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FA LL 2019

54 16 FOOD 65 FOOD THOUGHTS Game-changing Brussels sprouts 67 LET’S DISH All things fish

18 50

65

68 DINING OUT Finding out what’s behind the success of three young chefs 73 PAULA’S BITES Fresh autumn salad

DEPARTMENTS HOME

LIVING

10 DESIGNER AT HOME Going bold with pattern and colour

42 NEIGHBOURHOOD ON THE MOVE The vibrant and colourful Chinatown

16 INSPIRING PROJECTS Two rooms switch spaces with fabulous results 18 SPOTLIGHT A mirror image townhome decorated in different styles

46 STEP INSIDE The vision of the Director and CEO of the Ottawa Art Gallery 49 FIT AT HOME Why work with a personal trainer?

26 IN STYLE Creating outdoor fitness space

50 FASHION Fall’s wildly on-trend neutrals

33 CAPITAL COLOURS Getting décor right with white

54 PROFILE Meet four photographers who are making a name for themselves in the world of art

34 COMMUNITY The 2019 tour homes for the annual Homes for the Holidays event 41 GET THE LOOK Bringing Art Deco back

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6 EDITOR’S NOTE A pet-friendly home 31 BUILDERS INSIDER Connecting with nature 44 QUARTZ VS. GRANITE Ask the Expert 76 FORWARD THINKING ON TREND The new look of wood

60 NEW & NOTABLE Old favourites in new places 63 GIVING BACK Changing the perception of addiction

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Pet-friendly

Until one has loved an animal, a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.”  —ANATOLE FRANCE LET’S CONNECT facebook-f @OttawaAtHome twitter @Ottawaathomemag

My first pet was a black and white cat I named Butterfly. She came to me as an “after present” from my friend’s seventh birthday party. Her cat had kittens and guests could take one home. That was in the ‘70s and my parents were cool with that. As a family, we had a variety of pets coming and going in our lives and their antics play a strong role in our family’s story. I had never considered myself a dog person, but for the last 18 years our home has been dog filled—at my own doing! First there was Ginger, an adorable Bichon/Shih Tzu mix, bought from the pet store at Carlingwood. It was a classic case of “how much is that doggy in the window?” Our daughter Olivia, ten at the time, had to have her after she and a friend spotted the fluffy white pup in the shop display. Home she came. While Ginger looked sweet, she was anything but! For the ten years we had her she threatened to bite almost everyone who came through our door. I shudder now at the anxiety we experienced in dealing with a problem pet, but we coped and for the most part she was a loved family member. Her loyalty to us was her greatest asset. Lola, the 85-pound Goldendoodle, came next and continues to prove herself to be the best dog in the world. Fun-loving and mischievous as a puppy, kind, loyal and a lover of long walks at the cottage, Lola has turned herself into the perfect dog as she ages. Ceelo, the tiny rescue pup (pictured with me here), has proven to be our most challenging dog yet. He is the embodiment of the saying, “it takes a village.” Olivia (now all grown up and still a lover of dogs) took him after a friend in Maine was moving to Australia and couldn’t bring herself to put the anxious dog through the flights and required quarantine process. The move to Ottawa sent Ceelo into such a heightened state of anxiety that Olivia cannot leave him alone at home while she is working. So, she resorts to bringing him to our house every day where he takes great comfort in the company of Lola and me. He is always by one of our sides. Pets bring us great joy, yet their natures can be complex. The decision to bring an animal into the home should never be taken lightly, but their arrival can most definitely bring lightness into your life. Loyally,

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AWARD WINNING MODERN ARCHITECTURE csarchitect.com


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AN Design Communications ASSOCIATE EDITOR

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HOME Designer at Home

Love is in the Mix D

esigner Emma Doucet started working in the field of design after winning a House & Home magazine award in 2009 for the main bathroom of her Hintonburg-area home. The bathroom looks the same today as it did when it won, and the small space continues to serve the family of four well with its quirky, stylish aesthetic that blends in beautifully with the detailing of the home built in 1897.

Emma has gone on to win numerous awards with her company Grassroots Design. She focuses on residential projects, favouring older homes with a leaning towards kitchen and bath design. “I love trying to infuse older homes with function while maintaining the character of the home,” states Emma. Her talent for this is evident throughout her own threestorey home that oozes with character.

BY MARY TAGGART PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG TECKLES

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SECTION Title

CARPET, FROM WAYFAIR BLU DOT SOFA, FROM A MODERN SPACE LAMPS, FROM WEST ELM DRAPERY, FROM TONIC LIVING FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  11


THIS PAGE (LEFT) THE AWARD WINNING BATHROOM HONOURS THE ROOTS OF THE HOME WITH TRADITIONAL ELEMENTS (BELOW) COLOURFUL DINING CHAIRS ARE FROM A MODERN SPACE, THE DINING TABLE IS FROM RESTORATION HARDWARE FACING PAGE THE CARPET IS FROM DASH & ALBERT AND THE RE-FURBISHED COFFEE TABLE WAS A SECOND-HAND STORE FIND

EYE POPPING DETAILS While the bathroom was the award winner, it shares the spotlight with many stunning features in Emma’s home. Strong architectural details come to life against colourful walls that combine the use of both of paint and wallpaper to make bold statements throughout. Accent walls pop around corners to draw the eye to details, and colourful carpets ground the space in every room. Each room has a style of its own, yet there is a continuous flow of pattern and colour that work harmoniously from space to space to ensure that the overall aesthetic is pleasing. Emma’s home combines her passions. “I love using a mix of all things I love,” she says and adds, “I love old furniture, I love new furniture, I love colour and I love function.”

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SECTION Title

FUNCTION The function of her home starts with the grand feeling of space with high ceilings and an open concept layout within traditional confines. A kitchen outfitted in modern amenities speaks to the roots of an era where home-cooked meals were enjoyed around the family table. A large dining room, leading off the kitchen, answers the call. The look is casual, but also has a hint of formal to honour the period of the home, while comfort plays a leading role. As the mother of three children Emma understands the need for incorporating fabrics for heavy usage. “I don’t want kids, friends or guests to feel like they can’t sit down and put their feet up,” offers the welcoming designer. Sofas are dressed in sturdy fabrics and wood flooring covered in heavily patterned area carpets are forgiving of spills.

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Contact Emma at emma@grassrootsdesign.ca or visit the new Hintonburg showroom at 84 Sherbrooke Ave. RIGHT THE MASTER BEDROOM LIGHT FIXTURE IS FROM LUMIERE AUTHENTIK BELOW THE KITCHEN WAS DESIGNED BY GRASSROOTS AND PETER COPLAND BUILT THE CUSTOM CABINETS

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braeburnestates.ca


HOME Designer at Home

EMMA’S TIPS FOR ADDING COLOUR & PATTERN: 1. Experiment with throw pillows. They are relatively inexpensive, easy to change and add texture and warmth to any room. 2. Choose one wall that is relatively boring and experiment with a bold colour. Hang a mirror and you have instant wall art. 3. Dress windows with custom linen draperies that help to transform a room into a carefully curated space. 4. Bring new life to old furniture by painting it with brightly-coloured chalk paint. 5. Wallpaper is like artwork for an entire wall. Find a variety of patterns in a wide range of prices online.

Third World Bazaar colourful handcrafted goods from around the world

16th Year Operating in Manotick Station!

— S E V E N W E E K E N D S O N LY ! — September 27, 28 & 29

October 18, 19 & 20

October 4, 5 & 6

October 25, 26 & 27

October 11, 12, 13 & 14 (Thanksgiving Weekend)

November 8, 9, 10 & 11

November 1, 2 & 3

Friday to Sunday – 10AM to 5PM November 11 – 12PM to 5PM Visit our barn in Manotick Station which has been transformed into a world market place. Shop for exotic home decor items, clothing, jewellery and furniture from countries where our family has purchased directly from local producers.

Unique Gifts at Warehouse Prices! 6110 Mitch Owens Drive, Ottawa Located 5 minutes south of the Ottawa Airport in Manotick Station (next to Bakker’s General Store)

 ThirdWorldBazaar.ca 

FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  15


HOME Inspiring Projects

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HOME Inspiring Projects

RO OM

BY HOLLIE GRACE JAMES  INSTAGRAM @holliegracejames PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

SWITCH

C

reating spaces that work is what Tanya Leforte does well. With a formal education in interior design and science, she has worked in the industry for 15 years, running Black Clover Design. She pours her heart into projects with the goal of exceeding her clients’ expectations every time. Most recently, a challenging project provided a breath of fresh air, reminding her that she really loves what she does.

