yousuf joined Bon Secours Mercy Health in July as chief strategy officer of the Atlantic Group, responsible for all strategic planning across a fivestate geography, including Virginia, South Carolina, Florida, New York and Maryland. As market president, Yousuf will oversee all Richmond market operations, helping to advance a culture of innovation and excellence, while bringing best practices for efficiency and effective care delivery across the market.

Prior to joining the ministry, Yousuf spent more than 15 years in healthcare operations and leadership roles, most recently serving as president and senior vice president of LifeBridge Health, a Maryland-based health system. Prior to LifeBridge, he held chief operating officer roles with Sutter Health and Hospital Corporation of America. As he steps into this new role, Yousuf will work closely with the board, physician and market leadership to ensure a smooth transition. Yousuf holds a Master of Healthcare Administration and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University. More information: Visit www.bonsecours.com.

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Matthew Chung, MD

Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists Richmond | 804.282.2685 www.vacardio.com

Amanda Domagola, OD Virginia Eye Institute Richmond | 804.287.4200 www.vaeye.com

Steven G. Forte, DDS

Danny S. Garcha, DDS

Ankur Gupta, MD, MBA

W. Samuel Grizzard, III, DDS

John Onufer, MD

Trevor Posenau, MD

Mohammad Rajab, MD

Manuela Schuksz, MD

Endodontics Virginia Family Dentistry Glen Allen | 804.672.4900 www.vadentsit.com

Virginia Family Dentistry Ashland | 804.550.3324 www.vadentist.com

Virginia Eye Institute Richmond | 804.287.4200 www.vaeye.com

Virginia Family Dentistry Prince George | 804.526.4822 www.vadentist.com

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Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists Richmond | 804.288.4827 www.vacardio.com

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Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists Richmond | 804.288.4827 www.vacardio.com

Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists Richmond | 804.288.4827 www.vacardio.com

James River Cardiology Richmond | 804.520.1764 www.jamesrivercardiology.com


New Programs and Expansions Daily Planet Health Services Expands Oral Health Program The Virginia Health Care Foundation has awarded Daily Planet Health Services funding designated for expanding oral health services through the hiring of an additional dentist. Krystal Mattox, DDS has joined Daily Planet and begins seeing patients on November 11, 2019 at Southside Health Center, located at 180 Belt Boulevard, Richmond. Dr. Mattox is originally from St. Catherine, Jamaica having moved to Maryland as a teenager. She received her undergraduate degree from Salisbury University and her Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. She is heavily involved with the Christian Medical and Dental Associations (www.cmda.org) and currently lives in Richmond with her husband, Matthew. “We are excited to welcome Dr. Mattox to [the] Daily Planet Health Services dental team, and thrilled that we will increase our accessibility of comprehensive dentistry [care] to more central Virginians,� says Jernice Giles, DDS, Dental Director at Daily Planet Health Services. More information: Visit www.dailyplanetva.org or call 804.783.0678 (West Grace Health Center) or 804.292.3011 (Southside Health Center).

Anoop Shah, MD

Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists Richmond | 804.323.5011 www.vacardio.com

Steven Tucker, MD

Virginia Eye Institute Richmond | 804.287.4200 www.vaeye.com

Taylor B. Varner, DDS, MSD Orthodontics Virginia Family Dentistry Midlothian | 804.739.6494 www.vadentist.com

For More of The Pulse Visit:

www.ourhealthrichmond.com Do you have health-related news to share for The Pulse? Send to Stephen McClintic Jr. via email at steve@ourhealthvirginia.com.

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VIRGINIA SURGICAL INSTITUTE:

A Partnership for Independent Care

Virginia Surgical Institute’s Structure Allows for Autonomous Medical Decisions with the Convenience of a Healthcare Organization. words | KELSEY CASSELBURY

There’s no arguing that advances in technology and partnerships in care have played a dual role in progressing the field of medicine to provide better treatment and service for patients. However, there’s something to be said for physicians who remain independent from larger healthcare systems – but that’s an option that’s quickly becoming impossible for Virginians as private practices get bought out and folded into massive healthcare companies. There must be a middle ground—and luckily for those in Richmond and its surrounding areas, there is a middle ground in the form of Virginia Surgical Institute, a group of six surgeons with a wide range of specialties that work in partnership with the Virginia Cancer Institute but remain independent in providing care and making medical decisions for their patients. Amy Rose, MD A general surgeon with Virginia Surgical Institute who specializes in advanced minimally invasive surgery.

“There’s a benefit to a practice where you can have a good partnership and working relationship with the hospital, but you don’t have constraints as an employee,” says Amy Rose, MD, a general surgeon with Virginia Surgical Institute who specializes in advanced minimally invasive surgery. “A hospital is a corporation, and as a physician, it’s difficult to eliminate that reality. If you’re in a private practice, though, you can eliminate it.”

Michael Rose, MD

What a patient might not realize, however, is why that matters. Michael Rose, MD, a Virginia Surgical Institute surgeon who specializes in surgical oncology, explains that doctors often have to make decisions autonomously, based on what they think is the best care for the patient. That can be difficult when under the umbrella of a healthcare corporation.

A general surgeon with Virginia Surgical Institute who specializes in specializes in surgical oncology.

“One of the attractive things about this job is the ability to do what you believe is right and not be constrained,” he includes, adding that his patients don’t have to be concerned that he’s recommending a treatment just because it’s what a hospital would like him to do. That said, there’s a certain amount of convenience that a healthcare corporation can offer their patients, which is why the surgeons at VSI realized that partnership with a bigger organization such as VCI could be beneficial for everyone involved. Although the surgical group has its own staff and processes, they’re able to take advantage of VCI’s administration, including billing and higherlevel staff members. “We can offer patients integrated care,” Dr. Michael Rose comments. “We all share the same data, so it’s a much more streamlined, efficient model.” Because VSI’s partnership is with Virginia Cancer Institute, some might think that oncology, or cancer treatments, is the only type of medical care the surgeons provide—but that couldn’t be further from the truth. “We’re a full range of surgeons who do everything that falls under the broad umbrella of general surgery,” adding that the surgeons’ specialties include colon and rectal surgery, robotic general surgery, endocrine surgery, advanced gastrointestinal surgery, laparoscopic surgery, gallbladder surgery, hernia repair and da Vinci procedures. “With a broad, extensive cross-section of advanced training, the six of us can essentially do anything,” Dr. Michael Rose says. Both Dr. Michael Rose and Dr. Amy Rose bemoan the lack of private healthcare professionals in Richmond, particularly surgeons. However, it wasn’t necessarily simple – at the beginning, at least – to set the partnership with VCI that allowed the VSI surgeons to remain independent. “The stressful thing was figuring out who was coming to our practice and how we were going to structure it,” Dr. Amy Rose notes. “Once we got that out of the way, it was fairly easy. After all, VCI has opened up medical practices, she adds, so they know how to get it up and running, so we worked with them very closely to delineate what we need. “At the end of the day,” Dr. Michael Rose remarks, “It has the potential for better patient care.”

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VIRGINIA SURGICAL INSTITUTE 10710 Midlothian Turnpike, Suite 138 | Richmond | 804.348.2814 | www.vasurg.com 14 OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond


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Health Scene HAPPENINGS • WHO’S WHO • TRENDING contributor | NANCY NIETMAN photos courtesy of | JORDAN DICAPRIO AND JAMIE HAYES

13TH ANNUAL STEP UP FOR DOWN SYNDROME 5K AND FAMILY FESTIVAL RAISES OVER $178,000 On Saturday, October 5th, 1,682 walkers and runners, 1,509 donors, 103 sponsors and 217 volunteers joined together to help raise community awareness and more than $178,000 for the Down Syndrome Association of Greater Richmond (DSAGR) during their 13th Annual Step UP for Down Syndrome 5K and Family Festival held, at the Acca Shrine Center in Richmond. Over 2,000 participants of all ages enjoyed a 5K route through Bryan Park, live music by River City Party Band, food from Café 21, displays and activities from 32 exhibitors and sponsors and a variety of family-friendly entertainment. The DSAGR is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that benefits the lives of individuals with Down syndrome and their families through individual and family support, education, community awareness and advocacy. DSAGR was founded in 1983 and currently serves over 550 families in 52 counties throughout Central Virginia, Charlottesville, Williamsburg and the Central Shenandoah Valley. For more information about DSAGR’s programs and services, as well as volunteer opportunities, visit www.dsagr.org or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/DSAGRichmond.

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Questions. Answers. Knowledge.

Did you know? November is

STOMACH CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

For more information about how you can help spread awareness, visit www.cancer.org.

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What are three possible signs of stomach cancer that should not be overlooked? Stomach (gastric) cancer is uncommon in the U.S. and unfortunately most patients diagnosed in the U.S. have advanced disease that is all too often incurable. Weight loss, nausea, and persistent stomach pain are the most common symptoms and should not be ignored. There is often loss of appetite and the sensation of fullness despite not eating very much. As the disease progresses, there may be initially vague abdominal pain which slowly becomes more severe and constant. Sometimes there is discomfort with swallowing especially if the tumor partially obstructs the emptying of the esophagus into the stomach or the emptying of the stomach into the small intestine. M. Kelly Hagan, MD Virginia Cancer Institute Richmond | 804.559.2489 www.vacancer.com

What causes an infection that leads to the need for root canal treatment? Root canal treatment is a dental procedure that is performed with the goal of removing the inflamed or infected dental pulp tissue from within the tooth, in order to retain your natural tooth. Tooth decay, multiple dental procedures, faulty or leaking crowns, tooth trauma, and cracking teeth can cause bacterial, physical, and chemical irritation to the soft dental pulp. This can lead to inflammation, deterioration, and loss of function of the cells, and ultimately necrosis (dead tissue). When the tooth with an infected pulp is left untreated, bacteria will travel from within the tooth into the surrounding supporting tissues of the tooth resulting in a dental abscess (infection). Root canal treatment consists of cleaning, disinfecting, and sealing the space that was occupied by the pulp tissue. After the root canal treatment is completed, the top of the tooth needs to be sealed with a restoration (dental filling) to prevent bacteria from the mouth from contaminating the root canal filling. A crown is often required to protect the tooth from fracture and to replace the missing tooth structure. Harold Martinez, DDS Commonwealth Endodontics Richmond | 804.501.0501 www.commonwealthendo.com

What should my adult children know about my arrhythmia for their own health? There are several types of arrhythmias, or heart rhythm disorders. These affect the electrical system of the heart, resulting in irregular or rapid heartbeats. Many of them will cause symptoms such as palpitations, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, or fainting. Some can increase the risk for stroke, such as atrial fibrillation (AFib). Others can be life threatening, such as ventricular arrhythmias. Certain inherited conditions can increase the risk for arrhythmias. If you or your close family members have these conditions, your children may be at risk for them also. Screening for these conditions can be done with cardiac testing, including electrocardiograms (EKGs). Occasionally more invasive testing to identify the risk for arrhythmias may need to be done with Electrophysiology (EP) studies. Sometimes genetic testing may also be recommended. Evaluation and management of these conditions is often performed by a cardiac electrophysiologist, a specialist in heart rhythm disorders. Guru Mohanty, MD Cardiac Electrophysiologist Virginia Arrhythmia Consultants Richmond and Colonial Heights 804.410.9749 www.vaheartbeat.com


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Questions. Answers. Knowledge. What is cumulative trauma disorder?

Cumulative Trauma Disorder, also known as CTD, is an umbrella term for various

EXCESSIVE

WEAR AND TEAR INJURIES ON MUSCLES, TENDONS, AND/OR NERVE TISSUES caused by repetitive tasks, forceful exertion, vibrations, mechanical compression, or awkward positions.

Cumulative trauma disorder, also known as CTD, is an umbrella term for various excessive wear and tear injuries on muscles, tendons, and/ or nerve tissues caused by repetitive tasks, forceful exertion, vibrations, mechanical compression, or awkward positions. Work and non-work activities may together contribute to CTDs. Depending on the condition, symptoms may involve specific body parts including the back, shoulders, elbows, knees, hips, wrists, or fingers. Common symptoms of CTDs include, but are not limited to, pain, swelling, numbness or tingling, stiffness and decreased joint motion, headache, redness, and feelings of weakness. Prevention of CTDs and early diagnosis and intervention when they occur, have been identified as the best management strategies to decrease incidence, severity, and improve prognosis. Prevention for the development of risk factors should be aimed at education, ergonomic interventions, job redesign to reduce repetitive movements, excessive muscle tension, and a prescription of preventative daily exercises and stretching regimen. If diagnosed with CTD, action needs to be taken to halt the progression of the disease to prevent further complications, limit impairment, and improve patients’ well-being. Jessica Hupe, MD

VCU Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Henrico | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

What are some health benefits of floatation therapy?

What are three foods that people think are healthy, but really are not?

Float therapy, also known as floatation, floating, or sensory deprivation, involves a fiberglass tank with 10 inches of water containing 1000 pounds of Epsom salt. By effortlessly floating face up in skin temperature water (94 degrees) containing magnesium, which provides an antiinflammatory and pain-relieving effect, you are able to reach a state of deep relaxation.

