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PLUS: State of Local Healthcare | High Blood Pressure Redefined | Breaking the Silence: Organ Transplantation February • March 2018 ourhealthlbss.com

HEALTHY MADE A L FOR MEA THE FAMILY

TOO ELEV K TH ATO E R MAD APPOIN E T WITH P MENT RIMARY CARE P HYS FOR AN ICIAN NU PHYSIC AL AL

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LOADED CO U APP ON CH T PHO O NE 5K STED EXHAU ORK. W FROM TO SKIP T F GO LE ND GET ICE YM A . THE G M INSTEAD N A E CR GHT FOR A R OF O RI OR G ATING HOU ER EXHIL CARDIO

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DROPPED 10 POUNDS AND KEPT IT OFF

Y LTH TH A E I A H ST W D HA AKFA KIDS E E BR TH

FOUN SUSPICIO D A U ON YOU S MO R A LE RM SKIP YO DENT UR APPOIN IST T M EN T

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SE O GN B P E DIA H H DIS IT W EART H

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– EE ENT N Y K TM ACH P OIN IEST IAL E AP MAK H SPEC WIT

SO SOM AKED UP E SU N


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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Lynchburg and Southside


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TABLE OF CONTENTS FEBRUARY • MARCH 2018

12 THE PULSE

| KEEPING THE PULSE ON HEALTHCARE

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STATE OF HEALTHCARE IN LYNCHBURG & SOUTHSIDE

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BREAKING THE SILENCE: ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION

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KEEPING YOUR HEALTH IN THE GAME OF LIFE

12 – NEW PEOPLE, PLACES & ANNOUNCEMENTS 16 – HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE REDEFINED: WHAT SHOULD YOU KNOW?

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CALENDAR

| FEBRUARY & MARCH 15 Things to Do for Your Mind, Body and Soul

22 THE CHECK-UP

| LOCAL HEALTH & MEDICINE

22 – THE GIFT OF VOLUNTEERING

A look at the healthcare landscape in the Lynchburg & Southside area.

This series explores medical conditions and procedures that can be devastating to patients and their families, but that no one is talking about. In this edition, OurHealth shares a local story about the impact of organ transplantation.

Ideal Protein Diet Helps Mother/Daughter Team Lose Over 200 Pounds.

24 – Q&A ON HEALTH

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TABLE OF CONTENTS FEBRUARY • MARCH 2018

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FITSTYLES

48 – SIDELINE HEROES: ATHLETIC TRAINERS KEEP HIGH .SCHOOL ATHLETES HEALTHY, READY FOR COMPETITION

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NUTRITION

MENS HEALTH

| HEALTH TIPS FOR MEN

57 – SNORE NO MORE: ADDRESSING MENS SNORING

| LOCAL FOODS & RECIPES

51 – GET PUMPED: HEART HEALTHY TIPS 52 – COOL CUCUMBER DIP 53 – SALMON WITH CILANTRO PESTO 54 – PINEAPPLE UPSIDE-DOWN CAKE

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| LOCAL FITNESS & ATHLETICS

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february • march 2018 PUBLISHER PRESIDENT/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF VICE PRESIDENT OF PRODUCTION ACCOUNTING MANAGER CHIEF GRAPHIC DESIGNER GRAPHIC DESIGNER DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER | EVENT SPECIALIST DIGITAL MEDIA STRATEGY PHOTOGRAPHER

McClintic Media, Inc. Steve McClintic, Jr. | steve@ourhealthvirginia.com Jennifer Hungate Laura Bower Karrie Pridemore Tori Meador Heidi McClintic Dalton Holody Gordon Harris

CONTRIBUTING MEDICAL EXPERTS Kara K. Beatty MD Joseph Khoury, MD Laura Smith, MD, FACOG, SREI Sherman O. Smock, MD Matthew Tompkins, MD John Waldron, MD CONTRIBUTING PROFESSIONAL Catherine Brown EXPERTS & WRITERS Brandy Centolanza Susan Dubuque Elissa Einhorn Michelle McLees Christy Rippel Brandon Shulleta

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING Cynthia Trujillo | Senior Media Consultant P: 434.907.5255 | cindy@ourhealthvirginia.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Subcriptions are $19.95 per year. To receive OurHealth Lynchburg and Southside via U.S. Mail, please contact Jenny Hungate at jenny@ourhealthvirginia.com

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COMMENTS/FEEDBACK/QUESTIONS We welcome your feedback. Please send all comments and/or questions to the following: U.S. Mail: McClintic Media, Inc., ATTN: Steve McClintic, Jr., President/ Publisher/Editor: 303 S. Colorado Street • Salem, VA 24153. | Email: steve@ourhealthvirginia.com | Phone: 540.387.6482 Ext. 1 Information in all print editions of OurHealth and on all OurHealth websites (websites listed below) and social media updates and emails is for informational purposes only. The information is not intended to replace medical or health advice of an individual’s physician or healthcare provider as it relates to individual situations. DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES ALTER ANY MEDICAL TREATMENT WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF YOUR DOCTOR. All matters concerning physical and mental health should be supervised by a health practitioner knowledgeable in treating that particular condition. The publisher does not directly or indirectly dispense medical advice and does not assume any responsibility for those who choose to treat themselves. The publisher has taken reasonable precaution in preparing this publication, however, the publisher does not assume any responsibility for errors or omissions. Copyright © 2018 by McClintic Media, Inc. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. OurHealth Lynchburg/Southside is published bi-monthly • Special editions are also published • McClintic Media, Inc. • 303 S. Colorado Street, Salem, VA 24153, P: 540.387.6482 F: 540.387.6483. MAIN: ourhealthvirginia.com | ourhealthswva.com | ourhealthlbss.com | ourhealthrichmond.com | ourhealthcville.com | Advertising rates upon request.

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The Pulse PEOPLE. PLACES. NEWS TO KNOW. words | ELISSA EINHORN

Recognitions Centra receives 5-Star Rating from CMS The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have awarded Centra Lynchburg General Hospital and Centra Virginia Baptist Hospital a five-star rating. Only 337 hospitals of the 4,000 hospitals across the United States can claim this highest ranking. In Virginia, Centra is one of eight in the state to be recognized with 5-stars. Notably, Centra Southside Community Hospital and Centra Bedford Memorial Hospital improved from 3 stars, to 4 stars. These ratings can be found on CMS’ Hospital Compare website that has information about the quality, safety and customer experience at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals across the country and is provided to the public to help patients make educated decisions. Visit www.medicare.gov/hospitalcompare.

Openings Fifth Street Community Health Center opens in downtown Lynchburg

Promotions

Built to provide primary care as an alternative to emergency departments, the $8 million center that acts as a second location for the Free Clinic of Central Virginia on Main Street, is a collaboration between Centra Health, Free Clinic of Central Virginia and the Community Access Network. The 19,250 square-foot building includes a pharmacy operated by Hill City Pharmacy, laundry and shower facilities, conference rooms and waiting room with seating for 40 people. Horizon Behavioral Health, which offers mental health, substance abuse use and intellectual disability services, also operates a new location out of the clinic. The center is largely serving the uninsured, underinsured and individuals with an income level less than 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Level – about $24,600 for a family of four and will see about 3,000 patients annually. Located on Fifth and Federal Streets and open seven days a week for walk-ins or scheduled appointments. Hours are from 10 am – 10 pm Thursday through Tuesday and on Wednesday from 9 am – 5 pm. Visit www.communityaccessnetwork.org.

Centra names new Chief Medical Officer Chris Thomson, MD is Centra’s new Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer. Dr. Thomson succeeds Daniel Carey, MD who was recently appointed the Secretary of Health and Human Resources for the state of Virginia. Dr. Thomson has been with Centra for 11 years, and has been a provider in the community for the last 18 years as an emergency medicine physician. Visit www.centrahealth.com.

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THE P ULSE |

Openings New eye surgery center announced in Martinsville

Health Happenings

Roanoke Valley Center for Sight has been awarded a Certificate of Public Need to operate an eye surgery center in Martinsville. Martinsville Center for Sight is slated to open in fall 2018 with one operating room and the capacity to add a second. Initially the Center will provide cataract surgery and expects to provide other types of eye surgery in the future. The new surgery center is planned for 433 E. Commonwealth Blvd. More than $1 million will be invested in remodeling and equipping the facility. Martinsville Center for Sight will be owned and managed by Roanoke Valley Center for Sight, which has eye surgery centers in Salem and Roanoke. Visit www.vistareye.com.

Jennifer Gonzalez, MD James Meadows, MD Medical Associates Internal Medicine Lynchburg | 434.947.3944 www.centralvamd.com

Centra Medical Group – Nationwide Lynchburg |434. 200.3908 www.centrahealth.com

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THE PULSE

For More of The Pulse Visit:

Openings

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Johnson Health Center opens in Rustburg Johnson Health Center is assuming operations of CVFP Rustburg, located at 925 Village Highway. Rustburg Health Center will offer primary care to adults and children Monday through Friday from 8 am – 5 pm. Ken Swanson, family nurse practitioner, will be returning to Rustburg to be the provider on staff. The office will begin seeing patients Monday, February 5th. An open house will be held Friday, February 2nd from 3 pm – 5 pm. All are welcome to tour the facility, meet the staff and enjoy refreshments.

