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HOMES

DESIGN

LIVING

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the

TECH SAVVY HOME

RENOVATION

art

M E E T S

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29 FOOD 57 FOOD THOUGHTS Savoury tea biscuits

57

59 LET’S DISH Touring Ottawa area vineyards 64 DINING OUT Meet the team behind Jackson, the new restaurant at the Ottawa Art Gallery 67 PAULA’S BITES A refreshing grain salad for brunch

27

48 LIVING 32 NEW & NOTABLE Designs on fashion, art and entertainment

HOME 10 DESIGNER AT HOME Clever upgrades 14 CONDO RENOVATION Colour and culture impact a downtown condo 18 GLEBE RENOVATION A stately Glebe home is renovated in time for a milestone celebration 22 C OVER ALTA VISTA RENOVATION Stepping up style in an empty nest

34 NEIGHBOURHOOD ON THE MOVE The artistic vibe in Wakefield 41 ARTIST PROFILE Getting to know three Ottawa artists and their media 44 STEP INSIDE The Firestone family’s influence on the new Ottawa Art Gallery

  6 EDITOR’S NOTE Making changes   8 USING STONE OUTDOORS Ask the Expert 16 TECH TRENDS FOR THE BATHROOM Ask the Expert 20 TEXTURE IN THE KITCHEN Ask the Expert 36 TILE AND GROUT MADE EASY Ask the Expert 68 BACK STORY The story of Ottawa’s first home

46 STREET STYLE The unique style of four local artists 48 SPRING FASHION Shop spring fashion trends

27 CAPITAL COLOURS Joyful yellow

51 BEAUTY Non-invasive facial refreshers

29 GET THE LOOK Farmhouse style in the kitchen

53 FIT AT HOME Getting fit with body weight

31 TECH Updating with technology

55 GIVING BACK Helping kids through golf

4  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

DEPARTMENTS

COVER PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON


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EDITOR’S NOTE

PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

CHANGES

Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.”  —GEOR GE BE R N A R D SH AW

The spring issue of Ottawa At Home is our renovation issue. Along with inspiring features on home renovation projects, this issue also includes some intriguing stories about Ottawa’s vibrant arts community. Chloe Girvan meets three local artists to find out what drives their passion for the media they work with. Ottawa pottery artist Anne Nicol has been one of my closest friends since our days at Fisher Park High School. I have watched her talent grow and evolve, and I continue to be in awe of the path she takes on her creative journey. Read more about her and other local artists within the pages of our spring issue. Ottawa At Home is evolving on a creative journey of its own as we welcome a new team on the production side of the magazine, with AN Design now taking over the creative direction. I am impressed with their thoughtful, keen approach to tackling this project and look forward to growing with them. This change means that we bid farewell to Tanya Connolly-Holmes who has been the creative director since the magazine’s inception. This is a grand-scale change for me personally as Tanya can be credited for mentoring me through the process of becoming editor-in-chief to ultimately becoming owner of the publication. Tanya and I formed a strong friendship based on a mutual respect for each other and a passion for the product we were creating. Readers may notice some changes with the magazine, as the AN Design team works to bring their own influences to the pages, but rest assured, the backbone of the product will remain true to our original creative style. Like the renovation of a much-loved home, changes bring enhancements that honour the tradition. Ever evolving, always the same,

FOLLOW US! @OttawaAtHome @Ottawaathomemag @ottawaathomemag

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SECTION Title

ASK THE EXPERT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Mary Taggart DESIGN & LAYOUT

AN Design Communications ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Jane Whiting Vicky Paquette, C.I.D., Senior Sales Associate, Vesta Marble & Granite

Q A

What stone or solid surface is best for outdoor use?

With the popularity of engineered quartz, we often get requests to use it for outdoor kitchens, BBQ counters and tabletops. Unfortunately, quartz is not suitable for outdoor use. The primary reason being that it is not UV resistant; this would first become apparent when the product starts to fade and discolour. Relatively new to the market, there is a category of materials classified as Ultra Compact Surfaces. These materials have been engineered to resist the frost and thaw cycle and are UV stable. They are new, so colours are still limited, and this state of the art technology does come at a price. Around the world, natural stones have been used outside for various applications. When considering natural stone, even within the classification of natural stone— such as granite, marble, quartzite, limestone—there are a range of properties and characteristics vary. This makes it difficult to generalize one as suitable and another as not. Granite is an ideal choice for an outdoor countertop. Colour options are plentiful, and the durability factor makes it function well in this heavily used area. Honed marble would also stand the test of time for its classic qualities and look. The specific application, use and environment will play a role in the decision-making process. Customers should reflect on their particular needs and the intended use of the product so that they can be guided to the materials that will give them the best results over the life of their purchase. CONTACT VICKY: vicky@vestamarble.com 8  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

PHOTOGRAPHER

Mark Holleron FOOD EDITOR

Paula Roy FOOD CONTRIBUTOR

Korey Kealey STYLE/BEAUTY CONTRIBUTOR

Melissa Shabinsky CONTRIBUTORS

Mary Ciancibello, Catherine Clark, Vera Cody, Sandy Connell, Chloe Girvan, Katie Hession, Andrew King, Lianne Laing, Ted Simpson PROOF READER

Paula Roy WEB EDITOR

Olivia Taggart ADVERTISING

Jennifer Tackaberry ADMINISTRATION

David Lindsay FINANCE MANAGER

Danial Taggart PUBLISHER

Mary Taggart PUBLISHED BY

Ottawa At Home Media Inc. CONTACT US

General inquiries: editor@ottawaathome.ca ADVERTISING

advertising@ottawaathome.ca DIRECTOR OF NEWSSTAND

Craig Sweetman SUBSCRIPTIONS

admin@ottawaathome.ca CIRCULATION

30,000 copies printed 5 times per year 5-issue subscription $25.00

OTTAWA AT HOME MEDIA INC. Contents © 2018. Reproduction of advertisements or articles appearing in Ottawa At Home, in whole or in part, is forbidden without the written permission of the publisher. Ottawa At Home and Ottawa At Home Media Inc. shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with any advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement.


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HOME D  esigner at Home

custom D E

T A

I

L

S

BY MARY TAGGART PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

W

hen interior designer Gabi Miguel purchased her new home in Findlay Creek Village she wanted to tap into her architectural and design expertise to customize each room. Tamarack Homes’ Oxford model offered the talented designer the ideal floor plan to implement her signature details like reclaimed wood accent walls and contemporary panelling. Working within the confines of the builder’s specifications, Gabi was able to add her own personal touches and extra features during the construction phase and afterwards.

10  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018


HOME D  esigner at Home

RUSTIC VIBE The overall setting throughout the home is described as rustic contemporary with a relatively open floor plan that lends itself to the detailing nicely. From the entrance, the eye is immediately drawn into the living room where Gabi’s talents are evident in the transformation of an ordinary wall into a stylish fireplace feature. A deep grey panelled wall with contemporary wood beams is a stand out element and the furnishings blend perfectly, combining textures like leather, metal, glass and wood to complement the rustic vibe.

A TOUCH OF GLAMOUR In the adjacent dining room, Gabi introduced some luxurious elements. Side-by-side crystal chandeliers are suspended above a farm-style dining table, and mink-toned velvet chairs balance the rustic and glamorous features. Gabi created an accent wall from reclaimed wood that she distressed in her garage and installed herself. The heaviness of the wood is broken up with a mirror, which further enriches the glamour effect.

The overall feeling is light and airy yet sophisticated, with the addition of dark wood to the contemporary white cabinets.

FACING PAGE (TOP) THE OPEN CONCEPT LIVING/DINING ROOM ALLOWS FOR A LARGE DINING TABLE. (BOTTOM) GABI, WHO WORKS FROM HOME, TAKES A MOMENT TO ENJOY THE KITCHEN SHE DESIGNED. THIS PAGE (TOP) THE FIREPLACE FEATURE WALL IN THE LIVING ROOM WAS CREATED FROM MDF BOARD. (BOTTOM) GABI CUSTOMIZED THE MUSKOKA KITCHEN. LIGHT FIXTURES WERE FOUND IN BRAZIL WHERE GABI IS FROM. SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  11


HOME D  esigner at Home

LIGHT AND AIRY

UPGRADE

The Muskoka kitchen was designed by Gabi and enhanced with extras like a floating breakfast station that holds a built-in Miele coffee system. The overall feeling is light and airy yet sophisticated, with the addition of dark wood to the contemporary white cabinets. The space is ideal for the family of four and includes a round wood dining table with practical, yet stylish, ghost chairs. The family room space carries the sophisticated practicality with a built-in entertainment wall created within the original fireplace wall.

The entire home is a tribute to Gabi’s talents and serves as inspiration for taking the bones of a great layout and customizing the space. Gabi offers up four essential upgrades when building new:

BONUS SPACE

cabinets that your budget allows. This investment will pay off in the long term.

The finished basement cleverly brings in rustic touches, ideally suited to family recreation. The area divides itself with a clever wine wall for dad, a play room for the kids, a TV room and a guest room. The necessary support beam that usually wreaks havoc on décor has been covered with reclaimed wood to blend perfectly into the surroundings.