There are often foods that are not as healthy as they look. It’s easy to become confused about which foods are healthy and which are not. Three that are most commonly mistaken are:

Floating in darkness and silence adds additional benefit to the anti-gravity state and neutral skin temperature. It shifts the nervous system into deep relaxation similar to the first stage of sleep or deep meditation. Floating provides a gateway to meditation and mindfulness as it changes how we perceive and react to stress, including reduced production of cortisol, while increasing serotonin, dopamine and oxytocin. Floatation is a side effect free way to improve sleep and decrease anxiety, a valuable adjunct to any wellness lifestyle. Affecting both mind and body, float therapy improves mood, immunity and healing while sparking creativity, focus, energy and clarity of thought. David Berv, DC

The Float Zone Richmond | 804.551.1413 www.myfloatzone.com

• Crackers and chips: Crackers (I like to call them dehydrated mini bread slices) are still processed carbohydrates and a handful typically has no fewer carbohydrates than a slice of freshly baked bread. • Low fat or fat-free yogurt: Yogurt is very nutritious in its natural state, plain and full fat. It is loaded with probiotics, protein and satisfying fat. When you take away the fat, sugar is added, and lots of it! • Plant-based foods typically made to replicate meat are not made with the plants you think of as a serving of veggies. These products are highly processed and loaded with additives and preservatives. Instead, look for homemade black bean burgers or unprocessed veggies. Sticking to whole, unprocessed fruits and vegetables as a healthy snack option is always a safe bet. Krista Hicks, Nutrition Coach

Zacharias Ganey Health Institute, LLC North Chesterfield | 804.358.1000 www.ZGHealth.com


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Expressions A GOOD BEDSIDE MANNER GOES MUCH DEEPER THAN A REASSURING SMILE words | DYLAN ROCHE

Not even medicine is exempt from being impacted by the fast pace of the world we now live in. Schedules are tight. Support services come at a premium. Regulations are complicated. And paperwork has become seemingly unlimited. Today, doctors and medical providers are expected to do more, which unfortunately can leave less time available to spend with each patient. Attempting to build a relationship with those receiving care based on trust, compassion, empathy and effective twoway communication – characteristics that largely define a doctor’s or medical provider’s good bedside manner – helps make patients more receptive to guidance, more honest about their lifestyle, more apt to embrace new technology and more likely to keep their appointments. But not everything a doctor or medical provider says is going to be warm and fuzzy, and sometimes patients will receive information the wrong way.

KEITH A. MCCURDY, EDS, LPC, LMFT, a mental health professional in western Virginia who has 30 years of experience specializing in relationship counseling, says a good bedside manner is based on a model of empathy, truthfulness and kindness. Those three qualities will help ensure smooth communication between the caregiver and patient. “It’s about being able to acknowledge the patient’s emotions,” he says. “A good bedside manner is about seeing the value in everyone.”

“A good bedside manner is about seeing the value in everyone.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

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Breakdowns in Communication One of the major problems in communication is that many people suffer from what is known as a negative confirmation bias, according to McCurdy. “We much more easily hear what confirms our frustrations than what confirms our blessings,” he says. This isn’t merely in the case of doctor/provider-patient relationships — it’s in all relationships. As an example, McCurdy tells how he will often help couples on marriage retreats by giving them 30 seconds to write down everything that frustrates them about their spouse, followed by 30 seconds to write down everything they appreciate about the other. When it comes to their frustrations, each spouse scribbles away for the full 30 seconds, filling up entire sheets of paper; as soon as it’s time to write down their appreciations, both of them will have to stop and think for a moment. Then there’s the problem of people having distorted emotions. For example: a person’s fear felt during a bad dream or scary movie is every bit as real as the fear felt during a real-life threatening situation. “Our feelings can’t tell the difference between fantasy and reality,” McCurdy says. When it comes to doctor/provider-patient relationships, the combination of negative confirmation bias and distorted emotions can force a bad perception on the situation. Caregivers must be aware of this if they’re going to get through to people who are struggling to accept a difficult diagnosis or change poor habits. “If we’re going to operate from a platform of instilling hope and offering assistance, we’ve got to correct those things in ourselves,” McCurdy says.

Projecting a Good Bedside Manner So if patients can come to the exam room with a distorted perception, how can a doctor overcome that and still connect with them? The way to do this is by recognizing the patient’s humanity and inherent value, McCurdy explains. This is what makes a doctor successful. Even if a doctor has a strong understanding of medicine, that will accomplish only so much if the doctor doesn’t have good people skills. Instead, a doctor needs to connect with the human being behind the disease.

“When a patient feels valuable where they are, they are able to open up to accepting assistance and taking direction.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

A doctor or medical provider with good bedside manner is one who greets a patient warmly, makes eye contact when speaking, and uses language the patient will understand rather than medical jargon. A doctor or medical provider also must practice body language that is honest and express emotions that will put the patient at ease. But most importantly, caregivers with good bedside manner must be aware of a patient’s emotions and know how to react to them properly. CONTINUED ON PAGE 27


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Best Bedside Manner Awards 2019 GREATER RICHMOND

ANNUAL

OURHEALTH MAGAZINE

Acupuncture

for Richmond

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER

2019

The OurHealth Magazine for Richmond’s Best Bedside Manner Awards are widely considered by doctors and providers as the most meaningful and cherished recognition they receive because it comes from patients and peers in our community. Throughout the month of June this year, the public was invited to visit www.ourhealthrichmond.com to cast their votes for their favorite medical providers in 77 medical specialties who they feel exemplify excellence in bedside manner – a medical provider’s total approach to patient care that encompasses the attributes of professionalism blended with compassion and attentiveness and the ability to communicate with concern and empathy.

If you have any questions, please submit via email to info@ourhealthvirginia.com.

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Martin Buxton, MD Family Counseling Center for Recovery Richmond | 804.354.1996 www.pinnacletreatment.com

FIRST PL ACE Yan Fan, LAc Richmond Acupuncture Care Richmond | 804.937.6738 www.richmondacupuncturecare.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Peter Breslin, MD Peter Breslin, MD Psychiatrist Richmond | 804.495.8661 www.peterbreslinmd.com

SE CON D PLACE Xiaoyan Wang, LAc Chinese Acupuncture and Herbs Henrico | 804.301.1784 www.acupuncturistwang.com

Allergy and Immunology

T H IRD PLACE R. Keith Bell, DACM, LAc Oriental Medicine Specialists, PC Richmond | 804.358.7071 www.orientalmedicinespecialists.com

2019

H ON ORA BLE MENTI ON Ruiping Chi, LAc Acupuncture and Health Center Richmond | 804.308.3561 www.acupuncturevirginia.com Huiwen Liu, MD Wen Acupuncture Healing Center Glen Allen | 804.829.0296 www.wenacupunctureva.com

Addiction Medicine and Psychiatry

For 2019, more than 33,000 votes were cast, which were tabulated by a third party firm to determine the first, second, third and honorable mention winners in each specialty. Please join us in congratulating the 426 doctors and providers in Richmond who are the 2019 Best Bedside Manner Award winners.

James Thompson, MD The Virginia Center for Addiction Medicine Richmond | 804.332.5950 www.addictionva.com

THI RD PLACE

2019

AWARDS

SECOND PLACE

2019

FIRST PL ACE Peter Coleman, MD The Coleman Institute for Addiction Medicine Richmond | 877.773.3869 www.thecolemaninstitute.com

FI RST PL ACE Lawrence Gelber, MD Richmond Allergy and Asthma Specialists Henrico | 804.285.7420 www.richmondallergy.com

SECOND PLACE Michael Blumberg, MD Allergy Partners of Richmond Richmond | 804.288.0055 www.allergypartners.com/Richmond

THI RD PLACE Jeffery Schul, MD Allergy Partners of Richmond Richmond | 804.288.0055 www.allergypartners.com/Richmond

HONORABL E MENTI ON Anne-Marie Irani, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.9621 www.chrichmond.org *Dr. Irani has recently retired.


Patrick Powers, MD Allergy Partners of Richmond Richmond | 804.288.0055 www.allergypartners.com/Richmond Joseph Vilseck, PhD, MD Virginia Allergy and Asthma Center Henrico | 804.527.1190 www.vaaac.com

Anesthesiology 2019

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24

Good Bedside Manner Doesn’t Mean Coddling F IR S T P L A CE Mark Nelson, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

S E C O N D P L A CE Alice Coombs, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

T HI R D P L A CE Ann Marie Harman, MD Commonwealth Anesthesia Associates Richmond | 804.897.1518 www.caa-med.com

HONO R A B L E ME N TI ON Sabrina Dhillon, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org Michael Estes, MD American Anesthesiology of Virginia Bon Secours St. Mary’s Hospital Richmond | 804.288.6258 www.bonsecours.com

Congratulations WINNERS OF THE

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS

Many patients will come into the exam room with a range of negative emotions. They might be upset about their diagnosis — fearful of what’s to come or frustrated by the thought that they have to change their lifestyle.

“Nobody goes to a doctor or medical provider without being in need. When they’re coming in, they’re already stimulated with emotion.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

McCurdy explains that doctors and medical providers should acknowledge their patient’s emotion — even in situations where the emotion seems overblown — so they can then lay the groundwork for moving onto a solution. “Don’t fight the emotion of where they are,” McCurdy says. “When we can acknowledge the way they feel, it’s like letting air out of an overinflated tire.” In other situations, patients might be disappointed that there isn’t a miracle cure they were hoping for, such as pills and other pharmaceuticals that are perceived to be the sole solution. Doctors and medical providers should be prepared for this. “How many people feel they failed if they don’t leave the doctor with a prescription for an antibiotic?” McCurdy poses rhetorically. He says this is especially true in the field of pediatrics, when parents can get frustrated that not enough is being done to help their sick child. “That’s the mindset we have today, that everything should be solved, everything should have a quick fix, rather than accepting that sometimes, life is messy,” McCurdy continues. “We need to learn to be OK and have hope in the midst of life being messy. That’s a tough thing.” In these situations, McCurdy says it’s important that doctors and providers empower their patients to overcome hardships related to their health. The challenge, however, is that contemporary society doesn’t view struggle as a normal part of life the way people viewed struggle, say, 50 years ago. “We’ve changed our perception so that when we’re facing normal rigors of life, we view those as really negative,” he says. “When we suffer something traumatic, we feel completely helpless and hopeless.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 31 www.OurHealthRichmond.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

SECON D PLACE

Audiology 2019

Matthew Brengman, MD, FACS Advanced Surgical Partners of Virginia – HCA Virginia Richmond | 804.360.0600 www.advancedsurgicalpartnersofva.com

T H IRD PLACE Gretchen Aquilina, DO VCU Health Richmond | 804.827.0045 www.vcuhealth.org

F IR S T P L A CE Crystal Amantea, AuD, F-AAA, CCC-A Virginia Hearing Center Richmond | 804.288.1314 www.shaiamd.com

S E C OND P L A CE Jessica Poe, AuD Virginia Ear Nose and Throat Midlothian | 804.484.3700 www.virginiaent.com

H ON ORA BL E MENTI ON Brennan Carmody, MD, FACS Bon Secours Surgical Specialists at St. Mary’s Hospital Richmond | 804.893.8676 www.bonsecours.com Tejwant Singh Datta, MD Southside Physicians Network – Southside Surgical Specialists Petersburg | 804.520.6730 www.southsidephysicians.com

Islam Al-Howaidi, MD Dominion Cardiology PC Petersburg | 804.520.1080 www.dominioncardiology.com Mitesh Amin, MD James River Cardiology Colonial Heights | 804.520.1764 www.jamesrivercardiology.com Ashwani Kumar, MD, FACC Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists Richmond | 804.288.4827 www.vacardio.com Robert Levitt, MD Henrico Cardiology Associates HCA Virginia Richmond | 804.346.2070 www.henricocardiology.com

Chiropractic

T HI R D P L A CE

2019

Leah Ball, AuD Richmond Hearing Doctors Richmond | 804.282.0022 www.richmondhearingdoctors.com

Cardiology

HONORA B L E M E N TI O N

2019

Cooper Evans, AuD Evolution Hearing Richmond | 804.215.0001 www.evolutionhearing.com

Michael Mulvaney, DC Spinal Correction Center Richmond | 804.740.9300 www.lovethatspine.com

Holly Law, MED Richmond ENT Richmond | 804.622.3782 www.richmondent.com

FIRST P LACE

Bariatric Medicine

Mark Xenakis, MD Cardiology of Virginia Midlothian | 804.560.8782 www.cardiovirginia.com

SECON D PLACE 2019

Peter Ro, MD, FACC Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists Richmond | 804.288.4827 www.vacardio.com

T H IRD PLACE F IR S T P L A CE Jeffrey Sicat, MD Virginia Weight and Wellness Glen Allen | 804.726.1500 www.virginiaweightloss.com

Mark Johns, MD Cardiology of Virginia Midlothian | 804.560.8782 www.cardiovirginia.com

H ON ORA BL E MENTI ON Kwabena Agyeman, MD Community Cardiology Petersburg | 804.203.0620 www.communitycardiologyllc.com

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FI RST PLACE

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

SECOND PL ACE Rob Berube, DC Ariya Family Chiropractic Centers Richmond | 804.288.1005 www.ariyafamilychiropractic.com

THI RD PL ACE Heath Bills, DC, CCEP Advanced Wellness Centre Richmond | 804.673.9355 www.advancedwellnessrva.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON Anna Bender, DC Atlee Chiropractic Center Mechanicsville | 804.730.7010 www.atleechiropractic.com Kelly Donelley, DC Wellness First Midlothian | 804.897.3478 www.wellnessfirstcenter.com


www.OurHealthRichmond.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

C HIR OP R A CTI C H O N O RA B LE M E NT I O N CO N TI N U E D...

