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184.6 FEB. 15, 2018

YOUR NEWSPAPER ESTABLISHED 1951

GRYPHONS

ATHLETICS

REVIEW

PRIDE HOUSE Canada started LGBTQ+ trend at Olympic games. PG. 05

O, CANADA!

Gender-neutral lyrics create more problems than they solve. PG.15

HILLSIDE INSIDE PG. 04


NEWS

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THE ONTARION

0 2 | W E CA N D O I T!

ON THE RADAR Compiled by Tiann Nantais

U OF G FUNDING

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) have allocated $3.3 million to the University of Guelph for “innovative health research.” Projects that received funding spanned five departments and included applying circadian biology to treat heart attacks as well as food sovereignty for Indigenous communities. DRAGON’S DEN

Dragon’s Den will be holding open auditions in Guelph on Feb. 21, giving aspiring entrepreneurs the opportunity to pitch their idea to a panel of potential investors. HALO TOP

The Halo Top ice cream company has announced that its calorie-wise frozen dessert will be coming to Canada in 12 trial flavours. While the calorie count will be low, consumers can expect the price to be fairly high. FLU DEATHS

Health officials have confirmed that two students from the same elementary school in Guelph have passed away due to the flu virus. Neither the seven-year-old boy nor the 12-year-old girl had received a flu shot this year.

0 3 | GREEN PARTY CONVENTION

@Ont ar i on _ News

Ontario’s new mandatory standard lease agreement What this means for 2. U T I L I T I E S

present and future

Sometimes the price of heat, water, and Internet won’t be included in the rent. Check with your landlord beforehand to find out what the total price will likely be.

student renters J O N AT H A N S T M I C H A E L

AS OF APRIL 30, 2018, Ontario will be introducing new standardized leasing, which, for students, means less mess when dealing with your landlord. Essentially, standard lease forms will take the place of the custom lease forms currently being used by landlords. As it stands right now, landlords can create their own terms and conditions for leasing, and although leases tend to be similar, it is possible that landlords will include confusing terminology, omit crucial components of the lease, and even use illegal terms. With this new development, the Ontario government hopes to achieve the standardization of leases across Ontario; essentially, each lease will look roughly the same, differing only in the details concerning the specific tenant. With a standard lease form, renters won’t have to worry about getting duped by custom lease forms. “The new lease form is written

3 . L O C AT I O N New mandatory lease agreement means less hassle for student renters. PHOTO BY ALORA GRIFFITHS

in easy to understand language and is templated to capture basic information, such as names and addresses, the total rent and when it’s due, and any rules or terms about the rental unit or building,” wrote Ontario’s Ministry of Housing in a recent statement. “It also outlines the rights and responsibilities of both tenants and landlords, and explains what can (and cannot) be included in a lease.” As stated by Geordie Dent, executive director of the Federation of Metro Tenants’ Associations: “The standard lease will help protect tenants by providing clarity around their rights,” while also alleviating the confusion that may accompany the requirements of the lease. In the dynamic between

landlord and tenant, the aim of the standard lease is for both parties to understand their responsibilities and rights, which will inevitably lead to an easier and more comprehensive relationship. In light of the new standard lease, here are some things to look out for before renting an apartment or house in Guelph:

1. P R I C E Apar tments and houses in Guelph can be pretty cheap to rent, though some apartments might run on the pricier side. Make sure to weigh the pros and the cons of the place you’re looking at to make sure it’s worth the expense.

Proximity to the university is always important to take into consideration. The difference between a 10-minute walk and a 25-minute bus ride can have a noticeable impact on your day. However, being close to amenities that are farther away from the school can be a huge benefit, and having a place downtown isn’t so bad either. Check up on the bus routes to make sure you can get around easily.

4. P E T S It is important to note that in most cases a landlord can not say no to your pets. However, it might not be worth getting into an argument with them about your dog. Try to find a pet-friendly landlord if you plan to have furry friends living with you.

HYDRO ONE

According to the Financial Accountability Office of Ontario, the provincial government made an economic mistake by privatizing Hydro One. While the sale of Hydro One shares was meant to raise money for transportation and infrastructure, the FAO’s report shows that $1.8 billion would have been saved had the province taken on traditional debt to fund these projects.

Index News ..............................................02 Arts & Culture..............................04 Sports & Health..........................07 Center...............................................10 Opinion.............................................13 Editorial...........................................15 Fun page.........................................16

“We Can Do It!” feminist poster girl passes away at age 96 • In 1978, Women in Crisis opened a shelter, filling the gap left by a lack of funding.

Rosie the Riveter creates a lasting impact TA S H A FA LC O N E R

ON JAN. 20, Naomi Parker Fraley passed away at the age of 96. Fraley was the inspiration for what became known as the “Rosie the Riveter” poster. We all recognize this “We Can Do It!” poster from WWII, which was originally created to encourage women who were working in the factories. What many people don’t know is that Canada actually had its very own real life version of Rosie the Riveter, before the United States used the character in propaganda. Veronica Foster, or the Bren Gun Girl, worked in a munitions

manufacturing plant during the Second World War. She became popular in Canada when a series of propaganda posters were produced using images of her doing various activities, including playing baseball and dancing the jitterbug. Both Rosie the Riveter and the Bren Gun Girl later became entrenched in the feminist movement. The city of Guelph has its own unique ties to the feminist movement. A feminist organization, known only as ‘the group,’ organized initiatives to support Guelph women.

Researchers at the University o f G u e l p h h a ve a l s o m a d e significant contributions to the feminist movement.

Rosie the Riveter PHOTO COURTESY OF FLICKR

• In 1973, they established the second shelter for assaulted women in Ontario. Although it didn’t stay open long, it made a major impact.

Dr. Norma V. Bowen, a founding psychology professor at the university, started research on sexual harassment, and shared her research by presenting talks at other universities. She was also a conference coordinator at the Canadian Research Institute for the Advancement of Women. While Fraley may have passed away recently, the inspiration she gave to the feminist movement will live on in the work that her fellow women continue to put forward.


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TH E O NTA R I O N .CO M

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Sitting down with the Green Party of Ontario An inside look at the political party’s convention in Guelph M A R S C H E S T E R C H OW

From Feb. 2 to 4, the Green Party of Ontario held their annual convention at the Delta Hotel and Conference Centre in Guelph. The Ontarion had the opportunity to attend a portion of the convention and speak with some of the attendees. In a brief sit-down with convention attendee Cherie Wong, The Ontarion got a feel for the Green Party’s values. Wong explained that convention attendees, as well as the Green Party itself, all share six common values: 1. Sustainability 2. Social justice 3. Non-violence 4. Participatory democracy 5. Respect for diversity 6. Ecological wisdom

Wong stated that you cannot be “Green” without those values. She

Change the system so we can make a difference. also noted that the current cycle of politics is very selfish, and the aim of the Green Party is to develop evidence-based policy focused on people. This means doing the right thing for future generations by preserving the environment. A second attendee, Keenan Aylwin, was able to share more about what the party hopes to achieve. Aylwin told The Ontarion that the Green Party of Ontario would like to get young people more involved and to “engage them in a meaningful way and change

the system so we can make a difference.” According to Aylwin, “[The party] need[s] to show people that they can trust the government and that change is possible.” T he Ontar ion a ls o had t he opportunity to talk with Mike Schreiner, the leader of the Green Party of Ontario. In my talk with Schreiner, I learned that he placed a great deal of importance on ending the stigma surrounding mental health and addiction. He also emphasized the value of honesty and integrity and putting people first. For the Green Party this leads to a commitment to doing politics differently. Schreiner told The Ontarion that he was “tired of the political status quo and is wanting to bring hope and faith back.” He also said that the Green Party wants to increase efforts to leave a lasting legacy for the future. Before wrapping up, Schreiner touched on three final Green Party goals: 1. Rebuilding

the economy for the middle class 2. Investing in livable communities 3. Creating affordable homes and education

Green Party leader Mike Schreiner is set to be the party’s candidate in Guelph for the upcoming provincial election. PHOTO COURTESY OF GREEN PARTY

Summerlee Humanitarian Scholarships 5 Awards of $10,000

plus an additional up to $4,000 to support approved travel costs

BECOME CAREER-READY IN LESS THAN A YEAR. Specialized Graduate Certificates in: • Administrative Business Management • Career Development Professional • Community and Social Service Management • Entrepreneurship Management • Event Management • Financial Planning Services • Global Business Management • Global Hospitality Management (Co-op) • Human Resources Management (Optional Co-op) • Integrated Marketing Communications • Occupational Health, Safety and Wellness • Project Management

These scholarships were established by the Angel Gabriel Foundation and dedicated in the name of the seventh vicechancellor of the University of Guelph, Dr. Alastair Summerlee. These awards will provide students the opportunity to gain remarkable insight and understanding, engage in humanitarian issues of global importance, and build understanding and connections leading to lasting change.

