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170.4 ◆ t h ur s day, ja n ua ry 3 1 s t, 2 0 1 3 ◆ ww w.the onta rion .com

what's the deal with tuition? features Sugar coated relationships

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ALCOHOL HISTORY ALANNA GURR GOALIE SCORES!

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Not-so-new trend sparks discussion on sexuality Alicja Grzadkowska Landing a spot on a top-twenty list often comes with recognition, whether it’s good or bad. The University of Guelph recently ranked eighth on such a list, though opinions are split about whether the position is considered an accomplishment. According to SeekingArangement.com, 84 students at the University of Guelph are “Sugar Babies,” which places the school as eighth on the website’s list of “Top 20 Fastest Growing Sugar Baby Schools” in Canada. The website itself functions as an onCourtesy Project Social Art line dating site that helps “Sugar Daddies” and “Sugar Mommies” Sugar babies outweigh sugar daddies 12 to one on the site, according to Jennifer Gwynn. – wealthy, older individuals – to meet “Sugar Babies” and “Male and generous partners, specifi- throughout the history of human well-being, there’s the potenBabies” – young adults who are cally those who have the means relationships,” said Neustifter. tial for power to be abused. It often students that rely on their of providing them with comforts Neustifter also advises that doesn’t mean it’s necessarily “sugar parent” to pay for tuition, and luxuries.” people don’t immediately jump going to happen, it doesn’t mean textbooks, and other costs assoGuelph professor Dr. Ruth to conclusions about the re- that someone is predisposed to ciated with attending university. Neustifter, who works with lationships formed from the be a victim in that situation or The relationship is based on the Couple and Family Therapy website, despite the perhaps predisposed to being an abuser.” financial grounds, wherein program at the university and initial shock-value. Jennifer Gwynn, the public the older person advertises an specializes in sexual well being, “I think that [there’s an] as- relations manager for the site, sumption that this is doomed responded to similar criticism allowance for prospective “ba- agrees with the claim. bies,” which ignites the start “This sort of sugar baby, sugar to fail or [that it’s] something concerning opinions that the site of a “sugar” relationship. Ac- parent relationship is absolute- necessarily negative,” said was aimed at university students. cording to the site, “It’s […] ly nothing new so it’s not as Neustifter. “Anytime there’s “There are a lot of accusations natural for younger men [and] though this website is proposing economic disparity, where one going around that we’re targetwomen to seek out more expe- something that people haven’t person is depending on the other ing college students, and we’re ...se e sug a r ba bi e s pag e 4 rienced, sophisticated, wealthy negotiated and done probably for some or all of their economic

Sample Craft Beer Selections From 6 Local Breweries & Receive a Custom Sample Glass Starts at 5pm on February 8th


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

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Tech savvy

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Global to Local:

Technology showcase gives students opportunities to connect with alumni and industry leaders

“We wanted to bring the big “great, [and] really well done.” He’s career as a consultant, general companies and contributors to- now a graduate student at Guelph manager and professor. Now he’s gether here on campus,” added in subatomic physics, researching a councillor for the county of WelKlotz. the structure of nuclei. Fairchild lington, and a part time sheep and Lalonde addressed the benefits volunteered at the event to answer beef cattle farmer. of the showcase for attendees. attendees’ questions. “I think it’s great [and] I think “It’s not just a career fair, it’s they need more of these. Students more of a career fair plus a celeneed to be able to understand what Jordan Sloggett bration of technology. Students or is available and how to go about the general public can get inforlooking for jobs. It’s a lot different. The Science Complex atrium was mation about tech in Guelph – not When I was looking, the opporabsolutely buzzing, partly from the just career opportunities for tech tunities were really great; they’re still good, but now you have to do many computer screens that made professionals,” said Lalonde, the a lot of work to demonstrate to an up the different exhibits, but most- marketing coordinator for Guelph ly from the several hundred alumni, tech and design. organization or company you want industry representatives and proLalonde continued, “It’s nice to work for, what you’re going to spective students. for students that want to stay in bring to that company and how you The Guelph Technology Showcase Guelph to know about all these can help them out,” Don McKay 2.0 was advertised as “a career fair companies exist, and that they’re commented on the showcase. [and] celebration of technology in interested in, either coop or hiring, Jamie McDade, another attendGuelph.” Companies had a chance partnering with students.” ee, graduated from the University Klotz talked about the purpose to show off their career opportuniof Guelph in 2009 with a bacheties, while students could take the of having the career fair on campus. lor of commuting, and is currently opportunity to make connections “It’s a nice opportunity for stuthe release manager for Innosphere and chat to alumni of the Computer dents. We’re on their home turf, Systems. “I think it’s really important, esScience department and other re- [and] it’s casual so they can just lated programs at the U of G. drop by for a half-hour in between Don McKay graduated from pecially for the Guelph community Organized by Greg Klotz and classes and meet some companies. Guelph in 1970 with a B.Sc. in in general. The IT community is Valerie Lalonde, this was the sec- They don’t have to go to Waterloo Physics and Mathematics. He spent really starting to pull up, and so ond annual technology showcase. for a career fair.” some time working with Environ- events like this are crucial,” said Lalonde explained that the purZac Fairchild graduated from ment Canada, ended up getting his McDade. pose of the event was “to highlight the School of Computer Science Masters at University of Toronto, Guelph’s tech community, or tech in 2011 and described his time at and later returned for his PhD at for web-exclusive photo Reel sector.” Guelph as an undergrad as being, Guelph in 1977. McKay had a long

“Students need to be able to understand what is available and how to go about looking for jobs.” – Don McKay

U of G students and faculty on international and national news Monkeys shrieked in disapproval when Iran sent a fellow primate into space on Jan. 28. The launch was a part of Tehran’s aerospace development program, which hopes to send an astronaut into the cosmos in the near future. Monkeys were not the only mammals shaking their heads in frustration at the launch; the United States and its allies reportedly believe that the technology developed by Iran in the program could also be used to launch deadly long-range missiles armed with nuclear warheads. According to the Science World Report, “Iran wants to put its own satellites into orbit to monitor natural disasters. This would have huge benefits for the earthquake-prone nation.” The media could not help but make comparisons between Iran’s space monkey and the 1950s space race between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., when American and Soviet aerospace programs likewise launched rockets with a variety of animals on board. The Ontarion: Have you heard about this news topic, and does it interest you? Alex Sutton, student: I hadn’t heard about that, but I heard about all the fallout from it…[I heard] they were saying that they wanted to do a nuke test on the U.S. The Ontarion: Do you think it’s a relevant topic for Canadians to be discussing? AS: I feel like it’s a relevant topic, but not in the sense that everyone should be absolutely terrified about it…I think that [with] all of these hot-button issues, every time something happens, everyone [thinks that] this is going to lead to everyone’s downfall, but I feel like in a sense, you can have that [thought] in the back of your head, but it’s not necessarily what’s happening in reality. People can legitimately just be trying to improve something versus always trying to destroy the U.S. Thanks to the participant for this week’s interview. If you have something to say about international or national news, and would like to be contacted for future issues, or if you want to see a particular news story covered here, contact News Editor Alicja Grzadkowska at onnews@ uoguelph.ca.