Do you have health-related news to share for The Pulse? Send to Elissa Einhorn via email at elissa@ourhealthvirginia.com.

Visit www.jhcvirginia.org or call 434.929.1400.

What’s New?

Lynchburg Health & Rehabilitation Center Welcomes New Administrator A friendly new face is greeting patients and their families at Lynchburg Health & Rehabilitation Center. Lynchburg Health & Rehabilitation Center welcomes Andrew Shuler as its new Administrator of the facility. Shuler, who relocated from Danville where he was Administrator at Piney Forest Health & Rehabilitation Center, assumed responsibilities in Lynchburg in mid-January of this year. The “Hill City” is a familiar place for this United States Air Force veteran. Shuler grew up in the Lynchburg area and is excited to be back in his hometown. Lynchburg Health & Rehabilitation Center has been proudly serving the greater Lynchburg community including Madison Heights, Forest and more, since 1975. For more information on the Rehab’s recovery programs, including Fast Track Ortho, Advanced Rehab and Conditioning (ARC), and Activities in Motion, visit www.mfa.net.

Andrew Shuler

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THE PULSE

Q&A

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE REDEFINED What should you know?

words | MICHELLE MCLEES, SPECIAL CONTRIBUTER FROM THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION

N

early half of American adults are at risk for major health problems because of high blood pressure, according to recently released guidelines by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. University of Virginia professor of medicine Robert Carey, MD, who served as vice chairman of the committee that wrote the guidelines, says, “The new rules should help catch warning signs of heart and kidney disease and encourage early treatment.” OurHealth Lynchburg & Southside Magazine sat down with Dr. Carey and asked him questions about the new guidelines and other related information we should all be aware of.

What is the new definition of high blood pressure? Dr. Carey: The guideline changes the definition of high blood pressure. It is now considered any measurement at or above 130 systolic or 80 diastolic. (Systolic is the term for the top number, diastolic the bottom.) High blood pressure used to be defined as readings at or above 140 systolic or 90 diastolic.

Why did the guidelines need updating? Dr. Carey: There is a growing body of evidence that lower blood pressure is better for your health. The 2017 guideline reflects this new information to help people prevent and treat high blood pressure sooner

Why do the guidelines no longer identify prehypertension? Dr. Carey: The guideline committee moved away from the term “prehypertension” because the data shows the risk for heart attack, heart failure, stroke and other consequences of high blood pressure begins to occur at any level above 120 mmHg. Heart disease and stroke risk is doubled at 130-139/80-89 compared to blood pressure below 120/80.

How many Americans now have high blood pressure, according to the 2017 guidelines? Dr. Carey: We are going from one in three US adults with high blood pressure (32%) to nearly half of the US adult population (46%) with high blood pressure. 16

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Does lowering the baseline for diagnoses increase the number of people taking meds? Dr. Carey: The new definition of high blood pressure results in more persons being actively counseled on lifestyle changes to reduce blood pressure but only a small increase (1.9%) in the percentage of US adults for whom antihypertensive medication is recommended in conjunction with lifestyle management.

How does this change the percent of Americans at risk for stroke and heart attack? Dr. Carey: Risk has not changed. The new guidelines recognize identify that risk and encourage patients and providers to take significant action, and take it sooner, to prevent heart attacks and strokes.

The guidelines say I now have high blood pressure, when I didn’t before. What will change at my next doctor visit? Dr. Carey: Your doctor will talk to you about how this new definition changes the approach in managing your blood pressure and reducing future risk. Most of those who are newly diagnosed due to the guideline update will be advised to take action (dietary changes and increased physical activity, for example) to keep their blood pressure from rising further and may not require medication immediately.


Regular physical activity (90-150 minutes per week)

Robert M. Carey, MD

High Blood Pressure Redefined

Dr. Carey: The following lifestyle information should be considered:

THE P ULSE |

What types of lifestyle changes will help me manage my blood pressure?

Professor of medicine and dean emeritus at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and vice chairman of the 2017 Hypertension Guideline Writing Committee.

A healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy products with reduced content of saturated and total fat Maintaining a healthy weight Reduced intake of dietary sodium (<1,500 mg/d is optimal goal but at least reduce your current intake by 1,000 mg/d) Enhanced intake of dietary potassium Moderation in alcohol intake (for men, two or less drinks daily and for women, one drink daily)

My blood pressure level is now considered “Stage 2” – does that mean I’m at higher risk for heart attack or stroke? Dr. Carey: While the definitions for the stages of high blood pressure have changed, it doesn’t mean you face a dramatic increase in risk. Rather, the guideline is more aggressively identifying the risk that exists, and recommending action earlier. According to the new guidelines, most adults diagnosed with Stage 2 high blood pressure should be prescribed two antihypertensive medications in addition to lifestyle change recommendations. EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR Robert M. Carey, MD with the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Richmond.

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HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE is now considered any measurement at or above:

130 80

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CALENDAR 15 THINGS TO DO FOR YOUR MIND, BODY AND SOUL words | ELISSA EINHORN

MONEY $MART

Borrowing Basics An opportunity to improve the health of your financial house during this second in a 12-month Money Smart financial literacy series presented by Woodforest Bank. February’s topic is Borrowing Basics. Participants will understand how credit works, types of credit that are available and if they are ready to apply for credit. Free | 4 – 5:30 pm Bedford Central Library 321 North Bridge St | Bedford w www.bplsonline.org

2.2 Johnson Health Center

2.2

GO RED FOR WOMEN Come together on National Wear Red Day during American Heart Month! It’s time to prioritize your health and Go Red For Women has an engaging new initiative to keep healthy living interesting and fresh! Macy’s department store is joining in to cheer you on and keep you motivated with exciting prizes, like the chance to win a $1,000, $500, or $250 Macy’s gift card! Join the #GoRedGetFit Facebook group and begin a healthy lifestyle journey that positively impacts the way you look and feel, inside and out! #GoRedGetFit is a quarterly health and fitness challenge that combines nationally known and influential celebrity fitness trainers with the power, influence and encouragement of real women like you! #WearRedandGive. #GoRedGetFit.

w www.goredforwomen.org

Grand Opening/Ribbon Cutting Johnson Health Center, an independent, nonprofit, federally qualified community health center, is expanding once again by assuming operations of Rustburg Health Center. A division of Johnson Health Center, the Center will offer primary care to adults and children Monday through Friday from 8:00 am – 5:00 pm. The office will begin seeing patients February 5th. Ken Swanson, family nurse practitioner, will be returning to Rustburg to be the provider on staff. Come out and tour the facility, enjoy refreshments and meet the staff. Free | 3 – 5 pm Johnson Health Center | 925 Village Highway | Rustburg

c 434.845.5966

2.3 ARTIC 5K TRAIL RACE

Outdoor Recreation’s annual Arctic 5k Trail Race is one of the toughest, off-road courses in Lynchburg and is the first trail race in the Spring Liberty Mountain Trail Series. The course is comprised of a single-track trail intermixed with some forest roads. Awards will be given to the top three male and female overall winners, top three male and female in each age group, and top male and female masters overall winners. Door prizes will also be given out at the awards ceremony following the race. $25 (price increases after February 2nd) | 9:00 am Hydaway Outdoor Recreation Center | 936 Camp Hydaway Rd | Lynchburg w bit.ly/2Bp3FOF

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CALENDAR |

2.6 Women Wine Wisdom

February & March

We all need people in our lives to fan the flame and help us keep our lights shining. This evening will do just that! Enjoy a glass of wine, connect with others and be inspired by the wisdom of some amazing female professionals who will help “fan the flame” within you! $15: Alliance members; $25 General Admission 5:30 – 7 pm Lynchburg Regional Business Alliance 300 Lucado Pl | Lynchburg

c 434.845.5966

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2.8 XLR8

STEM ACADEMY

NAIL THE RAIL 9 MILER & New Virtual 9 Miler

Organized by Miles in Martinsville, a challenge series created to support outreach programs of the Martinsville-Henry County Family YMCA, such as the Doctor’s Orders program, and financial aid and scholarships for Y membership and child care. Runners starts at the zero-mile marker of the Dick and Willie Passage, run all the way to the 4.5 marker at Mulberry Creek, turn around, and run back. Can’t run the race on race day? Now you can run between February 3rd-10th and submit your GPS watch time to brad@martinsvilleymca.com. Virtual runners will receive the same race swag. Awards for top three male and female will also be given for virtual runners. $30 – $40 (price varies based on date of registration) 9 am 9 miles along the Dick & Willie Passage | Martinsville

c 276.632.1772 | m info@milesinmartinsville.com w Register at bit.ly/2DsqGBZ

2.14

Ribbon Cutting at Centra Bedford Memorial Hospital Emergency Department Join the Bedford Area Chamber of Commerce to celebrate the grand re-opening of Centra Bedford Memorial Hospital’s Emergency Department. Light refreshments and a tour of the renovations included. Free | 1 – 3 pm Centra Bedford Memorial Hospital 1613 Oakwood St | Bedford m mdooley@bedfordareachamber.com