Students must meet the following criteria to apply:

• • • • •

currently registered in an undergraduate degree program, completed no more than 17.0 credits, achieved a minimum 70% cumulative average, will be registered in an undergraduate degree program in Fall ‘18/Winter ’19, and demonstrate interest and/or commitment to humanitarian efforts.

Apply by March 1st

• Social Media Marketing • Supply Chain Management - Global • Sustainable Business Management

For more information about how to apply visit:

APPLY NOW

uoguelph.ca/registrar/studentfinance/ www.conestogac.on.ca

or email awards@uoguelph.ca


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ARTS & CULTURE THE ONTARION

0 5 | H AN S OLO M OV I E

06 | BOYSCOUT

HILLSIDE INSIDE

@Ont ar i on _ A r t s

Winter version of Guelph’s iconic festival features small storefront performances, big rock shows This past weekend, a dizzying variety of acts took over downtown Guelph for the winter edition of Hillside. This year’s Hillside Inside featured storefront performances by women- and queer-identified performers, bluegrass jams, loud punk shows, and much more.

Partner, all smiles, Metz turns up the Sun K, Texas King, surges through old volume on new tunes and Band of Rascals faves, new material at Mitchell Hall get cozy at Royal Electric Power pop group turns Toronto punk rockers cock rock on its head W I L L W E L L I N G TO N

threw themselves into a memorable show W I L L W E L L I N G TO N

Partner’s resident shredder, Josée Caron, previously played in Sackville band The Mouthbreathers. PHOTOS BY CLAUDIA IDZIK

Opening for Metz at Mitchell Hall on Saturday night, Partner reminded their Guelph audience — who probably didn’t need reminding — why they’ve quickly scaled the Canadian indie rock ladder. Goofy east coast lesbians Josée Caron and Lucy Niles, along with their solid backing band, are experts at wielding humour and heavy guitars. Their set played like a microhistory of their career, beginning with short, snappy early singles like “Hot Knives” and “The ‘Ellen’ Page,” moving through the singles from their 2017 record In Search of Lost Time, and even squeezing in a new tune, “Hottie,” toward the end of the set.

Partner reminded their Guelph audience Metz drummer Hayden Menzies is also an illustrator, creating much of the band’s merch.

... why they’ve quickly scaled the Canadian indie rock ladder.

Kristian Montano of Sun K brought ample charisma to Royal Electric.

Their performance was confident and polished, their stage show tight — Niles dressed in a baggy Supreme tee, Caron dressed in shiny black tights and a black sweater. Their banter was, as always, hilarious. But I’ve recently found myself tiring of the Partner shtick. There’s only so far you can go with gag-driven arena rock — “Hottie” struck me as particularly rote — and Partner left some of their more artful tunes, like “Creature in the Sun,” off the bill. However, the closing track “Ambassador to Ecstasy,” one of their best, left the show on a high note.

Canadian bands warm up on a wintry weekend C L AU D I A I D Z I K

Toronto punks Metz put on a tight, engaged show in their first Guelph gig since the release of their third album, Strange Peace, in September. Personally, I found the new album somewhat thin-sounding compared to their forceful first two records, Metz and II, and I was excited to see whether that material would better translate in a live environment. In this respect, Metz did not disappoint: “Raw Materials,” with its wiggly hook and epic breakdown, and the pounding “Drained Lake” sounded great. “Raw Materials” and 2016 single “Eraser” also included spacey guitar interludes, a nice complement to the heavier moments of the set. The sheer volume, however, perhaps compounded by the acoustic properties of the space itself — going to a show at Mitchell Hall always inspires f lashbacks to high school gymnasium dances — reduced the mix to a muddy blare. The band themselves gave the furious performance they’re known for. Frontman Alex Edkins in particular, short of breath and soaked in sweat after one or two songs, owned the stage, leaping, whirling, and thrashing. The decently sized crowd responded in kind, throwing down in the pit for “Headache,” the opening track from Metz’s 2012 debut record. The show never really topped that, however, although the pit got moving again for closing number “Acetate,” a funky highlight from 2015’s II. The few remaining moshers moshed through the first chorus, then paused, hands on each other’s shoulders, one of them stooping to tie his shoe.

Hillside Inside brought a wicked array of Canadian bands to Royal Electric Saturday afternoon. As part of their series of shows this weekend, Band of Rascals, Texas King, and Sun K played to an energetic Guelph crowd.

Sun K were not shy about their on-stage charisma. Texas King followed Band of Rascals to heat up the venue with their animated demeanor. The four-piece band met an eager crowd, showing Guelph just how much more energy they have compared to the lively recordings on their debut album. Sun K were not shy about their on-stage charisma. They closed the show off, displaying an undeniable magnetism and easy-going vibe. Their balance of soft-hearted songs and beat-heav y tracks managed to capture the crowd’s interest throughout. The band ended their set by jumping into the crowd and dancing along with audience members. It’s clear that there’s no lack of love in the local indie-rock music scene. Band of Rascals, Texas King, and Sun K all showcased their talents on stage.


I S SU E 18 4.6 | A RT S & CU LTU R E

TH E O NTA R I O N .CO M

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Buffy star Charisma Carpenter appears at GenreCon Event at Round Table Tavern kicks off Guelph convention M A R S C H E S T E R C H OW

LAST FRIDAY, Charisma Car-

penter, best known for playing Cordelia Chase in the Buffy the Vampire Slayer television series, appeared at The Round Table on Essex Street as part of GenreCon 2018. Just over 20 people attended the event and had the opportunity to meet Carpenter and have a small group talk with her. Nicholas Brendon, the actor who portrayed Xander Harris on the show, was also scheduled to attend, but was not able to make it. At the event, guests were handed limited edition character cards for the Buffy the Vampire Slayer board game. The cards were of Xander and Cordelia respectively and both were signed by Carpenter

Since the end of Buffy, Carpenter has appeared in other shows like Veronica Mars. | PHOTO COURTESY OF TVGUIDE

and Brendon. Later on, attendees lined up to get selfies with Carpenter before the event was over. GenreCon continued throughout the weekend with vendors, panel discussions, and other events at The Holiday Inn.

The Round Table provided a cozy setting for the fan event. PHOTO BY MARS CHESTER CHOW

Solo teaser trailer begins to turn the tides of fan expectations New film’s many stumbles suggest the difficulty of bringing balance to a cinematic universe

Fans are ready to sign this film’s death warrant.

Alden Ehrenreich looks the part, but fans are doubtful he’ll be able to match Harrison Ford. PHOTO COURTESY OF YOUTUBE

QUINN BAKER

IT IS NO SECRET that Disney intends to make Star Wars films from now until the end of time. There are so many upcoming Star Wars projects that it’s impossible to keep track of them all. Recently, Lucasfilm announced that the creators of Game of Thrones, David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, will be writing and producing their own Star Wars film series, with the exact number of films being unclear at this time. This series is in no way related to the trilogy Rian Johnson will also be making for the legendary franchise. With all this new information surrounding the Star Wars franchise, it’s almost easy to forget that their new standalone film, Solo: A Star Wars Story, is set to be released in May. However, after the recent trailer for the film aired during the Super Bowl, a lot more people are starting to talk about it. But why did the trailer take this long to come out? It seems

odd considering how close it is to the movie’s release date. However, it’s no surprise given the constant stream of bad news coming out of the film’s set. For one, the two directors who started making Solo, Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, left mid-production — the reason Disney gave for this odd departure was “creative differences.” Some reports have made it clear that these “creative differences” were based on the studio wanting to focus more on the script, whereas Lord and Miller wanted to stretch their legs and create their own unique film. Either way, Solo now has Ron Howard as its director. And the shuffling around of directors is not the films’ only problem; an acting coach was brought in for Alden Ehrenreich, a.k.a. Han Solo himself, last minute. Many fans were already c onc er ne d t h a t E h r en r eic h couldn’t pull off a perfect performance like Harrison Ford’s; add

in an acting coach and those fans are ready to sign this film’s death warrant. But now that the trailer is finally out… have initial fears turned into possible hopes? It may be too early to gauge the reactions of the entire fanbase, but it does seem like people are genuinely hopeful that the movie has potential. Fans have vocalized their excitement for Donald Glover as Lando, and a small segment of the fanbase have cut Ehrenreich some slack for the tough position he’s in with this impossible role. The trailer itself had some promising moments, even if it did look like a Marvel trailer at times (and yes, looking like Marvel is a bad thing). The trailer was actionpacked and included a few Easter eggs for fans, along with some familiar faces like Chewbacca. The new trailer also featured Emilia Clarke and Woody Harrelson’s new characters. As odd as it will be seeing Emilia Clarke, a.k.a. “Daenerys” from Game of Thrones, in this new universe, it is exciting to see an established actor join the Star Wars family. Hopefully this film does justice to the endless potential of these new characters, as well as to the ageold heroes that we know and love.