THE PROJECT

TANYA LEFORTE

A four-bedroom home in Stittsville was adapted for a chiropractor and engineer with two young daughters. These firsttime clients work endless hours running their own private clinic. Being acutely aware that their home office wasn’t ergonomically sound, the professional couple enlisted Tanya’s help. A main floor home office was cluttered and lacked proper storage. Furnished with department-store furniture and plenty of hand-me-downs, it wasn’t aesthetically pleasing either. With similar problems in the spare bedroom upstairs (used mostly as the kids’ play area), the couple had intended on simply making a clean sweep of both and replacing everything, while still using the rooms in their original capacity. That was until Tanya came up with the idea of switching the rooms to move the home office upstairs. “I believe that switching the rooms was necessary in order to make the most out of each of the spaces,” the clever designer stated. The focus was on optimizing the way each of the spaces functioned so that they were not underutilized rooms.

MAIN FLOOR LOUNGE Moving the office upstairs meant that the well-used space was out of sight, while a relaxing, stylish relaxed area was created within the old office on the main floor. To create a relaxed vibe, Tanya recommended using chaise lounge chairs. In order to transform the space everything in the room was removed, except for the flooring. The space was warmed up with an elegant side table from HomeSense and a dramatic Aerin light fixture from West of Main.

“Now at the end of the day the owners come into this space, close the doors, and just chill. It’s perfectly suited for what they were asking for,” offers Tanya.

UPSTAIRS OFFICE Once a rarely-used playroom, the renovated upstairs office is now the most used space in the house. Other than the specific request for an ample desk, the clients simply wanted a calm spot to work. “They wanted it to feel like a part of their house. They didn’t want a mishmash of furniture from big box stores—they wanted it to be more personal,” explains Tanya. She worked with Marc’s Custom Furniture to come up with a 14-foot wraparound desk, which can be used by the whole family at the same time. The renovation took four months to complete and has enhanced the way the family lives in their home. Now, a stylish lounge space brings a chic elegance to the main floor. The well-used office space upstairs combines style and function perfectly.

SOURCE GUIDE LOUNGE: CHAISE: GRESHAM HOUSE CARPET: FIBER & CLOTH CASHMERE THROW: ELTE FLOWERS: TERRA PLANTS AND FLOWERS CUSTOM DRAPERY AND CUSHIONS: BLACK CLOVER DESIGN OFFICE: CUSTOM DESK: MARC’S CUSTOM FURNITURE CHAISE, OTTOMAN, STOOL: THE MODERN SOURCE WALL SCONCES, DESK LAMP: WAYFAIR DESK CHAIR: OTTAWA BUSINESS INTERIORS

FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  17


HOME Spotlight

SISTER ACT

— REFLECTING ON DIFFERENCES BY JANE WHITING PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

Two new homes are almost mirror images of each other on the outside, just like the two look-alike sisters who live there side by side. Yet, the exterior similarities are not as evident on the inside where different choices reflect the sisters’ individual personalities and lifestyles. Brittany and Stephanie Wilson have a close relationship, so it was an easy decision to share a wall between their brand new semi-detached homes in Westboro. With partners and parents involved in the building project, it was definitely a family affair. “Our father, Brent Wilson, helped with the financing upfront and provided construction contacts through his Dymon Storage business connections,” explains younger sister Brittany. She adds that they combined his contributions with the experience of her fiancé, Michael Pyman, and her own in commercial real estate, working together as a team.

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HOME Spotlight

BRITTANY (LEFT) STEPHANIE (RIGHT) FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  19


HOME Spotlight

KITCHENS CONTEMPORARY WOOD

Growing up four years apart, the sisters agree that the gap closed during their twenties as they grew closer. Still, the collaboration between the family members was not always easy. “There were five different points of view during the planning and building process,” notes Stephanie, who moved in with her husband Ryan Quesnel just months after their baby son Denver was born. The project to demolish a single family home and build two semis took over a year to complete. Variances were needed and there were the inevitable delays, but the sisters were delighted that the homes were finished under budget. Maple Leaf Custom Homes was the general contractor, with owners Fred Carmosino and Brian Saumure described as lovely guys to work with. The Wilsons used TACT from Toronto (who do commercial projects for Dymon) for all the exterior architectural and design work. Kitchens by Design provided interior design services and the custom cabinetry, as well as the front-entrance and garage doors.

STEPHANIE INCORPORATED A DINING TABLE INTO THE KITCHEN ISLAND 20  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019


HOME Spotlight

SHAKER CHIC

S BRITTANY’S KITCHEN LEADS TO A STYLISH FAMILY ROOM

SIMILARITIES & DIFFERENCES While Stephanie considers herself to be more of a laid-back country girl with a casual style, Brittany is attracted to the urban lifestyle with a contemporary flair. Living in a traditional family home on the waterfront in Manotick, and later sharing a renovated duplex in an older Ottawa house, neither sister was accustomed to super-modern design. So, after meeting with their kitchen designer, Julinda Balca, they were both conflicted. “I left the office hating everything she suggested because it was too modern for me,” says Stephanie. “It was a big adjustment to go to the whole white-on-white look in an open-plan concept,” adds Brittany.

For a softer effect, Brittany opted for white shaker-style cabinetry in her kitchen with black table-style legs on the 10-foot white marble island, and light-washed wood flooring. To add contrasting elements, she chose matteblack appliances and an island sink, with a dazzling herringbone-tile backsplash in black and white. Surprisingly, Stephanie went with the high-gloss, flat-fronted cabinets and a waterfall design on the quartz island. She added a lower butcher-block counter to make the island more child-friendly, with subtle white and grey tones in the kitchen. “I love it now that I’ve lived with it for a while,” confesses Stephanie, and even Brittany admits to a bit of cabinet envy and wishes she had gone glossy!

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SEE IT BURN IN OUR SHOWROOM.

hubertsfireplaces.com | hubertsfireplaces@outlook.com | 613-728-3786 22  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019


HOME Spotlight

However, Stephanie explains that she was looking ahead when making some of the design decisions. “While Brittany and I love living so close together, Ryan and I see this home as a resale opportunity because we want more children and will then need a bigger home with more outdoor space.” With a resale intention, the designer encouraged Stephanie to go with finishes that would appeal to a wide range of homebuyers in a few years or so. It convinced her to embrace a more modern kitchen style than initially planned. Both homes have the same open-glass stairway that they agree is stylish, but hard to child-proof. A self-described neat freak, Brittany has discovered that wiping away the handprints of Michael’s five-year-old son, Cole, is a constant battle. Fortunately, the playroom is conveniently located in the walk-out basement; whereas next door, baby Denver takes over the family room and his parents put a gym in their basement for quick and easy workouts!

TOP A FLOW-THROUGH CLOSET SPACE IS A COVETED FEATURE IN BRITTANY’S MASTER BEDROOM BOTTOM A COZY SITTING AREA IN STEPHANIE’S MASTER BEDROOM IS PETFRIENDLY AND A GREAT PLACE FOR DENVER TO PLAY WITH THE FAMILY CAT

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HOME Spotlight

BATHROOMS Upstairs, the sisters’ master bedrooms are another reflection of their respective lifestyles as a new stay-at-home mom and a chic business woman. Brittany has an upgraded flow-through closet with high-end custom cabinetry in matte black. An oversized shoe rack was installed to accommodate the impressive collection of work and fun footwear. Her clean, minimalist style is seen in the sleek marble-tiled ensuite with separate vanity sinks, also evident is her penchant for striking black-tile accents.

SLEEK & CHIC

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S

HOME Spotlight

FAMILY FRIENDLY

Stephanie’s master has a reduced flowthrough closet to allow for more bedroom space with a cozy sitting area and a Juliette balcony. She chose neutral coloured finishes for her cabinetry and ensuite, and went for a glorious tub that sits in an open shower area which is large enough for the family to bathe together. Special stand-out features include a wood-effect tiled panel and a shared trough-style vanity. While very similar, the twin homes truly mirror the differences in the current lifestyles of two very attached sisters.