Information Sessions

This is a great opportunity for current 10th graders and parents to see what the XLR8 STEM Academy has to offer students interested in STEM (Science Technology, Engineering and Math), Health Science and Cyber Security Technology. Students can specialize in their senior year in Mechatronics/ Engineering; Biotechnology/Health Science; or Cyber Security. Free | 6 – 8 pm Central Virginia Community College, Merritt Hall 3506 Wards Rd | Lynchburg

c 434.832.7731 or 434.832.7651

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HOT TOPICS IN ETHICS:

Power, Control and Workplace Ethics Organized by Centra Mental Health Services, this seminar is designed to provide attendees with the tools they need to resolve ethical issues that often develop in the workplace. This highly-interactive session will consider topics such as managing collegial relationships, analyzing appropriate boundaries in the supervisor-supervisee relationship, defining sexual harassment and hostile work environments, and exploring the ethical basis for justified whistleblowing. Presented by Michael Gillette, PhD, President, Bioethical Services of Virginia, Inc. $75 ($50 for Centra employees) | 11:30 am – 3 pm The Kirkley Hotel | 2900 Candlers Mountain Rd | Lynchburg

c 434.200.4447 | m jill.goughnour@centralhealth.com www.OurHealthlbss.com

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CALENDAR

BOUND TO THE FIRE

Book Talk with Author Kelley Fanto Deetz Hear the story behind Southern food when author Kelly Deetz discusses her new book, “Bound to the Fire: How Virginia’s Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American Cuisine.” Then visit Poplar Forest’s historic kitchen where Poplar Forest interpreters will demonstrate period cooking techniques. A historical archaeologist, historian, and visiting Assistant Professor at Randolph College, Deetz draws upon archaeological evidence, cookbooks, and plantation records and folklore for this study of enslaved plantation cooks. The Program includes a cooking demonstration by Poplar Forest interpreters in the historic kitchen.

Autism Competencies

for Direct Support Professionals

Learn about supporting individuals with autism based on the Virginia Autism Councils (VAC) Skill Competencies for Professionals and Direct Support Staff in Virginia Supporting Adolescents and Adults with Autism. This training meets all requirements for Support Levels 5, 6 and 7 for adults determined by the Supports Intensity Scale and Supplemental Questions. Topics to be covered: General Knowledge Concerning Autism, Environmental Structure and Visual Supports, Communication, Social Skills, Behavior, Sensory, Independence and Community Engagement.

$10 | 2 – 5 pm Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest 1542 Bateman Bridge Rd | Forest

c 434.525.1806 | w bit.ly/2DBgtHL

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$50 | Noon – 4 pm The Arc of Southside 734 Main St | Danville

The 2nd annual Ties & Tails Mardi Paws Gala is the most important evening of the year for Lynchburg and surrounding areas homeless animals. Glamorous and compassionate animal lovers will enjoy cocktails, hot h’dourves, dancing, door prizes and silent auctions! Central Virginia Regional Rescue is a volunteer-based (foster home) nonprofit organization dedicated to the rescue, rehabilitation and re-homing of local animals.

c 434.836.3272

$55 – $500 | 6 – 11 pm Tresca on 8th | 724 Commerce St | Lynchburg

w bit.ly/2DEKd5D

3.23 HORIZON’S GOT TALENT

Join in for the 4th Annual Horizon’s Got Talent, a fundraiser for Horizon Behavioral Health. Your ticket includes dinner and a show put on by some of the best talent in Lynchburg. Horizon Behavioral Health is the premier provider of mental health, substance use and intellectual disability services in Central Virginia. Horizon’s mission is to support and promote the health, independence and self-worth of individuals and families in Central Virginia by providing a continuum of community-based prevention, early intervention, aftercare and psychosocial rehabilitation services for persons affected by mental health, intellectual disabilities, substance abuse and co-occurring disorders. $60 – $420 | 6 – 9 pm | 3410 Old Forest Rd | Lynchburg | c 434.238.7727 |

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w bit.ly/2DEKd5D


CALENDAR | February & March

3.25 LYNCHBURG Mini Maker Faire 2018 Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth – a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker Movement. It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning. Makers range from tech enthusiasts to crafters to homesteaders to scientists to garage tinkerers, and are of all ages and backgrounds. The aim of the Maker Faire is to entertain, inform, connect and grow this community. Free | Noon – 4:30 pm Randolph College 2500 Rivermont Ave | Lynchburg

w makerfaire.com

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Do you have an event that our readers simply must know about? Tell us about it by emailing Elissa Einhorn at elissa@ourhealthvirginia.com. Please submit your information at least three months in advance to be considered for publication in the magazine. www.OurHealthlbss.com

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THE CHECKUP

The Gift of Volunteering Bonnie Kidd Helps Raise Funds for Cancer Patients words | BRANDY CENTOLANZA

Having cancer is not pleasant, but Bonnie Kidd is making life just a little bit easier for those who are suffering from the disease. For the past five years, Kidd has been a volunteer at Seasons Boutique, a gift shop for cancer patients and their families. Seasons Boutique is located within Centra’s Alan B. Pearson Regional Cancer Center in Lynchburg.

“Anything that someone donates is always appreciated and never taken for granted. We want people to know that anything they offer is going solely to help the patients, so everything donated is worthwhile.” BONNIE KIDD of Lynchburg. A compassionate community volunteer.

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“The gift shop provides services including massage, hair salon, manicures, pedicures, bra fittings, wigs, compression garments fittings, gifts and snack foods,” shares Kidd. In addition to Seasons Boutique, Kidd has also been active with Trees of Hope, an annual event that raises funds for cancer patients who need financial help or any other assistance during this challenging time. The Trees of Hope campaign runs during the holiday season from the start of November through mid-December. Kidd has been a co-chair of Trees of Hope for the past three years, which involves coordinating an annual silent auction for the campaign. “All the money raised from this event goes directly into the Patient Care Fund,” Kidd says. “These funds can be used for medicine, tests, wigs, hotels and personal needs. Thanks to the community support, this past year we raised almost $24,000. This was made possible due to businesses and caring individuals who donated decorated Christmas trees, home crafts, gift cards, paintings, home décor items, sports items, spa packages, pet items and baskets.” No monetary donation is too small for Trees of Hope. “Anything that someone donates is always appreciated and never taken for granted,” Kidd says. “We want people to know that anything they offer is going solely to help the patients, so everything donated is worthwhile.” Through the years, Kidd has been struck by the kindness of those who’ve helped with Trees of Hope. One year, she says, “one young girl made bracelets, sold them, and gave all the money she raised from this to the Patient Care Fund. The pride this child got from giving back has no price tag.”

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THE C HEC K UP |

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The Gift of Volunteering

This is all part of the reason why Kidd has chosen to volunteer at the Alan B. Pearson Regional Cancer Center. “Everyone you are surrounded by at Pearson Cancer Center serves others with an open heart,” Kidd says. “Seeing joy and hope in others during this difficult time is an extremely rewarding experience.”

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Kidd is also part of the Stephen Ministry at Peakland United Methodist Church, where she is a member. “This ministry supplements pastoral care,” Kidd explains. “The program teaches laypeople to provide one-on-one care for individuals who request support.” In addition, Kidd dedicates her time to Mammograms Annually A Must (MAAM), which is a committee of the Centra Foundation whose mission is to raise awareness about the importance of breast cancer screenings. She is also a prospective member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). “Above all, I take great pride in being a grandmother to my ten beautiful grandchildren,” Kidd says. Kidd feels that everybody should help others in some way. “I feel strongly that everyone should do daily what they are able to do,” she says. “It could be a kind word to someone or taking a meal to someone. Just being supportive. Volunteering can come in any shape and size. It is not what you do but what you can do at the time of need. If it is just one day or many more, supporting others is always worthwhile.” EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR Bonnie Kidd, volunteer at Seasons Boutique in Lynchburg and so much more.

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HEALTH H E A LT H C A R E QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY LOCAL PROFESSIONALS

The Academy of Sleep Medicine guidelines, endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that teens get between 8 to 10 hours of sleep nightly.

How much sleep should a teenager get?

How is ideal weight calculated?

Sleep is an important and underappreciated component of health for everyone. Teenagers frequently get much less sleep than they need, which can impact their health, mood, and school performance. The Academy of Sleep Medicine guidelines, endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that teens get between 8 to 10 hours of sleep nightly. One problem I frequently see in teens is they tend to have an erratic sleep schedule, with sleeping in on weekends and then having to rise early for school during the week. This is an unhealthy pattern; I recommend trying to have a set bedtime and wake time regardless of the day of the week, including weekends.

An ideal body weight is usually calculated based on something called the body mass index (BMI). Basically, it uses a formula that uses a ratio of weight to height. Healthy people typically have a BMI of between 18.5 and 25. People whose BMI is less than 18 are underweight and those over 25 are overweight. There are a number of online calculators that can help with this calculation and it is calculated at every primary care office visit as well.