12  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

PA I N T: add some colour to the walls to

personalize space. F LOOR I N G : this is the base of the design

that helps determine the overall décor style. LI GH TI N G : it’s a pricey upgrade that is

much easier to implement during the building stage. K I TCH E N CA B IN E TS : install the best

Contact Gabi at gabi@allaboutdetails.ca

TOP A BUILT IN UNIT IN THE FAMILY ROOM OFFERS STORAGE AND DECORATIVE DETAILING. BOTTOM THE BASEMENT AREA INCLUDES A GUEST BEDROOM TUCKED IN BEHIND THE BARN WOOD ENTERTAINMENT WALL.


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ME YE R TR O U SE RS SP RIN G 2018 Dress Casual Cotton Pants from Meyer, Germany Comfortable, Stylish, Versatile. Available at:

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SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  13


HOME C  ondo Renovation

THIS PAGE THE DINETTE AREA OFF THE KITCHEN IS A FOCAL POINT FOR THE ENTIRE SPACE. SARAH PAPERED THE WALLS WITH TWO MURALS (MEADOW MULTICOLOUR) BY A STREET PRINTS. FACING PAGE A CHAIR FROM URBAN BARN IS AN IDEAL MATCH WITH THE TEAL CABINETS TO CONNECT THE SPACES BEAUTIFULLY.

14  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018


&

HOME C  ondo Renovation

COLOURFUL cultural chic BY JANE WHITING PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

T

he stars were perfectly aligned on the day that Sheena Zain met Sarah Kidder. Searching for an interior designer to help renovate her condo, Sheena found Sarah Kidder Design online and arranged a meeting at the Ottawa Home & Remodelling Show at the EY Centre. They met at the end of the final day when Sarah was about to pack up, but clicked immediately and formed a strong friendship and working relationship. “Sarah made a big impression on me right from the start and it was clear that she understood colour, which for me is paramount,” says Sheena, whose parents immigrated to Canada and opened an Indian boutique on Bank Street in 1964. Aziz & Company, which closed last year, offered a fusion of Indian handicrafts in a cacophony of colours that Sheena has happily transported into her condo style. After buying the two-bedroom unit in 2004 in a late ‘70s downtown condo building, Sheena and her husband Reid Cooper had neither the time nor finances to invest in renovations. Travelling with Reid on his postings with Global Affairs Canada allowed them to add West African and Iranian artifacts to their treasure trove of Indian belongings. Over a decade later, Sheena discovered that their vast accumulation dictated their lives and she was tired of the unkempt college lifestyle. “Reid loves books and music and his stuff was all over the place—we needed to move on from the crappy little apartment look! For the first time in our adult lives we now have what we call our grown-up home,” she cheerfully reports.

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  15


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ASK THE EXPERT

Caroline Mitchell, Assistant Manager, Mondeau Kitchen & Bath

Q

Which tech trends should I implement in my bathroom renovation?

A

The bathroom can become one of the most tech-savvy areas of the home. This high traffic space is about to get even more functional as a plethora of high tech influences are making their way into personal space. Style isn’t compromised with modern designs that include integrated toilets with bidet functions, heated seats with cleansing and drying features and, of course, automatically-closing lids. Touch and sensor faucets are continuing to grow in popularity with plenty of stylish options to suit décor. Create the ultimate showering experience with U by Moen. Imagine turning your shower on to the ideal temperature before you even get out of bed. The unit can be controlled by your smart phone, with a controller or with voice activation through Amazon Alexa. Other digital options for the shower include steam units, chromatherapy, audio-sense, which is controlled by Bluetoothenabled devices, integrated speakers, aromatherapy and digital faucet controls. If a bathroom renovation is on the horizon in your home then take some time to check out the high tech offerings to ensure that your new room is future-friendly. CONTACT CAROLINE: cmitchell@mondeau.ca 16  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

With elements of an Indian bazaar where jewel-toned colours come together on walls, floors and ceilings, the living room epitomizes Sheena’s belief that our eyes should never be bored. Lounging on a stunning fuchsia sofa anchored by a vibrant Indian rug, she can look up at patterned panels on the ceiling that cleverly cover up the old stipple finish.

INDO-AFRO VIBE Sheena is thrilled with all of Sarah’s innovative design ideas and is glad that she was gently urged to go beyond renovating just one bathroom and maybe some flooring. “I like how Sarah treats my money as if every dollar is her own. So I was very comfortable with an expanded project, which she developed into our very own Indo-Afro chic.” Revisiting the design of the apartment as a whole, Sarah replaced all the flooring to unify the kitchen and living area, which had been choppy. “It created a better flow and it made sense to renovate the kitchen at the same time,” says Sarah. For the flooring, Sarah chose reclaimed logs from the Ottawa River. “Logs End supplied the dried and cured birch planks which have a natural oil finish to allow the markings to show through,” she explains, adding that buying environmentally-

friendly products from local businesses was also important to the couple. The new kitchen, with Shaker-style cabinetry by Boiserie Sebo Woodwork, connects seamlessly to the redesigned eating nook. Above the banquette seating, the walls are papered with bright florals in the image of an English-country garden to honour Reid’s British roots. “As we are both children of immigrants, born and raised in Ottawa, we wanted to weave all of that into our home to reflect our past, present and future,” says Sheena, noting the challenge of their cultural mix and referring to Reid’s personal style as Victorian clutter. Decluttering and reorganizing their belongings was another vital element of Sarah’s work; she advised her clients to keep only the pieces that were dear to their hearts. After clearing out hundreds of books, Sarah crafted a new library/den by taking space from the long living room and erecting a wall. Meaningful artwork was reframed and is displayed along with special artifacts. Space has been well-utilized in both redesigned bathrooms with customized tiling accents. Sheena’s bathroom features a unique undermount sink that has broken pieces of her own gemstones embedded into the concrete countertop.


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LEFT A SECTIONAL SOFA FROM VAN GOGH DESIGNS, ORDERED THROUGH CHI, HAS THE ADDED CUSTOM DETAIL OF GOLD LEGS, FUSCIA FAUX VELVET FABRIC IS FROM C&M TEXTILES. ASSORTED CUSHIONS ARE FROM IKEA AND C&M TEXTILES. THE GERMILI CARPET IS FROM CHI. BELOW THE KITCHEN CABINETS WERE MADE BY SEBO WOODWORK, THE UPPERS ARE PAINTED IN BENJAMIN MOORE CLOUD WHITE, THE LOWERS ARE PAINTED IN BENJAMIN MOORE DARK TEAL.

Painting added the finishing touches with teal-coloured trim around doors and on baseboards to pull the condo together. Sheena and Reid love how their home now reflects who they are and where they’ve been with its personalized Indo-Afro vibe. Sarah and Sheena both felt an incredible harmony in working together and believe that their meeting was magical!

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  17


HOME Glebe Renovation

the FUTURE is bright BY CHLOE GIRVAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

A

few years after Monique and Chris Kent first moved into their stately Glebe home, they embarked on a major renovation which included the construction of a two-storey addition. Since then, they have completed numerous small and large household projects designed to make their home, built in 1919, both stunning and wellsuited to the needs of a modern family. Last summer, the Kents decided to update the home’s kitchen and surrounding area, while creating space with more natural light. “I love light and feel so happy when sun is streaming in across the table,” says Monique. “The kitchen is the hub of our house where we gather as family and friends to socialize.” The home’s kitchen also provides a regular backdrop for Monique, who as an assistant professor and researcher (currently in the area of food and nutrition policies), is often interviewed by the media. With an innate love of design and a history of successful renovations behind 18  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

TOP THE CLE TILES ON THE STOVE WALL ADD A DOSE OF DRAMA WITHIN THE SOPHISTICATED KITCHEN SPACE. BOTTOM LEFT CARRARA MARBLE TILE FROM EURO TILE IS LAID IN A HERRINGBONE PATTERN IN THE FRONT HALL. BOTTOM RIGHT TANNER AND MONIQUE HAVE FORMED A CLOSE FRIENDSHIP THROUGH THEIR RENOVATION PROJECT.


HOME G  lebe Renovation

Monique has great taste in home décor, knows what she wants and always provides a clear direction, budget and outline for projects.” — TANNER VINE

her, Monique used quiet hours recovering from breast cancer treatment last year to sketch the kitchen of her dreams. When it came time to formalize the layout, Monique brought back designer Tanner Vine, of Tanner Vine Interiors, who had worked with the family on several previous projects. “Tanner is a great listener and highly skilled at creating plans that perfectly match the desired finished product.” Tanner agrees that he and Monique make an ideal renovation team. “Monique has great taste in home décor, knows what she wants and always provides a clear direction, budget and outline for projects.” After securing long-time and trusted contractor Mark Patterson of Patterson Homes, work commenced by removing the cabinetry along one side of the kitchen to create a full wall of patio doors leading to the backyard. A six-burner gas range, centred on the back wall under a backsplash of bold black and white graphic tile, became the focal point of the kitchen, flanked by a full pantry, wide fridge and large chopping block. This highly-efficient layout now allows the house chef easy access to prepare delicious meals. Above a new large island, with a base painted in Benjamin Moore’s Hale Navy, hangs a breathtaking chandelier by Jonathan Adler in antique brass. Featuring a generous double sink, hygienic touch tap and tall comfortable stools, the island is surrounded by practical drawers concealed by light-coloured cabinets.

TOP CUSTOM SHELVING BY LOUIS L’ARTISAN IS MADE WITH WALNUT IN MATTE BLACK FRAMING AND HANGS ON STATUARIO MARBLE. BOTTOM THE UPSTAIRS BATHROOM WAS UPDATED WHILE MAINTAINING ORIGINAL FEATURES.