4 w w w.th e on ta r ion . c om Taking beauty tips from the 1950s “Look Younger, Live Longer” seminar analyzes Hauser’s work Colleen McDonell For those of us who weren’t around back then, the 1950s seem like a time when women wore lots of red lipstick, long skirts, and idolized Grace Kelly and Marilyn Monroe. Beneath all those hair rollers and mascara wands was a desire to not only look younger, but also to age gracefully and in good health. Catherine Carstairs, associate professor in the History Department at the University of Guelph, held a seminar on Jan. 29 on beauty and health in the 1950s. The seminar was part of the ASTRA (Arts, Science & Technology Research Alliance) Series. Carstairs focused the talk around the work of Gayelord Hauser, one of the best-known authors on food, beauty, and health in the U.S. and Europe during the mid-20th century. One of his books, Look Younger, Live Longer was first published in 1950 and remained extremely popular on best-seller lists for the next two years. “Throughout [the book], he stressed that true beauty comes from within,” said Carstairs. “In large part, he meant that women could not only change their outside appearance by

...s ug ar bab ies con ti n ue d

“…it’s sex work. That doesn’t make it good or bad, it just means that you need to prepare and educate yourself to be as safe and successful as possible.” –Ruth Neustifter not targeting by any means, we just saw a trend that we shared with the media and those colleges, that this is happening.”

attention to the supposed horrors of menopause, believed that older women were attractive, and encouraged them to be adventurous.” Carstairs also touched on how Hauser successfully demonstrated that beauty advice could come from a man, who even at the time, many recognized as gay. “Hauser provides us with a window into the relationships that existed, even in the 1950s, between straight women and their gay hairdressers, stylists, and entertainers. It shows that in this realm, as in others, queerness could be visible and even desirable, if it was carefully managed.” Carstairs started researching health a few years ago, analyzing what is considered “natural” packaged food and what is not, a debate that pervades our culture. Research involved interviewing different people and reading all copies of Canada’s leading health food magazine, vitamins, and taking the time to Alive, amongst other health enjoy leisure activities such as food sources. About two years travelling or dancing. Targeted into the project, Carstairs was towards women middle-aged or diagnosed with cancer, and older, Hauser’s “indomitable the articles became personal optimistic style” of writing was messages. received with wide, open arms “Reading all these health food by an audience that understood books about ‘if you do this you that the average lifespan was won’t get cancer’ or ‘if you do that you won’t get cancer’ was increasing. “He celebrated strong fe- just really moralistic and anmale figures from actresses noying, and sort of depressing,” to businesswomen, paid little explained Carstairs.

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changing what they ate, but he also asserted that even the plainest woman could be beautiful if she had charm, wit, and exuberance.” Hauser gave beauty tips in terms of makeup and hair styles, but also strongly stressed things that we often hear today from experts, such as the importance of eating whole grains and vegetables, getting your daily

“…he stressed that true beauty comes from within,” –Catherine Carstairs on Gayelord Hauser

With the recent sex club event at the University of Toronto, and the general conversation about sexual topics that were once taboo, the exposure of Seeking Arrangement. com to the media may contribute to a continuing discussion on sexuality and the wide variety of relationships. “The conversation is opened,” said Neustifter. “Of course we see things that we assume are like this happening all the time […] But, we’re talking about it more [now] and perhaps seeing it in this way lends it some sort of social credibility that didn’t exist before.” Nonetheless, people who

become involved in a sugar baby/ sugar parent relationship have to be aware of what arrangement they are entering into, and the risks and benefits of the relationship. Neustifter explains that it can be emotionally taxing and physically stressful, when considering safety issues. “I would encourage anyone who is looking at this as a possibility for paying tuition, for making money, to recognize that for what it is, it’s sex work. That doesn’t make it good or bad, it just means that you need to prepare and educate yourself to be as safe and successful as possible.”

Monday to Wednesday 10am to 3pm Thursday to Saturday 10am to 9 pm Sunday closed

courtesy

An obsession with beauty and health was ignited in the 1950s with the help of Gayelord Hauser. As a result, she salvaged a few works out of the project, including her favourite, the Hauser piece. He led an innovative approach to

women’s health and beauty in aging as well as exploring a lifestyle not considered conventional during the 1950s.


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

news

Putting your iPhone to (better) use App released to address homophobia and HIV transmission Alicja Grzadkowska With the help of their iPhones, students and the community of Guelph can now easily familiarize themselves with their use of homophobic language and HIV transmission through H3: Halt Homophobia & HIV, an app recently released by the AIDS Committee of Guelph and Wellington County (ACG). According to the ACG, the app has several functions aimed at promoting a positive discussion about homophobia and HIV transmission, such as giving users ideas for witty comebacks to homophobic slurs and phrasing, answering questions about HIV transmission, and providing a quiz for users that reveals their level of homophobia. Olivia Kijewski, the AIDS Committee’s positive prevention co-coordinator, say that the connection between the two topics, homophobia and the transmission of HIV, is closely related, which is why the app has combined the issues.

“Research is showing that those who experience homophobia in the form of bullying, discrimination, isolation, exclusion, and violence are more likely to experience ‘shame-based’ trauma,” explained Kijewski, “which can lead to an increase in the likeliness of developing ‘risky behaviours’ [that] can [then] lead to an increased risk of HIV.” Other risks identified with homophobia, according to the ACG, may include homelessness and depression, as well as the transmission of other STIs, which have been linked with experiencing homophobic attitudes. And, while the app might not be intended for people who are extremely homophobic, and may dismiss the use of the app’s services, Kijewski says that it is intended more for youth, who by acquiring information about homophobia and HIV transmission can become more aware of both issues, and omit the risks associated with them in the future. Guelph, as a fairly liberal city, might be the perfect place for the introduction of such an app, but Kijewski says that homophobic language is present even here. “Although Guelph is a progressive

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vanessa tignanelli

The homophobia quiz is one of the features of the new app released by the ACG. and accepting town, which I think will be receptive to the app, homophobia still exists here,” said the coordinator. “Often homophobia takes on more subtle forms, such as using expressions like ‘that’s so gay,’ but it still has very real and often harmful consequences for

those who experience it.” The ACG is looking to introduce the app to as many people as possible on Jan. 31, with their release party at the Albion, which Kijewski explains is a fun and open place to begin a discussion based on the app and the issues it brings up as the

bar holds an unofficial “gay night” every Thursday. Those who do not own an iPhone may be able to access the app in the future; Kijewski says that the ACG would look for ways to adapt it to other phone systems if it became popular enough.


news 6 w w w.th e on ta r ion . c om Concerns voiced over proposed nuclear waste dump Critics say burying nuclear waste so close to Great Lakes has potential for ecological disaster Andrew Donovan If there was a proposal to bury low and intermediate level nuclear waste just 400 meters from Lake Huron, part of a water system that services 40 million Canadians and Americans, wouldn’t you want to know about it? These are the sentiments of Beverly Fernandez, spokesperson for the Stop the Great Lakes Nuclear Dump, an organization dedicated to educating the population about the possible detrimental side effects of putting nuclear waste so close to an important environmental ecosystem.

“It defies common sense to bury nuclear waste approximately 400 meters from the Great Lakes.” – Beverly Fernandez According to Ontario Power Generation (OPG), the plan is to construct and operate a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for the long-term management of low to intermediate level nuclear waste. Assuming the public review process, expected to wrap-up by spring 2013, doesn’t cause much disruption to the completion of the project and the government approves the DGR’s legitimacy, the license to construct and build will be issued sometime in 2014. “It defies common sense to bury nuclear waste approximately 400 meters from the Great Lakes… Also, a DGR in limestone is unprecedented and unproven,” said Fernandez. “There has been a nuclear

waste dump for low to intermediate level waste in Germany… That DGR is leaking and it is an unmitigated disaster.” The burying of low to intermediate level nuclear waste has been tried before. The ASSE II mine in the mountain range of Asse in district Wolfenbüttel in Lower Saxony, Germany, had nuclear waste put in it from 1967 to 1978. The stability, or rather lack thereof, of such operations has come into question by media and politicians alike in Germany. There are reports that the infrastructure of the cavernous mountain is failing and brine contaminated with radioactive  caesium-137,  plutonium, and strontium has been found. This has led to the German government, along with the Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz (the federal office for radiation protection), declaring a closing of the mine. One of Fernandez’s primary concerns, stemming directly from the issues in Lower Saxony, was the lack of guarantee that a project of this magnitude, with materials this dangerous, can provide to the citizens of North America. Essentially, the 53,000 containers of waste will need to have a guarantee of 100,000 years while being buried 680 meters underground for this project to be safe. Concerned citizens are saying a 100,000-year promise on the storage of nuclear waste just isn’t possible. There is also a call amongst the concerned parties for more transparency and public knowledge on the possible effects a project this large can have if the unexpected happens. It is this notion that led to the privately funded Stop the Great Lakes Nuclear Dump into buying ad space on a billboard on the Gardiner Expressway in Toronto. Those concerned believe that it stands to reason that in a sound functioning democracy the citizenry, namely the 40 million that require this water supply for fresh drinking water, deserve to know the pros and cons to such a longterm project. “If we were to take that [German] situation, and place it beside our Great Lakes, what would the result be?” asked Fernandez. “I suppose it’d be an ecological disaster,” The Ontarion responded. “Exactly,” Fernandez replied.