Joseph Khoury, MD

Lynchburg Pulmonary Associates Lynchburg | 434.947.3963 www.lynchburgpulmonary.com

– Joseph Khoury, MD

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Lynchburg and Southside

When the ideal body weight is over what it should be, it is often an indication that lifestyle modifications are needed. The goal is never just to get a perfect weight, but to make people healthy. Fad diets tend to fail because they are short term fixes for long term problems. The only way to achieve the goal is with a long-term commitment to aerobic exercise and a healthy diet.

John Waldron, MD

Centra Medical Group – Brookneal Brookneal | 434.376.2325 www.centrahealth.com

How likely is pregnancy after a tubal reversal surgery? The chance of pregnancy after tubal reversal surgery depends on several factors. A woman’s age, egg supply, uterine and tubal anatomy, and sperm count all affect pregnancy. The surgical technique used to perform the tubal ligation, whether or not she has had cesarean sections or other pelvic surgery, pelvic scarring, and tubal length are also critical. The greatest chances of pregnancy following tubal reversal surgery are if a woman is less than 35 years old, has normal egg supply, her partner has a normal sperm count, a “filshie clip” laparoscopic tubal ligation, and if there is not extensive pelvic scarring found at surgery. In this “ideal” instance, we would predict that she would have an approximately 50-75 percent chance of having a baby following tubal reversal. At her initial consultation, our physicians discuss a woman’s specific history and surgery, recommended testing, and estimate her chances of pregnancy following tubal reversal.

Laura Smith, MD, FACOG, SREI Reproductive Medicine and Surgery Center of Virginia, PLC Charlottesville | 434.654.8520 www.rmscva.com


THE C HEC K UP | Q&A on Health

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HEALTH H E A LT H C A R E QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY LOCAL PROFESSIONALS

What is gum recession? Gum recession is a progressive loss of the gum tissue on a tooth root. When gums recede, the bone support is lost. The change may result in tooth sensitivity and tooth loss. Gum disease is the primary cause of receding gums. Other causes include: hormonal changes, smoking, tooth grinding, crooked teeth, body piercing of the lip or tongue, too vigorous brushing and using a hard tooth brush.

Nearly half of women experience urinary incontinence and as little as 25 percent of those women seek medical care.

– Matthew Tompkins, MD

To treat gum recession, the underlying cause should first be identified, then damage can be repaired. Surgical repair may be necessary. To regain lost tissue both functionally as well as aesthetically, special materials or your own tissue can be used to regenerate the bone and the soft tissue. Soft tissue grafts are used to regain the lost soft tissue and there are a number of procedures that have been developed to achieve the best result. Periodontists are specialists in the treatment of these problems. Sherman O. Smock, DDS

Periodontal Health Associates Lynchburg | 434.455.2444 www.periodontalhealthassociates.com

Since the birth of my last child I have had a serious struggle with urinary incontinence. What can I do? This can be an uncomfortable topic and difficult for women to ask due to embarrassment or the misconception that it is normal and untreatable. The most common type of incontinence in young women associated with childbirth is stress urinary incontinence. This is leaking of urine associated with an event such as coughing, sneezing, exercising or squatting. It is caused by a weakness of the pelvic floor muscles surrounding the urethra. Strengthening exercises of these muscles called Kegel exercises can make a significant improvement. This consists of squeezing the muscles you use when you try to stop your urine stream in the middle of the flow. I recommend 10 squeezes for 10 seconds each, 2-3 times a day with care to avoid bearing down and contracting your stomach or buttocks muscles. Weight loss in overweight women, smoking cessation and scheduled voiding can also help. Other treatment options through a urogynecologist, gynecologist, or urologist include physical therapy of the pelvic floor, pessaries (devices that you insert vaginally to support the urethra), and minimally invasive surgical options.

Matthew Tompkins, MD

Lynchburg Gynecology Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery Lynchburg | 434.385.7818 www.lynchburggynecology.com

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OurHealth | The Resource for Healthy Living in Lynchburg and Southside

Does alcohol kill brain cells? Alcohol can lead to altered communication between brain cells by damaging dendrites, the part of the neuron that sends messages between cells. It can also affect functions of brain cells indirectly by causing organ system failure and vitamin deficiency. People can present with different symptoms, depending on the area of the brain that is affected.

Kara K. Beatty, MD

Center for Neurorehabilitation Services PC Richmond | 804.272.0114 www.centerforneurorehabservices.org


THE C HEC K UP | Q&A on Health

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STATE OF

HEALTHCARE IN LYNCHBURG & SOUTHSIDE words | BRANDON SHULLEETA

As 2018 kicks off, major changes are taking place for many hospitals and medical facilities across the country, often with an infusion of new technology and improved medical practices. This is true for the Lynchburg and Southside communities in Virginia, but two of their key focuses for 2018 will also be regional cooperation and the development of more and better medical facilities. Among the biggest developments for 2018 is the fact that it will be the first full year for Sovah Health, a new regional hospital system formed by the joining of two hospitals in Danville and Martinsville — the Danville Regional Medical Center and Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County. Meanwhile, in Lynchburg, an $8 million clinic opened on Fifth Street with an aim to increase healthcare access in the area, especially among patients who are uninsured and have low incomes. These moves are part of an effort to provide high-quality care to people in a slice of Virginia that’s largely rural and historically underserved.

SOVAH HEALTH HOPES TO IMPROVE HEALTH IN SOUTH CENTRAL VIRGINIA In June 2017, Danville Regional Medical Center and Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County announced that the two powerhouse medical institutions would expand what had already been years of collaboration by forming Sovah Health. This will be the first full year that the new regional medical system will operate under the single name. Leaders of the initiative hope that it will mean a more effective response to healthcare needs in the region with a focus on being proactive. “Danville Regional and Memorial Hospital have collaborated for many years to make communities across Southern Virginia healthier,” Sovah Health CEO Alan Larson said when announcing the collaboration. “Becoming Sovah Health allows us to build upon this partnership in exciting ways, expand our services to meet the changing needs of our communities, adapt in the changing healthcare environment and create exciting new opportunities for growth for our staff and providers,” Larson says.

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Sovah Health will serve a sevencounty region across southern Virginia and northern North Carolina. Combined, the Danville and Martinsville campuses plan to employ more than 2,100 staff members and 200 physicians on active medical staff while serving more than 100,000 patients yearly.

Sovah Health will serve a seven-county region across southern Virginia and northern North Carolina. Combined, the Danville and Martinsville campuses plan to employ more than 2,100 staff members and 200 physicians on active medical staff while serving more than 100,000 patients yearly. Sovah Health offers inpatient, outpatient and emergency services, including cardiology, oncology, preventative health and wellness, radiology, rehabilitation, surgical services and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services. The Danville campus features a 250-bed medical center and more than 30 medical specialties, while the Martinsville campus is a 223-bed hospital with more than 25 medical specialties.

FIFTH STREET COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER NOW OPEN IN LYNCHBURG To jumpstart 2018, the Fifth Street Community Health Center was opened to the public on January 2 after much anticipation, which had been under construction since the September 2016 groundbreaking for the facility. The development comes in response to a community where the medical needs of tens of thousands of residents are underserved. At the time of the groundbreaking, more than a year before the grand opening, there were about 17,000 uninsured residents in the community and 37,000 residents with Medicaid or Medicare who did not have access to primary care, according to health professionals in the region. Meanwhile, the poverty rate for African Americans in the area was about 96.3 percent. The Fifth Street Community Health Center serves as a free clinic site, providing walk-in

athelas

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FEATUR ES |

immediate and primary care services to high-risk underinsured or uninsured patients. It also provides mental health services.

State of Healthcare in Lynchburg & Southside

The new center is at the corner of Fifth and Federal Streets in downtown Lynchburg at 800 Fifth Street. The 19,250-square foot building was an $8 million investment that was made in collaboration with the Free Clinic of Central Virginia, Centra Health and the Community Access Network, which consists of local healthcare providers working “to address the lack of access to healthcare locally and the social factors affecting the communities’ health,” according to Centra Health. “Through partnerships with nonprofits and social service agencies in the community, the clinic will also be equipped to address social issues affecting patients’ health,” Centra Health said in a statement, social issues that include “inadequate housing, transportation or a lack of financial resources. Having all these services under one roof is truly unique.”

CENTRA HEALTH OPENS URGENT CARE CENTER Meanwhile, in the Forest area, the new Centra Urgent Care facility was opened in early 2017. The urgent care facility is designed for patients who have time-sensitive medical needs that are not life-threatening.

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The facility was opened to patients on Jan. 23, 2017 at 16890 Forest Road in Forest. Its hours of operation are 8 am to 8 pm daily, and no appointments are necessary.

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While the urgent care center is not designed for patients with life-threatening injuries, it is well-suited for patients who can’t wait for primary care physicians to treat them. For example, the medical professionals at the center are able to treat patients suffering from ear pain, asthma, injuries, sore throats, painful urination and flu-like symptoms, among many other potential ailments. Digital x-ray and labs are available onsite.