LEFT BRITTANY’S ENSUITE HAS A SLEEK SOPHISTICATED LOOK WITH MATTE BLACK CABINETS ABOVE THE OVER SIZED BATHTUB IS PERFECT FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY AND IS HOUSED IN ITS OWN SPACE IN STEPHANIE’S ENSUITE

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HOME In Style

ROCKS ON THE

BY OLIVIA TAGGART PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON 26  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019


S

HOME In Style

F

or personal trainer Allan Alguire, the idea of an outdoor facility to complement an indoor training space within his home in the Westboro Beach area came to him as he started work on an extensive landscaping project. The catalyst for including the workout space within the landscape design was Allan’s belief that an open-air experience enhances a fitness program. “I personally enjoy the benefits of training outside. The sunshine and the change of scenery are mood boosting,” says the owner of End Result Fitness. These crucial combinations are a part of Allan’s process for keeping his clients interested and motivated. He explains that his clients want something different than a traditional gym experience, so he sought to find creative ways to meet their needs. “I

began thinking about how to offer clients a unique workout space that integrated training, wellness and design.” His client, Lauren Follett, moved from Toronto to Ottawa and has been amazed at how many Ottawans she sees doing open-air workouts all year-round. She didn’t expect to include the outdoors in her training sessions, but has been grateful for the overall experience. “I didn’t think I could feel as good as I do now after training with Allan, and being outside as much as possible is really energizing,” says the fit mom of two. THIS PAGE THE LANDSCAPING COMPLEMENTS THE CONTEMPORARY DESIGN OF THE HOME FACING PAGE LANDSCAPE DESIGNER MAGGIE JORDAN SOFTENS THE HARDSCAPE WITH A VARIETY OF GRASSES AND PERENNIALS THAT BLOOM THROUGHOUT THE SEASON

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SECTION Title 66 Iber Rd., Stittsville, ON

info@logsend.com

613-831-9333

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Allan recruited Jonathan Hoffman, from Split Rock Landscaping and Masonry, after meeting him while he was working on another job down the street. The pair hit it off and began to put their ideas in place for the Alguire home. Landscape designer Maggie Jordan was also enlisted to help with the project. Although the idea for the project was a good one, it came with a myriad of obstacles that included a challenging lot. “The back yard was difficult—the entire yard was sloped and a retaining wall ran parallel to the house,” reveals Jonathan, who added that it just had to be ripped out. The issues with the lot were intensified by the fact that access to the yard came through the neighbour’s backyard property. This meant that the cedar hedge separating the two yards had to come out, so that both the Alguire property and the neigbour’s yard were torn apart.

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HOME In Style

A series of retaining walls were built to help with the sharp north and south slopes of the property. To preserve the mature trees and to ensure privacy, the limestone platforms were strategically placed. As Jonathan tries to use as much of the material from job to job, he sourced the stone from another jobsite in the Westboro area, which he says sits on an old limestone quarry.

THE RESULTS Today, after taking six months to complete, the space boasts a magnificent outdoor fitness area. Allan is pleased with the results and how the fitness area offers an ideal blend of light and shade throughout the day. “I am now able to offer clients a unique, light-filled, private space where they can enjoy the many health benefits of working out in the outdoors.” THIS PAGE ALLAN AND HIS CLIENT LAUREN ENJOY THE BENEFITS OF WORKING OUTDOORS FACING PAGE LIMESTONE PLATFORMS FUNCTION AS BOTH STAIRS AND A WORKOUT ZONE IN THE BACKYARD

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HOME Builders Insider

CONNECTIONS

BY MARY TAGGART PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

O

ttawa has now become a city of one million people. No longer the small, sleepy community that was once the capital’s reputation, the city is growing at an impressive rate with the housing starts to prove it. While subdivisions are flourishing and offering buyers plenty of options close to parks and green spaces, the core of the city is enjoying its share of growth and development as well. Developers are seeing the beauty of creating naturally-inspired living, right in the heart of the city. Condo developments play up the benefits of a region that offers locations with waterfront and open greenspace views from the balconies, along with

scenic vistas of the Gatineau Hills and its recreational park, lakes and ski hills all close by. The Echo project is adjacent to the canal and much of its design reaps the benefits of sitting on the water’s edge. Both interior and exterior spaces have incorporated the trademark feature. Danielle Hannah, co-owner and designer with 2Hinteriors, worked in collaboration with the developer, Uniform Developments, and Hobin Architecture on the project’s interior details. Danielle believes that the location is what helps create an identify for this development, and the idea of connecting a building to its natural surroundings and influences is being seen throughout the city. “Being adjacent to the canal helps bring an identity to the project.

The sidewalks and green space entice people outdoors, whether on terraces or to stroll to nearby restaurants and stores. Most people are drawn to nature as a stress reliever. Water and green space are elements that inherently add calmness to our lives,” states Danielle. Living in a four-season city creates a strong need to connect the interior space to nature. Colder months mean more time spent inside, so Danielle advises utilizing collections from nature and plants to bring in the outdoors. “As soon as you have wood floors, some wood furniture, personal collections of driftwood or stones and some plants, you have brought nature into your home,” she offers. In a highly-connected world where information of all kinds sits directly at our finger tips, the development community has sensed a need for homeowners to feel a deeper connection to green space. But that doesn’t necessarily mean building on a large plot of land away from the bustle of city living. “The nearby presence of water and nature—whether park, stream, canal, lake or sea—means a lot and influences mood. Everyone needs to feel a connection to some natural surroundings,” says Danielle. To reflect this, she paid careful attention to the design aspect of both the interior and exterior space in her work on the Echo project so that balconies became extensions of interior space. Similarly, when decorating a deck or patio, it is important to make a seamless transition from indoors to outside with the look and feel of the interior décor. This helps to avoid the outdoor areas from appearing as unusable space when the colder months set in. FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  31


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Get to Know Ottawa’s

TOP DESIGNERS JENNIFER McGAHAN

LUC CRAWFORD

Owner/Principal Designer, Jennifer McGahan Interiors jennifermcgahaninteriors.com Instagram @jminteriors Twitter @jennifermcgahan 613-762-2093

Designer, Luc Crawford Design Inc. luccrawford.com luc@luccrawford.com Instagram @luccrawforddesignbuild 613-722-0839

Jennifer McGahan has been in the design business for eleven years. She specializes in residential renovations and redesign projects to include custom cabinetry and kitchens. Her talent for understanding and interpreting her client’s needs makes her a highly-respected designer. With her own classic and timelessly elegant style, and a team of professionals working under her, Jennifer provides her clients with up-to-date décor that is sure to stand the test of time. When asked about what she is coveting now, Jennifer says: “My current go-to palette is light walls and dark floors, lots of neutral fabrics in different textures, and hits of colour on pillows and accent pieces that can easily be changed out. I love chenille, velvets and area rugs with silk or viscose detailing; the shimmer adds a subtle, elegant detail without stealing the show.”

From interior and exterior design to commercial, residential and hospitality builds, along with renovation projects, Luc and his team have passionately worked with daring confidence for 25 years and always achieve eyecatching results. European influences play a role in Luc’s work. Although inspiration can come from a simple stroll in the park, travel continues to make an impression on his timeless, elegant style. Lavish finishes and opulent textures are popular with the culturally-inspired decorator who relishes time with his family. When asked about his current favourites, Luc says: “My favourites change as the seasons pass. I do love neutral colours, oversized prints, retro ceramics, and tone-on-tone textures—they all fall into my favourites.”

LISA POIRIER

SUSAN BRYSON

Westyle Interior Design westyle.ca lisa@westyle.ca 613-240-2629

Principal/Owner Susan Bryson Interiors susanbrysoninteriors.com info@susanbrysoninteriors.com Instagram @susanbrysoninteriors 613-863-0638

As an interior designer, Lisa has worked in the world of design for 20 years. She specializes in large-scale renovations and kitchen and bath design. While her own style is classic contemporary, she doesn’t let that dictate her work. She can easily transition from one style to the next to ensure that all projects reflect the client’s style, not hers. Her clients are always on her mind and she snaps inspirational images just about everywhere she goes. A trusted team of contractors helps her execute each job with ease. When asked what she is loving now, Lisa says: “White and all shades of it! Also, am loving the comeback of patterned tiles. They are a great way to add interest to a small space and if you are daring enough a whole kitchen.”

Susan has been working as a designer for 10 years. But as a former fashion model who studied literature and art, her style sense has been a strong feature throughout her life. Specializing in high-end interiors, her work steps out of the ordinary to produce chic, elegant spaces with edgy appeal. She has lived in Japan and Europe and her work often reflects influences from well-heeled global cities. When asked where her design eye is leaning these days, Susan says: “I love that wallpaper has made a huge comeback and being used in new ways. I love the large-scale murals, new types of textured grass cloth, and the contemporary restyled prints.”


HOME Capital Colours

White Done Right BRABBU DESIGN FORCES (HERMES SOFA)

BY MARY TAGGART instagram @maryktaggart twitter @ottawaathomemag

Creamy whites provide the ideal backdrop for today’s décor trend towards adding pops of colour and drama. While it might seem like choosing the perfect white paint colour is easy, it is anything but! White comes in a variety of tones and shades that can vary from being cool to warm. Cool whites have hints of blue undertones and are often used in contemporary spaces, while the warm whites carry brown tints and are best suited to more traditional or transitional décor style. Whether you choose cool or warm, ensure that the rest of the décor follows suit and then add colour pops and accessories from there. To create a serene, all-white space, consider layering textures of different shades of white in the same tone. Be sure to add colour that complements rather than contrasts the look when working with warm tones. Creams and beiges in assorted depths and muted tones are ideal for a soothing, sophisticated look. A stark cool-white wall, with doses of contrasting colours in furnishings and accessories, creates a stand-out look with eye-catching mod appeal.

IDEAL WHITES 1. DULUX PACIFIC PEARL IS A WHITE WITH A HINT OF GREY AND IS IDEAL FOR CONTEMPORARY SPACES. 2. FARROW & BALL “SCHOOL HOUSE WHITE” IS A WARMER SHADE MORE SUITED TO TRADITIONAL STYLE.