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A RT S & CU LTU R E | FEB RUA RY 1 5, 2018

TH E O NTA R I O N

Bachynski Project becomes Boyscout OVC vet student goes from dorm room jams to sold out crowds Graham Steinman (filling in for Trevor Cooke), Nate Bachynski, Shawn Fisher, and Adam Brown of Boyscout. PHOTO BY KAREN K. TRAN

H E L E N V I C TO R I A TO N E R

IT WAS A SATURDAY night in

downtown Guelph and the most thriving venue of the night was not a dance club or fast food eatery, but instead Van Gogh’s Ear, playing host to a series of bands, headlined by Boyscout with their homegrown Guelph alternative rock. Nathanael Bachynski, the band’s frontman, enchanted the audience with his energetic and charismatic vocals, which blended with soul-reaching instrumentals, including the unique inclusion of a violin. The band’s roots were established in Bachynski’s first year as an undergrad at the University of Guelph, when he decided to teach himself to play guitar as a hobby. He could never have anticipated where it would take him five years down the road. “I went from

playing in my dorm room to this year: we have our first album, we have our first music video, we played a show with Peach Pit, which is my favourite band, we’ve sold out DSTRCT, and we’re headlining shows regularly now!” said Bachynski. So how did Bachynski get from strumming his first chords to playing venues across the province? “It’s about vulnerability — taking those vulnerable moments, putting yourself out there,” said Bachynski, who points to a slow progression from playing with friends, to playing open mics, to opening shows. Although it initially started out as a solo endeavour under the name “The Bachynski Project,” a growing sense of collaboration — as well as fans’ struggles to spell his name — led to a rebranding as Boyscout,

I think that the intangible, unspeakable part of music is that I can feel sad, and you can feel that same sadness... with Adam Brown, Shawn Fisher, and Trevor Cooke completing the lineup. Alongside the rebranding this fall, Boyscout dropped their first album, By Your Side. It was an inevitability, said Bachynski. “We owed it to the people. The people of Guelph created these insane moments and memories, and we had all these songs building up

over time and it was a shame not to do something with them.” This sense of connection with the city is a very strong part of the band’s identity. “It’s more than being in a band and making stuff,” said Bachynski, “I’m only 50 per cent of the music — you, as the listener, are the other 50 per cent. You get to decide if this is good or not.” I asked Bachynski what the most rewarding part of the experience has been. “When people make their own connections,” said Bachynski. “When someone comes up to me after a show and says ‘this song reminds me of this,’ or ‘I really appreciated that.’ I think that’s beautiful. I think that the intangible, unspeakable part of music is that I can feel sad, and you can feel that same sadness, and we can

communicate that through instruments,” he said. The band also feels a strong responsibility to give back. In an annual tradition, now named “Music for Change,” Boyscout gets together with several other local bands to host a concert, with all proceeds being donated to various local charities. “I’m sure a lot of students would like to donate a grand to somewhere,” Bachynski explains, “but when you’re in debt, you can’t do that. It’s a moment to say ‘we’re individuals and we’re humans and we’re cool people, and we can do something.’ It’s using our talent to create money to create that movement and make that change.” The 2018 installment of Music for Change will take place on March 23 at DSTRCT.

Softside turns the other cheek on new tape Ian Bain’s new tunes work through emotional tumult with purpose and poise W I L L W E L L I N G TO N

’s Top Ten Albums B IRD CIT Y** Winnowing (Label Fantastic/Coax) L U K A* What Kind of Animal (Self-Released) ASHLEY CONDON* Can You Hear Me (Self-Released) BORN RUFFIANS Uncle, Duke & The Chief (Paper Bag) BREEZE* Record (Hand Drawn Dracula) ELAN NOON* Have A Spirit Filled (Self-Released) MUT T** Power-Up (Self-Released) E RIC CHE NAUX* Slowly Paradise (Constellation) KHRUAN G B IN Con Todo El Mundo (Dead Oceans) BR AD DE ROO** Brad de Roo’s Chimeras of Decline (Self-Released) *C A N A D I A N A R T I S T

* * LO C A L A R T I S T

W W W. C F R U . C A

SOFTSIDE’S 2017 EP Lower Hands

opens with a gloomy thought: “It’s been a bad year,” sighs frontman Ian Bain over a web of dark guitars. “I was very down and upset that summer,” said Bain. “That year was a real rough one, and I was in a very tumultuous place. I sat down with an acoustic guitar and pounded out that chord progression and just started singing the hook.” That song, “Over,” was the first Bain wrote for the project. Initially a bedroom recording project, Softside since blossomed into a well-regarded local live act,

Ian Bain started Softside after graduating from U of G’s applied music program. PHOTO BY WILL WELLINGTON

with Bain on lead guitar backed by a group of his best friends. Now, another year has passed and Bain is scheduled to drop a new full-length tape, Luxury Lounge, at a house-show this Friday. This year has been tumultuous too — Bain went through a breakup, for one thing — but the new record feels lighter, tinged with hope

and fresh purpose (in addition to plenty of the single-not-ready-tomingle blues). The new tape expands the Softside sound to include country twang and lowkey acoustic pop, a product of Bain’s growing confidence in his own vision: “I’m trying more and more to allow what’s coming naturally to me to be legitimate — not shut it down right away — and then try to develop it if I think it’s any good,” said Bain. This stress on development includes a new passion for quality lyrics: “My goal,” said Bain, “is to not allow any insecurity to get in the way of me expressing myself in a very honest way, lyrically.” Highlights like “Uxbridge” and “A Lot Like Her” indicate Bain’s new focus as a songwriter and have already begun to find a place in Bain’s live show. “Maybe next year,” sings Bain on “Over.” This new record should give Bain and his band plenty to explore throughout the next year.


SPORTS & HEALTH

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THE ONTARION

0 9 | M E N ’S HOCK E Y

1 2 | MATC HA RECIPE

@ Ont ar i on _ S p o r t s

Canada established sporting trend for creating LGBTQ+ safe space for athletes Created for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics, Pride House has expanded worldwide TA S H A FA LC O N E R

THE CANADIAN OLYMPIC Com-

mittee (COC) and Pride House International (PHI) are partnering up for the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang. For the first time, Canada House will be home to Pride House. Inside the house is a welcome message on the wall in English, French, and Korean. The message welcomes everyone regardless of one’s characteristics. The message roughly translates to: “This is your house no matter who you are or where you come from.” PHI states that the first Pride House was at the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Vancouver, BC. Many international sporting events have since had a Pride House, including the 2012

An aerial picture of the PyeongChang Olympic village located in the Gangwon Province in South Korea. | PHOTO COURTESY OF FLICKR

and 2016 Olympic Games, the FIFA world cup, the Pan Am and Parapan Am Games, and the Commonwealth Games. The Pride House has come full circle, from originating in Canada to now being hosted by the COC. It is not a surprise that the Pride House is being hosted by the COC, as Canada and PHI have shared values of inclusion, diversity, and respect. Additionally, Canada is a leader in advancing gay rights. In

2005, Canada became the third country to legalize gay marriage. The COC has stated that they take on LGBTQ+ issues in sports because they believe “in equality for all, and that athletes should be judged by their performance on the field of play and their character as people, not for who they love or how they identify.” Using this platform, the COC is able to make a larger impact on the community. The COC

notes in a press release that “by creating change in sport, we can create change across all segments of society.” This marks the first time a Pride House is directly affiliated with and hosted by a national Olympic Committee. This is an important step towards inclusion in sport. Outsports notes that there are 14 publicly out LGBTQ+ athletes competing this year, including Canadian pairs figure skater Eric

Radford. This is a jump from the 2014 Winter Olympics, which had seven publicly out LGBTQ+ athletes competing, but is nowhere near the 56 LGBTQ+ Olympians who competed at the 2016 Summer Olympics. The COC also has a One Team campaign that runs in schools and sports throughout the country, with its aim being to promote LGBTQ+ inclusion and respect.