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  19


SECTION Title

ASK THE EXPERT

Marina Medina, designer, Astro Design Centre

Q

How can I blend textural elements into my kitchen design without creating distraction?

A

The artful blend of finishes and textures in a kitchen is a trend that is here to stay. Gone are the days when one colour of cabinetry and one choice of countertop was the norm. Today’s finish selections are often much more complex and sophisticated, yet, in a well-executed scenario, are cohesive and do not appear visually noisy or distracting. It is not uncommon to combine multiple cabinet door styles, several colours and finishes of cabinetry and countertop, as well as mixed metals in hardware. In fact, it is possible and often even desirable to combine several different styles such as contemporary with a few traditional elements. The key is to ensure that one style stands out while the other complements it. In order to achieve a wellbalanced and unified kitchen, it is important to visualize all the samples together to avoid a disjointed look. Create a mood board by collecting samples and placing them on a neutral background to ensure that the pieces work well together. Keep in mind that one element should stand out with the others working to enhance it. CONTACT MARINA: marina@astrodesigncentre.com 20  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

Charm and practicality are both present in the wall cabinetry designed to look like a furniture hutch, with custom matteblack metal brackets and open walnut shelving. With a bar area below and ample glassware from which to choose, guests are encouraged to help themselves to drinks and the healthy snacks that Monique keeps within reach. Early in the design stages of the renovation, efforts were made to ensure that continuity and flow remained throughout the house. By carefully matching baseboards, trim and window styles, older and newer parts of the home are visually indistinguishable. To keep things light, paint colours of white, pale grey and blue were selected. Favoured materials already present on other floors thoughtfully repeat throughout the new space. Carrara marble countertops and tiny hexagonal marble tiles surrounding a nearby fireplace bring brightness, with walnut and brass fixtures introduced for their noted warmth and texture.

To bring the adjacent family room closer, existing cabinetry was painted black, knobs replaced and a little office alcove treated to the same black and white backsplash as above the stove. Just around the corner, a mud room wall of hooks and baskets keeps everything tidy with a cheerfully-papered powder room positioned across the hall. With the renovation completed, Monique could not be more thrilled with the result. “The new kitchen is so functional, efficient and airy. After completing a huge renovation in the past, this project provided a great opportunity to really focus on a smaller area, have some fun and experiment with details and finishes.” Meeting the renovation deadline allowed the family to celebrate Chris’s 50th birthday last September, while also giving back to the Ottawa Hospital Breast Health Centre by throwing a big fundraising party.


SECTION Title

A bespoke real estate experience.

TOP FAUX WOOD TILES WERE USED ON THE WALL TO CREATE A RUSTIC ELEMENT WITHIN THE MUDROOM. BOTTOM THE FAMILY ROOM OFF THE KITCHEN MAINTAINS SOME OF THE HOME’S ORIGINAL CHARACTER.

A bespoke experience means handcrafted attention to every detail, expert knowledge and insight, and meticulous white-glove service tailored for you. Whether buying or selling a home, sophisticated systems and smarter strategies are just starting points; it’s John’s standard of service that sets him apart. Contact John to learn about the Engel & Völkers advantage. .

A Selection of Ottawa’s Premiere Homes

©2018 Engel & Völkers Ottawa Central, Brokerage. All rights reserved. Each brokerage is independently owned and operated. John King, Broker.

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  21


HOME A  lta Vista Renovation

An empty-nest couple whose grand family home is filled with 29 years of memories and situated close to family decided to renovate, rather than downsize and relocate from their

SHOW STOPPER KITCHEN THE ENIGMA BACKSPLASH FROM CERA GRES IS THE PERFECT BACKDROP FOR THE STYLISH HIGH FUNCTIONING SPACE DESIGNED WITH A TEAM EFFORT.

cherished neighbourhood.

CONNECTING S

P

22  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

A

C

E

BY MARY TAGGART PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON


HOME R  enovation Alta Vista

“When the last of our kids moved out of the nest, we decided the time was ripe to start a renovation projection,” the homeowner declared. Built by Campanale Homes in a quiet enclave in Alta Vista, the home showcased an Art Deco style that suited their tastes 30 years ago, but not any more. Designer Heather Moro, the design centre manager for Campanale Homes, was tasked with ensuring that the design elements all came together. Tego Bathroom Solutions’ John Manzo was brought in to manage the construction, and Astro Design Centre’s Nathan Kyle came on board to design the kitchen.

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  23


SECTION Title

Westboro Flooring & Decor www.westboroflooring.com

24  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

613-226-3830

Ottawa & Kingston

The renovation started with a request for an updated kitchen. “The clients’ requirements and style had drastically changed and it was time for an update,” stated Heather, who described the original kitchen as a confined space. “The layout had three walls with perimeter cabinets and a peninsula separating the eating area from the kitchen. The 12-foot ceilings had several multi-layer bulkheads, lowering the majority of the ceiling and making the space feel closed-in.” After removing the bulkheads, Nathan came up with a design that opened the kitchen to the eating area and into the family room. The overall aesthetic offers a modern, elegant feeling within the large space. A long centre island functions to connect and unify the three areas, even though each offers a unique purpose with a workstation, eating area and entertainment space. While there is a high-function element to the new kitchen, the goal was to create a room that didn’t feel utilitarian. This was achieved by incorporating hidden


SECTION Title

appliances into the glossy-white cabinetry from Astro. The unique range hood fan has a floating concrete look which is carried over to the beverage station. In contrast to the concrete look, a stunning floating glass cabinet was designed to showcase the clients’ china and crystal. The elegant piece enhances the feeling of a customized space. Lighting is perhaps one of the most dramatic aspects in the room. Hanging above the island, the oversized Modern Globe pendants by Visual Comfort solidify the elegant style that has been created with the cabinetry, marble and concrete. Nathan’s objective was to ground the island with oversized fixtures and combine classic with modern. “The aesthetic of marrying classicallyinspired decorative lights within a modern, minimal environment is something I look for when creating powerful imagery,” offers the talented designer, who added faucets and hardware with hints of champagne gold for a perfect touch of metallic influences.

The homeowners lived in the home during the renovation project and continue to credit the dream team that they brought together for helping them achieve their goals. Their cherished home can now function as adult living space with entertaining and easy living in mind. Renovation mission accomplished!

ABOVE TEXTURE ADDS A TOUCH OF DECORATIVE DETAILING. TOP RIGHT THE SETTEE, FROM WEST ELM, BRINGS COLOUR TO THE MONOCHROMATIC SCHEME. CENTRE A DELTA TRINSIC FAUCET IN CHAMPAGNE BRONZE HAS TOUCH TECHNOLOGY; COUNTERTOPS ARE ZODIAQ QUARTZ IN SNOW, BY DUPONT. BOTTOM RIGHT ZODIAQ QUARTZ COUNTERTOP IN GRAPHITE BLENDS WITH THE BACKSPLASH PERFECTLY; BARSTOOLS, FROM ALTERIORS.


BACKSPLASH – Liverpool Ceramic

Your

kitchen

COUNTERTOP – Carrara Marble

CERAMIC TILES – COUNTERTOPS Ottawa Boutique Workspace – 3268 Hawthorne Rd 613-249-9112

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HOME C  apital Colours

PHOTO PROVIDED BY PIXERS

POSITIVE POWER OF YELLOW BY MARY TAGGART LIFESTYLE & DECOR EXPERT @maryktaggart @ottawaathomemag

F

inding the right colour scheme for a baby’s nursery is a daunting task. Of course sleep is an important aspect of the space, yet creating a cheerful place that a baby will grow into and relish their time in is an ideal goal as well. Yellow, used in just the right doses, is a good choice for a child’s room. The colour is uplifting and reputed to raise spirits, promoting joy and happiness. The many shades, from a soft buttery tone to a lively golden hue, offer endless possibilities for bringing vibrancy into the room. Colour therapists suggest using yellow to help alleviate digestive issues and jaundice, but warn of its aggressive powers and ability to aggravate sleep issues, so balance is essential.

Thought to increase concentration and sharpen the mind, yellow is an important early-life-stage colour. Combined with a strong neutral like grey, yellow is an effective choice. Walls painted in a muddied tone balance the energetic colour, while allowing pops of yellow to energize the space without creating chaos. Using the sunny side of this colour will be sure to have a positive effect on sleepdeprived, nervous new parents. Walking into a space that conjures feelings of joy will work to enhance the power of positive energy flowing from the room. Yellow also works beautifully with elements of nature. Fun murals like Pixers Animals of the World complement the colour scheme. Find this mural and more at pixers.ca SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  27


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HOME G  et the Look

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PHOTO: KOHLER

2

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G E T T HE LOOK

Farmhouse Kitchen

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BY MARY TAGGART

The farmhouse kitchen is timeless and always on trend. But now, more than ever, this warm, welcoming look is gaining in popularity. With an earthy colour scheme and functional style that conjures feelings of home-cooked meals and meaningful conversation, this look can be recreated with ease. 1. RESTORATION HARDWARE VINTAGE FRENCH FARMHOUSE DOUBLE PENDANT, $881, RH.COM 2. FARM HOUSE TWO HANDLE SIDE-SPRAY KITCHEN FAUCET BY FRANKE, MONDEAU 3. WHITEHAVEN, UNDER-MOUNT DOUBLE-BOWL KITCHEN SINK WITH TALL APRON, IN CASHMERE, $2,781, KOHLER 4. RICARDO, TWO-PIECE WOODEN SPOON SET, $29.99 HUDSON’S BAY 5. PEPPERMILL, IN DUNE, $40, LE CREUSET 6. PITCHER, IN OYSTER, $80 LECREUSET.CA

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HOME T  ech

TECH at your FINGER TIPS BY MARY TAGGART PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

JOHN KING

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ohn King, a broker with Engel Völkers Ottawa, and his partner Larry Mohr decided to move rather than renovate their older home, which needed extensive modifications to meet their demands. They found the ideal house in Ottawa’s McKellar Heights neighbourhood. While the home, built in 2003, was relatively new, they still needed to make some modifications to update the technology. John and Larry worked with Signature Audio Video to modernize the existing wiring system by installing the latest Control4 technology and adding a Sonos music system. “Now we control everything from our smart phones,” states John, who admits that they have more to do to furnish their home with the latest gear. But now that they have everything in place, adding extras like an enhanced security system and controlled heating and lighting will be easy.