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HomesHOLIDAYS HOMES Community

FO R T H E

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN HUM

« 8 CHARLES JACKSON AVENUE, DOWS LAKE This home carries the prominence of sitting on what was once a lumber yard that was a part of John R. Booth’s empire. The Canadian lumber baron supplied the wood for the construction of the Parliament buildings, and his legacy is a significant part of Ottawa’s history. Today, the Cape Cod style home retains the roots of its 1942 character, but renovated and updated with modern amenities. A cherished feature is its orientation with an east-facing kitchen and a dining room that enjoys western sunsets. The home on Charles Jackson Ave, a street named for JR Booth’s son, will be decorated by Karen Grand and Scrim’s Florist.

» 124 POWELL AVENUE, THE GLEBE This Younghusband designed home was built in 1917 on one of the Glebe’s most coveted streets. The original Arts and Crafts style architecture has been honoured with great attention to detail during two different renovations. Solid wood floors and stained-glass windows blend in with modern amenities that include a luxurious master suite, exercise room and an elevator to the second floor. An outstanding feature of this grand home is the award-winning gardens that can be enjoyed from the cozy verandah, which is naturally fitted with comfy wicker furniture and a wooden swing. Beaudry Flowers and Silk Greenhouse will be dressing this home for the tour.

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HOMES Community

As the longest-standing fundraiser in the National Capital Region, in support of Hospice Care Ottawa, the Homes for the Holidays tour kicks off the festive season over three days from November 15–17. In the tour’s eight beautifully decorated homes, Ottawa’s most prominent florists come together to wow visitors with the latest holiday décor.

« 260 PARK ROAD, ROCKCLIFFE PARK Currently home to the Ambassador of Belgium, Johan Verkammen and his spouse Kathleen Billen, this stone and clapboard house has seen its share of illustrious residents including Graham Towers, the first Governor of the Bank of Canada. Today, the décor reflects the welltravelled life of a diplomat. Rooms are filled with eclectic art from far-off lands including Senegal, Syria and Hong Kong. Upon entering the residence you’ll quickly become aware of the significance of Tintin, the globally recognized comic-strip character whose birthplace was Belgium. The home will be decorated by The Stalk Market.

» 555 HIGHLAND AVE, WESTBORO This stunning, contemporary new build was designed by Alex Diaz of Art House Developments and Candace Sutcliffe, president of C.A. Paradis. While the entire main floor boasts an open concept, each section of space is beautifully decorated with entertaining in mind. The award-winning kitchen is central to the overall sophisticated feeling of the home. Vibrant art work, vaulted ceilings and wall-to-wall windows make this home a must-see. Trillium Floral Design will create the display for a home with lots of wow factor.

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HOMES Community

» 2022 SHARON AVENUE, MCKELLAR HEIGHTS Attention to craftsmanship makes this home, designed by Terra Nova’s John Henry, a stand-out. The home was designed for entertaining, yet offers plenty of retreat space as well. Attention to detail is evident throughout, where a distinguished staircase is an impressive feature. Up-to-date modifications have been made with a newly-added home office and lounge area. The home is fitted with current automation technology which can be controlled directly from a smartphone. Long-time Hospice Care Ottawa supporter, Flowers Talk Tivoli, will be creating the décor for the tour.

« 1085 LENA AVENUE, MANOTICK An inspiring transformation from a classic 80s style home to a current contemporary bungalow makes this home a showstopper. From the peaceful and private outdoor living space to the Zenlike vibe within, the custom bungalow carries an on-trend, tailored style. The extensive renovations blend sleek style with comfort in a casual living space. Manotick’s Mill Street Florists will bring the holiday spirit into this beautiful home.

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HOMES Community

» 5793 LONGHEARTH WAY, MANOTICK While this classic Georgian style home was built within the past ten years, it holds an air of tradition that honours its architectural design. The columned front portico sets the tone, and the dormered windows and classic red brick exterior pay tribute to authentic Georgian architecture. The landscaping, by Eden Design enhances the authenticity with formal gardens that contribute to the air of sophistication. This home provides a quintessential backdrop for Terra Plants and Flowers to decorate for the holiday tour.

« 15 CARSDALE AVENUE, ROCKCLIFFE PARK Referred to as Carsdale House, this home takes the honour of being the only house on the street. Designed by local architect Denis Kane, the home recently underwent a seven-year rebuilding process. It is now beautifully fitted with oversized windows to channel natural light on the combination of modern design with antique furnishings. The overall décor creates intrigue with a unique transitional feeling. Stoneblossom Floral Gallery will be adding the trimmings and decorative detail for this year’s tour. For more information and to purchase tickets visit hospicecareottawa.ca

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ITALIAN MADE COMFORT


CADIEUX INTERIORS.ca

1280 OLD INNES RD., 613-745-1230


The Details Make The Difference kitchen • bath • lighting • accessories

DESIGN & CABINETRY BY ASTRO. FEATURING VISUAL COMFORT & CO. LIGHTING.

www.astrodesigncentre.com| 613.749.1902 | 1818 Woodward Dr. Ottawa


HOME Get the Look

IMAGE: WOODCHIP AND MAGNOLIA

MEDUSA LUMINAIRE LIGHT FIXTURE; ROCHE BOBOIS

BY MARY TAGGART instagram @maryktaggart twitter @ottawaathomemag

modernism Art Deco first came to the style scene in the mid-1920s and lasted through the 1930s. The streamlined design took over both North America and Europe, offering style aficionados an entirely different expression that included new material and design elements created by machinery. A combination of both natural and man-made materials emerged to create one-of-a-kind and mass-produced goods from the everyday to the ultra-luxurious. The design trend ended with the start of World War II. The 1960s brought some elements back, but it has never been as strong as it was during the roaring twenties and early 1930s when opulence reigned supreme. Today, Art Deco is getting noticed again. Look for geometric and sinuous shapes, a mixture of ebony and ivory, gold inlay and exaggerated shape in everything from furnishings and fixtures to accessories and wallpaper.

SAIKA MIRROR; $179, MOBILIA LOTUS WALLPAPER; FARROW & BALL

MEMOIRS DECK-MOUNT BATH FAUCET; FROM $1,022, KOHLER

EYE CANDY BUFFET; $5,215, CADIEUX INTERIORS FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  41


CHINATOWN LIVING N  eighbourhood on the Move

WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY TED SIMPSON

THEN Chinese culture has been present in Ottawa for over 100 years. The first record of Chinese residents in the nation’s capital comes from the 1911 census that registered 170 people of Chinese descent. It took another 20 years of slow growth for that population to double and establish its own Chinatown in the city of Ottawa. But the story doesn’t start in the place you might imagine—the first Chinatown in Ottawa was located on Albert Street. The Old Chinatown stretched from Kent Street to O’Connor Street and peaked in the 1940s with four restaurants, three laundries, two grocery stores and three other shops. As the downtown core was aggressively developed through the mid-20th century with new high rise buildings, the small Chinese merchants disappeared. The story of current-day Chinatown really begins in the early 1970s when the second wave of Chinese merchants began to open their shops in the commercial 42  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019

district along Somerset Street West, between Rochester Street and Bronson Avenue. At the time, the area was fairly run-down and the properties were reasonably priced. Chinese merchants and investors bought up the old houses along Somerset and converted them to commercial use. As the new Chinatown grew, so too did the Chinese population in Ottawa, from around 3,000 in 1971 to over 8,000 in 1981. This was in addition to new immigrants from all over Asia and thousands of Vietnamese refugees who arrived in the mid-70s, commonly known as the “boat people.” Through the 1980s, Ottawa city council made the decision to help out with the area’s development by designating the stretch of Somerset West from Bronson to Preston as a redevelopment area, bringing new and upgraded infrastructure to the strip. The City also designated a BIA for the area in 1989, with the name Somerset Heights. The official designation of the area as Chinatown finally came in 2005.


LIVING Neighbourhood on the Move

NOW Today, the first image that comes to mind when thinking of Ottawa’s Chinatown is probably the magnificent gateway, located on Somerset Street West near Bronson Avenue. It’s a standout feature of the city that rivals any traditional gateway found in Asia, and that result is owed to the collaboration on the project between Ottawa and Beijing. In 1999 Ottawa signed an agreement to become a “sister city” with the Chinese capital of Beijing. As a part of this international cooperation, Beijing designed Ottawa’s Chinatown gateway and provided the materials and crew to carry out the project, which was completed in 2010. The gateway combines with an abundance of murals, public art pieces and the typical neon lights of any Asian district to create an intensely colourful and vibrant community.