Dentistry: Cosmetic

Janine Scherm, DC Scherm Family Chiropractic PC Richmond | 804.887.0772 www.schermfamilychiropractic.com

Dentistry: Dental Hygienist

2019 2019

Scott VanWagner, DC Tri-Ad Chiropractic Glen Allen | 804.270.3000 www.tri-adchiropractic.com

FIRST PLACE

Concierge Medicine 2019

Karen McAndrew, DMD Virginia Center for Prosthodontics Richmond | 804.741.8689 www.vapros.net

Jonathan Schaaf, MD Executive Health Group Richmond | 804.483.2617 www.executive.md

Colleen Nash, DDS Virginia Family Dentistry Ashland | 804.550.3324 www.vadentist.com

T H IRD PL ACE S E C ON D P L A CE Brian Neely, MD Whole Health Physicians Midlothian | 804.601.4901 www.wholehealthphysicians.com

T HIR D P L A CE Virginia Kladder, MD PartnerMD Richmond | 804.843.6823 www.partnermd.com

HONOR A B L E ME N TI O N Neal Carl, MD Wellcome MD Richmond | 804.774.7099 www.wellcomemd.com Kevin Achille Keller, MD PartnerMD Midlothian | 804.668.9751 www.partnermd.com Barry Wein, MD PartnerMD Richmond | 804.843.6823 www.partnermd.com

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Debbie Plageman, RDH Virginia Center for Prosthodontics Richmond | 804.741.8689 www.vapros.net

SECON D PL ACE ( TI E) Ashley Epperly, DDS Grove Avenue Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Richmond | 804.285.1378 www.grovesmiles.com

F I R S T P L A CE

FI RST PL ACE

Marci Guthrie, DDS, FAGD James River Family Dentistry Richmond | 804.323.4200 www.jrfamilydentistry.com

H ON ORA BLE MENTI ON Graham Forbes, DDS Capital Dental Design Richmond | 804.320.8894 www.capitaldentaldesign.com Ursula Klostermyer, PhD, DDS Advanced Dentistry of Richmond Richmond | 804.767.1002 www.advanceddentistryofrichmond.com

SECOND PLACE Tasha Stephens, RDH Virginia Family Dentistry Ashland | 804.550.3324 www.vadentist.com

THI RD PLACE Susan Reid-Carr, RDH Alsamir Family Dentistry Midlothian | 804.739.5791 www.alsamirfamilydentistry.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Ashley Bosher, RDH Virginia Family Dentistry Ashland | 804.550.3324 www.vadentist.com

Dentistry: Endodontics 2019

Neil Snow, DDS Drs. Brown, Reynolds, Snow, Lenoir Richmond Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Richmond | 804.288.5324 www.brsdentistry.com

FI RST PL ACE

Congratulations WINNERS OF THE

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

Timothy Finkler, DDS Commonwealth Endodontics Richmond | 804.501.0501 www.commonwealthendo.com


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27

Patients can be difficult because most people don’t have a healthy outlook on hardship — or they act that way, at least. When McCurdy speaks at conferences, he recalls to the crowd a bit of advice his grandmother used to give: “It’s not a big deal unless your head’s on fire and you’re bleeding out of your ear.” In that context, McCurdy will ask his audience how many of them have suffered a big deal that day, or that week, or even that month. It’s usually not until they reflect on the past year that most people concede they’ve been up against something that could be classified as a big deal. But then McCurdy asks his audience how many of them have acted as if they’ve faced a big deal already that day. Most people will raise their hand and acknowledge they have.

“The point made is you’re operating on a distorted perception and that’s affecting your ability to see the world accurately, to have hope in the middle of these things because you’re convincing yourself this is worse than it really is.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

“When we can separate that, then when someone really is in trauma, we can more effectively deal with it.”

Expressing Emotion Part of a doctor’s or medical provider’s communication is nonverbal, often in the form of facial expressions. As noted by pioneering psychologist Paul Ekman in the 1960s, certain facial expressions are universally recognized across cultures even if people aren’t speaking the same language. The expressions Ekman noted as such include: HAPPINESS, DISGUST,

ANGER, SADNESS, SURPRISE AND FEAR. CONTINUED ON PAGE 35

www.OurHealthRichmond.com

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2019

2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards 2019 GREATER RICHMOND

D E NT IS TRY: E N D O D O N T ICS S E C ON D P L A CE Harold Martinez, DDS Commonwealth Endodontics Richmond | 804.501.0501 www.commonwealthendo.com

T HIR D P L A CE Jesse Harris, DDS East Coast Endodontics Mechanicsville | 804.559.3636 www.eastcoastendova.com

HONOR A B L E M E N TI O N Trisha Krause, DMD Endodontic Partners Richmond | 804.285.0400 www.endopartners.com Madelyn Morris, DDS Commonwealth Endodontics Richmond | 804.501.0501 www.commonwealthendo.com Bruce Overton, DDS Dominion Endodontics Midlothian | 804.744.3636 www.dominionendo.com Stephen Schroeder, DDS Commonwealth Endodontics Richmond | 804.501.0501 www.commonwealthendo.com Ronald Vranas, DDS Commonwealth Endodontics Richmond | 804.501.0501 www.commonwealthendo.com

SE CON D PL ACE

HONORABLE MENTI ON

Misha Ghazarian, DDS Virginia Family Dentistry Midlothian | 804.794.9789 www.vadentist.com

Thomas Eschenroeder, DDS Commonwealth Oral and Facial Surgery Richmond | 804.354.1600 www.commonwealthofs.com

T H IRD PLACE Ailin Shan, MD Glenside Dental Richmond | 804.365.5689 www.glensidedental.com

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON Robert Cox, DDS Duff and Cox Richmond | 804.355.3100 www.duffandcox.com

Monroe Harris, Jr, DMD Virginia Oral and Facial Surgery Richmond | 804.359.4474 www.oralfacialsurgery.com Ammar Sarraf, DDS Commonwealth Oral and Facial Surgery Richmond | 804.354.1600 www.commonwealthofs.com

Dentistry: Orthodontics

Alex Hawkins, DDS Hawkins Family Dentistry Midlothian | 804.897.9800 www.hawkinsdentist.com Melanie Resendes, DDS Melanie Resendes DDS PLLC Richmond | 804.275.1622 www.drresendes.com

Dentistry: Oral Surgery

2019

FI RST PLACE Graham Gardner, DDS Gardner Orthodontics Richmond | 804.282.0505 www.gardnerorthodontics.com

2019

SECOND PL ACE

Dentistry: General FIRST PL ACE D. Omar Watson, DDS, MD, FACS Virginia Oral and Facial Surgery Midlothian | 804.608.3200 www.oralfacialsurgery.com

F I R S T P L A CE ( TI E ) Benjamin Crowley, DDS Brightwork Family Dentistry Richmond | 804.223.5264 www.brightworkfamilydentistry.com Elizabeth Reynolds, DDS Drs. Brown, Reynolds, Snow, Lenoir Richmond Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Richmond | 804.288.5324 www.brsdentistry.com

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Paul White, DDS White Orthodontics Glen Allen | 804.747.7447 www.smilerichmond.com

THI RD PL ACE Wakeshi Benson, DDS WB Orthodontics Chester | 804.454.1888 www.wb-orthodontics.com

SECON D PLACE

HONORABLE MENTI ON

Gregory Zoghby, DDS Commonwealth Oral and Facial Surgery Richmond | 804.354.1600 www.commonwealthofs.com

Mike Holbert, DDS, MDSc Holbert Family Orthodontics Richmond | 804.270.7824 www.holbertbraces.com

T H IRD PLACE Ross Wlodawsky, DDS Virginia Oral and Facial Surgery Midlothian | 804.794.0794 www.oralfacialsurgery.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

Gus Horsey, DDS Horsey Orthodontics Richmond | 804.672.3030 www.horseyorthodontics.com


www.OurHealthRichmond.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

D E NT IS TRY: O R TH O DON T ICS HONOR A B L E M E N TI O N C ONT I N U E D. . . Larry Scarborough, DDS James River Orthodontics Henrico | 804.672.8607 www.jamesriverorthodontics.com Richard Villa, DMD Villa Orthodontics Glen Allen | 804.404.9126 www.villaorthodontics.com

T H IRD PL ACE Brian Burke, DMD Just 4 Kids Pediatric Dentistry and Sedation Richmond | 804.562.2667 www.just4kidsdentistryva.com

2019

H ON ORA BLE MENTI ON Jeff Laughlin, DDS, MPH Virginia Family Dentistry Ashland | 804.550.3324 www.vadentist.com

Dentistry: Pediatric 2019

Chris Maestrello, DDS Atkins, Maestrello, Miller and Associates Pediatric Dentistry, PC Richmond | 804.741.2226 www.pediatricdentistrichmond.com Lindsey North, DDS Dr. Richard Byrd and Associates Richmond | 804.330.0508 www.drbyrddds.com Ethan Puryear, DDS Virginia Family Dentistry North Chesterfield | 804.743.8166 www.vadentist.com

F I R S T P L A CE

S E C ON D P L A CE Joy Phelps, DMD, MS Commonwealth Pediatric Dental Specialists Sandston | 804.322.3669 www.commonwealthkidsdentist.com

FI RST PL ACE Chris Richardson, DMD, MS Richardson, Overstreet and Glazier Richmond | 804.355.6593 www.richmondperioonline.com

SECOND PLACE Carl Block, DDS, FASO Virginia Family Dentistry Midlothian | 804.379.1011 www.vadentist.com

THI RD PLACE

Holly Lewis, DMD, MS Sparkle Pediatric Dentistry Henrico | 804.746.7382 www.sparklepediatricdentistry.com

Join Us in Congratulating the WINNERS OF THE

2019 BEST

BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS

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Dentistry: Periodontics

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

Claire Kaugars, DDS Drs. Kaugars and Miller, PC Richmond | 804.285.4867 www.richmondperio.net

HONORABL E MENTI ON Thomas Glazier, DDS Richardson, Overstreet and Glazier Richmond | 804.355.6593 www.richmondperioonline.com Ben Overstreet, DDS Richardson, Overstreet and Glazier Richmond | 804.355.6593 www.richmondperioonline.com Stephanie Voth, DDS, MSD Virginia Family Dentistry Henrico | 804.364.7010 www.vadentist.com


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

Professor Robert Plutchik of the University of South Florida would later conduct follow-up research and add JOY and TRUST to Ekman’s list. Doctors/medical providers and patients can bring any of these expressions on their face when they enter the exam room, and in many cases, the emotion might not have anything to do with the appointment, diagnosis or recommended treatment. A patient might be sad because he broke a sentimental family heirloom before heading to the doctor’s office. The doctor or medical provider might be angry because he got a speeding ticket on his or her way to work. In either of these scenarios, each person’s expression might affect the communication between them and the overall experience of the visit.

Ang er

• E ye • B brows p u • D lging ey ulled do il e wn • P at e d n o s s u rs e d lip trils s

Consider a doctor’s or medical provider’s anger. ANGER is an emotion that can range from mild irritation to extreme rage. Anger is expressed via lowered eyebrows, pursed lips, bulging eyes and dilated nostrils. Inside the body, heart rate and blood pressure increase, and levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline rise abnormally. Anger can often be met with a defensive reaction. Similarly, the patient’s SADNESS, an emotion associated with loss or helplessness, can range from mild disappointment to extreme despair. It’s expressed by lowering the corners of the mouth, raising the inner part of the eyebrow and pouting the lips.

If the doctor or patient are aware of how they are feeling, they can better understand how the other might respond to their emotion, and they can strive to change their expression so they are not bringing problems like broken heirlooms or speeding tickets into the exam room. CONTINUED ON PAGE 39

Disgust

Sadn ess

down pulled brows • Eye d le e wrink p • Nos ulled u er lip p p p U • e s loo • Lips

• In ner rais corners of e • L ed yeb owe row s mou ring cor n e rs th w ith p of th outin e g of lips

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2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Dermatology

Dietetics and Wellness

2019 2019

S E C ON D P L A CE Lydia Johnson, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.9361 www.vcuhealth.org

FIRST PL ACE Mary-Jo Sawyer, RD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

SE CON D PLACE Ashley Mannel, RD, NP, IFMCP Nourish Health and Wellness Richmond | 804.513.9507 www.nourishhealthandwellness.com

T HIR D P L A CE Suzanne Spadafora, MD Dermatology Associates of Virginia, PC Richmond | 804.285.2006 www.dermva.com

HONOR A B L E ME N TI O N Kenneth Blaylock, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.9361 www.vcuhealth.org Christopher Gorman, MD Hunter Holms McGuire VA Medical Center Richmond | 804.675.5000 www.richmond.va.gov Victoria Gross, MD Richmond Dermatology and Laser Specialists Richmond | 804.282.8510 www.richmonddermlaser.com Camille Haisley-Royster, MD Commonwealth Dermatology Richmond | 804.282.0831 www.comderm.com

T H IRD PLACE Tina Shiver, RD, IFMCP Tina Shiver, RD, IFMCP Richmond | 804.254.1002 www.tinashiver.com

H ON ORA BLE MENTI ON Denise Cochran, RD Family Practice Specialists of Richmond, PC Midlothian | 804.330.3335 www.fpsrichmond.com Quinci Peri, RDN Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.chrichmond.org

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARD WINNERS 36

Peter Rigby, MD Virginia Ear Nose and Throat Henrico | 804.484.3700 www.virginiaent.com

George Tarasidis, MD, FACS Virginia Ear Nose and Throat Henrico | 804.484.3700 www.virginiaent.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON John Ditto, Jr., MD Southside Physicians Network Colonial Heights | 804.765.5320 www.southsidephysicians.com Ryan Nord, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org David Salley, MD Virginia Ear Nose and Throat Henrico | 804.484.3700 www.virginiaent.com James Tyson, MD Virginia Ear Nose and Throat Henrico | 804.484.3700 www.virginiaent.com

Emergency Medicine 2019

Ear, Nose and Throat (Otolaryngology) FI RST PLACE 2019

Pamela Royal, MD Royal Dermatology Richmond | 804.673.1119 www.royaldermatology.com

Congratulations

Michael Armstrong, Jr., MD Richmond ENT Richmond | 804.622.3782 www.richmondent.com

THI RD PL ACE

F I R S T P L A CE Melissa King, MD, JD Richmond Dermatology and Laser Specialists Richmond | 804.282.8510 www.richmonddermlaser.com

SECOND PL ACE ( TI E)

FIRST PL ACE Wayne Shaia, MD The Balance and Ear Center Richmond | 804.288.3277 www.shaiamd.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

Michael Vitto, DO VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

SECOND PL ACE Joel Morrissey, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org


www.OurHealthRichmond.com

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2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

E M E R G E N CY M E D I CI NE T HIR D P L A CE Kevin Noreika, DO Emergency Coverage Corp (TeamHealth) HCA Virginia Johnston-Willis Hospital Swift Creek Emergency Center Richmond | 804.483.5000 www.johnstonwillismed.com

HONOR A B L E ME N TI O N Eric English, MD Emergency Coverage Corp (TeamHealth) Richmond | 804.330.2000 www.chippenhammed.com Venkata Ramana Feeser, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism 2019

SE CON D PL ACE

SECOND PL ACE ( TI E)

Gregory Cook, MD Bon Secours – Richmond Diabetes and Endocrinology Mechanicsville | 804.764.7686 Richmond | 804.287.7570 www.bonsecours.com

Daniel McCarter, MD JenCare Senior Medical Center Richmond | 804.344.9848 www.jencaremed.com

T H IRD P L ACE Allen Burris, MD, FACP Virginia Diabetes and Endocrinology, PC Richmond | 804.272.2702 www.vadiabetes.com

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON Robert Castellucci, MD Richmond | 804.282.9899

Edmond III Wickham, MD, FAAP Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

Family Practice

FIRST PL ACE Eric Haacke-Golden, MD Commonwealth Primary Care, Inc. Midlothian | 804.323.1264 www.cpcva.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

Carolyn Peel, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

Kim Clements, MD Patient First Richmond | 804.968.5700 www.patientfirst.com

F I R S T P L A CE

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THI RD PL ACE ( TI E)

HONORABLE MENTI ON

Cynthia Ryan, MD Virginia Endocrinology Midlothian | 804.423.3636 www.virginiaendo.com

2019

Kristin Fabiato, MD Virginia Endocrinology Midlothian | 804.423.3636 www.virginiaendo.com

Pamela Wratchford, MD Ashcake Family Physicians Mechanicsville | 804.559.2916 www.ashcakefamilyphysicians.com

Peter Coleman, MD Hamilton Family Practice Richmond | 804.353.1230 www.hamiltonfamilypractice.com Jeffrey Greer, MD Virginia Physicians, Inc. – Midlothian Family Practice Waterford Midlothian | 804.744.0200 www.vaphysicians.com Daniel Jannuzzi, MD JenCare Senior Medical Center Richmond | 804.344.9848 www.jencaremed.com Giancarlo Pierantoni, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.527.4540 www.vcuhealth.org John Siedlecki, MD Family Practice Specialists of Richmond, PC Midlothian | 804.330.3335 www.fpsrichmond.com


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

But not all shows of emotion are bad. Because doctors and medical providers must be personable to form a relationship, emotion is important. In many cases, an expression of happiness can put patients at ease or make them feel optimistic. HAPPINESS is an emotion often associated with contentment or satisfaction, and it’s expressed with a smile, sometimes with the mouth parted to expose the teeth. Cheeks are raised and wrinkles form on the outside of the eye (known as crow’s feet) and from the outer nose to the upper lip. A person who is happy has a lower heart rate and reduced blood pressure. People who fake an expression of happiness might not necessarily be deceitful, but rather showing friendliness toward others.