John believes that the luxury market in Ottawa attracts an educated buyer that expects a home to be technologically updated, no matter what its age. “It will increase the value and marketability of the home,” he confirms. It’s not just the luxury market buyer that expects a house to be tech-friendly. It has become mainstream thinking that a home will offer a programmable thermostat and a properly designed network for managing multiple devices, explains Signature Audio’s Jon Van Wingerden. “Most customers do not realize that the Internet router they received from their provider is designed to work with six to eight wireless devices as a maximum. In a typical home we exceed that with phones and tablets before even starting to add in smart devices.” The time to bring an older home into the future is during the renovation process when walls are opened up and wires can

be hidden with ease. Jon likes to point out to clients that wireless means less wires, rather than zero wires. “If a renovation is planned, we love to take advantage of walls and ceilings being opened to get the wiring infrastructure in place.” Scott Parkes, Vice President of Tamarack Developments, says that new home builders are addressing the needs of this savvy generation of consumers. “We offer the latest technology and beyond. Each new Tamarack home has cabling that runs through a central hub, which allows for the future equipment to be run through this spot as well.” Scott offers that popular upgrades include whole-house wireless multi-point hubs, a lighting console and wireless heating and cooling control. Beyond the basics, which include smartphone-compatible technology with personalized heating and cooling as well as wireless music, many homeowners are diving deep into sophisticated entertainment systems. Home theatres are becoming more popular as people are seeing the benefits of creating family entertainment within the home. Personalization is becoming more conventional so that each member of the household has the ability to control everything from lighting to music from their own device. Both John and Jon agree that the most bang for your real estate buck goes into adding a programmable thermostat, a wireless music system and a techcontrolled lighting package. Jon adds that tech discretion is a must. “Most of our customers want to map out a way to hide the TV components and have better sound in at least one primary TV watching area.” Of course, all these devices are controlled at the tip of the fingers. SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  31


LIVING N  ew & Notable

Experience the circus, art & fashion BY SANDY CONNELL

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL—CORTEO Cirque du Soleil brings Corteo to Ottawa! Written and directed by Daniele Finzi Pasca, Corteo (which means “cortege” in Italian) is a joyful celebration of the life of a clown. The show premiered in Montreal in 2005 and has visited more than 60 cities in many different countries. It features over 50 highly talented artists performing stunning scenes in a synthesis of circus styles from around the world. Celebrating a life gloriously lived, dedicated to revelry and merry-making, Corteo is a festive spectacle that entertains and fascinates the audience. The show runs from June 27 to July 1, 2018 at the Canadian Tire Centre. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit cirquedusoleil.com

CENTRAL ART GARAGE

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Central Art Garage is reshaping the arts scene in Ottawa. For information about current and upcoming exhibits, visit www.centralartgarage.com PHOTO BY CHRIS SNOW

Central Art Garage, a contemporary art gallery and framing studio sandwiched between Chinatown, Little Italy and Centretown, opened in the fall of 2013. Partners Danny Hussey, an artist from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, and Bridget Thompson, an art collector, spent several months setting up a gallery space and the framing studio in a small automechanics garage in a residential section of Lebreton Street North. The contemporary gallery has garnered a reputation for artwork that’s focused more on ideas, concept and experiences rather than finding something to hang on your wall. In fact, according to Danny, some exhibitions have nothing on the walls at all and often there is nothing to buy—only to experience. The framing studio is equally innovative, producing its own frame designs focused on timeless hardwoods with joinery that relies on carpentry and splined wood corners for strength.


PHOTO BY BRITTANY GAWLEY

DUFFIELD DESIGN— STITCHING SUSTAINABILITY INTO FASHION Duffield Design is an innovative and trendy local clothing collection. Designed and manufactured in the Ottawa Valley, the philosophy at Duffield Design is to create beautiful, handmade clothing using quality natural and eco textiles. After graduating from Fanshawe College’s fashion design program and working in several facets of the fashion industry, Megan Duffield recognized a need for change in the business. She was inspired to design and manufacture her own collection based on an environmentally-friendly approach. Her focus is on designing both classic and contemporary pieces that are comfortable and stylish. Megan encourages her clients to buy less, buy quality and only buy what they need and love! Working on a traditional fashion calendar, she produces two collections each year, consisting of Fall/Winter and Spring/Summer. Duffield Designs are available in stores across Canada, including five in the Ottawa area. Visit www.duffielddesign.ca

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easy living in

WAKEFIELD

LIVING N  eighbourhood on the Move

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LIVING N  eighbourhood on the Move BY TED SIMPSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

THEN

NOW

The village of Wakefield in Quebec was founded in 1830 along the western bank of the Gatineau River, about 35 kilometres north of Ottawa. The village was originally settled by Irish, Scottish and English immigrants, who named the area after the town of Wakefield in west Yorkshire, England. This heritage continues to this day, with the village remaining primarily anglophone. The economy of Wakefield was built around a stone mill, constructed by Scottish settler William Fairbairn, for the purpose of milling grains harvested by local farmers in the river valley. The flour mill was established in 1838, predating the famous Watson’s Mill in Manotick by 20 years. By the 1840s the mill came under the ownership of James Maclaren, who expanded the industry to include a sawmill, woolen mill and general store. The mighty rush of water that once powered the mill still bears his name today, MacLaren Falls.

In today’s Wakefield, located in the municipality of La Pêche, the old mill has gone silent and the hard-labouring lumberjacks and farmers have been replaced by modern-day bohemians, hipsters, artists and musicians. With a population of just around 2,000 people, the feeling of a small, rural village remains intact. The town’s economy revolves around hospitality and tourism, providing an easy-going sanctuary away from the bustle of city life, while still being only a half-hour drive from Ottawa. A stunning example of Wakefield’s past and present coming together is found at the Wakefield Mill Inn and Spa. The same mill that anchored the town now welcomes travellers looking to be pampered, well fed and well rested. Husband and wife team, Robert Milling and Lynn Berthiaume, purchased the historic property in 2000 and set about removing the ancient machinery to fill

CHARMING WAKEFIELD WELCOMES VISITORS IN A VILLAGE FULL OF RESTAURANTS, BOUTIQUES AND ARTISAN SHOPS. THE CLOSET DOORS (LEFT) IN THE MCKENZIE MARCOTTE GALERIE POTERIE WERE CREATED USING BROKEN POTTERY SCRAPS.

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SECTION Title

ASK THE EXPERT With a population of just around 2,000 people, the feeling of a small, rural village remains intact. Esther Fleurant, Manager, Boutique Workspace, Ceragres

Q A

How do I choose the right grout for my tile?

As you start looking at grout colours, ask yourself these key questions: “Do I want the tile itself to stand out, or let the graphic pattern take center stage?” “Do I want a more seamless appearance, or a more linear one?” The colour of grout will determine whether the eye is drawn to the beauty of the individual tile or to the overall pattern and sequencing of the tiles across the surface. Generally speaking, a grout that blends with the base colour of the tile allows the tile to become the focus. The grout lines become less pronounced and the tile is accentuated; the colour, texture, pattern, and veining come forward when the grout is matched to the tile. By blending the colour of your grout, you create a seamless look and avoid visual breaks, so the room feels bigger. By contrasting the tile and grout colours, you draw attention to the pattern and layout of the tile overall. Once you add a little contrast between your tiles, the shape of the tile is revealed much more clearly, and the grout forms a pattern out of the negative space. This may be the best choice with detailed geometric or decorative patterns as the grout essentially frames the tile. In addition, the size of your grout joint also plays a role in the final result of your installation. Also, choosing the right grout is more than just about colour. Make sure the type of grout you choose is the right one for your application and ask an expert before you make a purchase. CONTACT ESTHER: efleurant@ceragres.ca 36  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

the space with modern luxuries, all while maintaining the mill’s historic integrity. Of course, the Wakefield covered bridge is an iconic town landmark. Sadly the original bridge, built in 1915 to link the two shores of the Gatineau River, was destroyed in a fire in 1984. The village raised the funds to have the bridge rebuilt atop the original stone pillars; yet another example of the strength of the community and their commitment to preserving the town’s heritage.

AN ARTIST’S PARADISE The residents of Wakefield boast that they have a bigger art scene per capita than New York, Paris or any other major centre of culture—and that’s not hard to believe.