Samantha Dewaele

Significant protesting has begun in response to plans for nuclear dumping in Ontario.


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

news

Learning the history of alcohol Department of History puts on presentation from renowned alcohol connoisseur Andrew Donovan We all drink it, we all love it, and we all loathe it, though the last sentiment generally comes the following morning. It is the great equalizer, the champion of sociability, and the number one sponsor for Tylenol. It is alcohol, the most widely discussed beverage across campus and perhaps across the world. So, when enthusiasts learned that the Department of History was putting on a presentation about the history of alcohol, it seemed only logical to attend in order to become better versed on the nightly drink of choice. Well-renowned writer, professor and alcohol connoisseur, Dr. Rod Phillips, spoke in MacKinnon on Jan. 28 about the history of alcohol in Western culture since the 16th century, and even managed

to draw a correlation between alcohol and the start of the French Revolution, which was rather unexpected. “Though alcohol was likely invented in China or somewhere in the Middle East, it was really Europe that made it the beverage of mass consumption as we know it today,” said Phillips. But the reason for it becoming so massively popular in Europe was perhaps the most interesting part of the lecture. According to Phillips, the water supplies in major metropolitan areas were often highly contaminated from human pollution of organic and industrial nature. This meant that the consumption of water was extremely low compared to what we’re accustomed to nowadays. In fact, Phillips noted that many of the best minds of the day, like politicians and doctors, wrote extensively on the threat that water posed to the human body. A theory coming out of England proposed that because the English lived in such a cold, damp climate, it was counterintuitive to give a

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sick person water because water was also damp and cold. However, if one lived in Libya, for example, and they were sick, they would need water to counter the dry and hot climate.

“Though alcohol was likely invented in China or somewhere in the Middle East, it was really Europe that made it the beverage of mass consumption as we know it today.” – Rod Phillips What seemed like silliness, and entirely opposite of what we perceive to be sound medical advice today, was in fact the very true history of why alcohol was consumed in such mass quantities in Europe, with places in France recommending up to two litres of the drink per day, as alcohol was the alternative choice of beverage to water.

Natasha Reddy

Dr. Rod Phillips described the evolution of alcohol use in the West to an eager audience. In another valiant effort to play myth busters on the topic of alcohol, Phillips was adamant that through his research, he found that the older you get, the more you drink. “Teen binge drinking isn’t anything more than moral panic […] They did a study in Italy that asked how many have had a least one drink in the past week. Ninety-three per cent of

adults responded saying they had had a drink in the past week versus just 17 per cent of young adults.” Phillips was comprehensive in his report to the group, and many audience members left with a rather new appreciation for a beverage that many don’t give much thought to, outside its price and reputation in various rap videos and country songs.


8 w w w.th e on ta r ion . c om Because you can do so much Do So Much weekend a big hit with students and community Kelsey Coughlin A day filled with innovation, collaboration and action is what students and community members were promised Jan. 26 with Student Volunteer Connections’ Do So Much Weekend. The eighth annual Do So Much weekend was a free one-day conference that promoted innovative and collaborative action with the focus of creating positive change in the Guelph community. Student Volunteer Connections, the student-funded and studentoperated organization, organized the event with three ideas in mind: building skills, passions, and community. Delegates consisted of any individuals that value their community and wish to enhance their leadership capabilities. Participants were guided throughout the day by a number of guest speakers who have been successful in creating positive change in their communities. Among these speakers were Dave Meslin, Heather Jarvis, and Brigette DePape. Meslin is an activist and journalist focused on public space, voting reform and increasing empathy across the globe. Jarvis is a feminist activist who bravely co-founded SlutWalk in early 2011, a small idea

that quickly grew to be a national The event also featured a number phenomenon. Lastly, DePape, an of inspirational and collaborative activist and writer fighting for en- workshops open to all participants. vironment change, made headlines Among the highlights included in the recent months by staging a “Do So Much With So Little” and peaceful protest in Parliament by “When Bodies Speak Out.” The latholding up a “Stop Harper” sign. ter informed students that the art These are just three of the inspi- of dance and choreography could rational speakers that visited the be tools used to promote commuuniversity on Jan. 26. nity engagement and worldwide peace. As student delegates had the opportunity to work one-on-one with other students, they realized that they are not the only shameless idealists walking around campus. “It is so inspiring to be around positive people who want to bring about change. It is quite possible that I have never been more inspired and happy for being myself,” explained one student. The day was not just a hit for students, but also for the volunteers. “Being around individuals and communities of compassion and activism saves my emotional wellbeing regularly,” said Jarvis. All students and members of the community left the conference with the knowledge that they had the potential to create meaningful and positive change in society. By All of these speakers had one creating a stronger community of thing in common: they strive to create social change in not just youth today, the youth of tomortheir communities, but all over row have no choice but to follow the world. It is this type of think- their lead. ing that the creators of the Do So Much weekend tried to instill in for web-exclusive photo Reel the participants.

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“Being around individuals and communities of compassion and activism saves my emotional well-being regularly.” – Heather Jarvis

Wendy Shepherd

Brigette DePape of the “Stop Harper” sign addressed students during the event.

Hungry for change Skip-A-Meal campaign looking to help local organizations Olivia Zollino It has been reported that one out of every five people experience food insecurity in Guelph, or in other words, a lack of access to nutritious food. However, the CSA’s Meal Exchange is helping to change this statistic with their campaign, “Skip-A-Meal.” Aimed at first-year students with meal card plans, “SkipA-Meal” is looking for students to miss one meal and donate the money instead. Namrata Tilokani, a third-year International Development student at the University of Guelph, and the volunteer and donations coordinator for Meal Exchange explained, “Every ten dollars donated goes towards four meals.” That equates to a meager $2.50 each meal. The non-profit organization buys food wholesale, and distributes the food directly to local agencies. Guelph Food Bank and

Guelph-Wellington Women in first-years can partake in. Upper Crisis are among the 19 organi- year students and others who zations that benefits from Meal choose to donate can do so in Exchange. various major buildings across “One hundred per cent of the campus such as the Bullring, donations stay in Guelph,” said University Centre, Creelman, Tilokani. The group’s goal is to and on Feb. 1, the MacKinnon alleviate food insecurity locally. lobby. “Students come to Guelph from Last fall, “Skip-A-Meal” garacross Canada. It’s a city that’s nered over $14,820. This year, built around a university, so the organization hopes to surstudents might be unaware that pass this total. For every $2,000 other university students and donated, 1,000 pounds of food is Guelph residents deal with food distributed. In addition to donatinsecurity,” explained Tilokani. ing, students can volunteer their Originating from a student time, which is just as valuable. This is just one of four events at Wilfred Laurier University in 1993 who decided to donate his hosted by Meal Exchange that meal card points at the end of is aimed towards alleviating the year rather than waste them, food insecurity over the school Skip-A-Meal has grown to be- year. In addition to Skip-Acome a national campaign to end Meal, there is Hunger Awareness local food insecurity. Week in March, Clear the Shelves Running from Jan. 28 to Feb. in April, and Trick-or-Eat in 1, the “Skip-A-Meal” campaign October. will be hosting various infor“We really want to raise awaremational booths, activities, and ness,” said Tilokani. have volunteers in first year There are multiple ways to get classes to speak. Volunteers will involved. Besides fundraising, then go to local organizations to Meal Exchange hopes to educate seek donations on Feb. 2. others in food scarcity locally, However, “Skip-A-Meal” as well as across the globe. Volis not just an initiative that unteers can come to the CSA

Sylvia Nayoung Han

The campaign hopes to gain awareness, and donations, for organizations in Guelph. boardroom at 5:30 p.m. every Tuesday to discuss various topics related to food insecurity. “It’s creating an open dialogue and a safe space to talk about food scarcity – what really

matters,” explained Tilokani. “A lot of people who first come, [they] do not know how food insecurity affects everyone,” said Tilokani, adding, “It’s so great to see that passion in them.”