From Gryphon to Olympian Brandon Maxwell recruited to U.S. men’s hockey team C H E RY L V E R S C H U E R E N

Brandon Maxwell played for the Gryphons during the 2012-2013 season before playing professionally in Europe. PHOTO COURTESY OF TEAM USA HOCKEY

GRYPHON SPIRIT is at a high point this Olympic season with former Gryphon Brandon Maxwell officially joining the U.S. men’s Olympic hockey team. Originally from Winter Park, Fla., Maxwell has had an international career, going from Guelph to Sweden to Utah to Czechoslovakia over the span of four years. He was the goaltender for the Gryphons for a single season during their 20122013 season, and appeared in a total of 14 games. “We had a good team when I was there and I made some really good friends, many of whom I’m still in contact with,” he said in a recent

interview with Gryphon Athletics. Maxwell has been described as “a pleasure to coach” by Guelph hockey head coach Shawn Camp, who has been coaching the school’s men’s hockey team for 11 seasons. Maxwell attributes his time here as one of the reasons that he knew he could play hockey professionally, and it paid off this year with his acceptance to the Olympics. He also attributes his success to his parents, whom he was most excited about sharing the exciting news with. “I was just really happy I could let me parents know. They’ve done everything for me; couldn’t

ask for better parents. Glad all their hard work and money spent has amounted to this,” Maxwell said in an interview with the Cambridge Times. Today, Maxwell is one of three goalies on the American Olympic team. He has maintained a save percentage of approximately 90 over the last 10 years from his collegiate training years to his professional hockey experience in Europe. Maxwell’s success story is an inspiration for students at Guelph, helping them realize that they can succeed. To be able to go from Cambridge minor hockey leagues to the Olympics is an incredible achievement for this young player. This Olympic season, Gryphons can watch with pride knowing that a Gryphon has proven that he can achieve his goals. Even though Maxwell is representing team USA, it’s nice to see him living his olympic dream.


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S P O RT S & H E A LTH

| FEB RUA RY 1 5, 2018

TH E O NTA R I O N

TALK N E R DY TO M E

An all inclusive guide to maintaining proper genital health and hygiene TA S H A FA LC O N E R

IT’S IMPORTANT to know your body well so

that you can tell if there are changes that come up, such as swelling, bumps, or sores. Make sure to see a health care provider if you notice any significant changes or are feeling concerned. Implementing monthly self-exams can be an effective way to catch any early problems. Everyone should be checking their breasts for any changes, including lumps, changes in appearance, or discharge. Breast cancer is easier to treat if caught early, and this applies to both men and women. Men should be doing monthly self-exams on their testicles. Like breast cancer, testicular cancer is easier to treat if caught at an early stage. The most common cancer found in Canadian men is prostate cancer. Prostate screening should be done annually for men over the age of 50, and at a doctor’s discretion for people with risk factors including a family history of the disease. It is recommended for women to get cervical cancer screenings — otherwise known as a Pap test — every three years once a woman is over 21 and has been sexually active. Women should also get pelvic exams. These exams inspect the cervix and vagina

to look for swelling, discharge, or signs of infection. Being mindful of what you wear can also help keep your genitals healthy. People should be wearing clean underwear that has been washed with a gentle laundry detergent. Underwear made with natural fibers, such as cotton, are best. In addition, it is better to wear looser clothing. That doesn’t mean you should throw out all your skinny jeans, but do try to alternate your wardrobe with looser items, like sweatpants for instance. Lastly, make sure to change out of your workout clothes or wet bathing suit following a workout or swim. It’s important to keep in mind that the vagina has a delicate balance of bacteria and a self-regulating pH level, so it’s best not to do anything that might upset this natural balance. For example, using anything that is scented around your vagina, including some soaps and bath bombs, or douching (washing out the vagina), may negatively impact your genitals and can lead to infections or other health issues. Check out my next column for information about the benefits of sex. If you’d like a certain sex ed topic discussed, send your requests to tashafalconer@trentu.ca

GRAPHIC BY TASHA FALCONER

FORBES INCLUDES U OF G AMONG CANADA’S BEST EMPLOYERS

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Reporting to the Assistant Registrar - Student Recruitment, each incumbent will assist in ensuring that the University meets its enrolment and revenue targets through a strong applicant pool of committed and well-qualified applicants by: developing a personal, compelling and informative presentation about the University of Guelph and delivering dynamic presentations at approximately one hundred Ontario high schools as part of both the Individual School Visit Program and the University Information Program. Liaison Officers will be required to complete extensive, rigorous training which will include presentation skill development and content learning regarding the University’s academic programs and student services, admission policies and requirements, and scholarships and awards. This information is used to deliver engaging presentations, respond to questions and counsel prospective students, parents, teachers and secondary school officials. Liaison Officers will also participate in all on- and off-campus recruitment events, including the Ontario Universities’ Fair, Fall Preview Day and Science and Engineering Sunday. Liaison Officers will also be responsible for: logistics planning as it pertains to travel and school visits, preparing reports on all visits, completing expense reports, assisting with the production of liaison materials and information; general correspondence; and other duties as assigned. Requirements of this position include: A university degree (preferably from the University of Guelph) and one (1) year relevant experience in the liaison, registrarial or student services environment, public relations or marketing, or an equivalent combination of education and experience; demonstrated excellence in public speaking, presentations, verbal and written communications and interpersonal skills; professional judgement, tact, diplomacy; flexibility and adaptability; ability to work both independently and as part of a team; excellent organization skills and demonstrated problem solving skills. A valid, full G - Ontario driver’s license is essential. Extensive travel throughout Ontario is required. Must be able to work evenings and weekends. Salary Band: P02 Professional/Managerial Salary Bands POSTING DATE: FEBRUARY 21, 2018 | CLOSING DATE: MARCH 7, 2018 All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. The University of Guelph is committed to equity in its policies, practices, and programs, supports diversity in its teaching, learning and work environments, and ensures that applications for members of underrepresented groups are seriously considered under its employment equity policy. All qualified individuals who would contribute to the further diversification of our University community are encouraged to apply.


I S SU E 18 4.6 | S P O RT S & H E A LTH

TH E O NTA R I O N .CO M

BATTLING IT OUT:

G RY PH O N S CO R E B OAR D CO M PI LED BY M AT TEO CI M ELL A RO

Men’s Basketball

Gryphons 76, Warriors 87 Gryphons 61, Golden Hawks 75 Gryphons’ Record: 5-17 Women’s Basketball

Gryphons 74, Warriors 55 Gryphons 74, Golden Hawks 56 Gryphons’ Record: 12-10 Men’s Hockey

Gryphons 6, Rams 2 Gryphons’ Record: 21-6-1

The Gryphons honour team veterans on “senior night” before beating up on the Lions. PHOTO BY MICHAEL CIMESA

Women’s Hockey

Gryphons dominate division rivals, York Lions, 6-2 Men’s hockey team continues to pull away from the pack in the OUA West MICHAEL CIMESA

the Gryphons played an astonishing game against the York Lions. The game began by honouring the Gryphons graduating this semester in a pregame ceremony, and then quickly jumped into the action. Right from the start, the Gryphons went on the attack and took the Lions by surprise, scoring four unanswered goals in the

ON THURSDAY, FEB. 8,

first period. Todd Winder, second year forward, scored two of the four only two minutes apart from each other. The Lions managed to score once in the second period, only to have two more goals scored on them before the end of the second. With too little, too late, the Lions managed to score once more on the Gryphons, bringing

the score at the end of regulation to 6-2. The Gryphons currently sit at the top of the OUA West with 43 points; 8 points ahead of second and third place holders York and Laurier.