The nearby Farrellton Artists’ Space is a non-profit, artist-run cooperative that provides studio space for around 20 members involved in the development of local arts and culture. In the heart of the village you’ll find hand-crafted, ceramic pottery by two resident potters at McKenzie Marcotte Galerie Poterie, and Wakefield Artisans Galerie offers an array of local creations that includes paintings, crafts, jewellery and sculpture, all curated from fine artisans. Live music has been drawing people to Wakefield, courtesy of The Blacksheep Inn, for over two decades. The modest pub and relatively small stage at the Blacksheep has become a favourite for many of Canada’s top indie rock, folk, blues and jazz acts. The vibe of a Wakefield concert is a hard departure from the rowdy, downtown night clubs—here you sit down, mellow out and enjoy the tunes. With Canadian and international entertainers appearing at the Inn every weekend, open-mic Wednesday nights at Kaffe 1870, and free-music Thursdays at Le Hibou, fun evenings and awardwinning food are always on the menu in Wakefield.


SECTION Title

HOUSING While Wakefield is a very small town, it has its own elementary school and hospital, so it’s a livable village for families. The real estate market around Wakefield abounds with opportunities. A vacant lot on or around the waterfront in the La Pêche area can be had for a very reasonable price to build a dream home or cottage. The housing market offers up everything from shacks to farm houses to mansions, so no matter your price point, there is a home to be found. For those looking for a short-term stay, the rental opportunities are excellent. A bit of time spent online can land you a beautiful cottage, cabin or even a houseboat to call your own.

FACING PAGE (TOP LEFT) ARTIST STEPHANIE HILL AT WORK IN HER STUDIO IN THE FARRELLTON ARTISTS’ SPACE. (BOTTOM LEFT) FIND A VARIETY OF POTTERY AT THE MCKENZIE MARCOTTE GALERIE POTERIE, 26 CHEMIN SULLY. THIS PAGE (BELOW) THE FARRELLTON ARTISTS’ SPACE INCLUDES ART IN MANY FORMS. THE RIVERSIDE STUDIO OFFERS HAND DYED YARN FOR LOCAL AND GLOBAL YARN PURISTS.

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  37


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LIVING A  rtist Profile

OUT OF THE WOODS BY CHLOE GIRVAN     @mom_interrupted PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

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ours spent learning to build houses in the woods gave artist Drew Mosley the time and environment he needed to finally discover his perfect medium. Long hikes provided him with fresh inspiration and the opportunity to observe and connect with many species of wildlife in their natural habitats. The constraints of cabin living also necessitated a switch from large canvasses to a sketchbook, and soon a completely unique series of fantastical creatures began to emerge in Drew’s drawings. Further influence came from First Nations murals and totem poles on Vancouver Island. “I loved the way animals were used to tell stories and narrate myths,” says the artist. Drew’s cast of forest characters are grittier versions of those deemed the cutest by pop culture. “Owls, rabbits, foxes and wolves are desirable when printed on a t-shirt or mug, but in the wild they are scruffy, considered a nuisance and often hunted. I wanted people to see them more how they really are and see the reality of how we are treating them.” He adds, “All of my characters, in my mind, are in a fight or flight moment and are being driven out of their natural habitat, physically carrying a little piece of their home. I use a black background to give the impression that they are making their way under the cloak of darkness.” Most of Drew’s paintings start with a small note or sketch. He frequently completes ninety percent of a piece within a week and then will tinker with it for months, waiting for the narrative to reveal itself.

Unable to choose a favourite colour, he says “I just like colour—colour is fun,” and he credits his consistently black backgrounds with enabling him to easily delete anything he doesn’t like. When completing a painting, the eyes are the very last thing Drew attends to. “Sometimes they can take a week or two to get right. The eyes are where the whole tone comes out. To me, I am looking for empathy for these creatures or trying to win them empathy by personifying them.” Names are assigned at the very last minute and often not until the painting has been hung on the gallery wall. Drew’s collection of acrylic paintings are complemented by a series of mesmerizing dioramas he builds into

small wooden bowls. A 3D effect is generated using carefully planned layers of resin, poured in thin layers, painted separately, and combined with natural elements. Drew is driven by a self-described “artistic obsession,” but also the need to create awareness for the environmental issues he sees as important. “I am always wanting to improve, never satisfied and never done. My own style has been developed but that doesn’t mean that I am comfortable in it. Bringing my son into this world this past year has served to make me want to boost the narrative of my work even more.”  @drewmosley

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LIVING A  rtist Profile

FROM HAND TO MIND BY CHLOE GIRVAN     @mom_interrupted PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

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nne Nicol can trace her artistic path back to the gift of a calligraphy book from her father when she was just eight years old. Years of personal and career success followed using many artistic mediums, but it was the devastating loss of her sister in 2014 that guided her to the door of LOAM Clay Studio. “When my sister died, I simply could not find an urn that was good enough. I decided to make one for her myself and signed up for a workshop. I was hooked by the first class and pottery quickly became my therapy and a way to work though my grief. Ultimately, it became my passion.” Almost three years later, Anne has made so many beautiful pieces that her fellow potters are gently encouraging her to have a show. When setting out to create, she rarely has a plan. “Things grow as they go. Visually I like the look of pieces that are hand thrown and hand built. Every item is unique and I enjoy transforming the ordinary into something unexpected.” Inspiration for her love of detail comes from Pinterest, calligraphy and cherished items like the trim on her wedding dress. Nature is sourced for the patterns and textures of simple objects like fruit and barn board. Meaningful sweet-faced little birds perch proudly on many finished works. From a vast wall of available glazes, the colours of spring are often preferred, including soft blues and a new favourite, petal pink. Recently, a set of little teacups, leftover from devising the perfect whimsical lid for a tea pot, provided the opportunity for her to go crazy with colour. “I had a ton of fun with a little gold lustre added for glitz.” This spring, Anne celebrates three years as a potter and she still looks forward to coming to the studio every day to make beautiful things for her own collection and for others. “I love private commissions and working in the service of someone else,” says Anne, noting the joy she also gets from making a piece of pottery for each client of her husband’s company, Crossford Construction, to welcome them back into their newly renovated home. When asked what drives her passion, she says happily, “I love creating, and as an artist this is the first type of art I have found that allows me to be mindful and completely in the moment. Ideas flow from my mind out through my hands. The studio is a very creative space for me to learn and grow as an artist. While at work I am always busy in my head thinking, trying and taking risks. There are lots of failures but also lots of successes.”  @anneknicol 42  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018


relax . read a book . bbq . glass of wine . kayak . canoe

The C    ttages-at-Turtlehil

deluxe. eco-friendly.waterfront

IMPORTANCE NONSENSE

THE

BY CHLOE GIRVAN     @mom_interrupted PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

T

he soothing beachy tones and layered patterns in his tiled sculptural hangings reflect Nate Nettleton’s happy childhood spent along the banks of Lake Erie. “My dad built furniture out of driftwood and I would spend hours in his shop, watching and learning,” says Nate. “One day while stacking up little piles of wood, I discovered a visually pleasing combination which would later become the foundation of my first artistic series.” Years later, the kitchen counter of a small apartment provided space for a newly-married Nate to cut and arrange overlapping squares of reclaimed and new wood to replicate the movement of waves. Dyed, fabric-covered squares add a textural component to a colour palette of whitecaps, sand, water and sky. As living spaces increased in size over time, so too did the dimensions of Nate’s creations. His newer Scribble Sculptures are comprised of hand-drawn scribbles, blown up, projected onto wood, cut out with a jigsaw and painted. Nate isn’t sure how he came up with this unique idea, but suspects that his background in psychology may have played a role. “I currently help run a very open-style art club at the school where I work and was really drawn to the scribbles and doodles of young children. Scribbling is therapeutic, conveys a lot of emotion and I really like the freedom it holds. I thought it would be cool to take this perceived ‘nonsense’ that is often thrown away and make it big and important.”

OF

His most recent works, a series of larger cube-shaped art installations, have turned the outdoors into his latest studio. Each open-sided structure has different materials suspended inside, such as brightly coloured tree branches bound together in a piece titled Possibility. “The idea is that the material enclosed within the cube is representative of restraint and the hardships of life with portions beyond the frame indicative of empowerment and overcoming.” Although work is usually a solo venture, with power tools whirring and sawdust flying, Nate calls his wife Kayla a godsend for the hours she has spent helping him with installations. Similarities found in his three styles of work reflect a fascination with movement, water and natural forces. Every creation takes a different length of time to complete, depending on whether chosen materials need to be cleaned, treated or found. Nate’s desire to create keeps pace with his growing collections. “My mind is always thinking about my work. I wake up in the night to make notes on colour, patterns and materials. Art has become a need and I have an internal desire to keep exploring different ideas through art. All I know is that I need to do this as much as possible.” Asked what a budding collector should purchase, he suggests, “Something that you like the way it looks or what it represents.” Those attending Nate’s upcoming show at Seven Below Gallery, in Old Ottawa South, from July 6 to 30 should be able to do just that.

2018 OW! KN BOO 2 Water Street, Newboro, ON www.turtlehillcottages.com turtlehillcottages@gmail.com

Toll-855 237 1255  Office -613 2725086

You’ll never want to leave!