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

arts & Culture

Harking back to rock ‘n’ roll’s heyday Alanna Gurr headlines with Ptarmigan, Lonnie in the Garden Adrien Potvin The Jan. 23 concert at eBar seemed to take one back to the heyday of rock n’ roll. A sea of bearded and longhaired heads bobbed around to the sounds of R&B, psychedelia and classic rock before the night’s first band hit the stage. For a few moments it was as if the British Invasion, San Francisco in 1967, and Motown Detroit centralized their energies into the room. After following sound check protocol and general banter, the show began with London’s Lonnie in the Garden. Utilizing a style similar to JefferLeigh Lichtenberg son Airplane (in the best possible way), Lonnie in the Garden cre- Alanna Gurr, Ptarmigan, and Lonnie in the Garden brought a pleasing blend of vintage-toned rock and ated thunderous and adventurous folk to eBar’s stage on Jan. 23. sounds for the attentive audience. Frontwoman Lynne Craven opened the stylistic roadmap, with shades timbre and decibels that many ’60s swept the crowd into a distinctly the set with a haunting vocal pro- of prog and noise rock and shoe- bands didn’t evolve to. “visual” folk music experience. With gression sung through a loop pedal, gaze often covered within one song, Ptarmigan, the second band of lyrics that form imageries of sailin a sort of Pink Floyd-esque atmo- but overall create a unique and very the evening also celebrated the ors and workers and maidens, and spheric opening that progressed heavy brand of psychedelic music. recent release of their CD, Eliak banjos, mandolins and accordions into heavier grooves and even The band’s music seems to act as a and the Dream. The Guelph/Pe- that chug away like the railroads of heavier hollers and soaring falset- sort of appendage to the psyche- terborough alt-folk group led by the Western expansion, the band tos by Craven. The band is all over delic age – charting territories in singer-songwriter Peter McMurtry as a whole demonstrates an acute

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ear for musical storytelling and knows precisely how to perform it live. Their stage presence is cool but never cocky, the lyrics are literate but rarely alienating, and the music is densely layered and complex, but never self-serving. The night’s headliner and final performer, Guelph singer-songwriter Alanna Gurr, struck a warm and inviting balance between Lonnie in the Garden’s freak-out experimentation and Ptarmigan’s literate folk musings. More “traditionally” folk and rock than the bands prior, Gurr’s band utilizes the beautiful sounding pedal steel guitar and soft, minimalist bass and drum work to accompany her bittersweet voice. Although songs of heartache can sometimes seem meandering and contrived, Gurr’s songs contain a warmth and honesty that is difficult to achieve – made all the more visceral by the atmospheric sensibilities of her supporting band. The three bands of the evening were most obviously “audience bands”; there was rarely a shade of self-indulgent musicianship or alienation by the performers. The music was overall eclectic, distinctly Canadian, and just plain fun to listen to.

Providing a voice musically and politically James Gordon releases new album

even producing a musical which showed the negative effects of big box stores. The musician feared that Wal-Mart would Kimberly Snider cause the smaller, local stores to lose business as they could James Gordon is set apart from not compete. Gordon stated that most local artists – this natu- the stories which continue to ral leader uses his artistic skills inspire him are the ones that tell to also provide a voice as the a tale of people disconnecting NDP candidate. In fact, the from their community. folk singer has even been given Obviously, the passion that the opportunity to play music Gordon reveals through music is with the late Jack Layton. Even the passion needed to be the NDP though Gordon has seen suc- candidate. Gordon is involved in cesses in his musical career, the a number of community initiaartist fears losing voters because tives; love for the community of a “hippie, folk-singer reputa- is shown through activism in tion,” but Gordon’s musical gig mental illness campaigns, the and political career relate more Wellington Water Watchers, the than one may think. Guelph Arts Platform, and many Gordon’s new album, Coy- more community groups. ote’s Calling, proves just that. Although Gordon is a political After thirty years of writing leader and a successful Canadian music, Gordon still uses his musician, he still has a grassroots music as a way to encourage mindset. Whether in politics social justice, environment- or in music, Gordon sees himal integrity, and to promote self as a citizen promoting local heritage. needs. Coyote’s Calling exempli“I listen to people’s stories, fies this, especially through the and try to provide a voice in the song “We’re the Ninety Nine”; best way that I can,” Gordon this song fights for equal pay and said explaining his inspiration. questions the wealth of the one Gordon’s spark of activism per cent. began about 15 years ago – as Compared to Gordon’s preGuelph welcomed Wal-Mart vious music, Coyote’s Calling into the community. Gordon may seem more cynical. Howspent time writing songs and ever, the darker sound provides

the sense of urgency that our time faces. Gordon explained that the new sound is, “going into a new direction, that I’m quite comfortable with.” Overall, the songs showcased on the album cover a broad range of subjects, accompanied by great talent. Gordon included songs that all generations can relate to, including lyrics about love, global issues, the environment, and mental illness. One of the most impressive songs would have to be “Got to Get Off the Oil.” Not only is it informing his audiences about the oil crises, Gordon is also identifying with the community, as he admits to be over-using oil. The headlining song, Coyote’s Calling showcases Gordon’s musical talents and illustrates the new sound he was aiming for. The slower song can be interpreted as one of his more sad numbers, however it is still beautifully written. Unfortunately because of his political involvement, Gordon will not be able to tour with this album as much as the record label would like him to. However, by focusing on his political goals, Gordon hopes to continue to empower people through speeches instead of music.

Fred Hunsberger

Acclaimed local folk singer James Gordon’s foray into politics is apparent in the artist’s most recent album, Coyote’s Calling.


10 w w w.th e on ta r ion . c om From A to Zavitz Fabrication explores use of materials Sarah Cordeaux Stephanie Rogers and Kate Johansen’s exhibition the week of Jan. 21 at Zavitz gallery included unconventional paintings, sculpture, etchings, crocheted work and weavings. Fabrication explored themes of the domestic home and the accessible space by displaying textiles reminiscent of familiar objects. The creative deceit enabled the artists to incorporate substitutes with materials, thus giving the viewer an appreciation of familiar objects in a whole new manner. The embroidery hoop piece is a perfect demonstration of this; it is only upon close inspection that one realizes that the delicate thread marks are in fact paint creations. It is this subtle change that continues to be the strong theme throughout the show and instills a sense of curiosity and at times bewilderment within the viewer. Rogers, who took a weaving class during a semester at NSCAD (Nova Scotia College of Art and Design), was greatly influenced by craft-based

courses and was left questioning where craft works fit into contemporary high art. Rogers created the long woven piece coming off the wall on her semester abroad. With close inspection of this piece one notices the garbage woven into it and this unusual merge contradicts the feelings that one would normally have for such a humble and comforting object.  Fascination with weaving led Rogers to bring it into a painting class, where the artist wove two large-scale paintings. In the first, one might say Rogers simply wove the scrap fabric, whereas in the second the artist is more considerate of the paint splashes on the rags, as though it was created with formal and aesthetic tastes in mind. Instead of using other materials in place of paint, Johansen kept the brush in hand when creating three large paintings, giving the viewer a close up of various textiles. Each had two planes to move between, one of the fabric, and another with a magnification of a section of the pattern. This caused an interruption in the seamless viewing of patterns, and forced the viewer to take the time and view the detail with more consideration. An elaborate installation by