Hap piness

To achieve a productive bedside manner, doctors and medical providers must find a way of separating the emotions of the outside world with what they must accomplish in their practice.

• M usc tigh le aroun d th • C tened e ey hee es k corn s raise d wit e rs raise h lip d dia gon a l ly

Part of that is achieving perspective — realizing that not everything is the end of the world, such as in the hypothetical case of the speeding ticket.

“If I’m going to instill hope and offer assistance to folks who are struggling, I can’t act like everything in my life is a big deal.”

Surprise

up pulled brows up d • Eye e ll u lids p • Eye n th ope • Mou

– Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

“If I get a speeding ticket on my way to work and I let it affect my whole day, I’m acting as if it’s this horrible thing, then I’m not able to effectively deal with patients. How can I speak into their perception of life if I’m distorted by something that in the long run is not really a big deal?” CONTINUED ON PAGE 43

Fear

• E ye • U brows pull ppe ed u eyes r eyelid s p u p a n d to sligh • M lled g et h t ly outh er stre bulging up with tche d

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2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Fertility Medicine 2019

T H IRD PLACE

SECOND PL ACE

Geof Tidey, MD Shady Grove Fertility Richmond | 888.761.1967 www.shadygrovefertility.com

Yiping Rao, MD Digestive Care Center of Virginia Petersburg | 804.504.5570 www.virginiagi.com

THI RD PL ACE

Gastroenterology F I R S T P L A CE Kenneth Steingold, MD Shady Grove Fertility Richmond | 888.761.1967 www.shadygrovefertility.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Richard Lucidi, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.327.8820 www.vcuhealth.org

2019

FIRST PLACE Robert Flynn, MD Richmond Gastroenterology Associates North Chesterfield | 804.330.4021 www.richmondgastro.com

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Alex Seamon, MD Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc. Mechanicsville | 804.285.8206 www.gastrova.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON William Brand, Jr., MD Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc. Richmond | 804.285.8206 www.gastrova.com Krista Edelman, MD Richmond Gastroenterology Associates Richmond | 804.673.2806 www.richmondgastro.com Jonathan Gaspar, MD Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc. Mechanicsville | 804.285.8206 www.gastrova.com Jeff LaFond, MD Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc. Richmond | 804.285.8206 www.gastrova.com


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2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Geriatric Medicine 2019

T H IRD PLACE

HONORABL E MENTI ON

William Irvin, Jr., MD Bon Secours Cancer Institute at St. Francis Midlothian | 804.893.8717 www.bonsecours.com

Ruksana Jabeen, MD James River Hospitalist Group Richmond | 804.327.4046

H ON ORA BL E MENTI ON Sharon Goble, MD Virginia Cancer Institute Richmond | 804.330.7990 www.vacancer.com

F IR S T P L A CE Bikram Saini, MD JenCare Senior Medical Center Richmond | 804.344.9848 www.jencaremed.com

S E C OND P L A CE Sarah Hobgood, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

John McCarty, MD VCU Massey Cancer Center Richmond | 804.828.5116 www.vcuhealth.org

Sheila Minaya, MD JenCare Senior Medical Center Richmond | 804.344.9848 www.jencaremed.com

HONORA B L E ME N TI O N

Infectious Disease

Mary Helen Hackney, MD VCU Massey Cancer Center Richmond | 804.828.5116 www.vcuhealth.org Mark Malkin, MD VCU Massey Cancer Center Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

T HI R D P L A CE

2019

FI RST PL ACE Clifton Hawkes, MD Southside Physicians Network Petersburg | 804.765.6766 www.southsidephysicians.com

Will Voelzke, MD Virginia Cancer Institute Richmond | 804.330.7990 www.vacancer.com

SECOND PLACE Suzanne Lavoie, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.vcuhealth.org

Hospitalist

Sirisha Brennan, MD Brennan Geriatric Medicine Glen Allen | 804.292.2430

2019

F IR S T P L A CE M. Kelly Hagan, MD, FACP Virginia Cancer Institute Mechanicsville | 804.559.2489 www.vacancer.com

FIRST PLACE

HONORABL E MENTI ON

FNU Nutan, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.9361 www.vcuhealth.org

James Brooks, Jr., MD Infectious Disease Specialists PC Henrico | 804.285.1833

SECON D PL ACE Adam Garber, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.2161 www.vcuhealth.org

T H IRD PL ACE S E C OND P L A CE Pablo Gonzalez, MD Virginia Cancer Institute Richmond | 804.330.7990 www.vacancer.com

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THI RD PLACE Mark Gentz, DO Bon Secours Infectious Disease Specialists Midlothian | 804.423.5050 www.bonsecours.com

Hematology/ Oncology 2019

Ali Masood, MD James River Hospitalist Group Richmond | 804.281.5546

Clifton Lee, MD, FAAP, SFHM VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 39

Doctors and medical providers also must provide support to patients during hard times in their life. If a caregiver must deliver unfortunate news, such as a bad diagnosis, he or she should communicate with compassion rather than personal sadness. As McCurdy explains it, the doctor or medical provider should focus on the patient’s emotions rather than their own. “At the most basic level, even if the news is horrible, we’re still in this with you,” McCurdy says. “When we share bad news, it’s a lot less about my emotional state.”

He emphasizes that the doctor or medical provider should, instead of reinforcing the patient’s emotional state, remind them of their own strength. The key to that is showing empathy — not to be confused with sympathy, which is often misapplied in society, according to McCurdy. If a patient comes in with a situation that it not traumatic but simply difficult, the doctor or medical provider shouldn’t be overly sympathetic and say, “I’m so sorry you’re going through that.” This show of sympathy encourages a false perception. “What we need to get better at is offering empathy, and empathy is about acknowledging what they’re expressing,” McCurdy explains. “A patient who comes in for care, but is having a hard time doing their part to take better care of their health gets frustrated. In turn, the doctor or medical provider can get frustrated with what may be perceived as the patient’s disregarding or not following his or her medical advice, thus seeing him or her as quote ‘noncompliant’. Instead, we can show empathy and demonstrate we can relate to and identify with the patient, such as saying: ‘I can tell how frustrating this is for you.’ When we show empathy, we disarm someone from the emotion that’s driving them.” The other part of consoling a patient is having a sense of immediacy. It’s easy to reflect on the past or anticipate the future. What life choices brought the patient to this state of health? What steps are needed for him or her to get healthy again? Instead, when doctors and medical providers are immediate — that is, focused on the moment at hand — they can help the patient move past the moment. “We need to stop and address what we see right then. When we do that, the patient connects to what I’m doing,” McCurdy says. “Empathy and immediacy go hand-in-hand.”

Joy

ned tighte es ey e s ey e d h t n u d o aroun rinkles ar le c w us • M ws F e e t ” lly ro gona ised a • “C r s k d dia e e e is h a r rs • C co r n e • Lip

Trust

• R elax ey e e d ey e b ro • S s, and c h e ws , ome e a so times p ks rese ft sm ntin ile g

Empathy Sympathy: vs.

Instead of reinforcing a patient's emotional state, a doctor should remind them of their own strength. The key to this is showing empathy — not to be confused with sympathy. If a patient comes in with a situation that is not traumatic by simply difficult, The use of SYMPATHY encourages a false perception. Where as, the use of EMPATHY disarms the patient from the emotion that's driving them. EXAMPLE OF SYMPATHY: “I'm so sorry you're going through this.”

CONTINUED ON PAGE 47

EXAPMLE OF EMPATHY: “I can tell how frustrating this is for you.”

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Internal Medicine

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

SECOND PLACE Peter Condro, MD, FASN Richmond Nephrology Associates Richmond | 804.272.5814 www.richmondnephrologyassociates.com

2019 2019

THI RD PLACE Shreyank Tripathi, MD Richmond Nephrology Associates Midlothian | 804.464.1028 www.richmondnephrologyassociates.com

F IR S T P L A CE Richard Tate, MD Commonwealth Primary Care, Inc. Richmond | 804.288.3001 www.cpcva.com

S E C ON D P L A CE ( TI E ) W. Clifford Hendrix IV, MD Drs. Titus Hendrix Turner Pahle and Christensen, LLC Richmond | 804.359.1351 www.richmondinternalmed.com Mihn Tran, MD Virginia Physicians, Inc. Richmond | 804.346.1515 www.vaphysicians.com

T HI R D P L A CE Deborah Koehn, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.560.8950 www.vcuhealth.org

HONORA B L E M E N TI O N Robert Bedinger, Jr., MD Virginia Physicians, Inc. – Reynolds Primary Care Richmond | 804.346.1515 www.vaphysicians.com Betty A. Johnson, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.9357 www.vcuhealth.org

Karen Hendricks-Munoz, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

Sonia Shah-Pandya, MD Bon Secours Internal Medicine Associates of Chesterfield – A Part of St. Francis Hospital Midlothian | 804.423.8470 www.bonsecours.com

Walid Abou Assi, MD Nephrology Specialists, PC Hanover | 804.559.6980 Richmond | 804.285.3384 Henrico Doctors’ | 804.285.6390 www.nephspec.com

SE CON D PL ACE Mark Astoria, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

Neurology 2019

T H IRD PLACE Adel Abdallah, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON

FI RST PL ACE

Kevin Al-Mateen, MD Pediatrix Medical Group Richmond | 804.282.8082 www.mednax.com

Matthew Boyce, MD Neurological Associates HCA Virginia Physicians Richmond | 804.288.2742 www.nairichmond.com

Nephrology

SECOND PLACE 2019

Sidney Jones, MD Bon Secours West End Internal Medicine A Part of St. Mary’s Hospital Richmond | 804.282.7857 www.bonsecours.com Richard Peebles, MD Primary Health Group Retreat HCA Virginia Physicians Retreat Doctors’ Hospital Richmond | 804.822.3480 www.phgretreat.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON

FIRST PLACE

Dawen Bu, MD Neuro Care of Virginia, PC Prince George | 804.452.4546 www.neurocareofva.com

THI RD PLACE Jonathan Snider, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

FIRST PLACE Mary McNeer, MD Nephrology Specialists, PC Hanover | 804.559.6980 Richmond | 804.285.3384 Henrico Doctors’ | 804.285.6390 www.nephspec.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Winslow Borkowski, Jr., MD Bon Secours Pediatric Neurology Clinic Richmond | 804.281.8303 www.bonsecours.com

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NE URO L O GY H O N O RA BLE M E NTI O N CO N TI N U E D... Soundarya Gowda, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.9350 www.vcuhealth.org Catherine Ham, MD VCU Health Henrico | 804.828.9350 www.vcuhealth.org

Nurse Practitioner 2019

F IR S T P L A CE Dalia Elsayed, FNP-C Family Practice Specialists of Richmond, PC Midlothian | 804.330.3335 www.fpsrichmond.com

S E C O N D P L A CE Colene Smith, FNP Dominion Women’s Health Mechanicsville | 804.730.0800 www.dominionwomenshealth.com

T HI R D P L A CE Amy Foster, NP TeamHealth Palliative Care at HCA Virginia Johnston-Willis Hospital Richmond | 804.560.9848 www.johnstonwillismed.com

HONO R A B L E M E N TI ON Elizabeth “Betsy” Downey, CPNP RVA Pediatrics Richmond | 804.754.3776 www.rvapediatrics.com Mary Kathleen Engelken, NP Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc. Mechanicsville | 804.285.8206 www.gastrova.com Andi Funai, RN, ANP Virginia Cardiovascular Specialists Richmond | 804.288.4827 www.vacardio.com Erin Nowlin, FNP-BC Shelterng Arms Physical Rehabilitation Centers Mechanicsville | 804.764.1000 www.shelteringarms.com

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NU R S E P R A CTI TI O N E R H ON ORA B LE M E NT I O N CO N TI N U E D... Kelly Steiner, NP Virginia Weight and Wellness Glen Allen | 804.726.1500 www.virginiaweightloss.com

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Keith Roberts, MD Southside Physicians Network Colonial Heights | 804.765.5206 www.southsidephysicians.com

Optometry

Danny Shaban, MD Dominion Women’s Health, Inc. Mechanicsville | 804.730.0800 www.dominionwomenshealth.com

Ophthalmology 2019

2019

2019

FI RST PLACE Richard Douglas, OD Douglas Optometry Chester | 804.748.6983 www.douglasoptometry.com

SECOND PL ACE F I R S T P L A CE Lawrence Miller III, MD Lawrence G. Miller III MD, PC Richmond | 804.282.2848 www.drlarrymiller.com