 @nnnnnate SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  43


LIVING S  tep Inside

THE ORIGINAL STAIRCASE IN THE FIRESTONE HOME

ARTFUL PRESERVATION BY VERA CODY

IMAGES SUPPLIED

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he anticipation for opening day of the striking new Ottawa Art Gallery is igniting huge public interest. The $40 million re-development project, designed by KPMB Architects, will showcase a gallery that has expanded from its original Arts Court Daly Avenue building to take over an entire city block. The Firestone Gallery was built as a cornerstone in the building to house the Firestone Collection of Canadian Art (FCCA). It consists of 1,600 pieces— paintings, drawings and sculpture—from major Canadian artists of the 20th century including the Group of Seven.

Art enthusiast O.J. Firestone, who fled Nazi Europe more than eighty years ago from Vienna, entered Canada as a refugee. He became an economist with the government and travelled the country with his wife Isobel Torontow, a concert pianist and music teacher. Inspired by the art in the National Gallery, in the 1950s he began collecting works by Canadian artists only, to show his love for the country that had welcomed him. In 1972, the collection had grown so vast the family donated their Rockcliffe Park home and the entire art collection to the Ontario Heritage Foundation. Twenty


LIVING S  tep Inside years later, O.J.’s son Bruce Firestone and Ottawa Mayor Jim Durrell finalized a deal with the Foundation and the City of Ottawa to transfer ownership to the City and house all of the works at the Municipal Art Gallery at Arts Court. When the former family home was slated for demolition in 2007, the original architect George Bemi was invited to salvage a few unique elements of the structure. The spectacular marble and brass staircase was saved and is now embedded in the OAG main entrance leading visitors up to the Firestone Gallery. The family is gratified that the OAG has recognized that the Firestone home was an architectural work of art. Brenda Firestone knows her parents would have been thrilled that Ottawa now has a worldclass gallery that showcases the Firestone collection as a historically significant one. Ottawa At Home chatted with Brenda from her home in Victoria, BC. What was it like growing up in your family home, Belmanor? The house was named after my mother Isobel and built in 1960 in the Village of Rockcliffe Park. My father’s vision to create a modern, modular home was considered very radical. It says a lot about him that he took such a risk to build a house like that in a neighbourhood that had classicalstyle architecture dating back to the early 20th century. While curating his growing collection he enjoyed conducting tours, regaling visitors with stories about the art and the artists. Art was everywhere and it was like living in a gallery. As the collection outgrew our home, my parents thought carefully about its future. What will it be like to see the new Firestone Gallery? It will be very emotional, as I will be stepping back in time when I climb the salvaged original marble and brass staircase leading me upstairs to the gallery. Both of my parents are gone, but their legacy continues to shine within the new OAG. The spirit of the house has been successfully recreated and the teak veneered walls in the gallery and the lobby are similar to the teak panelled salon in Belmanor, where my father held court talking about the collection to the many visitors who came to visit through the years.

FastPass

®

979 Richmond Rd. Ottawa, ON

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  45


LIVING S  treet Style

WHO: DEMS AND DOLL, A CANADIAN ART COUPLE

“Our art and murals are recognized as illustrative street style and we’ve had the pleasure of painting over one hundred murals in Ottawa over the last four years. You can find them at many coffee houses, clubs, restaurants, schools, head shops and festivals around the city. Two of our favourite murals can be found at Texture Hair Salon and Atari, both located on Dalhousie.”

P A I N T

T H E

T O W N

BY KATIE HESSION @YOWCITYSTYLE

S

RED

upporting local artists by visiting Ottawa’s art galleries or purchasing their work creates a relationship between our local culture and community. We met up with a few of Ottawa’s talented artists whose work beautifies our city in spaces beyond the traditional art gallery; they are improving the aesthetic of many local businesses we visit every day. Read on to discover how each of their unique styles of art might be in some of your favourite public places without you realizing.

WHO: EMILIE GIGNAC, ABSTRACT PAINTER

“I am interested in the effects of paint and how continuous layering can reveal the paint’s potential to transform. When I am engaged in creating any piece, my time is mostly spent in the exploration phase. I use creamy-coloured paints on canvas for most of my work, but I recently finished a commission for Shopify in Montreal and painted the walls of their art gallery themed room.”

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LIVING S  treet Style

WHO: MEREDITH LYMAN, POP ART PAINTER

“My style of art is very pop-inspired. I adore bright colours and vivid expressions usually centred around the face or facial features. My hope is that the passion I have for painting is translated into an emotional experience for the viewer, whether it’s sad, passionate or amusing. Currently, you can see my work at Oxygen Medi Spa, Happy Goat Coffee in Hintonburg and the Grand Hotel in Carleton Place.”

WHO: MARC ADORNATO, CONTEMPORARY ARTIST

“Ruined Landscapes is my latest painting series where I take old Bob Ross-style landscapes from thrift stores and add truck roll-overs, toxic train derailments and white-suited hazmat cleanup crews. I also did a series of sculptures with gas masks and antlers that hang in Union 613 and the Hintonburg Public House. I have a new coffee table art book and from April 5 to July 15, you can check out my solo exhibit of my paintings in the Diefenbunker Museum.”

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  47


LIVING S  pring Fashion

spring FASHION BY MARY CIANCIBELLO @MARY_CIANCIBELLO PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIA PHOTOGRAPHY

WEARABLE & BRIGHT There’s nothing like blooming flowers and chirping birds to add a spring to our fashion step. This season is especially exciting, as new collections promise a magnificent display of bright colours, patterns and wearable trends.

mellow yellow Fun colours like yellow are dominating the spring fashion scene. With so many variations of bright colours on the shelves—from soft pastels to loud hues—it’s easy to find something for all skin tones. BLAZER AND SKIRT: RACHEL SIN PURSE: ALDO (ST. LAURENT) SHOES: L’INTERVALLE

blooming florals

geometric shapes

Flowers are not exactly ground-breaking for spring, but this season’s blooms are literally jumping off fabrics and accessories in 3D.

A lot of our bling this season is taking us back to grade five geometry classes. These earrings get an A+ in style.

PURSE: ALDO (ST. LAURENT)

EARRINGS: VINTAGE GLORY 22

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LIVING S  pring Fashion

tropical treasures Borrowed from Mother Nature’s most exotic places, everything from palm leaves to cockatoos are making an appearance in spring clothes. DRESS: TRISTAN

jumpsuit for joy With more styles, fabrics and silhouettes than ever before, the jumpsuit trend has proved it has serious staying power. JUMPSUIT: RW & CO.

pleaty-please!

go wide or go home

Continuing strong into the spring and summer months, pleats are feminine way to add dimension without adding bulk.

After what seems like an eternal season of skinnies, our pant hems are giving way to wider fashion frontiers. If you are on the petite side, pair this trend with heels for a flattering look.

PLEATED DRESS: BANANA REPUBLIC

WIDE LEG TROUSER: RW & CO.

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  49


LIVING B  eauty

1

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2 2. NEW WINDOWS: LASH EXTENSIONS

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Individual natural lashes are dipped in an adhesive and then attached about 1–3 mm from the base of the lash. “It gives an immediate eye lift, a dark lash line and full and longer lashes. Plus they offer that wake-upand-go benefit with little fuss and are especially great for vacations,” says Angelique Do, eyelash specialist at Phi Beauty Bar on Bank Street. With proper application and homecare, the extensions can last up to 6 weeks. Cost: $65–$195.

5

3. NEW FRAMING: EYEBROW MICROBLADING

Spring Beauty Reno

Eyebrow artist Megan Klimkowski (@browdesign_bymegan) believes that well-shaped eyebrows can not only open up the eyes and help to frame the face but can even have a lifting effect. “Microblading has become very popular simply because no woman is born with perfect brows.” The procedure involves small, precise stokes that mimic the hair and deposit semi-permanent pigment to fill, shape and enhance the brow. Results last up to a year and can be maintained even longer with regular touch ups. Cost: Starting at $300.

4. FRESH RESURFACE: COLLAGEN BOOST

Tap into the latest arsenal of non-invasive treatments that can help to resurface, lift and refresh your face.

IPL is a non-invasive cosmetic treatment that utilizes intense pulsed light lasers to help rejuvenate and heal the skin. “Photo-rejuvenation treatments can help to boost collagen, unify and lighten any dark pigmentation spots, as well as minimizing any type of diffused redness revealing a healthy and clearer skin tone,” says Westboro Spa’s manager Nathalie Gauthier of the 30-minute inspa procedure. The results can be seen after the first treatment. Cost: $225.

1. LIFT: NATURAL FACE LIFT

4. SMOOTH FOUNDATION: LASERS + INJECTIONS

Oresta Organic Skin Care’s all-natural “face lift” incorporates the ancient facial rejuvenation techniques of Gua Sha (Traditional Chinese Medicine), Kansa (Ayurveda), healing crystals, manual lymph drainage (MLD) and face-sculpting massage techniques. “It is designed to help firm and tone the skin, sculpt the jawline and cheekbone, lift the eyelids, firm the neck and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, leaving a healthy balance and radiant glow,” says Oresta Korbutiak, creator of the Oresta Holistic Facelift. The procedure also feeds the skin with organic, antioxidant-rich whole plant medicine and oils plus includes lymphatic drainage and a stimulating facial massage. Cost: Starting at $150

“Botox is an ideal tool to ward off the unwanted signs of facial skin wear-and-tear, and a new movement towards pre-juvenation supports its use to prevent the development of irreversible hyperdynamic rhytides (wrinkles),” says laser and cosmetic medicines specialist Dr. Karen Dover of KJD-MD. She also recommends Thermage CPT for skintightening, which acts to shrink-wrap the skin while lifting, recontouring, redefining and realigning features. It gives instant results, with full and permanent results at six months. Cost: Starting at $375.