Gryphons 3, Lakers 6 Gryphons 3, Voyageurs 0 Gryphons’ Record: 13-4-6 Men’s Volleyball

Gryphons 3, Varsity Blues 0 Gryphons 3, Excaliburs 0 Gryphons’ Record: 7-8 Women’s Volleyball

Gryphons 2, Varsity Blues 3 Gryphons 3, Excaliburs 0 Gryphons’ Record: 7-10

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09


Mens Basketball. PHOTO COURTESY OF GRYPHONS ATHLETICS

Athletics in Review Athletics at Guelph experiencing a revival, opening a new chapter. Director of Athletics Scott McRoberts discusses resources, gender equity, and eSports M AT T E O C I M E L L A R O

Athletics at the University of Guelph has undergone a major facelift. A giant extension has been added to the University’s athletics facilit y, wor th $ 45 million, and the new football pavillion — the $10.5 million facility donated by Canadian football legend and Guelphite Stu Lang — had its unveiling to a live band and fireworks last October.

These state-of-the-art facilities, filled with hungry varsity athletes and an athletically-minded student body means a new athletic giant is rising in southern Ontario. These facilities rival a Division I school in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCA A), and if you enter the Athletics Centre any given night

of the week, you’re likely to see the vibrance, pulse, and activity of the student body. The fitness facilities, including the weights and cardio equipment, are averaging 2,200 card swipes a day, which doesn’t include those who swipe for classes, or varsity athletes coming in for practice. Currently, the University of Guelph has six Gryphons teams ranked nationally, including the best track and field teams in the country for both men and women, and our men’s long-distance runners are coming off of a national championship for cross country. Things are looking up for Gryphons athletics. New facilities attract widespread attention, and the University of Guelph is starting to gain a reputation beyond its agricultural college, both in Ontario and around the globe. The Ontarion sat down with Scott McRoberts, the director of athletics here at the U of G, and the man at the forefront of this athletics renaissance.

Women’s Soccer. PHOTO BY TASHA FALCONER

THE STUDENT ATHLETE Scott McRoberts’ vision for the student athlete can be summed up with one word: “wellness.” He hopes to continue to foster spaces for engagement and socialization, and to build a “massive cornerstone for wellness” through initiatives. T h e re s o u rce s ava i l a b l e to student athletes embody his vision. Within a five-minute walk, student athletes can access:

• Two strength and conditioning coaches, who are vital for injury prevention • Nutrition and food counsellors • Physiotherapy • A mental health counsellor for student athletes • Newly arriving this fall, a study hall on the second floor of the athletics centre for student athletes This new study space, along with the already existing study

Men’s rugby. PHOTO BY TASHA FALCONER

Women’s rugby. Women’s swimming. | PHOTO COURTESY OF GRYPHONS ATHLETICS

Women’s track and field.

PHOTO BY

PHOTO BY TASHA FALCONER

MIDO MELEBARI

space in the Football Pavilion and the Science Commons allows student athletes to have greater access to study space where they can grow academically. McRoberts also tells us that he is expanding Guelph’s Student-Athlete Mentorship (SAM) Program and, thanks to a new $35,000 donation from Aerotek, he will also be expanding the Student-Athlete Leadership Academy, which allows student athletes to obtain over 30 hours of leadership training during their U of G careers. As a program that has already expanded twice over the past two years, McRoberts hopes to add first year student athletes to the SAM Program, allowing for a welcoming and growing space for first-year athletes to get their academics on the right track from the moment they step onto campus. Injury prevention is a priority for McRoberts and his team, and they meet frequently to discuss concussion protocols from the intermural to collegiate level. McRoberts has confidence in the Gryphons’ resources for concussion


Men’s Rugby. PHOTO BY GRYPHONS ATHLETICS

management following the recent awareness of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). The University of Guelph consults with Dr. Margo Mountjoy, who sits on the International Olympic Committee (IOC) on concussion reviews. In addition, U of G will be implementing greater concussion protocols following the introduction of Rohan’s law into intramural sports.

COMMITMENT TO GENDER EQUITY Women’s involvement in sports are often tossed aside, some argue it is because of a lack of exposure and economic resources. Scholarships are imbalanced in Canada, favouring men’s involvement over women’s, partly because many male varsity alumni favour donating to their own sport, partly because the wage gap affects highly paid professionals, and largely because women’s involvement in sports has been stunted due to a lack of space and attention women’s sport requires for exponential growth. In addition to these barriers, U Sports also caps their scholarships at the collegiate level and restricts certain sports. Women receive fewer sports scholarships than men,

Women’s Hockey. PHOTO COURTESY OF GRYPHONS ATHLETICS

according to the U Sports policy on financial awards. “There is inadequacy around endowed scholarships [at the University of Guelph] for male programs versus female programs and that’s just based on alumni coming out and wanting to donate and give. But if some of the female programs weren’t treated equally to the men’s programs back in the day, why would they be coming forward to donate?” McRoberts said. “We’ve had a number of female varsity alumni from decades past that are being re-engaged and are coming back to support where we’re going with our women’s programs. And if you checked, our women’s teams do very, very well,” he continued. Men’s sports teams also receive the majority, if not all, of the showcase games. Homecoming, the Frosty Mug, and the OAC Aggies night only involve the men’s football and hockey teams. The only showcase game that is an outlier is senior night and Rez Floods the Rink. However, both events are shared between the men’s and women’s teams. McRoberts and his team hope to challenge the status quo and give equal opportunities to women’s athletics. “[Our] policy on scholarships [is] not 50/50. But say it’s 55/45 — we’re actually

better than we have to be in compliance with. Our goal, though, is to be balanced 50/50 and that’s part of our She’s Got Game movement,” McRoberts said. In addition to this campaign, a new $5,000 scholarship has been in the works for a female athlete, as well as two new marquee event games to take place next year that will emphasize and celebrate female player development from local minor leagues through to the collegiate level. The games will take place during She’s Got Game awareness month next February. The events will include a women’s basketball and women’s hockey stand-alone games that will highlight the involvement of girls ages 10 to 18 in sport while deepening community engagement. “We’re going to invite the local associations, so the Guelph Youth Basketball Association and the Guelph Girls Minor Association, and we’re going to [most likely] do a day game and a school day [for our] junior Gryphons,” McRoberts said. There are still many nuances that need to be worked out surrounding the upcoming events, but the showcase games with young Guelphites and junior Gryphons in attendance will foster attention and growth that women in sport don’t normally receive. McRoberts says that it’s vital that U of G

creates the space needed to allow women’s involvement in sports to grow, develop, and come full circle to re-engage as an alumni. McRoberts is committed and engaged with Gryphon female athletes, giving props and praises to Kelly Gribbons for scoring the overtime winner against the Brock Badgers on Feb. 1 and to the women’s basketball team for their strong season thus far.

eSPORTS ON THE RADAR McRoberts has also had beginning discussions about the rise of collegiate gaming clubs, which has garnered the attention of The New York Times and the NCAA. “We’ve just started talking about what [eSports] could look like. What happens in NCAA usually trickles across the border later,” McRoberts said. There are still many questions that remain surrounding sponsors and rules and regulations, but McRoberts says that eSports will “absolutely” be coming to an OUA down the line, especially if sponsors are available to support its growth.