The business makeup of the neighbourhood remains primarily Chinese, being a destination in the city for traditional dishes like dumplings, dim sum, Peking duck and bubble tea. Shops like Ping Fat Lee offer a gateway into Chinese traditional medicine with their friendly and knowledgeable service. Neighbouring restaurant So Good provides that hole-in-the-wall, authentic Chinese experience you’re looking for. The corner grocery stores carry special Asian ingredients and cookware that you’ll never find in a big box store. All this can be found alongside an abundance of Vietnamese restaurants that champion the pho noodle soup and banh mi sandwich. Of course, the flavours of Chinatown are completed by a mixture of Thai, Korean and Japanese shops.

FACING PAGE THE CHINATOWN GATEWAY IS A SYMBOL OF PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN OTTAWA AND BEIJING THIS PAGE (TOP LEFT) NEON SIGNS EVOKE THE FEELING OF NIGHT LIFE IN AN ASIAN CITY (TOP RIGHT) VIETNAMESE SHOPS ARE NEARLY AS COMMON ON SOMERSET AS CHINESE (BOTTOM LEFT) ASIAN GROCERY STORES OFFER UNIQUE AND EXOTIC ITEMS (BOTTOM RIGHT) CHINESE COMFORT FOOD AT SO GOOD RESTAURANT

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SECTION Title

ASK THE EXPERT

Laurie Asbil, Sales Manager, Stone Design Concepts

Q

I love the look of quartz and granite, what is the difference between the two?

A

Both products have benefits and fit in beautifully with today’s look for space with function and style. Granite is an all-natural stone product that has been quarried, cut to slab size and surface polished; while quartz is man-made. Quartz is comprised of approximately 93% natural quartz and the remainder is a combination of colouring and resins. The finished look of a quartz product is more predictable from slab to slab in comparison with granite’s more natural variation. It is always recommended that clients view granite slabs to ensure a good understanding of each slab’s unique characteristics. Anyone who is looking for solid colours will typically select quartz, especially in the lighter shades. Quartz does not require sealing, while granite does. The frequency of having to seal will depend entirely on the type of stone. Some stones don’t need resealing for five years or more. Both products are offered in 3-cm and 2-cm thickness and are durable solid choices. A client’s preference for one over the other usually comes down to visual appearance and taste. CONTACT LAURIE ASBIL: lasbil@stonedesignconcepts.com 613-228-5456 X 0027 44  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019

PEOPLE The people who built Chinatown were immigrants and refugees who braved the journey across the sea to Canada to build better lives for themselves and their families. They in turn brought richness and flavour to the culture of the city by setting up their businesses and carrying on their traditions. Today, that story remains very much the same. Patricia Wilson is the chair of Ottawa Centre Refugee Action, a grassroots

organization of volunteers who help to support and settle refugees in the area around Chinatown and other parts of west Ottawa. Patricia says that refugees are currently arriving mostly from Syria and Eritrea. “When they arrive here, they often struggle with a lack of English-language skills and a lack of education, that makes it very hard for them to go out and get a job,” says Patricia. “Because of that, they will often end up starting their own business, just as so many refugees have done here in the past.”


SECTION Title

HOUSING Living in Chinatown is very much skewed towards renters. Over 70 per cent of the homes in the neighbourhood are rental properties in fairly old buildings—only about 10 per cent of residences were built in the past 10 years. The upside of that older housing stock is that rents tend to remain at an affordable level, which attracts more young people, seniors and immigrants to the neighbourhood. “One thing I noticed about the area are the influx of newly-renovated rentals,” says Ottawa real estate agent Ian Charlebois. “Landlords like the area based on its purchase price, they renovate the building and attract young professionals who get to live a tad more luxuriously without the high monthly price tag.”

ABOVE STREET ART PUTS A FRESH FACE ON AGING URBAN BUILDINGS IN CHINATOWN LEFT PANDAS AND BAMBOO SYMBOLIZE PEACE AND GOOD LUCK IN CHINESE CULTURE FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  45


LIVING S  tep Inside

Art T H E G R E AT E S C A P E

BY VERA CODY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

G

rowing up on the Prairies in Regina, Alexandra Badzak, current Director and CEO of the Ottawa Art Gallery (OAG) dreamt of being either an artist or a forest ranger. Tree-filled northern Saskatchewan allowed her to connect with nature on a spiritual level, and her creative-filled household nurtured her artistic side. As a child, she was often found under the dining room table doodling and drawing. Her artistic resolve guided her in educational pursuits and ultimately to her successful role at the helm of the OAG. Graduating high school in 1991, she was accepted at the Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver and went on to study at the University of Saskatchewan receiving her Bachelor of Fine Arts and Masters of Continuing Education. She also completed a ceramics program in Prince Albert. While working in Saskatoon’s Mendel Art Gallery as the Head of Public and Professional Programs, she rose through the ranks as a gallery educator, programs facilitator and curator while expanding innovative programs during her ten years there. It was her artistic nature that led her to the position of the Director and CEO of the OAG, and since 2010 she has successfully led its growth, with its expansion culminating as her most exciting and gratifying achievement. Alexandra has received numerous awards while in Ottawa, including the

46  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019

2019 Victor Tolgesy Arts Leadership Award for contributing to enriching the cultural life in Ottawa, and Royal Canadian Academy of Arts Medal in 2018 recognizing leadership in the arts across Canada. In addition, the OAG won the 2019 Top New Visitor Experience Award from Ottawa Tourism. Alexandra is presently a member of the Canadian Art Museum Directors Organization, and on the Arts and Heritage Steering Committee to renew the Ottawa 20/20 Arts and Heritage Plan. She and her husband, Armin, live in the ByWard Market and believe Ottawa is a well-kept secret as many people in Western Canada have no idea what a wonderful city it is with its architecture, beautiful green landscape, accessibility and rich history. Has your vision of creating the OAG as a cultural and artistic hub been realized? The best laid plans are just plans, but when we opened the doors people came in great numbers. We wanted to make this gallery something that Ottawa embraced so the public felt this was their space. What was most gratifying was the interconnectivity, the diversity, honest comments and respect for the arts. We were successful beyond what we had anticipated, and attendance numbers have just kept growing. The OAG is just hitting its stride. We are interested in how a gallery in the 21st century functions, not just as space for art, but a space for people and the dialogs within the city. Its future possibilities are limitless.


SECTION Title

What does art mean to you? Art is another language and way of understanding and interacting with the world around us. The OAG is a privileged space, not an elitist space. It’s one that we need to hold onto because it is rare and helps us understand the world better. It is not necessarily mediated by politics or the media. It allows us to have conversations about the world around us. It is my favorite place to escape as it changes everyday and that is why I love being here. Are you yourself an art collector? It is a complicated question because I am, and I am not. I certainly do buy art, but I don’t do it aggressively for the reasons of ethics. I do not want to be in a situation where I am favoring or collecting a particular artist and that artist is having a show here. That would be perceived as a conflict of interest, so I am not a voracious collector because of that. Do you have a favorite section? All the spaces offer different experiences. The Firestone space is more a domestic space as it is a domestic collection and is part of the Canadian canon and identity. People connect with that, and it’s often an entry point into art as they are familiar with the Group of Seven. That then becomes a launching point for visitors to go to our other floors that house more contemporary works, or where they can connect with art on an intimate level. Every space for me is special and has something for everyone’s taste. FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  47


LIVING Fit At Home

Let’s get

PERSONAL

BY LIANNE LAING twitter instagram @liannelaing

S

tepping into a gym for the first time can be a daunting experience. Equipment is complicated, and first timers will often find themselves wandering from machine to machine without any idea of how to put it to good use. Keep in mind, it’s not just the first timers who find themselves with a lack of direction or action plan. Loss of motivation, ideas and accountability affect everyone at some point in their health and wellness journey. This is when hiring a personal trainer can be incredibly beneficial and well worth the investment. Some of the immediate benefits you see when working with a trainer are improved efficiency and time management. There are a variety of workouts that require different pace, tempo and recovery time. A trainer will know how to maximise effort for the time allotted. A lot of us get discouraged when we feel we have plateaued or aren’t seeing the desired changes in our bodies. A trainer is able to investigate why this might be happening and change the way you train to reach your goals. If you are new to the gym and the equipment, you will want a trainer to demonstrate how to use the equipment properly. This not only applies to the

equipment, but also basic movements like squats or push ups. Proper technique and form reduce the risk of injury or pain. The communication between you and your trainer also needs to be open and honest for the relationship to work. Adam Bracken, co-founder of the Fitness Lab, emphasizes that trainers are a walking billboard for their personal business, and says they need to practice what they preach. “I tell my trainers all the time that you need to put yourself through what you’re putting your clients through to fully understand what they’re feeling and how to adapt in that situation.” Adam also stresses how important that initial meeting needs to be when consulting with a trainer. Exercise is meant to make you feel healthier and stronger, not just physically, but mentally as well. The endorphin release from exercise is what keeps many people coming back for more. Accountability is a critical component, so whether you have an appointment with your trainer, a gym date with your friends or are looking to try a new class, be openminded. More importantly, invest in your own health; the return on your investment gives back every day.