BY MELISSA SHABINSKY @melissashabinsky   @melshabinsky

FACIAL RENOVATION

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  51


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LIVING F  it at Home

T h e

POWER O F

B O D Y

W E I G H T

On plenty of occasions body weight is all I have to work with and my workouts have never been better. Here are a few examples of ways to target multiple areas, using nothing but your own body resistance and power.

BY LIANNE LAING   @liannelaing PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

LEG BURNER

THREE FOR ONE

Start in a basic lunge position to bring power into the movement. Bring the back leg up and perform a small hop with the front leg to combine a cardio element with a massive leg burn.

Work the non-mirror muscles, meaning the backside, hamstrings and triceps, in one exercise. Start in a bridge position with hands and feet both parallel and facing forward. Drop the buttocks down to the floor, forcing you to flex at the ankle and bend at the elbow. Once the buttocks hit the floor, come back up to bridge, bringing the feet back down to the floor and straightening the elbows.

CORE STRENGTH Start in a basic side plank and hold for 10–30 seconds. Next try and bend the top knee and bring it up to touch the free arm at the elbow. This adds another movement for obliques and increases core stability. If you really want to push the envelope, bring the top leg straight across in front and have the free arm attempt to touch the toes. Alternate between the knee bend and the straight leg, working evenly on both sides. 1

2A

2B

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  53


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LIVING G  iving Back

TEE

Life from the

BY CATHERINE CLARK   @catherinejclark

K

evin Haime has been playing golf since he was old enough to walk. A successful junior, amateur and professional golfer, he has been teaching the game to thousands of Ottawa enthusiasts for the past three decades through his Kevin Haime Golf Centre and Kevin Haime Golf School. He believes that the skills built by golf go far beyond the course. “Growing up, golf gave me self-confidence, a sense of respect for others and communication skills which I’ve used throughout my life.” So when Kevin was thinking about how he could give back to his community, it just made sense that he would give back through golf. “We know that sports are incredibly important to kids, teaching them resilience, confidence and hard

work,” he says. “I wanted to take kids who love golf already but don’t have much chance to play and let them play in a safe, good environment.” Eleven years later, Kevin’s Kids to the Course Classic at Eagle Creek is still going strong. Local businesses and individuals, as well as sponsors like ClubLink and Ping, have helped to raise over half a million dollars so far to purchase memberships at local golf clubs for children who might not otherwise ever have the chance to place a ball on a tee. One of the most impactful elements of Kids to the Course is that the girls and boys are placed in a foursome with adults who share a love of the game. These adults act as “accidental mentors,” as Kevin likes to call them—people who have successful professional careers and are active

members of their communities, leading by example on and off the golf course. “Golf reflects life better than any other sport,” says Kevin. “You stand on the first tee and you have life spread out in front of you—the hazards, the tests, the physical, emotional and mental challenges—and it’s all about how you handle yourself and work your way through it.” Kevin explains, “It’s an opportunity for these kids to learn about life, tradition, rules and respect—all from the game of golf and the people they’re playing it with.” He adds, “When you give a kid an opportunity like this, they will never let you down.” And that’s why he is committed to helping kids swing big, both in life and on the course. For more information, please visit www.kidstothecourse.com

SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  55


FOOD F  ood Thoughts

Spring Tea Biscuits BY KOREY KEALEY @kitchenkonnected

Wedding season, tea parties, greens sprouting—they all say spring! These savoury buttermilk biscuits are infused with a taste of the first greens of the season—asparagus and chives. 15 minutes 10–14 minutes (depending on size of biscuit) makes 12 Biscuits

1. Heat oven to 450ºF. In food processor bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda; pulse.

1½ cups (375 mL) all-purpose flour

3. Turn mixture into large bowl; add buttermilk asparagus and chives; stir with fork until soft dough forms.

prep time

bake time

2 tsp (10 mL) baking powder ½ tsp (2.5 mL) salt ¼ tsp (1.25 mL) baking soda ¼ cup (60 mL) cold butter cut into small squares ¾ cup (175 mL) cold buttermilk ½ cup (125 mL) finely chopped asparagus spears 3 tbsp (45 mL) finely chopped chives

2. Add butter pieces and pulse 3–5 times until consistency of coarse meal.

4. Turn onto floured surface, sprinkle lightly with flour. Knead gently 8–10 times until no longer sticky. 5. Gently press dough to ¾ inch (2 cm) thickness; cut with 2-inch (5 cm) floured cutter. Place biscuits 2 inches (5 cm) apart on baking sheet. 6. Brush lightly with buttermilk. Bake for 10–12 minutes or until golden brown.

KOREY’S TIPS: PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

Use tea biscuits to make sandwiches: try ricotta cheese, pea shoots and fresh figs drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with salt and pepper. No buttermilk? Add 1 tsp (5 mL) lemon juice or vinegar to milk instead. SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  57


FOOD L  et’s Dish

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FOOD L  et’s Dish

JULIE RICARD

DISCOVERING HIDDEN GEMS AT LOCAL WINERIES BY PAULA ROY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK HOLLERON

I

t might be one of our region’s best-kept secrets. The Ottawa area is now home to over a dozen vineyards, several of which are located less than half an hour from Parliament Hill. Sommelier Julie Ricard has made it her mission to find creative ways to help local wines gather more attention through her company, Fortified Grape. Julie enthusiastically shared with Ottawa At Home her passion for the tenacity and talent of local winemakers. What drove you to working in the wine industry? I love drinking wine and decided I should learn how to drink professionally! After completing Algonquin’s sommelier program, by chance I met the godfather of the local wine industry, Denis Perrault. I had no idea wine was actually being produced in the Ottawa area but instantly knew I’d found my calling. Why choose to focus on promoting local wines and wineries? I like to say that in fact, local wines chose me. Denis hired me to work part-time in the retail store at Domaine Perrault and I filled my time by developing patio packages at the winery, which morphed into weddings, now a very big part of our business. Along the way, I began to work with other local wineries and decided to launch Fortified Grape to provide consulting services, create interesting events and offer tutored tastings. What makes our area well-suited to growing grapes and making wine? Eastern Ontario has an abundance of great farmland with a variety of soils, including clay and rocky, limestone-based areas that are known to be particularly good for growing grapes. Our warm summers are ideal too. What is especially driving

the change is the emergence of cold-hardy vines such as Frontenac and Marquette which produce really delicious wines. Local winemakers have learned a lot from growers and vintners in Quebec’s Eastern Townships, which has a similar climate and has had a thriving wine industry for several decades. Is there a wide range of wines being produced in the Ottawa area? Yes! Winemakers are successfully exploring many different styles, supplementing locally-grown grapes with fruit from the Niagara region as needed. In Navan, for example, Domaine Perrault produces fifteen wines, including rosés, whites, medium to robust reds and extremely wellbalanced dessert wines. At the nearby Vignoble Clos du Vully, you’ll find nine great varieties including fantastic fortified wine. South of the city in Mountain, Smokie Ridge Vineyard offers a diverse selection including a powerhouse rosé called Rosie Cheeks and their intriguing sm’Oaked Collection Sabrevois which has been barrel-aged for several years. What is the best way for people to get to know local wines? The vineyard experience is still the best way to connect with the wines as it is so welcoming and unhurried. Take a drive, meet the people and really get a sense of their passion and determination as they toil the old fashioned way, mostly by hand. These pioneers are now producing interesting, complex wines, especially the truly impressive port-style fortified wines that just might become the signature style for Eastern Ontario, the way Niagara is known for ice wine. There is so much untapped potential here—it’s very exciting! SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  59


FOOD L  et’s Dish Four wineries featured on Fortified Grape’s new Eastern Ontario wine-route map:

DOMAINE PERRAULT (Navan, ON) Owners: Denis and Lyse Perrault with their daughters. Vines: St. Pepin, Louise Swenson, Frontenac Gris and Blanc, St. Croix, Sabrevois, Frontenac, Marquette. Wines: rosé, red, white, fortified. Of note: Owners are among the founders and mentors of the area’s wine industry and theirs is one of the few original wineries still operating. Winemaker is Ottawa native Katie Duchesne, one of a select group of female winemakers in Canada. Julie’s Picks: Marilys (rosé), Zanibel (white), Cabernet Franc (red).

VIGNOBLE CLOS DU VULLY

VIGNOBLE CLOS DU VULLY (Navan, ON)

DOMAINE PERRAULT

SHO OAG P GAO

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60  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

Owners: Jan-Daniel Etter and partner Anne Grenon. Vines: Frontenac Blanc, Frontenac Gris, Frontenac Rouge, Petite Pearl, Marquette. Wines: rosé, red, white, fortified. Of note: Jan was raised on a local dairy farm and learned grape growing and winemaking from relatives in Vully, Switzerland. Anne trained in Hawke`s Bay, NZ. Julie’s Pick: Frontenac Blanc.

JABULANI VINEYARD & WINERY (Richmond, ON) Owners: Tom and Janet Moul. Vines: Over 11,000 vines including Frontenac Blanc, Frontenac Gris and Marquette. Wines: rosé, red, white, fortified, cider, strawberry wine. Of note: Tom has been making wine since he was a teenager in Africa; Jabulani is a Zulu word that means happiness or rejoice. The winery has won 11 international awards. Julie’s Picks: Marquette Chete and Iced Apple Cider.