Men’s field lacrosse. PHOTO BY MIDO MELEBARI

Kelly Gribbons. Women’s hockey. PHOTO COURTESY OF GRYPHONS ATHLETICS

Women’s wrestling. PHOTO BY MIDO MELEBARI


12

S P O RT S & H E A LTH | FEB RUA RY 1 5, 2018

TH E O NTA R I O N

Move aside coffee, matcha is the new go-to caffeinated beverage The green tea derivative is known for its invigorating qualities M A D I G A N C OT T E R I L L

bright green colour, unique taste, and numerous health benefits, matcha powder has become one of today’s most popular superfoods. Originating in Japan, matcha is processed from finely ground tea leaves to form a powder. The benefits of consuming matcha include helping to lower blood sugar, boost metabolism, detoxify the body, and calm the mind. Unlike other teas, which are made through leaf infusion, matcha is produced by grinding up whole tea leaves to create a powder that can be incorporated into almost any recipe. Frequently seen in items such as lattes, muffins, smoothies, breads, and even ice cream, matcha is not only a nutrient-rich superfood, but also contains 10 times more antioxidants than one cup of green tea. Some consumers may turn to matcha as a way to detoxify the body, while others are drawn to

WITH ITS DISTINCT

Matcha powder holds over ten times the nutrients of a regular cup of green tea. PHOTO BY MADIGAN COTTERILL

its natural mood-enhancing properties. Traditionally consumed by Buddhist monks to assist in meditation, matcha offers a persistent calm feeling throughout the day while also providing a strong energy boost. With two grams of matcha containing as much caffeine as an espresso, many users are turning to the substance as an alternative to coffee. Unlike other products, matcha releases c a f fei ne a t a g r a du a l p a c e throughout the day, preventing the consumer from experiencing the “crash and burn” effects of other caffeinated beverages like

coffee and energy drinks. You have no doubt noticed multiple coffee shops and stores beginning to sell matcha-infused products, like Starbucks’ matcha latte and the multiple matcha flavours found at David’s Tea, including peach, strawberry, and maple. Consumers are turning to these options, however, with the belief that they are receiving all the added benefits and making a health-conscious choice, when in fact they are causing more harm to their bodies than good. On her blog, nutritionist Carla Golden writes: “someone choosing

Starbucks’ matcha to help control their blood sugar imbalance is being pumped up with inflammatory, acidic sugar. It’s criminal!” It may be easy to believe that ordering a “matcha drink” in a coffee shop is a smart choice, but the best option is to brew one for yourself at home. Since its recent surge in popularity, matcha is available in powdered form at almost any health food store — even some grocery stores (check out the Metro on Edinburgh). By following these simple steps in the recipe below, you can now start your morning off right with this powerful drink and feel energized all through the day.

MATCHA LATTE RECIPE

until it forms a paste. heat up your milk in a saucepan until it becomes warm. 4. Once the matcha has completely dissolved, add in the warm milk and enjoy! 3. Meanwhile,

Note: If you’d like a little more flavour, try adding some vanilla extract and cinnamon.

THE NUDE DOGS

BSHC BAND JAMIE GIA

I N G R ED IENTS

• 1 teaspoon of matcha powder • 2 teaspoons of sweetener, such as honey or maple syrup • ¼ cup hot water • 1 cup of milk (can be plant-based)

A NIGHT OF GARAGE ROCK AND PUNK

D I R ECTIONS 1. Add the matcha

powder, along with the hot water and sweetener into a mug. 2. Using a bamboo or metal whisk, blend the powder with the water

FEBRUARY 24th @ JIMMY JAZZ AS ALWAYS - NO COVER

PET OF THE WEEK

WE’RE HIRING PHOTO BY MADDIE PETRIE

EDDIE

The Guinea Pig

Human: Maddie Petrie Pet’s Age: Eddie’s absolute favou-

rite pastime is snacking. He will munch on just about any vegetable and has learned to stand up on his hind legs for treats of hay! His hobbies have led him to be quite bootylicious.

Do you think your pet deserves to be the next pet of the week? Send your photos to onweb@uoguelph.ca by 9 A.M. on MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26, along with your full name, pet’s name and age, and a fun fact about them.

Visit www.theontarion.com/jobs for more information.


OPINION

13

THE ONTARION

1 4 | ANTHE M STR E E TE R S

1 5 | O CANADA LYRIC S

@ t h e ont ar i o n

PLAYING THE WAITING GAME The stress of graduating without a plan has forced me to reevaluate what I really want

Not knowing what the future has to hold can be stressful, but it is also a time to grow. | PHOTO BY ALORA GRIFFITHS

FIONA CASHELL

LAST WEEK , as part of my

international development seminar, I had to write a 10-year plan. Despite not requiring any research, this was probably one of the most difficult times I’ve had starting an assignment. I have always had a plan. Maybe it came from years of Girl Guides, where the motto was “Be Prepared.” Maybe up until now there has been a singular, logical path for me. I expected to go to university, I had the grades to do it, and I went. I wanted to go on exchange. I saved up, I organized my classes in order to achieve a major and a minor, complete the exchange, and be done in four years. I have been fortunate to be able to realize a number of my dreams. Now, I am at a loss. As I hit the halfway mark of my final semester of my undergraduate degree, for the first time, I am unsure of what comes next. I have loved my program and the

freedom it allowed me over four years, but there is no clear route from here. For the first time, it feels as if my options aren’t guaranteed. I have applied to grad school, but I may not get in. The job fairs have felt less inspiring and more overwhelming. “You should be looking for a job that you are willing to stay at for three years,” I have been told. I have no idea what I want in three weeks, let alone in three years. I have gone through numerous changes in the past 12 months. Things that I thought I could depend on have disappeared. I am no longer in contact with people that I thought would be a permanent fixture in my life. This isn’t all necessarily for the worst — I have shifted to acting with a sense of urgency. I have met wonderful people in the past few months that have changed my worldview and opened my eyes. If you had told me last year I would be going on vacation to the “Deep South” next week, I wouldn’t have believed you. I have put myself out there and,

for better or worse, this has let me grow exponentially. Responses from grad programs roll out in March, which feels much farther away than it is. In the meantime, I feel trapped. Do I look for a permanent job that I may have to leave for school? Where will I be living? It is impossible to commit to anything past April. I know that this feeling is temporary. Once I get responses from universities — positive or negative — I will be able to make firm decisions about the future. But for the next three weeks I (and I suspect many others like me) will be stuck in limbo. This quarter-life crisis has been paralyzing. But it has also given me the rare opportunity, after being on a linear path, to analyze what I truly want from life. This is a work in progress, and I am still trying to figure things out. But I think I am closer to knowing now than I was before.

I have put myself out there and, for better or worse, this has let me grow exponentially.

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14

O PI N I O N

| FEB RUA RY 1 5, 2018

TH E O NTA R I O N

O Canada: What do you think of the change to the national anthem? T R U S T K AT S A N D E

GREG FORKUTZA

GREG FORKUTZA

Fourth year, Mathematics “Tradition is important, but to what extent do traditional values have a place in a modern world where ‘equality’ seems to reign supreme?”

RYAN JEFFERY

HARSIMRAN KAUR

Fourth year, Environmental Science “The national anthem should reflect the values of Canadians today. The change should better reflect this. Considering this, maybe we should also revisit how God fits in to our country, which is diverse in faith.”

HANNAH HAASEN

RYAN JEFFERY

Third year, Accounting “There are more important issues in our country that our government should be putting their time and energy into. Things like poverty, unemployment, and the care of our veterans are all more important issues. The change of one word in our national anthem seems pretty unimportant.”

HARSIMRAN KAUR

MALLORY GITZEL

Third year, Accounting “Well, tradition and culture are two very important assets of our society. But they are in the past, it’s our history. The government should work on other issues which are crucial for the current society, such as equality, unemployment, privacy, poverty, and much more.”

MALLORY GITZEL

HANNAH HAASEN

Second year, International Development “I feel like this alteration of the national anthem is unnecessary, especially because it clearly doesn’t reflect the majority of citizens’ values or opinions. The government should be focusing on more important issues that would actually make a significant impact. I also do feel that when I have a daughter I will be happy for her to sing ‘us’ instead of ‘sons,’ but I just think there are more pressing issues.”

TAYLOR COURT

TAYLOR COURT

Second year, Criminal Justice and Public Policy “I feel that people are too sensitive these days. I think people understand that ‘sons’ included females as well and did not exclude them. I believe that there are better things that the government should be worried about.”

JULIA STANTE

Second year, Biological Science “I feel that society’s focus has shifted to ‘issues’ that could be put on the back burner, as there are greater problems occurring in our country.”

JULIA STANTE

WE’RE HIRING Visit www.theontarion.com/jobs for more information.