CENTRA LYNCHBURG GENERAL HOSPITAL RECOGNIZED AS A TOP HOSPITAL FOR HEART SURGERY Centra Lynchburg General Hospital enters 2018 with a distinction that few other hospitals can boast after having been recognized as one of the best hospitals in the country for heart surgery.

“Becoming Sovah Health allows us to build upon this partnership in exciting ways, expand our services to meet the changing needs of our communities, adapt in the changing healthcare environment and create exciting new opportunities for growth for our staff and providers.” ALAN LARSON Sovah Health CEO

In May, Centra Lynchburg General Hospital announced that it had been recognized by a consumer analysis published in partnership with the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. That report marked Centra Lynchburg General Hospital as one of about 70 hospitals considered among the top nationally for heart surgery. The Lynchburg hospital earned top scores for both aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass surgery.

OPIOID CRISIS AND MENTAL HEALTH BEING ADDRESSED Danville is among a list of high-risk localities in Virginia that are targeted for prevention, treatment and recovery related to opioid use, according to an August 2017 report from the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health & Developmental Services. Mental health and drug use problems in Danville and the surrounding areas have not gone unnoticed by local medical professionals, who are looking to tackle the problem head on. One way that the crisis is being addressed is by providing more medical attention to those in need. Danville Regional Medical Center, for example, expanded its Behavioral Health Unit last year, investing about $3 million for the renovation, raising the total number of beds to 24, and making the area more spacious, among other improvements, according to multiple media reports. Among the improvements were more security cameras and suicide preventive bathrooms. The project also moved behavioral health patients from the oldest part of the building to a newer section. Amanda Oakes, director of prevention services for Danville-Pittsylvania Community, was quoted calling the opioid crisis in Danville “an emergency.” Oakes noted that the fatality rate for opioid overdoses had been higher in Danville than the state fatality rate for 8 out of the previous 10 years. EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR Alan Larson, Sovah Health CEO in Danville.

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FEATUR ES | Breaking the Silence: Organ Transplantation

Breaking the Silence:

Organ Transplantation words | SUSAN DUBUQUE

This series explores medical conditions and procedures that can be devastating to patients and their families, but that no one is talking about. We will talk openly about these disorders and dedicate our stories to the courageous individuals living with them and the health care providers and researchers committed to treating and curing these enigmatic diseases.

For five years, William “Dan” Andrews was tethered to a 45-foot length of tubing. His life, his every breath, depended on a chugging apparatus called an oxygen concentrator. Just leaving the house for dinner was an ordeal. It involved toting a 25-pound device along and watching the clock carefully to make sure its battery didn’t run down. But all that changed on June 7, 2017, when a single phone call gave Dan his life back. Always a prankster, Dan loves nothing more than teasing his wife Kathy and his four daughters, Annie, Liz, Lauren, and Meghan. But in 2012, Dan seemed to have lost his sense of humor and his zest for living. “Even the smallest effort left me feeling exhausted and breathless,” he recalls. “My wife finally convinced me to see a doctor.” After a trip to the emergency room and a short hospital stay, Dan learned he was suffering from severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a progressive ailment of the lungs that causes reduced oxygenation, making it hard to breathe. “My lung capacity was only 13 percent of what it should have been, and the doctor immediately put me on oxygen and referred me to a pulmonologist, Dr. Donkor.” Dan continued to work, relying on an oxygen concentrator at the office to let him run his contracting business. “Even with the support of oxygen, I still tired easily,” he says. “It was a pretty depressing time for me.” But Dan isn’t one to stay down for long. He inquired about a pulmonary rehabilitation program he learned about through a brochure in his pulmonologist’s office. “My doctor thought it was a good idea and encouraged me to check it out,” says Dan. “I called Paula McNutt, the rehab

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“I don’t know who gave me this incredible gift, but I sometimes imagine that my donor was a man. And I envision that he had a family – perhaps two children. It saddens me to know someone had to die for my life to be restored. But I would like to assure my donor’s family that I will take very good care of my lungs and that a part of their loved one lives on.”

nurse at Centra Southside Community Hospital, and she told me that each session would cost $250. So I quickly crossed that off my list. Fortunately, Paula looked into other options and called me back. She said I would only have to pay $40 per session, the equivalent of a doctor’s office visit.” Dan signed up and enthusiastically started the exercise and breathing regimen. “When Dr. Donkor retired in 2016, I started seeing Dr. John Plankeel, a pulmonologist in Lynchburg,” says Dan. “My first visit with him produced news — both good and bad. The bad news was that my tests showed that my pulmonary function was now only nine percent of normal. But the good news was that I might be a candidate for a lung transplant.” In May 2016, Dan went to the Transplant Center at UVA Health System for an evaluation. Four months later, he joined the waiting list for a double lung transplant. On June 7, 2017, at 1 PM, the transplant coordinator at UVA called Dan and asked him to come to the hospital immediately. “Fortunately, my oldest grandson overhead my part of the conversation,” says Dan. “Kathy and Lauren thought I was kidding.” But the family soon realized that this was really happening: Dan was getting a second chance at life. “We were excited and scared at the same time.” His go-bag was already packed, and at 3:30 PM Dan was admitted to the short-stay unit to wait until the lungs arrived. At 10 PM he was taken to preop, and by 11 PM he was in the operating room. Kathy, Lauren, Annie, Meghan, and Meghan’s husband, Rob Orr, waited anxiously through the night. Dan’s life rested in the hands of Alexander Krupnick, MD, a thoracic surgeon in the UVA Health System. But the operation went flawlessly and was done by 3 AM “Dad was in his room by 5 AM and off the ventilator by noon,” Lauren remembers. Dan’s recovery was remarkable. Just three months after his surgery, he completed a local 5k. “Kathy and I walked and Meghan ran the 5k, and Lauren ran the half-marathon. It was a real celebration after all we had been through the past year,” says Dan. “I really believe that my fast

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FEATUR ES | Breaking the Silence: Organ Transplantation

“I’m semi-retired now. I want to enjoy every minute of every day. I have an immense feeling of gratitude.” - William ’Dan’ Andrews

recovery was in large part due to the pulmonary rehab program. Other than my lungs, I was basically in pretty good shape.” “Our whole family is incredibly grateful to UVA for giving us our father back,” says Lauren. “When we were young, Dad was involved in all our activities, like coaching our little league teams. I want my son Carter (11), and Annie’s children, James (13) and Sam (11), to have the same experience.” Meghan is recently married and is also excited that her future children will have the opportunity to know their grandfather. “It really is pretty amazing how the pieces just fell into place,” Dan recounts. “My primary care physician convinced me to go to the hospital. The hospital referred me to the pulmonologist, where I happened to see a brochure that led me to pulmonary rehab. Paula McNutt took the time to investigate the payment options so I could afford to participate in the program. My doctor retired, so I saw Dr. Plankeel, who in turn suggested the transplant. I truly believe this sequence of events involved more than just luck. There was a higher power up there pulling the strings.” Dan’s life has changed in many ways since his transplant. “I’m semi-retired now,” he says. “I want to enjoy every minute of every day. I have an immense feeling of gratitude. I am thankful for Paula McNutt for getting me back in shape so I was ready for surgery. For my transplant team — Drs. Weder, Kilbourne, and Mannem — who managed my care before my operation and keep me well now. And, of course, I am grateful for my surgeon Dr. Krupnik and his team. In fact, the whole staff at UVA — from the housekeepers and people who delivered my food, to the doctors and nurses — all treated me and my family with extraordinary care and compassion.” Today, Dan’s future looks bright. “My lung capacity is excellent,” he says. “Now I can devote my time to important things — like pestering my wife and grandkids, going fishing and turkey hunting, and getting back to fixing up my cabin in Cumberland County. It’s been lying dormant for five years and it needs some love and attention.”

What is COPD? COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a disease that causes reduced airflow to the lungs and makes it hard to breathe. It is also progressive, meaning that it worsens over time. COPD can include emphysema, chronic bronchitis, or both. Roughly 15 million adults in the US have been diagnosed with COPD, but millions more may not even know that they have it. Cigarette smoking is the most common cause of COPD, but other factors include long-term exposure to secondhand smoke, air pollutants, chemicals, and dust.

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“I don’t know who gave me this incredible gift, but I sometimes imagine

When Dan reflects on his life, he feels a deep connection to his organ donor. “I don’t know who gave me this incredible gift, but I sometimes imagine that my donor was a man,” says Dan. “And I envision that he had a family – perhaps two children. It saddens me to know someone had to die for my life to be restored. But I would like to assure my donor’s family that I will take very good care of my lungs and that a part of their loved one lives on.”

that my donor was a man. And I envision that he had a family – perhaps two children. It saddens me to know someone had to die for my life to be restored. But I would like to assure my donor’s family that I will take very good care of my lungs and that a part of their loved one lives on.”