Johansen included 184 etchings. When concerned with patterns and textiles, Johansen came upon the idea of creating tiles. Following a long history of making tiles, they are made individually and each has little differences between them. As a result Johansen created prints that mimicked tiles, and for some they were tiles first, print multiples second. This again served as a remarkable example of the interchange of materials used throughout this show. The work that caused a great stir among the viewers at the reception was a table and chair set. In reality though there was no actual table or chairs in the set up but a manipulation of textiles and starch. By draping fabric and lace over a table and chairs the starch enabled them to take their form and stand as independent sculptures. This process resulted in what one regards as accessible objects becoming inaccessible. Their function was not only removed but a tension was created in a structure of strength and solidity being rendered to a creation of fragility and delicacy in its design, thus contradicting the viewers’ perception of these commonly used objects. Rogers and Johansen’s tactile and

arts & Culture

Nadine Maher

Using a variety of media, Stephanie Rogers and Kate Johansen explored the use of sometimes-unconventional materials at the Zavitz gallery the week of Jan. 21. colourful exhibit at times literally pulled the wool over your eyes and caused the viewer to do some doubletakes, but this manipulation of senses

at the same time left one with a strange sense of comfort with what we find familiar in our daily lives having been portrayed.

Records, they’re already being set for an official EP release March 12 and a tour across Canada alongside Yukon Blonde and Zeus this April. I’m “running out of pipe dreams,” said drummer Rob Canali jokingly. This might be especially true after receiving the thumbs up from chef/

music enthusiast Guy Fieri at a show in support of label-mates Great Bloomers – an exceptionally suiting kudos considering Davis dressed as Fieri for Halloween this year. To help ring in the good news, Grounders took the stage at Van ...se e g rou nde rs pag e 11

Grounders play Van Gogh’s Ear Andrew Bonter Whenever discussing the band Grounders, somewhere along the line, Grizzly Bear seems to come up in the conversation. It makes sense, as most would agree that each in their own right are able to play with a kind

of fine-tuned jangle that seems both effortless and meticulously planned. Make no mistake though, Grounders is more mutation than genetic copy, which is largely accredited to the work of Andrew Davis in composition and vocal style. With a taste for classical music, and an ear for sun-soaked

rock and roll, Grounders is baroque for the bar. Hopefully, it’s a comforting comparison for a group that had such small expectations and full potential, and has suddenly been handed everything they’ve had coming for the past few years. Just recently signed to Nevado


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

arts & Culture

Book Review: The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling Talented writing, but no boy wizard

stands to benefit most from Fairbrother’s death? And amidst all the scheming, underhanded intentions, and secrets concealed within the Samantha Dewaele very framework of Pagford, will anyone take over his coveted spot It’s a pretty hard novel to miss – on the council? even without its bold red and yellow The town of Pagford seems alcover popping with eye catching most a living entity, as it infects all graphics, The Casual Vacancy holds its residents with an uneasiness, an a deliberate spot at the front counter unhappiness, and an inability to imof any major bookstore you might prove their lives. But who are we, walk past. Of course, this is a logical as readers, to pity more: Krystal step for any bookstore who remem- Weedon, the troubled young bully bers that author J.K. Rowling has whose only hope out of a dismal life been receiving royalties for the best- was through Fairbrother’s guidselling Harry Potter series since it ance; Kay, a single mother whose began over 10 years ago. The real uprooting move to Pagford is not question here is whether or not ‘The at all appreciated by her new boyCasual Vacancy’ holds the same sto- friend; or Andrew, a vengeful son ry-telling power as the last venture. whose abusive father is receiving As readers were warned by stolen goods? There are too many Rowling’s publicists, this is not a characters to name in this novel, children’s novel. The language is and each new section takes on a graphic and the scenes are dark and new perspective. often violent. It seems that almost The characters seem to be delibevery other word in the dialogue be- erately unlikeable – the teenagers gins with an “f.” Characters’ voices, are acne-scarred and emotionspeaking in English slang, are inter- al wrecks, and the adults carry rupted by legal terms and definitions with them a sense of despair and that separate the sections. unhappiness. This lends well for Set in the unassuming town of sympathy, but they seem to have Pagford, the novel begins with the little or no redeeming characterunexpected death of Councillor istics that would incline the reader Barry Fairbrother. Fairbrother’s to root for them. Whether I feel the death not only deprives Pagford of absence of a central protagonist (or one of its most personable residents, certain boy-wizard) is hard to say, but also opens up a very influen- but without one character drawing tial spot on the Parish Council. The the plot along and providing a fixed going gets more complicated, as perspective, at times the novel feels someone has been writing slander- a little scattered. ous messages through Fairbrother’s That being said, Rowling’s writing old account on the Pagford web- is as talented as ever. Rowling draws site. One is reminded that this is a up characters who emerge from the mystery novel at every turn – who page fully formed, and provides a

complex plot that the reader gradually connects, page by page. The emergence of Rowling’s new novel has garnered much attention, though I haven’t heard much

to benefit the contents of the book. Having a decidedly different audience, perhaps The Casual Vacancy has not yet created a reader foundation able to worship it on quite the

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same scale as Harry Potter – and I can’t see a bookstore clamouring with The Casual Vacancy fans, dressed in their best detective outfits, in the near future.

...groun ders con tin ued

Aside from all the excitement, whether it’s positive or negative Gogh’s Ear Jan. 25, starting things Grounders maintains a refreshing, feedback.” off with a brand new tune. Warming sobering outlook. Grounders hone a thinned-out the room up fairly early for later acts “We’ve been given a great oppor- mercury sound, picking notes Tyson & His Gameboy and Absolutely tunity,” said multi-instrumentalist that cause ripples in the ooze and Free, it was admittedly a luke-warm Daniel Busheikin. “A lot of stars shimmer on chrome – a choice reception to begin with. By the time have been aligning – everything we of imagery that might be a result the first song had finished however, do feels like it has a purpose. We’re in part from the chemical-like Grounders had audience members very flattered by the praise and at- artwork created by Canali and setting down their nachos, turning tention, but [we] also recognize it Busheikin for Grounders’ EP, Wreck their heads and rising from their seats can sometimes be easy to champi- of a Smile. It’s unnatural and fato finer grooves – their songs unfurl- on Canadian music. It’s important miliar all at once, and for whatever ing like rich tapestries that would to think hard about the music you Wreck of a Smile might be, with the come to banner a relatively psyche- support. Hopefully they’ll like us bright future in store for Grounders, delic evening. – we love to hear from listeners, they must be smiling now.

Bryan Waugh

Things have been looking up for Grounders, who will be releasing an EP in March before heading on tour with Yukon Blonde and Zeus.

Wayfarer gives Off the Floor Fest a kick start Jimmy Jazz hosts a raucous crowd Robyn Nicholson The bitterly cold evening of Jan. 24 saw the opening night of the fifth annual Off the Floor Fest. The weekend-long event aimed at showcasing local talent did not disappoint with its rowdy punk rock upstarts who treated the Jimmy Jazz to a brand of stomping and shouting action which was totally fitting of its setting. The night kicked off with Toronto natives Pkew Pkew Pkew (gun noises) – that’s right, a band with a subtitle. The band kept it upbeat and light with lyrical honesty that most bar-goers in attendance could surely relate to. This simple-is-best lyrical approach was readily apparent in choruses such as “friends don’t let friends move in with girlfriends,” (a song lovingly dedicated to “all the ladies in the bar”), and especially the set closer, which featured the line “we’re all good buddies

and we all brought beers / so we’re wailing vocals on the brink of control just gonna sit down and drink here.” and a crisp togetherness musically Sound plan indeed. The enthusiastic with the rest of the band as an ensemold-fashioned pop-punk the band ble which was entirely unexpected churned out, with more than enough considering the genre. The band’s appearance alone was opportunity and encouragement for ensemble hand clapping, kept the lar- enough to dispel genre stereotypes. ger-than-usual Jimmy Jazz crowd The drummer started the show in entertained and energized, ready for boxers alone (although to his credit, the bands to come next. the singer ended up shirtless by the end as well, thus it was perhaps only The evening rolled right along in the welcoming of TV Freaks, all an act of premonition), while the unthe way from Hamilton. The transi- assuming bassist started in a baggy tion between frontmen was a little winter coat, changing later to a wool rough, considering we went from un- cardigan a size or two too small. Lead assuming pop-punker to aggressive singer David O’Connor was the only pure-punker, whose opening ques- one who looked the part, with sleeve tion to the Guelph crowd was “you tattoos and a black t-shirt, while guys still got hippies?” to which the guitarist and co-founder T.J. Charlton rhetorical response was “fuck those started the show in a v-neck sweater fucking fuckers” – a nice way to over a dress-shirt. make friends in a new city. Despite Appearances aside, the set won over this overt aggression, which actually this reviewer, although witnessing the managed to increase as the set con- crowd dissipate slowly, it may have tinued, it started to develop a kind put off or even intimidated others. A of roguish charm. In fact, the band’s phrase came to mind while watching material created a sharp and poign- the set which might readily sum up ant contrast between straining and the appeal: “gloriously spazzy.”