S E C ON D P L A CE ( TI E ) Christopher Paoloni, MD River City Ob/Gyn Midlothian | 804.362.0808 www.rivercityobgyn.com Alexandra Tate, MD Virginia Women’s Center Richmond | 804.288.4084 www.virginiawomenscenter.com

T HIR D P L A CE Leemore Burke, MD Commonwealth OB/GYN Specialists – HCA Virginia Henrico Doctors’ Hospital Richmond | 804.285.8806 www.hcavirginia.com

HONOR A B L E ME N TI O N Alice Hirata, MD Bon Secours – Richmond Ob-Gyn Richmond | 804.320.2483 www.bonsecours.com Mark Hyde, MD Virginia Physicians for Women Midlothian | 804.897.2100 www.vpfw.com

FIRST PLACE Walter Bundy III, MD Virginia Eye Institute Richmond | 804.287.4200 www.vaeye.com

SECON D PL ACE Shilpi Pradhan, MD Eye Doctor MD, PC Glen Allen | 804.270.3333 www.eyedoctormd.org

Harold Bernstein, MD Richmond Eye Associates, PC Glen Allen | 804.270.0330 www.richmondeye.com Joseph Iuorno, MD Commonwealth Eye Care Associates Henrico | 804.217.6363 www.commonwealtheye.com Robert Knape, MD Virginia Eye Institute Richmond | 804.287.4200 www.vaeye.com

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2019

Peter Nardone, OD Patterson Eye Clinic Richmond | 804.285.7638 www.pattersoneyeclinic.com Robert Rainer, OD RVA Eye Care Richmond | 804.282.7228 www.drrainer.com

H ON ORA BLE MENTI ON

2019

Michel Kish, OD Hanover Family Eyecare Mechanicsville | 804.746.5245 www.visionsource-hanovereye.com

HONORABLE MENTI ON

Evan Silverstein, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

2019

THI RD PL ACE

Christopher McGarry, OD James River Eye Optometry Henrico | 804.270.2020 www.jamesrivereyeoptometry.com

T H IRD PL ACE

Vienne Murray, MD West End Obstetrics and Gynecology, PC Richmond | 804.282.9479 www.westend-obgyn.com

Kensington Hatcher, OD Virginia Eye Institute Richmond | 804.287.4200 www.vaeye.com

Join Us in Congratulating the WINNERS OF THE

2019 BEST

2019

BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 43

Focusing on the Content, Not the Delivery Productive communication is a two-way street. Doctors and medical providers must speak well and listen well, as do patients. In situations where a doctor’s or medical provider’s tone isn’t exactly what the patient wants to hear — because it sometimes will not be — the patient should understand that the caregiver still has his or her best interest at heart. For example, a doctor or medical provider might be happy and jovial when they first come in to greet the patient, thus putting the patient at ease. But later in the appointment, the caregiver has to be very firm and forward with his or her advice as to what the patient should be doing at home. Recognizing this firmness is not necessarily poor bedside manner is very important. “The doctor or medical provider has to be aware of his or her delivery; at the same time, the patient needs to realize it’s the content not the manner,” McCurdy says. “We’ve got to work on both. I’m not necessarily warm and fuzzy, but I like to think I’m hopeful. I’m hopeful, but very direct.”

Good communication is about taking what is said at face value. Those who overthink or overanalyze nonverbal communication — or those who are passive aggressive in their delivery — run the risk of drawing or delivering false information. “Ignore what you see and pay attention to what you hear,” McCurdy says. “Learn to ignore the white noise.” This can be difficult when one or both parties is bad at communication, and not just in a doctor/providerpatient relationship. McCurdy compares it to a man who asks his wife whether he can play golf one Saturday. His wife scoffs and says yes in an exasperated voice. If the man listens to tone, he won’t go play golf; on the other hand, if he listens to the content, he will take his wife at her word and feel at liberty to play golf that day. This is about trusting and operating on the words that a person says, and about having transparent communication. CONTINUED ON PAGE 51

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Orthopaedics

2019

FI RST PLACE William Nordt, III, MD OrthoVirginia Richmond | 804.288.3136 www.orthovirginia.com

SECOND PL ACE

HONORABL E ME NTI O N

Vivek Sharma, MD Colonial Orthopaedics Richmond | 804.526.5888 www.colonialortho.com

G. Vincent Dalton, MD OrthoVirginia Prince George | 804.732.0095 Richmond | 804.288.8512 www.orthovirginia.com

THI RD PL ACE ( TI E)

Vipool “Vic” Goradia, MD G2 Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Glen Allen | 804.375.4322 www.g2orthopedics.com

Matthew Dobzyniak, MD Tuckahoe Orthopaedics Richmond | 804.285.2300 www.tuckahoeortho.com Paul Kiritsis, MD OrthoVirginia Midlothian | 804.379.2414 www.orthovirginia.com

Stephen Kates, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.7069 www.vcuhealth.org

Pain Management

2019

FI RST PLACE Stephen Long, MD Commonwealth Spine and Pain Specialists Richmond | 804.288.7246 www.commonwealthspineandpain.com

SECOND PL ACE

HONORABL E MENTI O N

Kelly Lastrapes, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

John Barsanti, MD Commonwealth Spine and Pain Specialists Richmond | 804.288.7246

THI RD PL ACE P. Duke Crane, MD Neurosurgical Associates, PC Richmond | 804.288.8204 www.neurosurgicalva.com

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www.commonwealthspineandpain.com

Yaoming Gu, MD National Spine and Pain Centers Henrico | 804.270.7262 www.treatingpain.com Nadeem Khan, MD Interventional Pain and Spine Specialists Chester | 804.715.4709 www.ipssva.com


Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019

2019

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Palliative Medicine 2019

SE COND PLACE Mary Falterman, MD Children’s National Cardiology Richmond Richmond | 804.285.1611 www.pediatriccardiologyva.com

Pediatric Endocrinology 2019

T H IRD PL ACE Douglas Allen, MD UVA Pediatric Cardiology Richmond Richmond | 434.924.0000 www.uvahealth.com

F IR S T P L A CE Vidya Raghavan, MD Bon Secours Palliative Medicine A Part of St. Mary’s Hospital Richmond | 804.288.2673 www.bonsecours.com

FI RST PLACE

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON Scott Gullquist, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

S E C O N D P L A CE Erin Alesi, MD VCU Massey Cancer Center Richmond | 804.828.5116 www.massey.vcu.edu

Pediatric Ear, Nose and Throat (Otolaryngology)

T HI R D P L A CE

2019

Tahira Naviwala, MD Bon Secours Palliative Medicine A Part of St. Mary’s Hospital Richmond | 804.288.2673 www.bonsecours.com

HONO R A B L E M E N TI ON Leanne Yanni, MD Bon Secours Palliative Medicine A Part of St. Mary’s Hospital Richmond | 804.288.2673 www.bonsecours.com

Pediatric Cardiology

Trang Le, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

SECOND PL ACE Anil Kumar, MD Bon Secours – Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Associates Richmond | 804.281.8303 www.bonsecours.com

THI RD PL ACE Anshu Gupta, MD, MS Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

FIRST PL ACE Kelley Dodson, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

SE COND PLACE

2019

Julie Redmon, MD Comprehensive ENT Glen Allen | 804.228.4480 www.comprehensiveentva.com 2019

F IR S T P L A CE Kerri Carter, MD, FAAP Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

T H IRD PL ACE Patrick Gibbons, MD Commonwealth Ear Nose and Throat Specialists PC Midlothian | 804.378.7443 www.commonwealthentpc.com

Congratulations WINNERS OF THE

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS

FI RST PLACE Madhu Gowda, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

SECOND PL ACE India Sisler, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

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2019

2019

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2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Pediatric Infectious Disease

Pediatric Nuerology 2019

THI RD PL ACE Bruce Rubin, MEngr, MD, MBA, FRCPC Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

2019

Pediatric Surgery FIRST PL ACE F IR S T P L A CE Jose Munoz, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

S E C ON D P L A CE David Friedel, MD, FAAP Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

Pediatric Nephrology

David Jaffe, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Chesterfield | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

SECON D PLACE

FI RST PLACE

David Leszczyszyn, MD Bon Secours Pediatric Neurology Clinic Richmond | 804.281.8303 www.bonsecours.com

Charles Bagwell, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Prince George | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

T H IRD PLACE Alison Alford, MD Pediatric Headache Center of Richmond Richmond | 804.658.5385 www.pediatricheadachecenter.com

2019

Pediatric Pulmonology F IR S T P L A CE

Timothy Bunchman, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Prince George | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

T HI R D P L A CE Megan Lo, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Prince George | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

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SECOND PL ACE Patricia Lange, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Prince George | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

Pediatrics

2019

Cristin Kaspar, MS, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Fredericksburg | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

S E C ON D P L A CE

2019

2019

FIRST PL ACE

FI RST PLACE

Judith Voynow, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.vcuhealth.org

Melani de Silva, MD, FAAP RVA Pediatrics Richmond | 804.282.9706 www.rvapediatrics.com

SECON D PLACE Joshua Freedman, MD Bon Secours Pediatric Lung Care Richmond | 804.281.8303 www.bonsecours.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

SECOND PL ACE Gauri Gulati, MD, IBCLC Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org


IS YOUR

FAVORITE DOCTOR OR PROVIDER MISSING

FROM THE LIST OF WINNERS? CONTINUED FROM PAGE 47

“If you get both sides working at once, it works well. In a patient/provider-doctor relationship, that’s pretty tough because we can only control one side of that.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

Ultimately, however, a doctor’s or medical provider’s number one priority is communicating what a patient needs to hear, even if that means tough love. Patients should recognize this as such. “My job is not to make you feel good,” McCurdy says. “My job is to tell you the truth and give you the information you need because you are valuable.” From the patient’s perspective, it helps to acknowledge his or her doctor or medical provider is just another human being with complex emotions who is trying to do the best he or she can with the knowledge possessed. “Don’t put doctors or medical providers on a pedestal,” McCurdy says. “It’s the same with doctors/medical providers, lawyers, preachers and folks in government. We need to recognize they are individuals just like we are. As patients, we need to go in and realize this is a person as well.” And, it helps when patients demonstrate kindness toward their providers.

In the greater Richmond community, there are thousands upon thousands of exceptional doctors and providers who are just as committed to providing exceptional bedside manner to their patients as the winners on this list. If you feel your doctor or provider is deserving of recognition for his or her excellent bedside manner and would like to receive reminders of when voting will open for the 2019 Best Bedside Manner Awards so you can nominate him or her, please visit

www.ourhealthrichmond.com and subscribe to our e-newsletter.

Working off the model of empathy, truthfulness and kindness, doctors and medical providers will be able to help their patients feel seen and heard — this will go a long way in demonstrating to patients that they are valued and their doctor or medical provider has their best interests at heart.

“When we can demonstrate that value to them, all of sudden their issues are important, then they’re willing to trust more and willing to take more direction.” – Keith A. McCurdy, EDS, LPC, LMFT

This is what makes up good bedside manner, and it can make all the difference.

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P E D I A TR I CS T HI R D P L A CE

H ON ORA BL E MENTI ON

J. Mark Shreve, MD Pediatric Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.282.4205 www.parpeds.com

HONORA B L E ME N TI O N Andrew Anderson Jr, MD Richmond Pediatric Associates, Inc. Richmond | 804.747.1750 www.richmondpediatrics.com Christopher Ayers, MD, FAAP Commonwealth Pediatrics Richmond | 804.320.1353 www.commonwealthpeds.com Tamara Charity-Brown, MD Associates in Pediatrics Glen Allen | 804.364.4400 www.associatesinpediatrics.net

Physical Therapy

Tana Kaefer, PharmD Bremo Pharmacy Henrico | 804.288.8361 www.bremorx.com

2019

Jessica McDaniel, PharmD, BCACP Kroger Pharmacy – Carytown Richmond | 804.254.6400 www.kroger.com Emily Peron, PharmD, MS VCU School of Pharmacy/Richmond Health and Wellness Program Richmond | 804.628.5059 www.vcuhealth.org

Physical Medicine

Lora Christian, MD, FAAP RVA Pediatrics Richmond | 804.282.9706 www.rvapediatrics.com

2019

Annemarie Tull, MD Pediatric Center Richmond | 804.266.9616 www.richmondpediatriccenter.com

2019

FIRST PLACE

SECON D PL ACE Samuel Clanton, MD, PhD Shelterng Arms Physical Rehabilitation Centers Midlothian | 804.764.1000 www.shelteringarms.com

F IR S T P L A CE Chris Currin, RPh RX3 Compounding Pharmacy Richmond | 804.717.5000 www.rx3pharmacy.com

Kristen Hicks, PT, MPT, CMTPT Orthopedic Physical Therapy, Inc. Richmond | 804.285.0148 www.orthopedicptinc.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Kevin Black, PT, DPT Physical Therapy Solutions Glen Allen | 804.716.0457 www.physicaltherapysolutions.net Derek Metzler, MPT Restore-PT Richmond | 804.644.1221 www.restore-pt.com

Joelle Makon, MD Shelterng Arms Physical Rehabilitation Centers Mechanicsville | 804.764.1000 www.shelteringarms.com

Allison Waddell, PT, DPT, OCS Sheltering Arms Physical Rehabilitation Centers Midlothian | 804.764.1000 www.shelteringarms.com

H ON ORA BLE MENTI ON Gregory O’Shanick, MD Center for Neurorehabilitation Services Richmond | 804.272.0114 www.centerforneurorehabservices.org

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Amanda Lyons, PT, DPT, NCS Sheltering Arms Physical Rehabilitation Centers Midlothian | 804.764.1000 www.shelteringarms.com

T H IRD PL ACE

Baylor Rice, RPh, FIACP South River Compounding Pharmacy Richmond | 804.897.6447 www.southriverrx.com

Blake Bray, PharmD Westwood Pharmacy Richmond | 866.996.6379 www.westwoodpharmacy.com

SECOND PLACE

Daniel Midkiff, PT, DPT InMotion Physical Therapy Richmond | 804.756.8490 www.inmotion-pt.com

S E C OND P L A CE

T HI R D P L A CE

Tracey Adler, PT, DPT, OCS, CMTPT Orthopedic Physical Therapy, Inc. Richmond | 804.285.0148 www.orthopedicptinc.com