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When it comes to healthcare, knowledge is power. So let’s learn more about organ transplantation: the number of people affected, the medical conditions that can require transplants, and the services that are available here in Virginia. If you think organ transplantation is a rarity, or if you assume that no one in your family will ever need a transplant, read on. The facts will astound you. More than 116,500 people in the United States are on the waiting list for a life-saving organ transplant. Even so, only 33,611 transplants were performed in the country last year. Every day, twenty people die while waiting for an organ and another person is added to the waiting list every 10 minutes. One day, that person could be you or a loved one.

Which organs can be transplanted? Most people are familiar with heart, kidney, and liver transplants, but you may be surprised to learn that the pancreas, intestines, and even hands and faces can be transplanted as well. Around 80 percent of the people on the list are waiting for a kidney, 12 percent for a liver, 3.4 percent for a heart, 1.2 percent for a lung, and 2.5 percent for another organ.

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FEATUR ES | Breaking the Silence: Organ Transplantation

Many medical conditions can lead to the need for an organ transplant. Kidney failure is most commonly linked to chronic high blood pressure and diabetes. Liver failure is not always the result of excessive alcohol use. It can also be due to hepatitis, viral infection, injection of a poisonous substance, or genetic disorders. A heart transplant may be needed due to weakened heart muscles (cardiomyopathy) resulting from coronary artery disease, heart valve disease, abnormal heart rhythms (ventricular arrhythmias), or congenital heart defects. Lung transplantation may be needed for a variety of conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, or sarcoidosis of the lung. A pancreas transplant — sometimes alongside a kidney transplant — may be needed for certain patients with diabetes. The impact of being a donor is far reaching. One person can donate up to eight lifesaving organs: heart, liver, pancreas, two lungs, two kidneys, and intestines. In addition, donated tissues — including skin, bone, veins, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments, as well as the cornea, middle ear, and heart valves — can save or dramatically improve the quality of life for their recipients. As an organ or tissue donor, your generosity can have a remarkable effect on the lives of up to 50 people.

What is a living donor? About 40 percent of donated organs come from living donors — typically a relative or friend of the patient. With so many people on the waiting lists, a living donor can shorten wait times significantly and improve transplant outcomes. For example, a kidney from a living donor lasts longer than one from a deceased donor. And even if a willing donor is not a good match with a loved one, the hospital can coordinate an organ exchange or organ chain to pair up compatible donors and recipients.

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And then there are Good Samaritan or altruistic donors — people like Laurie Miller of Harrisonburg, who donated one of his kidneys to an unknown recipient. Miller is the director of student programs at Eastern Mennonite University. He grew up in the Church of the Brethren and is now a member of the Mennonite Church. His faith is what motivated him to look for opportunities like this to help others. We could make a huge dent in the waiting list if more people would consider organ donation, either living or deceased. In the U.S., 95 percent of adults say they support organ donations, yet only 54 percent actually sign up as donors by checking the box on their driver’s licenses.

Where do I start if I need a transplant or want to donate an organ? The UVA Health System’s organ transplant program is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. To date, more than 5,000 patients have received life-saving and life-altering organ transplants. There are nine transplant programs at UVA: adult heart, liver, kidney, lung, pancreas, and isletcell, and pediatric heart, liver, and kidney. If you or a loved one needs an organ transplant, or if you would like to learn more about donating an organ, please contact: UVA Health System Transplant Program

800.257.0757 for heart and lung transplants or 800.543.8814 for kidney, liver, pancreas, and islet cell transplants Each program involves of a multidisciplinary team that includes physicians, nurses, a nutritionist, a social worker, a financial coordinator, a pharmacist and a neuropsychologist. Some of the members of the lung transplant team are: Jose Oberholzer, MD, Director of the Charles O. Strickler Transplant Center, UVA Health

System Max Weder, MD, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

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Hannah Mannem, MD, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Sarah Kilbourne, MD, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

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Alexander Krupnick, MD, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

WEBSITE FOR EVEN MORE

Christine Lau, MD, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

HEALTH RESOURCES!

REFERENCES

ourhealthlbss.com

Donate Life America: donatelife.net United Network for Organ Sharing: unos.org U.S. Government Information on Organ Donation and Transplantation: organdonor.gov

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FEATUR ES | Keeping Your Health in the Game of Life

Ideal Protein Diet Helps Mother/Daughter Team

Lose Over 200 Pounds words | CATHERINE BROWN

Since June of 2017, mother and daughter Marci Hughes and Shelby Grace have lost a combined 215 pounds. They have undergone an amazing transformation thanks to the Ideal Protein Weight Loss Method administered by Jeffrey Widmeyer, MD, of Widmeyer Vein Center in Lynchburg. Though Dr. Widmeyer describes the mother/daughter duo as “star dieters,” he says that “they are the rule rather than the exception” because of the program’s effectiveness. In fact, the patients he has worked with have lost over 20,000 pounds in total. According to Dr. Widmeyer, “Ideal Protein is a physician-supervised weight loss program that utilizes good-tasting, specially formulated meal replacement products as well as coaching.” Prior to working with Dr. Widmeyer, 43-year-old Marci weighed over 300 pounds, was pre-diabetic, and took two different medicines for high blood pressure. Although she’d always been active, she repeatedly had trouble losing weight. “I’ve done every diet plan under the sun,” Marci says. “I would always be successful for a few weeks, and then I would gain weight again. Nothing worked.”

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Marci Hughes

Shelby Grace

Before

Before

After

After

The partnership in the weight loss journey between mother and daughter has been one of accountability, improved health, and renewed confidence. Marci Hughes and daughter Shelby Grace of Lynchburg.

Likewise, 16-year-old Shelby struggled with her weight despite being active. She weighed about 290 pounds, was pre-diabetic and was sometimes bullied at school. A theater kid, Shelby also often felt frustrated when she couldn’t find costumes in her school’s collection that fit her. In addition, the stress of being bullied contributed to her weight gain. Both Marci and Shelby are thrilled to have lost weight successfully with the Ideal Protein Weight Loss Method, which Dr. Widmeyer describes as an aggressive weight loss program.

“Often, the diet part is the easy part. If you’re doing this protocol as we prescribe it, you’ll see the weight loss. The question becomes: What happens after the protocol?” JEFFREY WIDMEYER, MD Offers physician supervised weight loss services at Widmeyer Vein Center in Lynchburg.

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“Women typically lose two to four pounds per week,” Dr. Widmeyer says, “and men lose about three to five pounds per week.” By measuring patients weekly through the body composition analyzer, Dr. Widmeyer can ensure that the weight loss happens safely and that patients are losing fat rather than muscle. The rapid weight loss has helped Marci and Shelby to stay motivated throughout the program. “Motivation hasn’t really even been an issue because the weight comes off so fast,” Marci says. “Also, we have more energy, and because we are drinking more water and not eating sugar, our skin looks better and we feel better overall.” They also enjoy buying smaller clothes each time they lose a size. Being able to lose weight with her mom as a partner has helped Shelby stay focused, but the coaching at Dr. Widmeyer’s office also plays a role. “I really like that there are coaches keeping us accountable and weighing us each week,” she says. “I’m less likely to cheat.” Both Marci and Shelby also appreciate their coaches’ accessibility and willingness to help them make challenging decisions. “Lori [the coach] is always available,” says Marci. “We can text her if we’re going to a restaurant, and she can look at the menu and tell us what we can eat. That

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way, we’re prepared when we get there and aren’t tempted by less healthy foods.”

Keeping Your Health in the Game of Life

For the first phase of the diet, which lasts until they get within a few pounds of their ideal weight, patients eat foods sold through the doctors’ office for breakfast, lunch and snacks, along with vegetables they prepare. For dinner, patients prepare their own meat and vegetables. “Once we figured out the plan, which wasn’t hard, there was no desire to cheat because we were always satisfied,” says Marci. “We weren’t hungry.” According to Dr. Widmeyer, “Patients don’t feel hungry because their bodies are burning their own fat as fuel.” Once they get close to their idea weight, explains Dr. Widmeyer, patients engage in Phase 2, a two-week period in which they prepare their own lunch foods. Then, they move into Phase 3, which lasts for another two weeks; in this phase, patients also prepare their own breakfast foods. Finally, Phase 4 is the maintenance phase. “Each transition between phases involves a lengthy sit-down discussion, videos and very specific instructions so patients get good results,” Dr. Widmeyer says. Marci is currently still in Phase 1 as she works to reach her ideal weight; Shelby has moved through Phase 1 and 2 and will soon be in the maintenance phase. After Shelby’s loss of 120 pounds and Marci’s loss of 95 pounds, they are both proud to no longer be prediabetic. Additionally, Marci says that she has been able to stop taking one of her blood pressure medicines, and she hopes to stop taking the other one once she reaches her ideal weight. While the weight loss, renewed energy and health improvements keep Marci and Shelby going, the “non-scale victories” also contribute to their motivation. “I’m happier that it’s a lot easier to find costumes that fit me,” Shelby says. “Now, I have about 15 dresses to choose from!” She also delights in comments from peers: “When they look at pictures of me in my costumes from this year and last year, they say, ‘That’s not even the same person!’” Marci likes that she can watch Shelby perform on stage comfortably: “Before, I would sit in the theater chairs and get bruises on my legs,” www.OurHealthlbss.com

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says Marci. “Now, I can sit in the theater seat, and my legs don’t even touch the sides of the chair!” When describing the Ideal Protein Weight Loss Method, Dr. Widmeyer explains, “Often, the diet part is the easy part. If you’re doing this protocol as we prescribe it, you’ll see the weight loss. The question becomes: What happens after the protocol?” Dr. Widmeyer and his coaches work hard to ensure that patients understand how they need to eat after finishing the program in order to maintain their ideal weight. Both Marci and Shelby consider the Ideal Protein Weight Loss Method to be a lifestyle change, not just a diet.