EDITORIAL

15

THE ONTARION

Follow us @theontarion What’s in a lyric? Canadians wonder if changing words can really change the world. | PHOTO COURTESY OF FLICKR

O Canada… Lyric change ruffles some Canadians’ feathers C A R O LY N N W H I T E H O U S E

REMEMBER the good old days back in elementary school when the national anthem would play over the speaker system and you had to stand beside your chair and sing along? Or, in my case, pretending to sing along by faintly moving my mouth to match the words I thought were being sung. It seems that many people today, when asked, have a hard time identifying what exactly the words in the anthem are. Given this general lack of attention to the anthem’s lyrics, let alone the meaning and symbolism behind them, it came as a bit of surprise when our handsome, wavy-haired, prime minister, Justin Trudeau, announced this very important decision that had been made: the phrase in the anthem, “in all thy sons command,” has officially been changed to “in all of us command,” to ensure gender parity. Now, I like the idea of an inclusive and representative anthem, I really do. I feel just as proud as the next person when I hear Canada’s national song fill the echoing

The Ontarion Inc.

chambers of an ice rink at a hockey game. I feel a wave of excitement when I hear it being played at the Olympic Games. However, what I don’t feel so excited about is the fact that our government is spending so much time and energy changing a few simple words around and feeling like they have made a significant difference when the issues that inspire this kind of change are rooted much deeper and require much more digging and hard work to see any progress made. The English version of Canada’s national anthem was based on a poem written by a rather mustachioed man named Robert Stanley Weir. From his poetic lyrics came the “O Canada” that we know and love today. The version that was presented at that time was officially proclaimed to be Canada’s national anthem on July 1, 1980. According to an article by CBC News, the demand to change the phrasing of the national anthem had been in the works for quite some time. Prior to the bill officially being passed just this year, 12 others had been introduced and rejected in the House of Commons since 1980. This goes to show just how long it can take for change to come about. And what makes this even more disappointing is the fact that the original lyrics written by Weir in 1908 were in fact gender neutral before being changed to include

the part about “thy sons” in 1914. Weir’s original lyrics included the phrase “thou dost in us command,” and though you wouldn’t likely hear anybody saying that today, it certainly is a more inclusive version. I wonder what Weir would think of the lyrics now, having taken so long to get back to what he originally envisioned. It’s true that language is a powerful tool and agent for change. The words we use can have tremendous impact, changing the way we see ourselves and the world around us. The problem I see here, however, is the fact that

REVISED ANTHEM LYRICS O Canada! Our home and native land! True patriot love in all of us command. With glowing hearts we see thee rise, The True North strong and free! From far and wide, O Canada, we stand on guard for thee. God keep our land glorious and free! O Canada, we stand on guard for thee. O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

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there has been such a huge focus on and celebration of something being accomplished that is so trivial. This seems to be a surface level change that has been made, perhaps to make us feel better initially, but which is not really making any concrete changes with regards to gender equality. This kind of action could also be seen as dangerous in the sense that it creates a false sense of hope for everyone who is involved. Another element of interest here is the recent exchange between Prime Minister Trudeau and a woman who was attending a townhall-style meeting in Edmonton,

Open Position Mehkansh Sharma

DIREC TORS

CONTRIBUTORS Anna Aukema Quinn Baker Fiona Cashell Mars Chester Chow Michael Cimesa Léanne Colbeck Madigan Cotterill Tasha Falconer Claudia Idzik Trust Katsande Melanie Katz Mido Melebari Jonathan St. Michael Megan Sullivan Helen Victoria Toner Cheryl Verschueren

Megan Scarth Alex Lefebvre

Alb. last week. Trudeau jokingly corrected the woman’s use of the word “mankind,” indicating that she should instead use the more inclusive phrase “peoplekind.” The contradiction that arose here between the seriousness that was given to the phrasing in the national anthem with the joking nature of swapping in a made-up term that Trudeau used is something to seriously consider. This lighthearted use of the English language, though likely with good intention, undermines the integrity of the phrasing that they were trying to establish in the first place. If you’re going to say that language is powerful and important, it should not then be tossed around to make gender parity into a joke. Moving forward, if we as Canadians are aiming to be politically correct and to continue to advocate for equity and inclusivity, there is another element of our national anthem that, as of right now, seems to have been overlooked: the incursion of God. An exploration of the presence of religion in our governing laws and legislation is an interesting, though admittedly difficult, subject to discuss. However, not unlike gender, it is important to take this first step in discussing and assessing our use of language to bring about more concrete change down the road.

The Ontarion is a non-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors. Since The Ontarion undertakes the publishing of student work, the opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of The Ontarion staff and Board of Directors. The Ontarion reserves the right to edit or refuse all material deemed sexist, racist, homophobic, or otherwise unfit for publication as determined by the Editor-in-Chief. Material of any form appearing in this newspaper is copyrighted 2017 and cannot be reprinted without the approval of the Editor-in-Chief. The Ontarion retains the right of first publication on all material. In the event that an advertiser is not satisfied with an advertisement in the newspaper, they must notify The Ontarion within four working days of publication. The Ontarion will not be held responsible for advertising mistakes beyond the cost of advertisement. The Ontarion is printed by Hamilton Web.


F U N PAG E

16

THE ONTARION

S M T W T

F

S

GET ON TOP OF

february

02/12- 03/01

TO DO LIST Feb. 15

Honey and Harvest Celebrating future 10C rooftop 4:30 p.m. 42 Carden St.

Feb. 16 Snowtunes in the Cold Broadway Benefit Concert 7 p.m. Lakeside HOPE House P4B Presents: Softside album release Ft. Nigel Nigel 8:30 p.m. Steph’s House (ask a punk)

Feb. 17 Poetry Slam* Guelph Spoken Word Ft. Up From the Roots Dwayne Morgan and Paulina Reid 8 p.m. The eBar

Guelph: Justice for Colten Boushie 1 p.m. Guelph Market Square Jenn St-Onge signing Comic artist behind The Misfits and Bingo Love 1 p.m. The Dragon DGBA and Silence Present: CROW Ukelele duo 3 p.m. Royal Electric

Feb. 21 Dragon’s Den Holds open auditions in Guelph 11 a.m. Holiday Inn (Scotsdale Dr.) Guelph Creatives Networking Night 7 p.m. The Dragon South

Feb. 22 Riverfest Elora Presents: Rich Aucoin Ft. Taylor Knox & Beams 9:30 p.m. The eBar

Feb. 23 Guelph Youth Jazz Ensemble* Directed by Brent Rowan 7 p.m. Guelph Civic Museum M. Walter Ft. DJ Hacker-Wright & Möglichkeit; Electronica 7:30 p.m. Silence Yoney R&B trio 10 p.m. Jimmy Jazz Tragedy Ann Ft. Inna Powell 8:30 p.m. The Red Brick Cafe Digging Roots & Dione Taylor Roots, blues, and R&B 8 p.m. River Run Centre

Feb. 24 Funga Drummers* A family-friendly workshop 1:30 p.m. Heritage Hall Nicolette & The Nobodies Music Weekends Matinee

3 p.m. Planet Bean Corey Gulkin F t . M is s y B au ma n & Jo Jo Worthington 8 p.m. Silence February Repair Cafe Bring broken stuff and get it fixed 10 a.m. Three Willows United Church Women & Trans Open Mic 9 p.m. Take Time Vintage The Nude Dogs Ft. BSHC & Jamie Gia 9:30 p.m. Jimmy Jazz

Feb. 25 Black History Month Celebration* Underground Railroad Quit Codes, family drumming workshop led by Gerima Harvey and Jeffrey Cummings 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Waterloo Region Museum

Elaquent Ft. Sensi Boy & Obuxum Music Weekends Matinee 2 p.m. Red Papaya

Feb. 28 Chili Fundraiser Annual CoA United Way Chilly Days chili fundraiser 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. PCH Closing Ceremony** Concluding remarks, performance by Black Umfolosi 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. UC Courtyard

Feb. 28 - Mar. 1 Build-A-Band 2018 CASU hosted 24hr band contest As part of Black History Month: *Presented by the Guelph Black Heritage Society ** Presented by The Cultural Diversity Office

MAR. 01 New issue of The Ontarion on stands


F U N PAG E

17

THE ONTARION

CROSSWORD 1

For your chance to win TWO FREE BOB’S DOGS, submit a completed crossword to The Ontarion office, UC 264, by FEBRUARY 27, 2018 at 3 P.M.

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ANSWERS FROM 184.5

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Crossword Winner from 184.5 SHREYA ANAND

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Winners are announced in the paper each week and should collect their voucher from The Ontarion office.