THI RD PLACE Nathan Zasler, MD Concussion Care Centre of Virginia, LTD Richmond | 804.270.5484 www.concussioncarecentre.com

Pharmacy

FI RST PL ACE

Timothy Silver, MD Shelterng Arms Physical Rehabilitation Centers Midlothian | 804.764.1000 www.shelteringarms.com

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Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019

2019

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Physician Assistant (PA) 2019

T H IRD PLACE Jessica Kernodle, PA-C Virginia Physicians for Women Richmond | 804.897.2100 www.vpfw.com

Plastic Surgery: Cosmetic

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON

2019

Richard Acevedo, PA-C Patient First Richmond | 804.968.5700 www.patientfirst.com

F I R S T P L A CE Sarah Burchett, PA-C Zinsser Plastic Surgery PC Richmond | 804.474.9805 www.zinsserplasticsurgery.com

S E C O N D P L A CE Jennifer Bauer, MPA, PA-C Dermatology Associates of Virginia, PC Richmond | 804.794.2307 www.dermva.com

Susan Kewer, PA-C OrthoVirginia Richmond | 804.288.8512 www.orthovirginia.com Tracie Lumpkin, PA Bon Secours Commonwealth Internal Medicine Associates A Part of St. Mary’s Hospital Richmond | 804.560.8838 www.bonsecours.com Daniel Raible, PA VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

FI RST PLACE Isaac Wornom III, MD Richmond Plastic Surgeons Richmond | 804.585.3420 www.richmondplasticsurgeons.com

SECOND PL ACE Matthew Stanwix, MD, FACS Stanwix Plastic Surgery Richmond | 804.724.7244 www.drstanwix.com

Will Warren, PA Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc. Richmond | 804.285.8206 www.gastrova.com

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2019

2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards 2019 GREATER RICHMOND

P L A S TI C S U R G E RY: COSM ET IC T HI R D P L A CE ( TI E ) Lewis Ladocsi, MD, FACS Richmond Plastic Surgeons Richmond | 804.585.3420 www.richmondplasticsurgeons.com

Plastic Surgery: Reconstructive 2019

John Zinsser, MD, FACS Zinsser Plastic Surgery PC Richmond | 804.474.9805 www.zinsserplasticsurgery.com

HONORA B L E ME N TI O N Nadia Blanchet, MD Nadia P. Blanchet, M.D. Richmond | 804.320.8545 www.nadiablanchetmd.com Matthew Bridges, M.D., FACS Commonwealth Facial Plastic Surgery Midlothian | 804.655.0400 www.matthewbridgesmd.com Stephen Chen, MD Richmond Plastic Surgeons Richmond | 804.585.3420 www.richmondplasticsurgeons.com Travis Shaw, MD Travis Shaw MD Richmond | 804.775.4559 www.travisshawmd.com

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THI RD PL ACE Michael Feldman, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.288.3060 www.vcuhealth.org

HONORABLE MENTI ON Sharline Aboutanos, MD, FAAP, FACS Richmond Plastic Surgeons Richmond | 804.585.3420 www.richmondplasticsurgeons.com

FIRST PLACE Darrin Hubert, MD Richmond Plastic Surgeons Richmond | 804.585.3420 www.richmondplasticsurgeons.com

SECON D PL ACE Jennifer Rhodes, MD, FACS, FAAP Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

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Leslie Cohen, MD, FACS Leslie V. Cohen, MD, FACS Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Richmond | 804.288.2800 www.lesliecohenmd.com

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Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019

2019

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Prosthetics and Orthotics

Podiatry 2019

2019

SECOND PLACE Valentina Cimolai, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

THI RD PLACE James Sellman, MD James Sellman and Associates Richmond | 804.282.3387

F IR S T P L A CE James Shadbolt, DPM, FACFAS James Shadbolt, DPM, FACFAS Henrico | 804.754.7400 www.lovethosefeet.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON FIRS T PLACE Beth Martin, CO Powell Orthotics and Prosthetics Richmond | 804.649.9043 www.powelloandp.com

S E C O N D P L A CE Justin Phillingane, DPM Southside Physicians Network Petersburg | 804.732.6000 www.southsidephysicians.com

T HI R D P L A CE William Eng, DPM The Foot Center Richmond | 804.285.1523 www.thefootcenter.org

HONO R A B L E M E N TI ON Reman Dhaliwal, DPM JenCare Senior Medical Center Richmond | 804.344.9848 www.jencaremed.com Scott Vantre, DPM Virginia Foot and Ankle Center Richmond | 804.285.3933 www.vafootankle.com David Weiss, DPM, DABFAS West End Foot and Ankle Richmond | 804.346.1779 www.richmondpodiatry.com

SE COND PL ACE Michael Monteiro, CPO Powell Orthotics and Prosthetics Richmond | 804.649.9043 www.powelloandp.com

T H IRD PLACE

WINNERS OF THE

2019 BEST

BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS

Robert Seward, MD Tucker Psychiatric Clinic, Inc. Richmond | 804.320.7881 www.tuckerpsychiatric.com

Psychology and Counseling

M. Shawn Valentine, CO Paul L. Valentine Orthotics and Prosthetics, LLC Richmond | 804.355.0283 www.valentineorthotics.com

2019

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON Javier Mejia, CPO Hanger Clinic: Prosthetics and Orthotics Richmond | 804.643.9064 www.hangerclinic.com

Psychiatry 2019

Join Us in Congratulating the

Walid Fawaz, MD, ABPN Virginia South Psychiatric and Family Services, PC Midlothian | 804.378.0800 www.vasouth.com

FI RST PL ACE Jennifer McCauley, LCSW Discovery Counseling and Consulting, LLC Richmond | 804.591.0002 www.vadcc.com

SECOND PLACE Carrie Walker, LPC, RPT-S, CTP-C, ADS Richmond Creative Counseling Richmond | 804.592.6311 www.richmondcreativecounseling.com

THI RD PLACE FIRS T PLACE Ramesh Koduri, MD Virginia South Psychiatric and Family Services, PC Petersburg | 804.861.0700 www.vasouth.com

Ted Petrocci, LPC, MAC Ted Petrocci, LPC, MAC Richmond | 804.822.0271 www.tedpetrocci.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Heather Bender, PhD Lantern of Hope Family Psychology Practice Richmond | 804.307.6514 www.lanternofhoperva.com

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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

PSYC H O L O GY A N D CO UN SELIN G HONOR A B L E ME N TI O N C ONT I N U E D. . . Lee Anne Hausler, LPC, PhD Discovery Counseling and Consulting Richmond | 804.591.0002 www.vadcc.com Deborah Hill-Barlow, PhD Shelterng Arms Physical Rehabilitation Centers Richmond | 804.764.1000 www.shelteringarms.com

Daniel Smith, MD Pulmonary Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.320.4243 www.paraccess.com

Radiation Oncology 2019

Jiyearn Chung, MD Radiology Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.272.8806 www.rarichmond.com

THI RD PLACE Nicole Kelleher, MD Radiology Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.272.8806 www.rarichmond.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON

Robyn Nunley, PhD, LPC, LMFT Tandem Mental Health Associates Glen Allen | 804.277.9877 www.tandemmentalhealth.com

Rakesh Agarwal, MD Commonwealth Radiology, PC Richmond | 804.288.8327 www.commonwealthradiology.com

FIRST PL ACE Alfredo Urdaneta, MD VCU Massey Cancer Center Richmond | 804.828.7232 www.massey.vcu.edu

Pulmonary

SECOND PLACE

2019

Daniel Musick, MD Commonwealth Radiology, PC Richmond | 804.288.8327 www.commonwealthradiology.com

Rheumatology

SE CON D PLACE David Penberthy, MD Virginia Radiation Oncology Associates, Inc. (Southside Physicians) Richmond | 804.287.3000

F I R S T P L A CE Jamie Hey, MD Pulmonary Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.320.4243 www.paraccess.com

S E C ON D P L A CE Johnny Wong, MD Pulmonary Associates of Richmond Mechanicsville | 804.320.4243 www.paraccess.com

T H IRD PLACE David Randolph, Sr., MD Virginia Radiation Oncology Associates, Inc. Richmond | 804.330.2164

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON Judy Chin, MD, FACR Bon Secours Cancer Institute Radiation Oncology Richmond | 804.281.8350 www.bonsecours.com

Tammy Spring, MD Premier HealthCare Associates Richmond | 804.288.7901 www.premierhealthcare-va.com

Steven Maestrello, MD Virginia Physicians, Inc. Richmond | 804.346.1551 www.vaphysicians.com

Radiology

THI RD PLACE

HONOR A B L E ME N TI O N

2019

Tahir Allauddin, MD Virigina Medical Group Specialists Colonial Heights | 804.526.0682 Daniel Grinnan, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

FIRST PL ACE

Alice Herlihy, MD Pulmonary Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.320.4243 www.paraccess.com

Brian Strife, MD VCU Health Richmond | 800.762.6161 www.vcuhealth.org

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FI RST PL ACE

SECOND PLACE

T HIR D P L A CE Sujoy Gill, MD Pulmonary Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.320.4243 www.paraccess.com

2019

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

Aarat Patel, MD Bon Secours Rheumatology Center A Part of Richmond Community Hospital Richmond | 804.217.9601 www.bonsecours.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Michael Strachan, MD Premier HealthCare Associates Richmond | 804.288.7901 www.premierhealthcare-va.com


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2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Sleep Medicine 2019

SE COND PLACE

THI RD PLACE

Larry Benson, MD, CAQSM OrthoVirginia Midlothian | 804.440.4878 www.orthovirginia.com

Chiwon Hahn, MD Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates – HCA Virginia Physicians Chippenham Hospital, Henrico Doctors’ Hospital Richmond | 804.320.2751 www.heartsurgeryva.com

T H IRD PL ACE ( TI E) Thomas Loughran, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.0713 www.vcuhealth.org

F IR S T P L A CE Cecilia Santos, MD Bon Secours Sleep Disorders Center Mechanicsville | 804.764.7491 Richmond | 804.673.8160 Midlothian | 804.595.1430 Kilmarnock | 757.398.2214 www.bonsecours.com

S E C O N D P L A CE Douglas Puryear, MD, FCCP Pulmonary Associates of Richmond Midlothian | 804.320.4243 www.paraccess.com

T HI R D P L A CE Samuel Taylor, Jr., MD, MS VCU Health – Center for Sleep Medicine Richmond | 804.828.9350 www.vcuhealth.org

HON O R A B L E ME N TI ON

Shannon Wolfe, MD Tuckahoe Orthopaedics Richmond | 804.285.2300 www.tuckahoeortho.com

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON

2019

F IR S T P L A CE Douglas Cutter, MD HCA Virginia Sports Medicine Richmond | 804.560.6500 www.hcavasportsmed.com

Mark Bladergroen, MD Bon Secours Cardiac Surgery Specialists Mechanicsville | 804.764.7340 www.bonsecours.com

Surgery: Colon and Rectal

Seth Cheatham, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.0713 www.vcuhealth.org Steven Reece, MD OrthoVirginia Richmond | 804.270.1305 www.orthovirginia.com

2019

Jose Reyes, MD OrthoVirginia Midlothian | 804.379.2414 www.orthovirginia.com

FI RST PL ACE

Surgery: Cardiac

Justin Brockbank, MD Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

Sports Medicine

HONORABL E MENTI ON

2019

Andrew Vorenberg, MD, FACS Colon and Rectal Specialists Henrico | 804.249.2465 www.crspecialists.com

SECOND PLACE Jaime Bohl, MD VCU Health VCU Massey Cancer Center Richmond | 804.827.0049 www.vcuhealth.org

FIRST PL ACE Leo Gazoni, MD Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates – HCA Virginia Physicians Chippenham Hospital, Henrico Doctors’ Hospital Richmond | 804.320.2751 www.heartsurgeryva.com

SE COND PLACE Vigneshwar Kasirajan, MD, FACS VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.2775 www.vcuhealth.org

THI RD PLACE Christine Bouchard, MD Surgical Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.560.7706 www.thesar.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Paul Charron, MD, FACS Colon and Rectal Specialists Henrico | 804.249.2465 www.crspecialists.com Joseph Coury, MD Colon and Rectal Specialists Mechanicsville | 804.249.2465 www.crspecialists.com

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2019

2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards 2019 GREATER RICHMOND

Surgery: General

Surgery: Hand

2019

SECOND PL ACE Gary Tye, MD, FAANS Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU Richmond | 804.828.2467 www.chrichmond.org

2019

THI RD PL ACE F I R S T P L A CE

FIRST PL ACE

James Pellicane, MD, FACS Bon Secours Virginia Breast Center Midlothian | 804.594.3130 www.vabreastcenter.com

David Galpern, MD Comprehensive Hand Surgery Center Richmond | 804.215.3313 www.CompHSC.com

S E C ON D P L A CE

SECON D PLACE

Levi Procter, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.7748 www.vcuhealth.org

Brian Le, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.3060 www.vcuhealth.org

T HIR D P L A CE

T H IRD PLACE

Clifford Deal III, MD, FACS Richmond Surgical HCA Virginia Physicians Henrico Doctors’ Hospital Richmond | 804.285.9416 www.richmondsurg.com

Sanjay Desai, MD OrthoVirginia Richmond | 804.288.3136 www.orthovirginia.com

HONOR A B L E M E N TI O N Sasa-Grae Espino, MD Southside Physicians Network Petersburg | 804.520.6730 www.southsidephysicians.com Sudha Jayaraman, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.7748 www.vcuhealth.org Ralph Layman, MD Richmond Surgical Group Henrico | 804.968.4435 www.richmondsurgical.net

HONORABLE MENTI ON Peter Alexander, MD Neurosurgical Associates, PC Richmond | 804.288.8204 www.neurosurgicalva.com Brian Cameron, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.9165 www.vcuhealth.org

Surgery: Orthopaedic

H ON ORA BL E MENTI ON 2019

John Blank, MD Tuckahoe Orthopaedics Richmond | 804.285.2300 www.tuckahoeortho.com

Surgery: Neurosurgery

FI RST PLACE Mark Jones, MD OrthoVirginia Richmond | 804.379.8088 www.orthovirginia.com