“We’ve learned how to be healthy and stay on track,” Shelby says. That reassures Marci, who feels confident that Shelby can now prepare healthy food for herself when she goes off to college in a couple of years. EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR Jeffrey Widmeyer, MD offers physician supervised weight loss services at Widmeyer Vein Center in Lynchburg.

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FITSTYLES

Sideline Heroes Athletic Trainers Keep High School Athletes Healthy, Ready for Competition words | CHRISTY RIPPEL

You see them on the sidelines at your local high school’s football, volleyball and soccer games, watching the action and the athletes. They’re hoping not just for a victory for the home team, but for a safe competition for all. And when a player goes down, they’re the first on the field, assessing the injury. Athletic trainers are the angels on the shoulders of today’s young athletes, and with increasing attention on concussions, their role on the field is being noticed like never before.

JEN ARMSTRONG Athletic trainer at Lynchburg’s E.C. Glass High School

Jen Armstrong is the athletic trainer at Lynchburg’s E.C. Glass High School, and is responsible for 650 athletes on more than 30 teams. In her 11 years at E.C. Glass, she has seen firsthand how the knowledge of and interest in concussions has changed. “Every high school now has to have concussion policies and procedures per the VA Department of Education,” says Armstrong. “There are more checks and balances, and less concussion are being missed.” Armstrong says coaches and parents are more aware of the dangers of concussions, and feel more comfortable reporting troublesome symptoms than in the past.

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FI TSTY LES | Sideline Heroes

“Now an athlete might come to you and say, ‘I got hit hard in the head at practice, can I get looked at?’,” Armstrong says. “Because I cover so many teams and can’t be at every practice and game, I rely on that to help me do my job.” While concussions are a hot button topic, athletic trainers have more responsibilities than just assessing head injuries. In conjunction with physicians, they work to prevent, examine, diagnose, treat and rehabilitate acute and chronic injuries. On any given day, that might mean assessing a baseball player’s sprained ankle, referring a tennis player to an orthopedist for a nagging elbow injury, running a soccer player through the concussion protocol, and bandaging a runner’s blister. Athletic trainers are sometimes confused with personal trainers, but there is big difference in the education and skills of these two professionals. Athletic trainers must hold a degree in athletic training, and 70 percent of athletic trainers have a master’s degree. They must also pass a certification exam to practice. Athletic trainer programs are currently in the process of becoming master’s level only, so all future Athletic trainers will hold an advanced degree. This intense training and skill level is good news for today’s athletes – as is the move toward including athletic trainers in more high schools across the country. Armstrong is a full-time school system employee – she teaches during the day, and covers practices and games in the afternoons and evenings. She explains that some school systems contract with a hospital or physical therapy group to provide coverage for sports rather than employing someone at the school. However, Armstrong thinks her daily presence in the school helps her do her job. “I form real relationships with these student-athletes,” she says. “When you know them personally, you know if something is off. No athlete can return to practice if a concussion is suspected by a coach, or me, or another medical professional. So having me here full-time is helpful.” While plenty of high schools and most middle schools do not have an athletic trainer, Armstrong, who is involved in the athletic trainers profession’s governing body to bring about important changes, says we are moving toward legislation that will mandate athletic trainers at all high schools. A move that will help more athletes stay healthy and safe while competing on the field, around the track, in the pool and on the courts.

EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR Jen Armstrong, an athletic trainer at E.C. Glass High School in Lynchburg.

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NUTRITION

Get Pumped WITH

HEART HEALTHY EATING TIPS words | MICHELLE MCLEES

The start of the New Year is a perfect time to reflect on the past 12 months and assess what habits you want to take with you, and what you want to leave behind. Remember: it takes 21 days to make a habit and only one day to break it. To ensure your success, the American Heart Association recommends following these rules:

Make lifestyles changes to your diet by knowing what to keep, what to moderate and what to kick!

What to Keep:

1

CHOOSE WISELY, EVEN WITH HEALTHIER FOODS:

Ingredients and nutrient content can vary by brand and preparation.

2

COMPARE NUTRITION INFORMATION ON PACKAGE LABELS:

Select products with the lowest amounts of sodium, added sugars, saturated fat and trans fat and no partially hydrogenated oils.

Fruits and Vegetables | Nuts and Seeds | Beans and Legumes | Fat-free and Low-fat Dairy Products Whole Grains | Fish, Skinless Poultry, and Plant-based Alternatives | Healthier Fats and Nontropical Oils

What to Moderate:

Fatty or Processed Meats (if you choose to eat red meat, select the leanest cuts) | Saturated Fat Sweets and Added Sugars (including sugar-sweetened beverages) | Sodium and Salty or Highly Processed Foods

What to Kick: Trans fats, partially hydrogenated oils and excessive calories

3

WATCH YOUR CALORIE INTAKE:

To maintain weight, consume only as many calories as you use up through physical activity.

4

IF YOU WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT:

Consume fewer calories or burn more calories.

5

EAT REASONABLE PORTIONS:

6

EAT A WIDE VARIETY OF FOODS:

7

LOOK FOR THE HEART-CHECK MARK:

Often this is less than you are served.

This is the best way to get all the nutrients your body needs. Prepare and eat healthier meals at home: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have more control over ingredients.

Easily identify foods that can be part of an overall healthy diet. Learn more at heartcheck.org.

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NUTRITION

COOL CUCUMBER DIP SERVES 8 | Two tablespoons per serving Crushed toasted almonds provide crunch, and the just-right seasoning blend adds zing to this unusual dip. It’s convenient and stress-free for parties. You can make it up to four days in advance and serve it with colorful precut vegetables.

INGREDIENTS 1/4 cup plus one tablespoon sliced almonds 3/4 cup fat-free sour cream 1/4 medium cucumber, peeled, seeded, and coarsely chopped (about 1/2 cup)

2 medium green onions, cut into 1/2-inch pieces 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar 1

NUTRITION ANALYSIS (PER SERVING): Calories: 47, Total

Fat: 2.0g, Saturated Fat: 0.0g, Trans Fat: 0.0g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.5g, Monounsaturated Fat: 1.0g, Cholesterol: 4mg, Sodium: 20mg, Carbohydrates: 5g, Fiber: 1g, Sugars: 2g, Protein: 2g, Dietary Exchanges: 1/2 carbohydrate

HEALTH BENEFITS OF EATING MORE CUCUMBERS NATURAL HYDRATION: Cucumbers are made up of 96 percent water, therefore they are an excellent source of hydration.

VITAMIN C: Cucumbers are loaded with Vitamin C, an antioxidant that protects the body against illness due to damaged cells.

VITAMIN K: The peel of a cucumber is loaded with Vitamin K. Like

vitamin A, vitamin K plays a role in building bone, as well as other tissues of the body.

POTASSIUM: This mineral, also found in cucumbers, aids in metabolic functions and also plays a role in the development of muscle tissue.

source: Livestrong

teaspoon salt-free extra-spicy seasoning blend

DIRECTIONS 1.

In a medium skillet, dry-roast the almonds over medium heat for three to four minutes, or until golden brown, stirring occasionally. Put one tablespoon almonds in a small bowl. Set aside to use as a garnish.

2.

In a food processor or blender, process the remaining almonds for three to five seconds, or until coarsely crushed (1/4-inch irregular pieces). Transfer to a medium serving bowl.

3.

Process the remaining ingredients until the desired consistency, five to ten seconds if you prefer a chunky texture, 15 to 20 seconds for smooth. Stir into the crushed almonds.

4. To serve, sprinkle with the reserved almonds.

COOK’S TIP For a decorative presentation, peel a medium cucumber in lengthwise strips about 1/2 inch wide and 1/2 inch apart, leaving 1/2-inch strips of peel intact. Cut the cucumber crosswise into 3/4-inch slices. Using a melon baller or the tip of a small spoon, partially hollow out the slices, making little cups with enough of one end intact to hold the filling in place. Spoon the filling into the cups.

This recipe is brought to you by the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement. Recipe copyright © 2005 by the American Heart Association. Look for other delicious recipes in American Heart Association cookbooks, available from booksellers everywhere or online at americanheart.org/cookbooks.

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NUTR I TI O N |

SERVES 4 | Three ounces fish and one tablespoon pesto per serving Vibrant orange salmon fillets get a double dose of crunchy almonds, one in the pesto and one in the topping. The lovely green pesto is easy to make and gets a delightful flavor boost—without salt—from the garlic-herb seasoning blend. For a quick and pretty dish, scatter the almonds over the surface, as instructed below. If you prefer a fancier presentation, after spreading the pesto over the salmon, slightly overlap the almonds on the fillets to resemble fish scales, then bake as directed.