O’Connor said, rather self-aware, The following, therefore, may be an that “I feel like we’re more abrasive unpopular opinion: while the set from and less good-looking than the other Wayfarer was earnest and energetic, bands.” the actual material felt generic and Despite the self-deprecation, TV unoriginal, and to be brutally honest, Freaks put on what would be, in this entirely forgettable. To put it perhaps reviewer’s opinion, the best set of the more practically, it was typical bar night, regardless of crowd apprecia- music – good music to get drunk to. tion or lack thereof. As the band left And get drunk they did, audience the stage, a couple shirts the lesser, and band included (a couple of parthe crowd began to gather again in ticularly familiar fans had the job of preparation for headliners Wayfarer. offering up trays of shots to the musiRight off the bat, the audience’s cians as they played mid-song). Song reception and previous knowledge by song, the crowd continued to sing of Wayfarer’s material was highly un- along with warmth and affection as expected and admirable for a local drinks flowed. band (hailing from just up the road An encore was demanded but lead in Kitchener). Something must be singer Kyle Krische admitted, “we said for a band who can inspire that don’t know a single song more and kind of loyalty and love, especially that’s the honest truth.” Thus ended the first of four shows in such a small area. This popularity may be attributed to the band’s record encased in the Off the Floor Fest: a Our Fathers having had pretty regu- fun and festive beginning to a weeklar play recently on campus station end which promised to be full of CFRU. Whatever the case, it seemed fantastic (and some perhaps not so that a majority of the large enthusi- fantastic) local music, keeping downastic crowd were there for Wayfarer town Guelph’s illustrious live concert alone. scene alive and kicking.


arts & Culture 12 w w w.th e on ta r ion . c om Pop Machine: Raising the Flag – again (twice) Iconic hardcore-punk group reforming as two separate outfits for reunions, new material Tom Beedham A steady, concrete ontology was never anything Black Flag founder and guitarist Greg Ginn was concerned with. The forever-mutating sound and roster of the until recently longdisbanded iconic Los Angeles hardcore-punk outfit has intrigued, divided, turned away, and even brought about the self-alienation of its listener/ fan-base. In defense of the latter claim, consider the conflict an avid devotee to the group’s cofounder and 1976-’79 frontman Keith Morris would face when weighing their options coming across any Black Flag pressing at a record shop, especially given the knowledge that he has been denied royalties for the work he did in the group since departing it to eventually form the Circle Jerks. Of course, the psychic comfort of any Black Flag fan preferring any member over Ginn would be immediately complicated by the knowledge that, as Henry Rollins imparted (in a 2011 interview with Nardwuar) that Ginn, “has never paid any member of Black Flag a royalty, or given any member of Black Flag even a royalty statement,” but I digress. The point that needs to be understood is that perhaps the only constants in Black Flag’s

tom beedham

Two new concert-bound versions of Black Flag’s lineup are reiterating the band’s historic refusal to obey convention and craft its own image. history were (1) Greg Ginn’s involvement, and (2) its flux; to say that one is a Black Flag fan is a complicated issue. Reenacting (or amplifying) that anxiety-stirring reality, it was recently announced that Black Flag alumni Keith Morris, Chuck Dukowski, Bill Stevenson, alongside Descendents guitarist Steve Egerton would tour material “from all eras of Black Flag’s history” across the United States this year as well

as play Belgium Groezrock Festival and Germany’s Monster Bash. Perhaps massaging (or exhausting) the recently further complicated position of Black Flag fandom, on Jan. 25, metal blog Invisibile Oranges announced Ginn would perform alongside Black Flag alumnus Ron Reyes, an unknown bassist that has so far only been identified as Dale Nixon (the pseudonym Ginn cited

for the low-end on My War), and Gregory Moore – who performed with Ginn in what began as the Black Flag side project Gone. Not only that, but Ginn’s independent ham radio equipment–cum-record label SST (Solid State Transmitters) Records announced the new formation was “putting finishing touches” on a new alum and that they would soon be committing the material to wax. So far without any word

out on legal battles between the two near-simultaneously announced bands, what the harmonized new iterations are effectually doing is shrugging the conventions and expectations of what a reunion – and a band– can be. It’s just another case of Black Flag restating the message of its logo: Black Flag is anarchy. This band cannot be trusted. But you can get excited about that – as complicated as that might be.

mi notau r s

Minotaurs graced the UC courtyard at noon on Jan. 25, before celebrating their album release at Ed Video that night. for web-exclusive

photo

vanessa tignanelli

Reel


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

arts & Culture

What the Tech? Is my job on the line? Nick Revington In terms of my job as Arts and Culture Editor at The Ontarion, the answer to the above is most certainly yes. But don’t worry, that’s not news – I’m on an eight-month contract, so I knew it was coming. And in terms of the newspaper industry more broadly, the Internet has led to a widespread decline of print media – but this has been a long-term trend, and surely we’ll always need writers to post news on the web and write novels and stuff, right? Somewhat disconcertingly, the answer might actually be no. It has been reported that a marketing professor at INSEAD Business School, Philip M. Parker, has developed software that can produce a technical manual in about 20 minutes. For reference,

we’re talking about writing an en- even some of our actual stories. tire non-fiction book in less than Other software has gone even the span of time taken writing this farther. Russian publisher Astrelshort 400 word article. Canadian SPb released a 320-page novel in Business reported that Parker 2008 written by a computer in only has used the program to publish 72 hours. The book, True Love, is over 100,000 books, and another based on 17 other literary works 700,000 under the banner of the fed into a database, including Leo company Icon Group International. Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. Similarly, The program basically follows a Parker also hopes to move beyond formula to gather information from technical manuals to produce roa database, and then compile it in mance novels. a way that avoids plagiarism. PerThese computer-generated haps surprisingly, the end result is novels may be legible and even adequately coherent and informa- compelling, yet Astrel-SPb’s tive. Creative it is not, but that’s not chief editor admits that softan issue for this type of literature. ware – at least for now – is by no Similar techniques can be ap- means as good at writing fiction plied to generate simple formulaic as a real author such as Hemingreports, such as Forbes magazine’s way or Shakespeare. But that may “Narrative Science,” an AI-gen- not matter: books like Dan Brown’s erated blog that offers investing Da Vinci Code, E.L. James’s Fifty insights. If The Ontarion had the Shades of Grey, or Stephanie budget, we could do the same thing Meyer’s Twilight saga have been for This Week in History and our immensely popular despite being community listings – and perhaps panned by literary critics.

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Mirko Tobias Schaefer

Robots making books is one thing, robots writing them is quite another – and may represent a grim reality for journalists and authors.