2019

SECOND PL ACE

Amy Rose, MD Virginia Surgical Institute Richmond | 804.348.2814 www.vasurg.com

FIRST PL ACE

Join Us in Congratulating the

Katrina Murphy, MD Neurosurgical Associates, PC Richmond | 804.288.8204 www.neurosurgicalva.com

Dennis Rivet II, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.9165 www.vcuhealth.org

J. William Van Manen, MD OrthoVirginia Richmond | 804.270.1305 www.orthovirginia.com

THI RD PL ACE Glenn Kerr, MD OrthoVirginia Midlothian | 804.379.2414 www.orthovirginia.com

WINNERS OF THE

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARDS 64

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond


2019

2019

2019

Best Bedside Manner Awards

2019

2019 GREATER RICHMOND

S UR G E RY: O R TH O P AED IC HONO R A B L E ME N TI ON Gregory Golladay, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.7069 www.vcuhealth.org William Nordt III, MD OrthoVirginia Richmond | 804.288.3136 www.orthovirginia.com

Surgery: Spine

T H IRD PLACE

THI RD PL ACE

Jed Vanichkachorn, MD Tuckahoe Orthopaedics Richmond | 804.285.2300 www.tuckahoeortho.com

Gregg Londrey, MD, FACS Vascular Surgery Associates Richmond | 804.288.1953 www.vascularsurgeryassociates.com

H ON ORABL E MENTI ON

HONORABLE MENTI ON

J. Michael Simpson, MD Tuckahoe Orthopaedics Richmond | 804.285.2300 www.tuckahoeortho.com

Hong Jun, MD Southside Physicians Network – Surgery Petersburg | 804.520.6730 www.southsidephysicians.com

Surgery: Vascular

2019

F IR S T P L A CE Chester Sharps, MD Tuckahoe Orthopaedics Richmond | 804.285.2300 www.tuckahoeortho.com

S E C O N D P L A CE Bruce Mathern, MD VCU Massey Cancer Center Richmond | 804.828.9165 www.vcuhealth.org

2019

Mark Levy, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.7749 www.vcuhealth.org

Urgent Care Medicine 2019

FIRS T PLACE Jeff Brown, MD Vascular Surgery Associates Mechanicsville | 804.559.7634 www.vascularsurgeryassociates.com

FI RST PLACE SE CON D PL ACE Richard Binns, MD Surgical Associates of Richmond Richmond | 804.560.5972 www.thesar.com

Rachel Burton, DO Patient First Richmond | 804.968.5700 www.patientfirst.com

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Congratulations

GREATER RICHMOND

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARD Winners! 2019

BEST BEDSIDE MANNER AWARD WINNERS

Best Bedside Manner Awards 2019 GREATER RICHMOND

SE CON D PLACE Andrew Kolb, DO Patient First Richmond | 804.968.5700 www.patientfirst.com

T H IRD PLACE Mark Rausch, MD BetterMed Urgent Care Richmond | 804.285.8206 www.bettermedcare.com

2019

Noelle Edwards, MD, FAAP KidMed Mechanicsville | 804.559.5437 www.kidmedva.com Nermine Saleh, MD Bon Secours Good Health Express Glen Allen | 804.893.8702 www.bonsecours.com

Urogynecology/Female Pelvic Medicine

2019

FIRST PL ACE Nathan Guerette, MD The Female Pelvic Medicine Institute Richmond | 804.523.2533 www.fpmiofva.com

SE CON D PLACE David Glazier, MD Virginia Urology Richmond | 804.330.9105 www.uro.com

T H IRD PLACE Lauren Siff, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.323.1180 www.vcuhealth.org

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON Quinn Lippmann, MD, MPH, FPMRS Virginia Urology Richmond | 804.330.9105 www.uro.com

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Urology

H ON ORABLE MENTI ON

CERTIFICATION NOTE:

As of summer 2019, all doctors receiving recognition for their bedside manner held current certification from the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), as applicable. The American Board of Medical Specialties is the recognized leader in developing and setting the gold standard for physician specialty certification in the United States. The 24 ABMS Member Boards that offer Board Certification in 40 specialties and 87 subspecialties adhere to rigorous training and assessment standards. It is for this reason, that all physicians recognized in OurHealth Magazine for Richmond’s Best Bedside Manner Awards are certified by one or more of the American Board of Medical Specialties Member Boards in their applicable specialty or subspecialty as verified through our partnership with ABMS Solutions™ The Primary Source for Verification.

Megan Shannon, MD Virginia Women’s Center Richmond | 804.288.4084 www.virginiawomenscenter.com

OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Greater Richmond

FI RST PL ACE Kinloch Nelson, MD Virginia Urology Mechanicsville | 804.330.9105 www.uro.com

SECOND PLACE Michael Franks, MD Virginia Urology Prince George | 804.330.9105 www.uro.com

THI RD PLACE Eugene Park, MD Southside Physicians Network – Urology Chester | 804.765.6100 www.southsidephysicians.com

HONORABL E MENTI ON Michael Byrne, MD Virginia Urology Richmond | 804.330.9105 www.uro.com Jeffrey Lou, MD Virginia Urology Richmond | 804.330.9105 www.uro.com Luriel Smith-Harrison, MD VCU Health Richmond | 804.828.9331 www.vcuhealth.org Jason Szobota, MD Virginia Urology Richmond | 804.330.9105 www.uro.com

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Health Trends

What Were They Then and What Are They Now? words | DYLAN ROCHE

1

It’s inevitable that trends come and go. What’s popular today will be a memory tomorrow. And while it’s true that some practices do prove to have staying power, they still evolve with the changing times.

2 3

4 5

10

6 7 8

10

9

When it comes to health, modern science continually changes our concept of what’s best for the human body, whether it’s the food we eat, the exercises we do, the medicine we take or some other healthy habit we adopt. But what the masses latch onto isn’t always what’s necessarily the best option, and the necessary information isn’t always available when the trend is at its peak. So, what health trends captured America’s attention over the past decade, and what do we think of those trends now in 2019? How has science shaped our understanding of these practices, and in what ways is their influence still a part of our culture? Let’s take a look.

We’re giving each trend a rank on a scale of 1 to 10. Those that proved to have staying power and scientific support get higher scores, while those that flopped when put under scrutiny get lower scores.

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1

Elimination of Trans fats 2 3 4

10 ELIMINATION OF TRANS FAT

HEALTH RATING:

The conversation around trans fats 10 years ago paved the way for partially hydrogenated oils to be removed from the market today, making the food industry safer for all consumers.

5 6 7 8

The fight to eliminate trans fats from the American diet has been going on for decades, but it wasn’t until the last 10 or 15 years that it really entered mainstream conversation. And it wasn’t until 2019 that these dangerous oils finally left the market. Found in processed fats like partially hydrogenated oils, trans fats pose a threat to health by lowering HDL cholesterol (commonly known as the good cholesterol) and raising LDL cholesterol (commonly known as the bad kind), thus contributing to heart disease.

Back in the early ‘90s, the Center for Science in the Public Interest began to urge 10 the Food and Drug Administration to include information about trans fats on food labels. But it wasn’t until 2006 that laws went into effect stating that trans fats had to be included on Nutrition Facts labels. That was also the year New York City became the first city to ban partially hydrogenated oils from all restaurants.

9

The year 2009 was a turning point, as studies showed then that more manufacturers were responding to the growing awareness by replacing trans fats in their products with healthier types of oil. In 2012, a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed a decline in consumption of trans fat.

But the biggest progress took place in 2013, when the Food and Drug Administration announced a preliminary determination that partially hydrogenated oils were no longer generally recognized as safe. Two years later, the FDA went one step further and declared that the industry had three years to eliminate partially hydrogenated oils from all its recipes. As of 2019, no new products can be made with partially hydrogenated oils, and the war on an especially dangerous ingredient has been won.

1

Low-Carb Diets 2

3 Low-carb diets work for fast weight loss, but doctors still maintain that carbohydrates are an important source of energy. More importantly, those who consume too much saturated fat and avoid fruits and vegetables run the risk of hurting their long-term health.

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10

The aversion to carbohydrates has stuck around in one form or another, and the biggest diet craze today is ketogenic diets, known to most people simply as keto. In this form, 7 going low carb means being much more restrictive. 8 Doctors with the Mayo Clinic cite the scientific reasoning behind keto is that when you decrease carbohydrate intake, the body turns to fat for energy. With keto, people must eat fewer than 50 grams of carbohydrates a day.

6

LOW-CARB DIET

HEALTH RATING:

Even though the low-carbohydrate diet advocated by physician and cardiologist Dr. Robert Atkins has been around since the 1970s, it saw a resurgence in 3 the 2000s. Other popular eating plans based on reduced carbohydrate 4 consumption, such as the South Beach Diet, also evolved toward the end of the decade. The idea behind these diets was that cutting refined carbohydrates 5 and sugar could aid in weight loss.

9

For many people, it works for weight loss. The catch? It calls for cutting out lots of healthy food, including many fruits and vegetables. There’s not enough research on the longterm effects of a ketogenic lifestyle, but doctors fear that the high levels of fat, particularly saturated fat, along with the limits on nutrientrich fruits, vegetables and grains, don’t bode well for a person’s health.


1

Cannabis 2 3 4

3

5 6 7

CANNABIS

8

HEALTH RATING:

10

Far from being considered a dangerous psychoactive substance the way it once was, cannabis is now regarded for its health benefits. Times have definitely changed with this one!

9

It’s amazing what a difference 10 years can make in the public’s perception of a drug. Cannabis, more commonly known as marijuana, has gone from being an illegal substance to an acceptable medicinal alternative to pharmaceuticals. Although many progressive thinkers had been pushing to destigmatize cannabis for years prior, it still carried criminal penalties at the end of the last decade. Early in 2009, Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps suffered a scandal after a photo was released showing him smoking recreational cannabis. USA Swimming suspended him from competing for three months, and a heroic figure of athleticism lost the respect of many.

Fast-forward to today, and medicinal cannabis is legal in 29 states and Washington, D.C. Harvard Medical School estimates that 85 percent of Americans support the legalization of cannabis and at least several million Americans currently use it. Does this make what Phelps did acceptable by modern standards? Maybe, maybe not. Cannabis use among athletes is still a subject of debate. The World Anti-Doping Agency lists cannabis as prohibited in competition; however, a 2018 review published in the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine notes that there is no evidence of performanceenhancing effects from cannabis and that it is useful for pain and concussion management. And some athletes are open about their use, such as ultramarathoner Avery Collins, who advocates cannabis for athletes, claiming it helps him focus when he is running for hours at a time.

1

Superfoods 2 3 4

5

5 6 7

SUPERFOODS

HEALTH RATING:

The superfood trend has introduced many lesser known fruits and vegetables into the mainstream, but people should not let themselves believe that any one food is a cure-all miracle that will provide them all the nutrients they need.

8

10

If you feel as if every year brings a new food trend…well, you’d be right. It all started in 2009 with a segment by Dr. Mehmet Oz (better known simply as Dr. Oz) on The Oprah Winfrey Show when he introduced America to a little-known fruit called the acai berry, touting it as having twice the antioxidant content of a blueberry. Suddenly, everyone wanted to start eating acai berries for their enormous health benefits. And in the years that followed, specific foods would emerge from relative obscurity into the mainstream and be hailed for their cure-all properties: quinoa, kale, coconut, avocado and so forth. Each one of them was loosely referred to as a superfood.

Today, the trend continues, and although doctors and dietitians encourage people to try new foods, they want them to look past the hype around these so-called superfoods. Why? Well, as the experts at Harvard Medical School emphasize, no single food can offer all nutritional and health benefits the human body needs.

9

Instead, people should start thinking of superfoods as important additions to the diet. It’s great that more people are eating healthy foods, but variety and balance is still key. Consider this: A 2018 review published in the journal Food & Function looked at the effects of 17 superfoods sourced from an internet search and found only limited evidence for their effect on things like BMI, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. So in the era of avocado toast, experts such as those at Harvard emphasize that people should not focus all their attention on one specific food to improve their health. Instead, they should focus on other equally nutritious options that might not get as much media attention.

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1

Swine Flu and Vaccinations 2 3 4

10

5 6 7

SWINE FLU AND VACCINATIONS

HEALTH RATING:

8 10

Reaction to the swine flu helped raise awareness about the importance of vaccinations, but there’s still progress to be made in eradicating all viruses.

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Swine flu was one of the biggest health stories of 2009 and 2010. The strain of influenza formally known as H1N1 broke out across the world. In the United States, the first reported cases supposedly resulted from trips to Mexico. By March 2010, an estimated 59 million Americans had been affected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By August 2010, the World Health Organization had declared that the outbreak had moved into post-pandemic mode. But during the time that swine flu was rampant, the U.S. government launched a massive vaccination campaign to fight its spread.

Through advertising and press conferences, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ran an aggressive campaign to spread awareness of and encourage vaccination, which played a major role in reining in H1N1, although it continues to circulate today as a strain of seasonal flu.

Many people responded to the campaign and started making flu shots a regular part of their fall health routine. The CDC estimates that vaccinations were able to prevent an estimated 5.3 million flu illnesses in the United States during the 2018 flu season.

But despite the CDC’s efforts, and despite the growing number of people who vaccinate every year, a vocal group of dissenters in 2019 continue to distrust vaccines — flu or otherwise. Case in point? Measles, which were eliminated in the United States in 2000, are making a comeback. So far in 2019, about 670 people from 22 states have been affected. Doctors emphasize that the best way to avoid the measles is to get the vaccine, but skeptics continue to fear negative side effects. Lack of insurance or access to health care is also an obstacle in the push for vaccination.

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Minimalist Running Shoes 2 3 4

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5 6

It’s not the worst trend to enter the mainstream, but science doesn’t seem to support the claims that these trendy shoes were any better for runners than other (i.e. less-expensive) versions. In 2019, most people are back to using traditional cushioned running shoes.

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Between 2010 and 2012, sales in minimalist shoes tripled. More and more people were subscribing to the idea that if they trained in these types of shoes, they could strengthen their feet back to how nature intended them to be.

But the American Academy of Sports Medicine and the American Podiatric Medical Association maintained 8 that there was not enough research to support either the benefits or the risks, and encouraged anyone interested in the trend to consult a podiatrist beforehand.