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LIVING F  all Fashion

WILD FOR NEUTRALS BY MARY CIANCIBELLO  INSTAGRAM @maryciancibellostyle PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIA MACPHERSON

ANIMAL PRINTS ARE STILL KING Trends with staying power, like animal prints and plaids will be the new neutrals into this season and beyond.

CHIC SUITING The best part about the suit trend is the ability to separate each piece, creating endless fall looks. SUIT JACKET & SKIRT: RW & CO.

LEOPARD PRINT COAT: BANANA REPUBLIC GOLD PANT: WINNERS BAG AND SHOES: ALDO

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LIVING Fall Fashion

TOTES WITH ‘TUDE Put your attitude into your totes— snakeskin carry-alls make a big statement.

MEN’S WEAR WITH A TWIST

TOTE WITH SNAKESKIN DETAIL: COACH SNAKESKIN TOTE: MARSHALLS

Trousers are nothing new to the women’s fashion scene. Add a high waist and wide leg, and you’ve got a look that’s anything but masculine. CREAM TROUSERS: RW & CO. WIDE LEG TROUSERS: TRISTAN

FLIRTY SKIRTS LAYER ON THE COZY The cooler weather calls for cozy accessories and stylish warmth. FEDORA: MARSHALLS EXCLUSIVE HUNTER BOOTS & SOCKS: THE BAY

Skirts with layers and movement provide the perfect amount of “flirt” to your layered looks. LAYERED SKIRT: ROADTRIP PLEATED WRAP SKIRT: H&M

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WELCOME HOME

Learn more at eQProvence.ca Prices and specifications are subject to change without prior notice. Renderings are artist’s concept. E. & O.E.


Coming to Orléans, Fall 2019 Perhaps you have seen it in your dreams – that picture perfect home, nestled in the ideal place to raise a growing family. This Fall, we invite you to discover that dream come true, here in Orléans where eQ Homes will unveil a beautiful new collection of singles and townhomes.


LIVING P  rofile

PHOTOGRAPHY

FINE ART OF

BY CHLOE E. GIRVAN  TWITTER instagram @mom_interrupted PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

LEFT TO RIGHT WHITNEY LEWIS-SMITH, OLIVIA JOHNSTON, JONATHAN HOBIN, MERYL MCMASTER

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LIVING P  rofile

J

onathan Hobin, Olivia Johnston, Whitney Lewis-Smith and Meryl McMaster are vibrant creatives that all share a prestigious connection to the School of the Photographic Arts Ottawa (SPAO), and are currently attracting attention on both the national and international stage for their breathtaking and thoughtful photographic artwork. Jody Surette, Associate Director at Galerie St-Laurent + Hill, explains the increased appetite for photographic images that are unique and special. “Thanks to young artists that are doing new and interesting things with the medium of photography, moving it from the common snapshot to fine art photography, we have seen a steady growth of interest in the Ottawa market over the past ten years.”

WHAT WILL I SAY TO THE SKY AND THE EARTH II BY MERYL McMASTER

MERYL McMASTER Describing herself as a very imaginative and introverted child, Meryl McMaster first found herself in front of the camera out of necessity. “One of my assignments at the Ontario College of Art and Design was to take a portrait. I was too shy to ask someone, so I just took it of myself. Self-portraiture is a now signature of my images.” Plains Cree from Red Pheasant First Nation in Saskatchewan and a member of the Siksika First Nation in Alberta, Meryl’s work explores how one’s sense of self is formed through experience on the land, lineage, history and culture. “My own Indigenous and European heritage does inform the work, but also I look more broadly at issues like the environment and our human impact on the earth, animals and natural surroundings.”

One of Meryl’s projects, As Immense as the Sky, evolved from her interest in the passage of time and how her world views had been informed. “It was mindboggling for me to think about how much history has gone by, will continue to go by, and the landscapes my ancestors had experienced.” Asked what she would like her dreamlike, theatrical images to evoke in others, Meryl says, “My hope it that people will be able to use them as portals into their own conversations. Perhaps they could be a teaching tool for future generations, to discuss our own troubled Canadian history. A way of looking to the past, but also forward with hope.” Meryl’s work will be part of an upcoming group exhibition, Inaabiwin/ Movement of Light, in early October at the Ottawa Art Gallery. FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  55


SECTION Title DEAR LEADER BY JONATHAN HOBIN

THE TWINS BY JONATHAN HOBIN

56  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019

JONATHAN HOBIN Born in Ottawa and a graduate of Canterbury High School, Jonathan Hobin is perhaps best known for his major projects, Mother Goose, In the Playroom, Cry Babies and Little Lady/Little Man. His first major project, Mother Goose, was conceived when a very young Jonathan began to detect a darker narrative in books of traditional Mother Goose rhymes. “As a kid, I always felt that childhood was a much darker experience than what is portrayed in pop culture.” Witnessing the widespread impact of 9/11 while attending Ryerson University led to the creation of In the Playroom, which depicts images of children innocently playing out the details of contemporary news tragedies. “I remember thinking that these grand stories of the 24-hour news cycle were perhaps the modern fairy tales of our time,” says Jonathan. He adds that Playroom “is an extreme metaphor for the idea that it is a dark world, media is everywhere, and you can see echoes of that in kids’ behaviour.” The project soon became the subject of public debate, resulting in an appearance on CNN. “That was a weird and rocky road. On one hand, my work was being hung in museums and featured in art books, but at the same time vilified and the subjected to harsh criticism.” Yet, he was also mindful for the Cry Babies project that, “The best work has to be true to myself.” Using essential tools of a notebook and pencil, his images begin with drawings replicated with photography. He reworks images and rebuilds sets until everything is exactly right, noting that nothing is accidental. “Every detail in an image matters as every element is another opportunity to tell more of the story.”


LIVING P  rofile

WHITNEY LEWIS-SMITH

WORKING BY WHITNEY LEWIS

While living on a marine science base near the Maldives documenting the coral reefs of the Indian Ocean, Whitney Lewis-Smith began to explore further ways that her camera could be used creatively to photograph objects located beneath the surface. Today, she uses a combination of historic and photographic processes to produce breathtaking images. They often feature natural elements which are no longer alive, to invite discussion on themes of consumerism, sustainability and globalization’s impact on the environment. Educated in biology and greatly concerned about society’s treatment of the environment, Whitney frequently travels the globe to places like Mexico City and the cloud forests of Veracruz in search of the perfect specimens and objects needed to create each poignant image. Embracing the concept of, Biophilia, meaning how humans possess an innate tendency to seek connection with nature and other forms of life, Whitney uses her art to play into the viewer’s childlike passion for nature. She wants her images to induce subtle visual connections to something innately loved, so audiences will feel the instinctive urge to protect it, while also feeling “connected and excited about the lushness of this world we live in and its creatures.” This fall, Whitney’s latest work will be featured in a three-artist interactive group show titled TERRAMATTER at Ottawa City Hall Art Gallery. PROMO SEGAL BY WHITNEY LEWIS

FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  57


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ROUND AND FLAT AND FULL OF DARK ADVICE BY OLIVIA JOHNSTON

LIVING P  rofile

OLIVIA JOHNSTON

MATER DOLOROSA BY OLIVIA JOHNSTON

Olivia Johnston draws upon her artistic talent and education in art history to explore themes such as beauty, gender and sexuality throughout her work. Each project tells a story to hopefully inspire open conversation on topics that might otherwise be difficult to broach. “As vulnerability is something that I often request of my subjects, I only feel it fair that I too share personal struggles with my audiences.” In projects, like Trauma (Photo Booth) which documents Olivia’s battle with acne, and I May Be Crazy But Not that Crazy, based on her own experience with cyberbullying, she considers the interesting dichotomy between beauty and horror. “You can often make something beautiful out of a horrible experience.” Using a wide variety of both simple and advanced cameras in her work, Olivia also employs digital post-production methods to manipulate the faces of her subjects. “I want to draw people’s attention to the fact that photographs can lie, and that identity is much more fluid than the way we look.” Her current project, Saints and Madonnas, is being shown at Carleton University Art Gallery this fall. It features unconventional images of subjects, including Olivia’s mother, depicted as religious figures. Pondering whether the Madonna image can exist in a contemporary way, and what is required for the designation of holiness or saintliness in today’s world, the project also includes questions of gender as a large component. With so many skills in her possession, Olivia’s warmth and compassion contribute to her success. “I like the idea of finding the magic in people around me and putting them in the studio; photographing them is my way of doing that.” FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  59


LIVING N  ew & Notable

W H AT ’ S

OLD

NEW IS

BY DANI-ELLE DUBÉ  TWITTER @danidmedia

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMIE KRONICK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMIE KRONICK

T

his year is a new beginning for three small Ottawa businesses as they make the move to new locations in the city. The trio, which all resided just blocks away from one another along Wellington St. W, are now setting up shop closer to downtown.