Star Trek director at the helm of the new Star Wars J.J. Abrams takes over franchise

Toy Story 3. Obviously, the producers hope he’ll bring back some heart to the beloved franchise after the poorly-received prequel trilogy. Jordan Sloggett The announcement follows Disney’s purchase of Lucasfilm and Two of the world’s most iconic sci-fi everything Star Wars related in Ocfranchises are now under the con- tober of last year. Shortly after the trol of J.J. Abrams after the official purchase, Disney announced they announcement by Disney on Jan. 25 were moving forward with the prothat Abrams would direct a new Star duction of a new sequel trilogy of Star Wars film. Abrams is best known Wars films, to be released in 2015. for creating the enigma that was the George Lucas, who announced his show Lost, as well as directing and retirement from large-scale movie producing Super 8 and the 2008 Star making last month, commented on the announcement. Trek reboot. “I’ve consistently been impressed Academy Award winning Michael Arndt was already announced as with [Abrams] as a filmmaker and screenwriter. Arndt wrote the 2006 storyteller. He’s an ideal choice to hit Little Miss Sunshine, as well as direct the new Star Wars film and

the legacy couldn’t be in better with this remarkable group of people, hands,” said Lucas. is an absolute honour,” Abrams Exactly what legacy Star Wars has said. “I may be even more grateful left is up for debate. It may have pi- to George Lucas now than I was as oneered the blockbuster, and has a kid.” certainly left its impact on the inThere is no doubt that Disney dustry, but it’s not 1977 anymore, hopes Abrams’s energetic style will and films have changed. What was bring new life to the franchise, just new and exciting for audiences three as it did with the well received Star decades ago has become pretty stan- Trek reboot, and lightsabers will definitely give Abrams ample opdard box office fare. For Abrams this means an oppor- portunities to use (or overuse) his tunity to fulfill a childhood dream. signature lens-flare. “To be part of the next chapter of Dennis Muren, Oscar-winning the Star Wars saga, to collaborate special effects artist and Star Wars

veteran said of Abrams, “He puts everything he has into his work. He totally immerses himself. He’s got such a visual eye, which is so important to the Star Wars films. It seems that a lot of the same things that were in George when he first made the Star Wars films are also in [Abrams]. I think he’s going to fit into the movies perfectly, with the energy [Abrams] has. We’re kick-starting Star Wars again with dynamite. It will knock people out, including the people who get to work on it. I think it’s a great choice.”

ms ac

vanessa tignanelli

courtesy

Can J.J. Abrams successfully juggle both Star Trek and Star Wars franchises?

Serbian artist Vessna Perunovich presents her latest works at the Macdonald Stewart Art Centre in Line Rituals & Radical Knitting. Using a variety of mediums, she discusses the subject of boundaries, personal intimacy, and societal constructs. Her repetitive processes help to convey communication and separation, merging hope and despair, irony and beauty, the private and the public. The exhibition runs until March 31.


What’s the dea U of G President Alastair Summerlee responds to student concerns about tuition Tom Beedham On Jan. 30, University of Guelph students, faculty, and staff gathered in the University Centre courtyard to rally in support of the Freeze the Fees campaign. Steered by the Guelph Student Mobilization Committee (GSMC), the freshly launched campaign aims to call on the U of G’s Board of Governors to hear students’ cries for lower tuition and put an end to its recent inclinations. According to the campaign, the board has voted in favour of increasing tuition fees across programs by around four or five per cent annually since 2007. As an alternative, the GSMC is proposing that the administration freeze tuition fees at the rate of inflation – something it says will put “real pressure” on the provincial and federal governments to address the needs of the university. “It’s about mobilizing students on campus behind this demand and making sure that the

university knows that we’re calling on them to implement this freeze in April,” Roísín Lyder – an organizer with the GSMC – told The Ontarion in an interview prior to the rally. It’s not the first time the GSMC has had the Board of Governors in its sights, and the group feels that that’s because the school’s administration needs to be woken up. But when asked about some of the GSMC’s Freeze the Fees campaign literature, U of G President Alastair Summerlee lacked confidence in the group’s claims. The president said freezing tuition at the rate of inflation would “absolutely not” put pressure on the government, citing previous years of experience struggling with funding. “In a number of years we have not gone to the full amount that we could do at the University of Guelph for tuition increases. And immediately the response from government has been, ‘So, why are you asking us for money?’” Summerlee related. “[I]n the current economic climate, when most ministries have been substantially cut and postsecondary education has not been cut and hasn’t been increased, inflation is an issue, but it would not be an argument the government would even blink over, and they’ll go the other way.”

To Summerlee’s skepticism, Lyder responded that the president was accessing a “favourite scapegoat” used by the administration in the past to escape the situation of having to tackle the problem of Ontario’s underfunded education sector, saying the administration is “not serious” in its approach to the issue. “We disagree with what Alastair Summerlee is saying,” said Lyder. “We think if the university is not making it clear that they’re working hard on securing adequate public funding for the education sector, then they don’t really have a leg to stand on.” The GSMC has also been critical of the structure of the university’s board. “There’s 24 seats on the Board of Governors, and only eight of those seats are reserved for students or faculty, or workers at the University of Guelph. The other 16 go to administrators or people appointed by the board, and those are usually bigwigs from the private sector in Ontario. It’s just not people who have the interests of students at the core of their beliefs,” Lyder said. In its entirety, the board consists of President Summerlee as vice-chancellor, David Mirvish of Mirvish Productions as chancellor,

Dick Freeborough as chair, vice chairs Virginia McLaughlin of Helmhorst Investments Limited and Katharine Stevenson of Stevenson Advisory, and 19 other board members; government-appointed Lieutenant Governor Order-in-Councils Dr. Mary Anne Chambers (retired Senior Vice-President of Scotiabank) and Paricia Walker (president of THE Consulting); U of G faculty members Dr. John Kissick (School of Fine Art and Music), librarian Michael Ridley, and Chris Whitfield (Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology); U of G staff member Effie Gatsinos (assistant registrar at student recruitment in U of G Admission Services); board appointed members Graham Badun (CEO of Brookfield Residential Property Services), Shauneen Bruder (EVP of Operations and Canadian Banking at RBC Royal Bank), Nancy Croitoru (president and CEO of Food and Consumer Products of Canada), Earl Ellis (assistant treasurer at Campbell Soup Company), Kevin Golding (president of Rothsay – a member of Maple Leaf Foods Inc.), staff member Richard Jordan (manager of the U of G Arboretum), Peter MacGowan (partner of Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLO), and Wendy Millar (EVP and Chief Risk Officer for the Personal and Commercial Bank


al with Tuition? at BMO Financial); as well as students Jason Carere, Sarah O’Carroll, and Sofia Oke; and awaiting approval by the provincial government, Andrew Marsh (president and chief executive officer of Richardson GMP Limited) and Neil Parkinson (a fellow of the Chartered Accountants of Ontario and National Insurance Sector Leader of KPMG LLP). Seven of the 24 board members are listed as U of G alumni. Three are current students. “I think the reason the seats exist in the first place is honourable. It’s community seats in a university. So it’s the idea that we are a public institution and the community needs to be a part of our decision-making,” fellow GSMC organizer Denise Martins said in following up Lyder’s claim. “But what we instead see is corporate heads on the seats representing the community.” Acknowledging the GSMC’s critique of the board’s structure as “an interesting perspective,” Summerlee went on to address the claim. “[T]hese people are volunteers. They get no remuneration, and part of being a board member is that you agree to take on the responsibility within the definitions that are set up for board members, which are that your

allegiance is solely to the institution,” said Summerlee. “The external members – really the whole board – are representing taxpayers of Ontario. I mean, that’s the point of the board. And that includes the internal members. So the internal members (students, faculty, and staff) are not there to represent the students, but are there to represent the taxpayer from the perspective of the views of the internal community.” The Jan. 30 assembly featured speeches from U of G undergraduate Board of Governors representative Sarah O’Carrol, Central Student Association (CSA) External Affairs Commissioner Dominica McPherson, as well as fellow GSMC members Drew Garvie, Denise Martins, and Peter Miller, although Garvie (who is also the CSA’s communications and corporate affairs commissioner) spoke on behalf of the CSA, while Martins spoke on behalf of CUPE 3913. U of G Associate Vice-President (Student Affairs) Brenda Whiteside also spoke during an open mic held after scheduled speakers took the stage, to which Lyder responded. Words from Ashley Lowenthal about the U of G’s cancelled Women’s Studies program and support from U of G Sociology and Anthropology Professor Terisa Turner were also received.