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MINIMALIST RUNNING SHOES

HEALTH RATING:

Interest in barefoot running and minimalist running shoes rose after the release of Christopher McDougall’s Born to Run. The idea behind the practice is that running shoes with thinner, minimalized soles encourage a natural gait, strengthen the foot and reduce risk of injury.

10

9

Then the lawsuits started. Vibram, one of the leading manufacturers, settled in a class-action lawsuit stating its marketing made unsubstantiated claims that minimalist shoes were better for preventing injuries. The trend very quickly fizzled out, although some runners continue to swear by minimalist shoes. As for the science behind it, a 2019 study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology explains that it’s less about the shoe itself and more about how athletes adjust their gait to compensate for the lack of cushioning. Runners in cushioned shoes tend to land on their heels whereas barefoot runners land on the balls of their feet to absorb the impact.


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Interval and Circuit Fitness Training

2 3

4

10 INTERVAL AND CIRCUIT FITNESS TRAINING

HEALTH RATING:

These workouts are scientifically supported and continue to grow in popularity.

5 6 7

By the late 2000s, countless fitness junkies were embracing new workout routines like bootcamp-style fitness programs, functional fitness, circuit training and HIIT (high-intensity interval training). These types of fitness classes were popular because, as the Mayo Clinic observes, they require little or no equipment and they create a sense of camaraderie among the participants.

Over the past 10 years, these workouts continued to be popular, particularly circuit training and HIIT. The American 9 Council on Exercise (ACE) explains that most people give up a 10 fitness routine because they’re either bored or pressed for time. Both these styles of exercise avoid those problems — they’re varied, so you don’t get bored, and they’re so intense that you get the benefits of a full workout in a shorter period of time.

8

And that short amount of time still counts, according to the experts. Per the recommendation of the Department of Health and Human Services, you should get 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity. So it’s still effective to work out less as long as you’re working out harder.

You should get

75 MINUTES of vigorous aerobic activity a week.

These fitness trends have stuck around with good reason, but that’s not to say they’re not better in 2019 than they were in the past. With the surging popularity of fitness apps like Esquared, which lets you find and drop in on classes close to where you are, it’s easier than ever for people to seek out opportunities for these types of classes, even if they’re traveling or moving to a new area.

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HealthCare Reform 2 3 4

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HEALTHCARE REFORM

HEALTH RATING:

Strides have been made in reforming the American healthcare system, but it remains a controversial topic. How legislators will handle it going forward remains to be seen.

8 10

9

The new decade was a milestone for healthcare changes in the United States. In 2010, a little more than a year after his inauguration, President Barack Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which required everyone to have health insurance by 2014. The legislation strove to make affordable health insurance available to more people by providing subsidies for lowincome households, expanding Medicaid, and restricting health plans from denying coverage to anyone for any reason.

Throughout the years that have followed, healthcare has continued to be a huge part of political discourse, and it is now a major talking point for presidential candidates running for office in 2020.

To put it simply, there are lots of opinions. Joe Biden, who was vice president under Obama, wants to expand the Affordable Care Act and give Americans the choice of either enrolling in a public health insurance option or keeping their employer-based plan. Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren want to get rid of private insurance and establish Medicare for All. And Donald Trump wants to do away with the Affordable Care Act and reduce funding for Medicaid and Medicare. A decade after it first started trending, healthcare reform continues to be a controversial topic, and there doesn’t seem to be an easy solution in sight. In summer 2019, the American Medical Association stated it “strongly believes that every American should have access to meaningful, affordable coverage” and that America must “build on our current system of coverage provided by employers, government, and individually selected plans so that patients can benefit from choice and competition.” 75


1

E-Cigarettes 2

3

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E-CIGARETTES

HEALTH RATING:

E-cigarettes might have once been seen as a safe alternative to cigarettes by some people, but experts emphasize that’s not the case. They still pose certain health hazards. More research is being done to help doctors and legislators fully understand the risks that vaping devices might pose.

Electronic cigarettes, e-cigarettes, e-cigs, vapes — whatever you want to call them, they were originally embraced by people as a safer alternative to smoking tobacco 3 products. That’s because electronic cigarettes produced vapor instead of smoke. 4 When a person puffs on an electronic cigarette (or vapes, per the proper terminology), they inhale a vaporized nicotine solution that mimics that flavor 5 and feeling of tobacco smoke.

8 10

9

Action in the United States started in 2009 with the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, which gave the Food and Drug Administration the authority to regulate tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. However, despite the controversy, proponents of vaping continued to build a culture around it. The first VapeFest was held in Richmond, Virginia, in March 2010. A decade later, more information continues to be available on e-cigarettes. The National Institute on Drug Abuse notes that research so far shows they are less harmful than cigarettes when people who regularly smoke switch to them, but they are still dangerous to a person’s health. There are other concerns as well. It’s now understood that e-cigarettes can lead to a nicotine addiction just as cigarettes can, and it’s still to be determined whether they are an effective smoking cessation aid. More research is needed. Meanwhile, as of fall 2019, the FDA and CDC are investigating incidents of respiratory illness associated with vaping products.

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Gluten-Free Eating 2

Back toward the end of the 2000s, eating a gluten-free diet was still an emerging lifestyle. People were doing it, but it wasn’t as commonplace as it is today. But there’s been a lot of misconception that’s floated around in the years in between.

3 4

4

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GLUTEN-FREE EATING

HEALTH RATING:

While it’s great that growing awareness of gluten has made life easier for those with Celiac disease, it has also led to a lot of false information that has duped people into putting unnecessary dietary restrictions on themselves.

From the get-go, experts weren’t onboard with this alternative. In 2008, after e-cigarettes had been in the U.S. market for about two years, the World Health Organization stated it did not consider e-cigarettes to be a legitimate smoking cessation aid.

8 10

9

Gluten-free diets are beneficial for people with Celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder in which gluten — a type of protein found in wheat, barley and rye — triggers an immune reaction in the small intestines that prevents the absorption of nutrients.

Scientific circles have studied gluten allergies since the 1970s, but between 2005 and 2010, awareness of gluten entered mainstream culture. Celebrities and other prominent figures started claiming avoiding gluten helped them lose weight. Sales of gluten-free products exploded, and countless people started turning to wheat alternatives like rice flour.

However, doctors have responded to the gluten-free diet’s popularity by emphasizing the reality: Less than one percent of Americans actually have Celiac disease, and there’s no evidence to support claims of weight loss or overall improved health in people who don’t have an allergy. On the contrary, as Mayo Clinic points out, striking whole-grain products made from wheat, rye and barley can affect your intake of fiber, vitamins and minerals.

Restaurants and food manufacturers continue to cater to gluten-free living by providing more options and designating those options with gluten-free labels. For those who have Celiac disease, this is a huge step forward in helping them manage a normal life with their dietary restriction. For those who don’t have an allergy — well, it’s just another marketing ploy.

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Politics and religion have long been considered topics of conversation to steer clear of, especially when among families and friends. But a James Madison University communication studies professor is challenging this notion. Her research suggests that weighing in on these tough topics instead of avoiding them may spark conversations that can turn out to be more productive than divisive.

words | STEVE MCCLINTIC, JR.

While there are lots of good times to look forward to as the holidays approach, the season can also bring much unwanted stress. Whether it be diet concerns, the pressure of planning events or even anxiety over family gatherings, there’s no question that emotions can run high. But when it comes to a line commonly, almost universally, considered one never to be crossed – discussing heavy topics that traditionally have a track record of wrecking havoc on the most merry of occasions – James Madison University professors Lori Britt, PhD and Jaime Kurtz, PhD suggest what many would believe unthinkable: invite politics and religion to the table this holiday season. Dr. Britt, professor of communication studies at James Madison, says it actually may prove beneficial to dive into heavier topics over a meal with loved ones. As the focal point of her research – facilitating healing conversations – Britt’s aim is to shape dialogue that positively impacts individuals and communities. “Well designed and facilitated talk can keep people at the table even when the issues are difficult. This offers more opportunity to collaboratively find solutions,” says Dr. Britt.

Well designed and facilitated talk can keep people at the table even when the issues are difficult. This offers more opportunity to collaboratively find solutions. - LORI BRITT, PhD -

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BE HAPPY DURING THE HOLIDAYS

Leave the Stress Behind

Happiness is among Dr. Kurtz’s research interests, including looking at how people in other countries view happiness compared to Americans. She has authored more than 30 books and papers on the subject, including “The Happy Traveler: Unpacking the Secrets of Better Vacations.”

A few suggestions Dr. Kurtz can pass along to ease holiday stress include:

» Don’t procrastinate. Spread out your

shopping and other holiday prep so you’re not overwhelmed and battling crowds at the last minute.

» Anticipate likely challenges. Is there a

particular relative you always butt heads with? A person who is especially hard to shop for? Travel headaches that leave you exhausted? You can strategize on how to manage these challenges ahead of time.

» Consider what research says about gift giving. Give gifts that connect you with your

loved ones (such as a spa day together), gifts that save time for busy people (a meal delivery service), an experiential gift (movie tickets or a hot air balloon ride) or gifts that somehow really say, “I understand you.”

» Most of all, just take the pressure off of yourself. The more you try to craft a perfect holiday, the more stressed, less present, less connected, and less happy you will be.

Lori Britt, PhD Associate Professor in the School of Communication and Director of the Institute for Constructive Advocacy and Dialogue (ICAD) at James Madison University.

Jaime Kurtz, PhD Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at James Madison University.

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Dr. Britt’s teachings with the Institute for Constructive Advocacy and Dialogue at James Madison, where she serves as the director, is what the University describes as being infused with a passion for training students to design and facilitate conversations where people can tackle challenging issues and impede productive and healing conversations. Here are some tips she shares:

How to Have a Healing Conversation About Hot Button Topics Introduce a Topic in a Non-Confrontational Way Instead of beginning the conversation offering your viewpoint on a topic, first try to understand what others are concerned or hopeful for regarding pressing public issues. We have an easier time when we learn what people care about; the “why” rather than the “what” of their position. The National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD) offers these starter questions as part of its Revive Civility Project:

» What are you most thankful for about America? » What are your thoughts and feelings about the deep divisions and incivility we see now in the country?

A good practice is attempting to engage others through the spirit of curiosity. Dialogue shouldn’t be considered a competition where there’s a winner and loser; it’s about understanding each other. Try to shape the space into one where you can uncover the nuance. Think about asking questions that get beneath the surface of what another person believes so you can have a better understanding of why. This helps us humanize each other. For instance, I may not agree with my father’s commitment to free markets as the solution to many of our pressing concerns, but understanding his upbringing, his commitment to hard work, his career in banking, and his experience going through several recessions makes me understand why certain things are important to him. This allows us to learn about each other in deeper ways.

Establish Ground Rules for the Conversation If you are having a conversation with a large group, chances are there is going to be some strong opinions on both sides. Setting some ground rules before you begin can help keep everyone on point and reduce the chances of the conversation veering to far off the path. Examples can include:

» Assume Best Intent » Listen to Understand, Not to Counter » Don’t Interrupt » Share the Air (don’t monopolize the conversation)

If you get a group to agree to the guidelines, it’s easier to then gently remind or redirect a person or persons should the conversation seem to be getting off point. It may feel awkward to do at first, but in order to shape new habits for communication, we need to learn how to talk to each other in productive ways.

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Funny BONE HUMOR • SEARCH • CHECK

OURHEALTH ADVERTISER DIRECTORY 62 ABC Health Care 4

American Heart Association

29 Ariya Family Chiropractic Centers

77 Boomer Insurance Group 13

Carrell Blanton Ferris Attorneys-at-Law

70 Center for Neurorehabilitation Services 62 Chinese Acupuncture and Herbs 13

Christian Brothers Automotive

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Clinical Research Partners

11

Comfort Keepers

33 Commonwealth Endodontics 65 Comprehensive Hand Surgery Center 53 Concussion Care Centre of Virginia, LTD 37 F amily Practice Specialists of Richmond, PC 70 FocusMD 41

Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc.

37 HCA Virginia – Sarah Cannon Cancer Institute 58 James E Shadbolt, DPM, FACFAS 29 James River Cardiology 54, 84 JenCare Senior Medical Center 34 Just 4 Kids Pediatric Dentistry & Sedation 83 Medical Facilities of America 81

Can you spot the SEVEN differences between the two cartoons? Be the first reader to email us describing what the seven differences are and you will earn the satisfaction (and bragging rights) of having your name in print in the next edition. OK, START YOUR SEARCH! Email info@ourhealthvirginia.com with the subject line Funny Bone Richmond.

Montante Plastic Surgery and Aesthetics

62 Orthopedic Physical Therapy 7

Our Lady of Hope

66 Patient First 19

Pink Ribbon Boutique

56 Powell Orthotics 61

Pulmonary Associates of Richmond

48 Richmond Acupuncture Care 40 Richmond Gastroenterology Associates 17

Visit www.OurHealthRichmond.com or our Facebook page @OurHealthRichmond and sign up for our e-newsletter for more fun games, quizzes and contests to win great prizes!

Richmond Translator

70 Rosewood Village 65 RX3 Compounding Pharmacy 45 Sheltering Arms Physical Rehabilitation Center 9

Sitter and Barfoot Veterans Care Center

29 Sparkle Pediatric Dentistry 21

The Float Zone

48 Tuckahoe Orthopaedics 25 Vascular Surgery Associates

CONGRATULATIONS

CLIFTON LEMON of Richmond

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19

Virginia Arrhythmia Consultants

3

Virginia Cancer Institute

11

Virginia Commonwealth Bank

2

Virginia Family Dentistry

77 Virginia Prosthetics & Orthotics

Clifton Lemon of Richmond was the first person to email the correct seven differences in last issue’s Funny Bone.

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For the full list of answers visit our facebook page @OurHealthRichmond.

21

Virginia Surgical Institute

57 Virginia South Psychiatric 69 Virginia Women's Center Zacharias Ganey Health Institute

55 Zinsser Plastic Surgery PC


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Profile for OurHealth Magazines

OurHealth Magazine for Richmond: November/December 2019  

It's that time of year again! Find out if your favorite doctors and providers made the list in OurHealth's 7th Annual Best Bedside Manner Aw...

OurHealth Magazine for Richmond: November/December 2019  

It's that time of year again! Find out if your favorite doctors and providers made the list in OurHealth's 7th Annual Best Bedside Manner Aw...