6

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Across

Down

1–Run smoothly

1–Sunday seat

5–Vintner’s prefix

2–Suffix with glob

9–Very funny

3–Accelerate

13–Robt. ___

4–Go in again

14–Bluffer’s ploy

5–Threatening words

16–Rocker a apton

6–Ahead of time

17–___ Only Just Begun

7–Columbus’ ship

18–Dadaist Max

8–CIA predecessor

19–DMl a hole

9–Book of the New

20–Nabisco’s ___ Wafers

Testament

22–People of courage

10–Buck follower

24–Rapturous delight

11–Bring on board

27–Irritate

12–Breezes through

28–Riding school

15–In the right

29–Aquatic plants that float

21–Shakespearean villain

33–Alamogordo’s county

23–Wapiti

34–When said three times, a

24–Hams it up

1970 war movie

25–China

35–“The Sweetest Taboo”

26–Scoffs

singer

27–Countrified

36–Common article

29–Column style

37–Reef material

30–Makes

38–Rocker Ocasek

31–Archie Bunker’s wife

39–Hearing organs

32–Lure

41–Blue dye source

34–Medicine

42–Totaled, as a bill

37–King Arthur’s palace

44–Affecting the whole body

40–Sports arena

46–Soggy and reedy

42–Sprinted

47–Wait ___!

43–Hall of fame

48–Prohibits

45–Ending for legal or Japan

49–Large beer mug

46–Actress Mason

52–Swiss river

48–Teases

53–French summers

49–Preservative

57–___ want for Christmas…

50–Writer Wiesel

58–Watering hole

51–Intestinal sectors

60–Lymph ___

52–On the ocean

61–In ___ of

54–Ripped

62–Molars, e.g.

55–Yellow cheese coated

63–Some nest eggs

with red wax

64–Side

56–Zaire’s Mobutu ___ Selo

65–Tabula ___

59–___ Lingus (Irish carrier)

66–Treater’s words

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9 2 McIntyre Proofreading

CL A SS I FI E DS Blood Donor Clinic @ U of G Peter Clark Hall March 7, 2018 9am-12pm Book online today! Blood.ca

Guelph Record Show Sunday, March 4th 10:30am to 4:00pm at the Royal Canadian Legion (57 Watson Parkway South, Guelph). 34 tables and over 30,000 vinyl records! Most genres and formats available! Admission is $4.

BBBSG Bowl For Kids event is March 13th! Register your team at www.bfksguelph. ca for a great time, prizes, pizza and drinks! A change of shoes can change a life.

The Ontarion is setting aside space for three free classified ads in each issue. First come, first served. Free classified ads cannot be booked more than a week

ahead of the issue they appear in. NEXT WEEK’S FREEBIES ARE AVAILABLE NOW. The deadline for the next issue of The Ontarion is 1 p.m. on Monday, February 26, 2018. Classified Ads have a limit of 90 words and start at $6/30 words. Email ontarion@ uoguelph.ca to book yours.

Your key to enhanced writing Visit: www.pwmci.com for more details.


fill a gap in your program

#GUELPHKIND See a cute outfit on someone in the UC? Compliment! Have a cool convo, but didn’t get a name? Reconnect! Witness an act of kindness? Celebrate!

After Valentine’s Day seems a little late, but I’m trying to think of ways to tell you how I feel. That you’re one of the most amazing people I have ever met and that when you smile at me it feels like the sun on my face in the summer. I want to be friends forever. ~ Anonymus

Send your compliments, missed connections, and celebrations to onweb@uoguelph.ca by Monday at 12 p.m. to be featured in the following Thursday’s paper. 50 words or less. (Kindness only.)

TESL GRADUATE CERTIFICATE Athabasca University has over 850 courses for you to choose from to meet your needs. Monthly start dates of undergraduate courses fit into your schedule so that you can work at your own pace. Fill the gap and save a semester.

PREPARE FOR A CAREER… TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE This graduate certificate program prepares you to teach English language learners in: • community programs across Canada • a variety of workplace settings

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Apply now for September! go.athabascau.ca/online-courses open. online. everywhere.

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GUESS THE PHOTO

Can you tell what this photograph is a close-up of? Tell us your guess by commenting on our Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter, and we’ll publish the right answer and best guesses in the next issue. @T H EO N TA R I O N What do you win? Bragging rights and satisfaction. PHOTO BY MICHAEL CIMESA

Q +A W ITH G U E LPH

Is celebrating Valentine’s Day a benefit or a stressor in your relationship? R ES U LT S : V- DAY I S G R E AT =75% V-DAY IS STRESSFUL=25%

STRESSFUL

25%

GREAT 75%

Every week we’re asking readers to participate in a poll and tell us what you think about a chosen topic. Look for our polls posted on our Facebook and Twitter page every Wednesday, and post your comments for a chance to see your opinion printed in next week’s issue of The Ontarion!


#IWriteTheOntarion PHOTO BY WILL WELLINGTON

BACHELORS & BACHELORETTES OF GUELPH

Trust Katsande MSC PL ANT SCIENCES

What is your favourite part about writing for The Ontarion?

What are your favourite things about the Guelph community?

I get to meet different people and also listen to different opinions, since “there is so much that you can learn when you just listen.”

The people.

W h at i s o n e of yo u r favo u r i te things that you’ve covered for The Ontarion?

Tell us one fun fact about yourself.

I believe life is a dream, and only a few are “woke.”

The untitled poem I wrote for the arts issue.

FOLLOW TRUST @losttruthphotography

FOLLOW US @ontarion @theontarion @theontarion

We’re celebrating our awesome contributors! Interested in seeing your name in print? Come to our volunteer meetings on Wednesdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. (UC264). If you can’t make it, just drop by the office or email Mirali at oneditor@uoguelph.ca for more info!

BACHELORS

BACHELORETTES

MATTHEW B. Matt is one of my good friends (since first year) and is incredibly empathetic, kind, entertaining, witty and an excellent presence to have in social situations. He’s often known as the glue of our social group, and he frequently goes out of his way to do things for others, evidencing his selflessness. Furthermore, he’s a culinary artist, sends exceptional memes, is a connoisseur of fine wines and cheeses, loves music, is involved in research, has wonderful organizational systems using Post-It notes, loves dogs, and will successfully beat you at any Nintendo video game. The real deal. Nominated by Corey G.

EMILY C. When I read the ad looking for “an allaround great person,” my roommate Emily came to mind immediately. In her third year of Human Kinetics, Emily is not only smart but she is a sweetheart. Emily is always making me laugh, she’s a great cook, prefers a quiet night in with friends and she can eat her weight in sushi. I’m nominating Emily because she always makes me watch horror movies with her and I don’t want to watch them anymore. I’m not sure how she’s still single tbh. Nominated by Lauren M.

COREY G . Corey is great because he pays attention to detail, is totally bubbly and has a great memory! He has a couple of hidden talents that will be sure to amaze you! He can identify virtually any plane, some even by sound! He’s clever and cunning, he likes pottery and long beach walks. He knows all the words to every Drake song. He loves Pixar and DreamWorks movies (yes, even the bee one) and can teach you about their soundtracks. His favourite TV shows are Riverdale and The Big Bang Theory. He spends most of his spare time axe throwing with friends, but could really use a partner in doing so. He is an incredible goalie on and off the soccer field. If he can’t save the ball, he’ll get your heart. He makes great company, uses dad jokes, and even owns a fanny pack. But don’t just take my word for it, find out for yourself! Nominated by Matthew B.

EMMA N. Emma has been my friend and roommate for four years now and she is the greatest person I know. She is smart, kind, and hilarious. Emma makes every situation fun and light hearted always knowing what song to play or breaking it down on the d-floor at most dollar beer nights. She is one of a kind and also loves horses and dogs. She’s an exceptional person all around! Nominated by Janelle G. JANELLE G . If you’re looking for a supportive, kind, and generous person, then look no further than Janelle! With a passion for the environment, Janelle is an active recycler, loves going on hikes, and can pitch a mean tent. She just purchased Spotify premium, so not only is she demonstrating her financial stability, but Janelle is also ready to make a fire playlist for any activity or mood. As a Starbucks barista, a knowledgeable outdoorswoman, and an exceptional dancer, Janelle is the complete package! Nominated by Emma N.

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY & READING WEEK If you’d like to connect with one of the people featured here, email us at onweb@uoguelph. ca. We’ll forward your contact information to the bachelor or bachelorette of your choice.

The Ontarion - 184.6  

Gryphons Athletics Review, Pride House, O Canada, Hillside Inside

The Ontarion - 184.6  

Gryphons Athletics Review, Pride House, O Canada, Hillside Inside