INGREDIENTS CILANTRO PESTO 1/2 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro

NUTRITION ANALYSIS (PER SERVING): Calories: 206, Total

Fat: 9.5g, Saturated Fat: 1.5g, Trans Fat: 0.0g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 3.0g, Monounsaturated Fat: 4.0g, Cholesterol: 66mg, Sodium: 129mg, Carbohydrates: 2g, Fiber: 1g, Sugars: 0g, Protein: 28g, Dietary Exchanges: 3 1/2 lean meat

3

tablespoons fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth

2

tablespoons sliced almonds

2

tablespoons shredded or grated Parmesan cheese

1

teaspoon salt-free garlic-herb seasoning blend

SALMON 4 salmon fillets (about four ounces each), rinsed and patted dry

1/4 cup sliced almonds

HEALTH BENEFITS OF EATING MORE

DIRECTIONS

SALMON

OMEGA 3 FATTY ACIDS: The body cannot create Omega 3 on its own and requires intake from food or vitamins in order to supply the nutrients. Omega 3 reduces the risk of heart disease.

PROTEIN: Salmon contains up to 58 percent of the daily required

intake of protein per four-ounce serving. The protein found in salmon helps the body maintain metabolism at levels to promote weight loss.

VITAMIN ENRICHED: A three-ounce baked fillet will give you

more than 40 percent of your daily intake of vitamin B-12; over 30 percent of niacin; over 25 percent of vitamin B-6 and more than 10 percent of thiamin and pantothenic acid.

1.

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil or lightly spray with cooking spray.

2.

In a food processor or blender, process the pesto ingredients for 15 to 20 seconds, or until slightly chunky.

3.

Place the fillets about two inches apart on the baking sheet. Spread the pesto evenly over the top of the fillets. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup almonds.

4. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.

source: Livestrong

This recipe is brought to you by the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement. Recipe copyright © 2005 by the American Heart Association. Look for other delicious recipes in American Heart Association cookbooks, available from booksellers everywhere or online at americanheart.org/cookbooks. www.OurHealthlbss.com

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Heart Health Recipes

SALMON WITH CILANTRO PESTO


NUTRITION

PINEAPPLE UPSIDE-DOWN CAKE SERVES 8 Say aloha to a heart-healthy version of an American favorite. This cake recipe has the familiar rich, fruity taste and topping of caramelized pineapple rings, but has shed the excess sugar and replaced the unhealthy fats in the batter with mashed banana. Covered with a design of pineapple rings but with banana used in place of additional fat in the recipe, this isn’t just impressive on the eyes, it’s also a healthy cake that tastes indulgent.

DIRECTIONS 1.

Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2.

Make the pineapple glaze: Drain pineapple juice from the canned pineapple slices (about one cup) into a medium heavy-duty pot. (Reserve pineapple slices.) Add low-calorie brown sugar blend and ¼ cup no-calorie granulated sweetener into the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Let boil until bubbly and reduced by about one-fourth, around eight to ten minutes. (Make sure to keep an eye on it while boiling in case it reduces quickly.) Remove from heat; the amount of liquid should be around ¾ cup.

3.

Coat a 9-inch cake pan with cooking spray. Pour the pineapple glaze into the dish. Arrange as many pineapple rings as will fit over the glaze—about seven. Reserve the remaining pineapple rings.

NUTRITION ANALYSIS (PER SERVING): Calories: 188, Total

Fat: 3.3g, Saturated Fat: 0.6g, Trans Fat: 0.0g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.8g, Monounsaturated Fat: 1.6g, Cholesterol: 47mg, Sodium: 187mg, Carbohydrates: 35g, Fiber: 2g, Sugars: 17g, Protein: 4g, Dietary Exchanges: 1 fruit, 1 starch, 1/2 other carbohydrate, 1 fat

INGREDIENTS 1

(20-ounce) can pineapple slices in juice, undrained

1/4 cup low-calorie brown sugar blend 3/4 cup granulated, no-calorie sweetener (divided use) 1

cup all-purpose flour

1

teaspoon baking powder

4. Meanwhile, into a small bowl, add all the dry ingredients: ½ cup no-calorie, granulated sweetener, flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt. 5.

1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1

medium ripe banana (peeled, chopped)

1

tablespoon canola oil

1

tablespoon water

Into a large bowl, add the chopped banana. Use a fork to mash the banana. Add oil, water, eggs, buttermilk, and extract into the bowl with the banana, stirring together to combine. Stir in the dry ingredients until mixed together. Chop remaining pineapple rings and stir into the batter.

2 large eggs

6. Pour batter over the pineapple rings. Bake in the oven until a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out clean, about 50 minutes.

½ cup 1 percent buttermilk

7.

1

teaspoon vanilla extract

pinch of salt Copyright © 2017 American Heart Association, Healthy For GoodTM, heart.org/healthyforgood

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Remove cake from the oven and let cool 10 minutes. Run a butter knife along the edges of the cake pan to make sure the cake won’t stick. Place a plate on top of the pan and use pot holders to flip cake over to invert. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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MENS HEALTH

Addressing Men’s Snoring words | CATHY BROWN

When I got married, my sister gave me a “survival kit” that included nighttime breathing strips for my husband so that I could sleep peacefully. Because men are more likely than women to snore, she could safely assume I was marrying a snorer. According to the Center for Disease Control’s 2009 Unhealthy Sleep Related Behaviors study, 48 percent of people surveyed reported that they snore. George Morcom, Manager of Centra Health Sleep Disorders Clinic, says, “it is generally thought that about a third or more of men snore while only about a fifth of women do.”

The Prevalence of Snoring Among Men The increased prevalence of snoring in men results from differences in the shape of the throat and palate. In men, the throat tends to be narrower, and that makes snoring more likely to occur. As men and women age, they tend to be even more likely to snore because of decreased muscle.

The Causes of Snoring “Snoring in anyone is caused by tissues in the airway (throat) relaxing and causing a partial blockage,” Morcom explains. “Everyone’s airway relaxes when they sleep, some more than others. When breathing occurs, this relaxed tissue vibrates, causing the snoring noise.” Individual traits like having narrower airways, having a deviated septum and experiencing chronic congestion can all contribute to snoring. Carrying extra weight also leads to increased snoring. “Being www.OurHealthlbss.com

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MENS HEALTH

overweight causes excessive fatty tissue in the neck,” says Morcom, “putting additional pressure on the airway.”

The Dangers of Snoring

“Snoring in anyone is caused by

Although the distinctive sound of snoring results from obstructed airways, it is not necessarily dangerous. For most men and their partners, snoring is an annoyance. However, the minor frustration can lead to poor sleep quality, resulting in fatigue and headache and increased likelihood of accidents.

tissues in the airway (throat)

“While snoring may not always be that bad,” Morcom says,

relaxing and causing a partial

“the disruptions in sleep can cause further medical issues

blockage. Everyone’s airway

down the road such as high blood pressure, diabetes and

relaxes when they sleep, some more than others. When breathing occurs, this relaxed tissue vibrates, causing the snoring noise.” GEORGE MORCOM Manager of Centra Health Sleep Disorders Clinic

heart disease.” In some cases, snoring can indicate obstructive sleep apnea, in which airways collapse and block breathing. Sleep apnea is closely associated with the long-term health conditions Morcom describes. According to Morcom, “the severity of snoring can be assessed to some degree by either a parent or bed partner. The snorer is not always aware that they are snoring.” If a partner notices the snorer choking or having trouble breathing for ten seconds or more during sleep, the snorer should seek medical help. If the patient has sleep apnea, a doctor can recommend a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine, which applies air pressure through the nose and throat and reduces snoring.

Ways to Improve Snoring There are many ways to improve snoring, depending on its causes. For instance, sleeping on one’s side can alleviate snoring. In some cases, treating allergies and congestion can reduce snoring. For men who are overweight, weight loss can help. People who snore should also cut down on smoking and avoid alcohol and narcotics close to bedtime. If none of the above methods improve snoring, there are several medical options that might. For instance, an ENT doctor can evaluate patients for surgery that can curb it. Other men might benefit from an oral device fitted by a dentist.

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Lynchburg & Southside WEBSITE FOR EVEN MORE HEALTH RESOURCES!

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“If snoring causes disruptions or awakenings from sleep for an extended period of time,” says Morcom, ‘it might be time to consult your physician.” A medical professional can recommend a full sleep evaluation to rule out sleep apnea and determine the cause of snoring. After all, a sleep evaluation seems a small price to pay for years of wedded bliss!

EXPERT CONTRIBUTOR George Morcom, Manager of Centra Health Sleep Disorders Clinic.

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OurHealth Lynchburg & Southside Feb/Mar 2018  

Keeping your Health in the Game of Life, Organ Transplants, Athletic Trainers and and more.

OurHealth Lynchburg & Southside Feb/Mar 2018  

Keeping your Health in the Game of Life, Organ Transplants, Athletic Trainers and and more.