ALICE RESTAURANT Alice Restaurant itself is new to Ottawa’s foodie scene, but it is Chef Briana Kim’s second local restaurant. Her first eatery, Café My House, was on Bank Street before relocating to Hintonburg and served the public for a decade before closing in January this year. Months later, the award-winning chef opened her new culinary venture on 40 Adeline St. in Little Italy. It’s a vegetable-focused restaurant which serves an eight-course, blind-tasting menu. The space itself is light and airy with a charming simplicity that promotes a quaint and intimate environment. “Our focus is bringing a modern and creative fine-dining experience using plant-based ingredients and vegetables,” says Briana, who was the 2017 winner of Gold Medal Plates Ottawa. Patrons will be introduced to a new high-end menu every six weeks. Natural wine pairings and alternative pairings of non-alcoholic beverages, made in house, will complete any tasty dish and satisfy the palate.

60  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019


LIVING New & Notable

VIENS AVEC MOI BOUTIQUE After eight years in business, viens avec moi had become somewhat of a staple in Wellington Village. However, the women’s clothing and accessory boutique will be making its new home in The Glebe at 797 Bank St. in September. Owners Sophie Beaudoin and Renée Morra’s love of travel, cottage life and nature have inspired the shop and its fashion lines, which tend to be a mix of bohemian and trendy. That signature feel will continue with the new store, but shoppers can also expect some updates with fresh, rich and modern elements, plus new clothing lines like Vero Alfie and Ivy Lee among others. “We have dedicated ourselves to offering a unique, excellent and pleasant shopping experience by curating fashionforward lines at affordable prices,” says Renée. “We personally do all of the buying, and we take pride in the attention to detail we give when we curate our lines for customers.”

TWISS & WEBER Laura Twiss and Tonia Weber first started working together as knitwear-pattern makers and fibre artists in 2009. Now, the two entrepreneurs own and operate a women’s boutique that features locallymade clothing designed by the duo, as well as other Ottawa designers like Stephanie Davis Designs, Seven Sisters Apparel, Sabrina Jade Designs and more. With Twiss & Weber’s new location at 443A Sussex Drive, shoppers can expect a new and unexpected line of perfume; continued cross-promotions with local businesses like The Saucy Milliner, Isabel’s and Schad Boutique, plus new artwork from Wellington West artists Andrea Stoke, Alison Fowler and Steven Artwell.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANI-ELLE DUBÉ FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  61


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LIVING Giving Back

CHANGE

Thoughtful BY CATHERINE CLARK twitter instagram @catherinejclark

G

ord Garner dedicates his professional life to breaking down the stigma associated with addiction, a stigma he faced daily before he successfully went into recovery from his own substance use disorder (SUD). Having turned his life around, Gord is now making sure that others have the same opportunity. As Executive Director of Ottawa’s Community Addictions Peer Support Association and Chair of Recovery Day Ottawa, Gord organizes peer support initiatives and community engagement projects that help those living with SUD get the help they need and recognize that they’re not alone in their suffering. “I see my job as helping to re-educate people about what addiction is, and about the importance of language,” says Gord. “Lots of people don’t talk to anyone about their substance use disorder because they hear how negatively others talk about people with addictions,” says Gord. He also knows first-hand that one person’s addiction impacts many lives. “My family suffered a great deal from my addiction,” he explains, which is why Gord is such a champion of September’s annual Recovery Day Ottawa event, allowing families, friends and those in recovery to share information, challenge stigma and celebrate the fact that recovery is possible. “Stigma not only stops people from asking for help for a substance use disorder, it also means they don’t always get the help they need if they do work up the courage to ask for it,” Gord notes. “We tend to think of people with substance use disorders as being homeless, but the vast majority of them are living ‘indoors.’” says Gord. In fact, a national report on homelessness indicates that 200,000 Canadians experience

homelessness in any given year, but Statistics Canada reveals that some 6 million people meet the criteria for SUD. That’s a lot of suffering happening behind closed doors to people of all ages, all backgrounds and all walks of life. “I’m not asking people to be polite,” says Gord. “I’m asking them to simply stop and think about the words they’re using that hurt people in their homes, workplaces and communities.”

Gord hopes that by challenging our perceptions, we’ll start looking at SUD as an illness, not a failure, and begin treating those suffering from addictions with compassion and empathy rather than disdain. “My overall goal is simply to help people have better lives, whatever form that takes.” For more information on substance-use disorders or on Recovery Day Ottawa, please visit www.capsa.ca

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  63


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CUSTOM BENCH

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THE BENEFITS OF A MUSKOKA KITCHEN

M U S K O K A C A B I N E T R Y I S A V A I L A B L E A T:


FOOD Food Thoughts

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG TECKLES

Love ‘em

INGREDIENTS 2 pieces bacon, sliced

KOR ADD Y EY’S TIP O GORG UR FAVOUR ONZO ITE L ALON G WIT A CHEESE H THE AND P INE NU BACON AN EX TS FO R TRA D EC SIDE D ADENT ISH.

2 tbsp (30 mL) toasted pine nuts 16 Brussels sprouts, trimmed, halved lengthwise Sea salt and freshly-ground pepper, to taste

BY KOREY KEALEY twitter @foodthought instagram @kitchenkonnected

Often found at the market on a long stalk, Brussels sprouts are typically a love ‘em or leave ‘em vegetable. But flash cooking over high heat with a little bacon can be the game changer. Prep time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 8 minutes

METHOD 1. In heavy bottom sauté pan or cast iron pan, cook bacon over medium high heat until crispy; about 5 minutes; remove from pan and set aside. 2. Reserve 1 tbsp. (15 mL) bacon fat in pan; heat pan over high heat until bacon fat is sizzling; place Brussels sprouts cut side down and leave for about 2 minutes or until deeply browned. 3. Flip each sprout over and cook an additional minute or until just forktender and bright green. 4. Sprinkle with pine nuts, reserved bacon, salt and pepper and serve immediately. Serves: 4 FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  65


Great ideas flow here.


FOOD Let’s Dish

F I S H TA L E S BY PAULA ROY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

C

hef Ben Baird has been delighting diners in Ottawa since he launched his first culinary venture here—the Urban Pear—in 2002. A year later, he embraced Ottawa’s expanded food truck scene with his “Streat Gourmet” concept before moving on to create the inventive menu for Oat Couture Oatmeal Café. Now executive chef at Pelican Seafood Market and Grill, Ben has made a name for himself for his deft handling of the freshest ingredients and continually seizing new opportunities. Ottawa At Home sat down with Ben to find out what fuels his passion for food. What sparked your interest in the local food movement? I attended Stratford Chefs School and found the program to be

absolutely life-changing because we got to meet so many farmers and work with the freshest produce and herbs. It was very inspiring and I knew that it would influence my career as a chef. Is Pelican Seafood Market and Grill your first deep dive into working with fish? After Stratford I worked at Sooke Harbour House near Victoria where the local fisherman would show up at our door straight from the docks with their catch of the day. I fell in love with fish there. What brought you back to Ottawa? It was more feasible to open my own place here rather than Victoria. My goal with the Urban Pear was to add to the city’s limited casual fine-dining options in the early 2000s, creating a west-coast vibe and

capitalizing on the connections we were forging with local farmers. I’m very proud of what we accomplished there before selling it to focus on the food truck. How did your partnership with Pelican happen? Although the food truck had been extremely successful—some days we sold out in 45 minutes—I began to think about selling it. A chance meeting with Pelican co-owner Jim Foster made me realize we could create an effective partnership instead, hence the birth.  After 27 years in the industry, what keeps you inspired and motivated? The ingredients! I love a beautiful piece of halibut or the smell of a freshly-shucked oyster; every year I get excited for the first strawberries of the season. Now that I am older, I also particularly appreciate the chance to join a great team like we have here. Why have you chosen so many different culinary opportunities? I’ve really tried to jump on all the chances that have come my way and stay ahead of the curve. Trying different things helps re-ignite my passion for food, so I guess change is good for me. Any advice for someone considering becoming a chef? Be prepared to work extremely hard! Get a job in a kitchen before you commit to culinary school, but do go to school to get the best foundation possible. Buy and read every cookbook you can get your hands on and play around with food at home. What changes are you working on for Pelican? Our fall menu will feature some new dishes including meat, vegetarian and gluten-free options. We’re also preparing to launch Pelican’s “School of Fish” which will offer unique, intimate hands-on culinary experiences in a working kitchen; giving guests a chance to learn, play, have fun and eat some really great seafood. CHEF BEN’S TOP TIPS FOR COOKING FISH • Buy the freshest fish you can find from a reputable fishmonger. • Start by drying the fish on clean paper towel, then season before placing in a hot pan.  • Don’t overcook it.  FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  67


FOOD Dining Out

Village IT TAKES A

BY PAULA ROY  TWITTER instagram @paulajroy PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

When it comes to the bright lights in Ottawa’s culinary scene, several young stars are blazing new trails and earning accolades for the inventive dining experiences they offer. Their success is credited to a network of supporters within the city’s restaurant industry.