SECTION Title

KIN VINEYARDS (Carp and Kinburn, ON) Owners: Chris and Sandra Van Barr. Vines: First winery in the region to grow vinifera vines (buried in the fall), plus cool climate varietals including Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Muscat Ottonel, Vidal Blanc, Marechal Fosch, Marquette, Frontenac, Dijon clones of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. Wines: rosé, red, white, cider. Of note: Some proceeds from their wine sales are given back to the local arts, land stewardship and environmental projects. Julie’s Pick: Kin Oaked Chardonnay. KIN VINEYARDS

JABULANI VINEYARD & WINERY SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  61


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FOOD D  ining Out

A delicious marriage of art & food at Jackson Café BY PAULA ROY PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

T

he recent renovation and expansion of the Ottawa Art Gallery (OAG) includes a delicious new space called Jackson. Co-creators Caroline Gosselin and Chef John Leung, both veterans of the Ottawa restaurant industry, have collaborated to create a unique space and slate of food services at Jackson. Locals and visitors alike are sure to be tempted when the café and its catering services open for business in late April. Caroline opened her first establishment, Restaurant E18hteen, in 2001 and soon 64  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

hired John as executive chef, which helped propel the restaurant and both their careers to lofty heights. They have since worked together on numerous projects, including the recently-opened Rideau Sports Centre’s public eatery, the Clubhouse Restaurant. Their latest project, Jackson, is named in honour of iconic Canadian landscape painter A. Y. Jackson, the only member of the Group of Seven to have a studio in Ottawa. The Firestone Collection, which is housed in the new OAG, includes

250 works by Jackson, so the naming is a most appropriate homage to the artist. Given the stature of the Ottawa Art Gallery, the bidding process for the food services contract was a complex one. It included devising a menu based on paintings in the Firestone Collection; it was a challenge the chef was happy to embrace. As for Caroline, her interest in the OAG project stems from her longstanding passion for the artistic world. “I am a painter and I love the collaboration between art and restaurants.


John and I both are very excited about getting inspiration from the gallery’s works.” The food served at Jackson, and at events held in the gallery, promotes contemporary Canadian cuisine, presented in its most stylish yet accessible forms. The short menu of elegantly crafted smaller plates includes table snacks, dishes dubbed “light and bright” and “grilled and roasted” along with sides and desserts. “The menu has a very global flavour profile and will change when the art changes, which is fun,” explains John. “Most plates have no more than six elements, with each component well thought out. Working with local and organic as much as possible, there are lots of plant-based dishes as well as gluten-free and vegan options and even a kids’ menu. Plus, our mixologist has come up with some fantastic craft cocktails as well.” A grab-and-go counter in the café— offering fresh baked goods, sandwiches, specialty coffee, juices and smoothies—is sure to become a magnet for the downtown crowd, especially with the new boutique Le Germain Hotel next door and both the Rideau Centre and University of Ottawa nearby. As for the design aesthetic, Jackson ties in beautifully with the rest of the gallery, blending with both the overall appearance and culture. The teak panelling, which was a prominent aspect of the original Firestone home, is echoed throughout the building, including in the café which also features soaring ceilings and clean, uncluttered lines. Plinths with acrylic boxes on top display A. Y. Jackson artifacts in an environment best described as Contemporary Minimalist. It is sleek and comfortable with some feminine touches for warmth, including cozy camel-coloured banquettes and bright pops of white and gold as accents. The marriage of art and food at Jackson is intentionally designed to encourage conversation and sharing, notes Caroline. “Pulling together the right music, atmosphere, lighting and food so each aspect enhances the other is essential to creating the right ambiance. We are confident Jackson will prove to be a relaxed, joyous space and that eating here, just like visiting the Ottawa Art Gallery, will be a fun and rewarding experience.” SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  65


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FOOD P  aula’s Bites

INGREDIENTS 1 cup (250 mL) freekeh, bulgar or quinoa 1½ cups (375 mL) orange juice ½ cup (125 mL) water 2 tbsp (30 mL) olive oil, divided 1 tsp (5 mL) salt 2 tsp (10 mL) grated ginger root 18 stalks of asparagus, cut in 1”/2.5 cm pieces 1 sweet red pepper, diced ½ cup (125 mL) fresh or frozen green peas 2 navel oranges, peeled and sectioned 4 green onions, minced ¼ tsp (1.25 mL) cayenne pepper, or to taste ¼ cup (60 mL) toasted walnut or pecan pieces ¼ cup (60 mL) chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

PHOTO BY MARK HOLLERON

METHOD 1. In a large saucepan, combine freekeh, orange juice, water, 2 teaspoons (10 mL) of olive oil, salt and ginger. Cover and place over medium-high heat and bring to a boil, then immediately reduce heat to low. Simmer 15–20 minutes until all the water has been absorbed. Turn off heat and let stand 5 minutes.

Freekeh salad with asparagus and oranges BY PAULA ROY Paula’s Bites:  

@paulajroy

Grain salads are a great addition to any brunch, lunch or dinner menu. This one is hearty and delicious, with bright, fresh springtime flavours and colours. Freekeh is a fantastic superfood also known as cracked green wheat. It’s an ancient grain that is high in fibre with a low glycemic index, making this dish as nutritious as it is pretty.

2. While freekeh cooks, sauté asparagus in 2 teaspoons (10 mL) of olive oil in a broad, shallow pan for 2 minutes, stirring often. Add pepper and peas and sauté one additional minute. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. 3. Transfer cooked freekeh to a serving bowl and add asparagus, peppers, peas, oranges, green onions, cayenne and nuts and stir gently to combine. 4. Drizzle remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil over salad and stir gently. Top with parsley and serve warm or at room temperature. Serves 4-6 SPRING 2018 o  ttawaathome.ca  67


BACK STORY

HONEYWELL HOUSE BY ANDREW KING  

@twitandrewking

SKETCH BY ANDREW KING

O

nce a land of forests, swamps and unharnessed waterfalls, the Ottawa region looked much different two centuries ago. The Algonquin people settled along the Kitcisìpi River, an important conduit for commerce, cultural exchange and transportation, often stopping at Asticou, now known as Chaudière Falls. For generations, canoes would be portaged, ceremonies would be performed and stories would be told at the “great boiling kettle” waterfalls on the Ottawa River. There would be no permanent residence constructed nearby until an American named Philemon Wright built a small log cabin in Gatineau. Other than a trading-post shanty at the falls, no other structure existed on the south side of the river until 1810, when an ambitious young man from Prescott 68  ottawaathome.ca SPRING 2018

Ottawa’s First Home traversed the wilderness and built a log cabin in present-day Nepean. His name was Ira Honeywell and he built the first permanent home in Ottawa. Remains of this structure no longer exist, but there is a small plaque commemorating this cabin near Woodroffe Avenue. But what did Ottawa’s first home look like? Where exactly was it built? Let’s travel back 208 years and find out. In the winter of 1810, Ira’s father, Rice Honeywell, had just given him a plot of uninhabited land along the Ottawa River, west of the Chaudière Falls. As an American Loyalist, land was granted to Rice for settlement, but he later gave that land to his son on the condition that one day he would settle there. Once Ira was old enough, he headed north, braving the untamed wilderness that lay between Prescott and the Ottawa River. Arriving at his new waterfront property full of trees, thick underbrush and glacial rocks, Ira faced the daunting task of building his new home. With the help of some residents across the river at Philemon Wright’s settlement, Ira chopped down trees on his land and built a log cabin structure that would become the first permanent residence in the Ottawa region. It was located on a lot which is now at the corner of Woodroffe Avenue and the Sir John A. MacDonald Parkway, overlooking the Ottawa River. A year later, Ira brought his wife Polly and three children to reside in the finished cabin. Packing their belongings onto a crude wooden sleigh pulled by oxen, the Honeywell family left Prescott and arrived in Merrickville. From here, they detoured onto the clear path of the frozen Rideau

River all the way to Hog’s Back Falls, then headed into the forest that covered the Ottawa region towards their new home. The Honeywell’s cabin was a typical single-storey structure, built from logs which were laid horizontally and interlocked on the ends with notches using British cog joints. The space between the wall logs would have to be ‘chinked’ to keep out the elements, using a putty made from clay and moss. Most likely, the logs would have been placed on level, cleared ground that was covered with flat field stones pulled from the shores of the Ottawa River. The roof would have been covered with sheets of wood bark, laid as shingles. With multi-paned glass windows on either side, a simple front door and a stone and mortar fireplace for both heating and cooking, the cabin would have been a basic structure. But it was the first of its kind in Ottawa, and home to the Honeywells who welcomed a new son there in the spring of 1812. The land was also cleared to create Ottawa’s first garden. Corn, potatoes, onions and cucumbers were grown to feed the family, and Ira paddled his homemade canoe to either Montreal or Kingston for needed supplies. Ira and Polly’s eldest son, Rice, subsequently took over the property. Eventually, the original cabin disappeared; its remains either plowed over for suburban homes or buried under the land now owned by the NCC. While there is no replica cabin on the site of Ottawa’s first permanent home, the NCC erected a small plaque in 1968. It sits on the corner of the appropriatelynamed streets of Honeywell Avenue and Algonquin Avenue.


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UPGRADE YOUR LIFE

Ottawa At Home | Spring 2018  

Ottawa At Home magazine, Spring 2018 Renovation Issue

Ottawa At Home | Spring 2018  

Ottawa At Home magazine, Spring 2018 Renovation Issue

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