68  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019


FOOD Dining Out

MARLO (LEFT) & COCO

COCO AND MARLO DE LEO— DREAMLAND CAFÉ Sisters Coco (22) and Marlo (21) De Leo may be young but they have an abundance of passion and talent, as evidenced by the success of their Preston Street eatery, DreamLand Café. Coco started working in the kitchen at Westboro’s Fratelli at age 16, and found the restaurant industry to be an appealing career path. Meanwhile, Marlo worked as a hostess and bartender, honing her front of house skills. Armed with recipes from their beloved nonna and a keen appreciation for what it takes to delight diners, they made their vision of owning a restaurant come true with DreamLand Café, which serves up oldschool Italian food with a twist. “Many of our regulars are people who have travelled to Italy and they say our food is as good or better than what they had there, which is really gratifying,” says Coco.

Coco’s time at the Culinary Institute of Canada in P.E.I. was worthwhile, but she preferred to keep learning by getting back into the kitchen full time. Their parents have always been entrepreneurs, so the young restaurateurs count on them and a great accountant as sounding boards, as well as their treasured mentor Pasquale Valente, the patriarch of the clan that owns Fratelli restaurants. “His enduring passion shows me this business is sustainable in the long term,” says Coco. Marlo sees distinct advantages of youth. “I have no other commitments like kids or a mortgage, so I can just focus on myself and the business. I also have the energy to make sure that every guest has the best possible experience.” Coco agrees and adds, “We have a different take on how to run a restaurant and we also put a lot of emphasis on making sure our staff feels safe and valued.”

FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  69


SECTION Title

PHIL CAMERON— GERMAN EMBASSY

Eight exquisite homes decorated for the season, a Holiday PopUp Shop, a Holiday Bake-off, Handmade Bazaar and much more! $50 per person. Tickets will go on sale September 18 For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit www.hospicecareottawa.ca or call 613-260-2906 ext. 222

70  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019

A self-proclaimed lover of eating plus an injury which cut short a promising career in basketball drove Phil Cameron, now 26 years old, towards the culinary industry. “When I started cooking often for myself, I discovered how much I loved it so I decided to enroll in the culinary program at La Cité collégiale,” he recalls. Phil’s carefully-structured career has included stints at the Chateau Laurier and House of Commons. He’s now head chef at the German Ambassador’s residence where he also serves as residence manager. On the side, he works as a personal chef for hire and is an apprentice member of Culinary Team Canada which competes in prestigious international competitions. plus a regular volunteer at the Ottawa Mission and occasional teacher at La Cité. While the combination of long hours at the embassy plus all his volunteer work can be overwhelming, Phil says he wouldn’t change a thing, especially while he is young, energetic and doesn’t yet have a family. His youth means he sometimes is not taken seriously, but he loves proving the doubters wrong as he continues to prepare himself for the future. “I would love to become one of the competing chefs on Team Canada and maybe one day open a restaurant,” he notes. His list of valued mentors includes two from the House of Commons: Chef Judson Simpson and sous chef Robert Graveline, whom he respects for his ability to balance work and family. He admires Chef Ric of the Ottawa Mission for giving so much to others and president of the Ottawa chapter of the Canadian Culinary Federation, Chef Janik Quintal of St. Albert Cheese, regularly offers valued guidance. Chef Louis Charest at Rideau Hall inspires Phil with his imagination and innovation. Phil believes being a chef is the best job in the world but going in, people need to accept that it involves a lot of sacrifices, including foregoing sleep and a social life. “If you are passionate then go for it but consider formal training to learn proper techniques. Most importantly, put your ego aside and recognize that you will always have things to learn in this industry.”


FOOD Dining Out

DOMINIQUE DUFOUR— GRAY JAY HOSPITALITY Just 30 years old when she recently opened Gray Jay Hospitality in Little Italy, Dominique Dufour has a list of culinary triumphs that might give one reason to think she is far older. The Montreal native, who attended culinary school at George Brown College, toyed with the idea of joining the fashion industry before realizing food was her true passion. She’s worked in numerous establishments across Canada, including a treasured stint in the Yukon, as well as in England and Spain. Dominique was also the co-founder of Les Femmes Chefs de Montréal, an association aimed at showcasing the contributions of female chefs and producers and creating a level playing field for all chefs, regardless of gender. Dominique was an ideal fit when recruited last year to open Norca, the stylish restaurant at Ottawa’s chic Le Germain boutique hotel, where she leveraged her locavore philosophy to devise a menu focused exclusively on produce and proteins from Canada. Once Norca was running smoothly, she was ready to open her own place. “My partner Devon Bionda and I chose to stay in Ottawa and open Gray Jay because we found the culinary community so supportive and we really like the quality of life here. We bike to work and can forage close to home.” Named after Canada’s national bird which is known for being friendly, the restaurant’s approach is to serve reasonably-priced, crave-worthy dishes with great wines and cocktails in a laid-back environment. The focus is on hyper-local ingredients and a chef’s table concept makes the experience more personal and memorable. Dominique cites Steve and Jen Wall at Supply and Demand as being very inspiring, both in terms of their food and the atmosphere they have created. Marisol Foucault at Edgar and Yannick LaSalle at Les Fougères are two other local chefs she admires greatly. “A chef once told me something invaluable, which was to be sure to take time to look inwards not just outwards,” she offers as advice to aspiring young chefs. “Don’t let what other people are doing be too much of a distraction.” FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  71


FOOD Paula’s Bites

BY PAULA ROY twitter instagram @paulajroy

This simple salad helps keep the flavours of fresh-picked produce shining throughout the autumn season. While it’s best to grill the vegetables, you can also sear them in a cast-iron pan on the stovetop or roast them in the oven.

INGREDIENTS 4 Roma or plum tomatoes, cut in thick wedges 1 each medium-sized yellow and green zucchini, thickly sliced on the diagonal 1 bunch green onions, tops and bottoms trimmed, with bulbs left intact 2 limes ½ cup (125 mL) crumbled feta or chèvre Garlic or other flavoured olive oil for brushing Salt & pepper

METHOD 1. Preheat gas or charcoal grill to medium temperature (approx 350F).

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

Grilled Tomato, Zucchini & Green Onion Salad

2. Place all vegetables on a platter or baking tray. Brush with flavoured olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper, turning to coat evenly. 3. Put the prepared tomatoes, zucchini and green onions in a grill basket and cook until softened and lightly charred, turning occasionally. Cook in batches if needed to prevent overcrowding. 4. Arrange cooked vegetables attractively on a platter or in a broad, shallow bowl. 5. Top with a generous squeeze of lime juice and crumbled feta or chèvre. 6. Serve warm or at room temperature, with additional wedges of lime on the side. Serves 2 as a main course or 4 as a side dish. FALL 2019 ottawaathome.ca  73


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FORWARD THINKINGTrends

Keep It Light PHOTO COURTESY OF DELIGHTFULL

BY MARY TAGGART

W

hile wood is a material found in just about every room in the house, it has never been as on trend as it is today. It came into vogue during the 1970s as more of a décor influence than merely a staple, taking on a variety of shades and shapes that were often heavy looking during the mod decade. Beamed ceilings, paneled walls and teak furnishings were all the rage, combined with heavily textured fabrics. Moving towards 2020 we see influences from Scandinavian style, which has been so popular in current spaces. The look and feeling is light and airy. Wood, as a prominent feature, is kept light using beech, ash and light-stained pine. Lighter flooring choices lead the way for a bright, open feeling within the home. Marie Hill, a design consultant with Westboro Flooring & Décor, advises against using yellow hues to achieve this. “The current trend with hardwood is lighter tones which create a natural feeling in the space. The key is to lean towards beige undertones and steer away from yellow. The top sellers now are white oaks and bare maples, that lend a more relaxed, Scandinavian feeling to the home,” she says. Neutral, clean-looking furnishings and flooring will be wildly popular in the coming year. The look combines sturdy wood features with softer textures like wicker and woven goods. Floors are kept bare except for area carpets in principal rooms. Find wicker lamps dangling from the ceiling, woven baskets doing double duty for kitchen storage and wide-weave, reedstyle plant holders making their way into casual living spaces. 76  ottawaathome.ca FALL 2019

VISIT THE THIRD WORLD BAZAAR (OPENING SEPTEMBER 27TH, RUNNING FOR SEVEN WEEKENDS) TO FIND A VARIETY OF WOOD AND WOVEN ITEMS FOR SALE. THESE JAVA BASKETS RANGE IN PRICE FROM $18–$75. FOR MORE INFO THIRDWORLDBAZAAR.CA


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Ottawa At Home | Fall 2019  

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Ottawa At Home magazine, Season 2019 Home & Design Issue

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