The specific event was partially organized to address the level of attention the student body has received from administration with regards to its demands for lower tuition. But Summerlee is standing his ground. “Occasionally somebody comes to a “Rumour Mill” and says something; occasionally there are events in the [University Centre] courtyard, but there are events in the courtyard anyway,” said Summerlee. The president expects more engagement. “This is my tenth year. There would be two years in which I’ve had an approach from the students to come and say, ‘Can we come? Can you set things up? Can we go together? Can we do something?’ And we’ve gone and done things. And I actually feel it’s a joint responsibility. And offered the opportunity – I mean there are many things I have to do, and chasing around after the people that I think ought to be saying something, I don’t think is my role.” Martins called this response “insulting,” pointing out that Dominica McPherson wrote a joint letter with Summerlee to the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities regarding a multitude of issues, including a suggestion that one of the things the province could do to help the education sector would be to insure

proper public funding. By the time of The Ontarion’s Jan. 29 interview with the GSMC, a Freeze the Fees petition had received 1500 signatures. As to whether or not raising tuition will be something on the administration’s agenda in April, Summerlee couldn’t say. “We have no idea whether we are even going to be allowed to increase tuition because of what’s going on,” Summerlee said, alluding to the shuffling of the Liberal Party and its effect on provincial decision-making. “But the government hasn’t indicated yet whether it will or will not increase tuition.” In the meantime, U of G administration is reminding students that the deadline to apply for the 30 per cent off tuition grant for the 2012-13 school year is on March 1 of this year, while students enrolled in a one-term program in the spring or summer will still be able to apply within the first 30 days of their study period. For a complete audio interview with Alastair Summerlee, visit this article at theontarion.com for web-exclusive

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Photos by Vanessa Tignanelli


16 w w w.t h e on ta r ion . c om A bunch of “Gumps” The on-campus table tennis club boasts small attendance, big aspirations Elias Tsafaridis Deep inside the core of the W.F. Mitchell Athletic Centre, behind all the squash courts, nooks, and yoga mat crannies hides the University of Guelph’s best-kept secret. Neatly stashed away in gym unit AC 173 and unfolded two or three times a week is the small yet passionate table tennis club. What is this mythical sport you may ask? “Table Tennis” is essentially the professional name for what the laymen may consider “ping-pong.” “When we hear the word ‘pingpong’ – it’s what people play in their basements or at parties. What we try to establish with table tennis is an element of professionalism,” club president Patrick Torrens says, which is indeed where the club fancies its intentions. Compared to most clubs at the University, it is relatively new in being only ten years young and the club leadership is passed down through rank of most attendance.

The group meets three times a week: Monday and Wednesday evenings, and once on Sunday afternoons where members play in tournaments and put on intramural competitions. The club operates on a relatively small level at the moment, with usually only ten to twelve members per meeting, which is an issue due to the amount of space provided for the club. The room that the club meets in is far below the regulation space standards for traditional games of table tennis. Without a bigger area to put the table, the lack of adequate space can really compromise the abilities of the player’s game. The issue of the constricting space comes from an issue of engagement. Due to the low turnout of members as semesters move into heavier areas of work, the growth and progression of the club has had its issues over the years when it comes to fluctuation of attendance. “We have always wanted to go Varsity and don’t lack the potential; it’s just a matter of attendance and getting the word out,” Torrens said, which would undoubtedly be to our University’s advantage. Considering that our neighboring peers at Laurier and Waterloo University both have Varsity clubs, it leaves Guelph in a position of endless promise for the future of this

sports & Health

Elias Tsafaridis

Members of Guelph’s Table Tennis club get into a heated rally in one of their weekly meetings in the W.F. Mitchell Centre. sport. The future aspiration of this tiny it has the benefit of being young, and club is to one day have a tournament over time members of the club see against our regional combatants, even the sport’s popularity growing into if it wouldn’t account for too many its own and potentially becoming a tallies in the win column. At this point part of our athletics association. in the club’s history, their goal is simFinally, the question on every table ply to gain exposure. tennis player or ping-pong enthu“Our biggest issue that the club has siast’s mind is, what does the name faced has always been people’s lack of “Forrest Gump” mean to the sport? knowledge,” Torrens said. However “We take that question as a joke usually,

but if someone refers to you as ‘Forrest Gump’ or ‘Gump-sized’ it usually means you’re really good,” said a laughing Torrens. And there you have it – with Forrest Gump as an industry term, the University of Guelph Table Tennis Club may fall short in attendance from time to time, but certainly makes up for it in character!

Gryphon figure skaters golden in Ancaster Gryphons are overall victors at McMaster Invitational Jeff Sehl It came down to the final event of the meet, but the Gryphons were able to hold on to their first place seeding, edging the Western Mustangs and University of Toronto Varsity Blues for the overall team gold medal at the McMaster Invitational which took place on Jan. 23 and 24. Although it was the team synchro event that solidified the Gryphon victory, it was strong individual performances by every team member that put the Gryphons in a position to come away with a medal. Guelph’s victory was fuelled by gold medals in the pairs fours, men’s free skate, and creative dance events, as well as several silver medal performances that gave the Gryphons the edge on a tight leaderboard on which the top three teams were separated by just three points entering the final event. For fourth year skater, Christina Kucava, it truly was a full team effort. “To be honest, every team member contributed and made a difference as we all work together, whether you’re skating or not,” Kucava said. After finishing second to U of T by 24 points at the Carleton Invitational

Sylvia Nayoung Han

in November, the Gryphons showed had done really well in and which a huge improvement at the Mc- contributed to the improvement of Master Invitational. According to our overall team score,” said Kucava, Kucava, the addition of some new who was involved in two gold medal events and added familiarity with performances for the Gryphons in their routines contributed to the Ancaster. “For some, this would have been the second time this improvement of their team score. “What was different at this com- season showcasing new programs petition from the first was the so we were more comfortable and addition of a few events which we knew what to expect. We had four

solid first place finishes which made a difference, and we will have more to add at OUAs.” After gold and silver performances this season, it would appear that the Gryphons are serious contenders for the OUA title with just over two weeks remaining before the OUA championships. However, Kucava still believes there is room

for improvement. The team will now focus on polishing their routines in order to maximize their team score in their season finale. “The next step for our team is to continue building off of what we have gained up until now,” said Kucava. “We need to focus on the final touches now. This last competition in Ancaster has really opened our eyes and showed us how much of contenders we really are this season. We are all very motivated to work even harder now and to win back our OUA title.” After a two month layoff between their first two events of the season, the Gryphons have relatively little time to prepare for their OUA Championship meet which will take place on Feb. 12 and 13 in Kingston, Ontario. With the OUA title on the line, competition should reach a climax in the coming weeks, and after such a strong performance in Ancaster, rival teams should be gunning for the Gryphons. But, according to Kucava, the Gryphons won’t be worried about any team other than their own in the lead up to their final performances of the season. “Our team is just going to focus on ourselves until then and put our best efforts out there, which can and will help us win,” said Kucava. “It’s just a matter of skating well at the right time.”


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

sports & Health

Men’s hockey goaltender Maxwell to join KHL Maxwell’s play for the Gryphons has earned him a “Kontinental” opportunity

Maxwell, who was a sixthround draft pick of the Colorado Avalanche in 2009, proved to be a huge addition to the Gryphons who currently sit in second place in the competitive OUA West division Jeff Sehl with a 15-7-2 record. In 14 games played for Guelph, Maxwell put up It’s been a crazy year in the world some ridiculous statistics, putting of hockey, and Brandon Maxwell, together a 10-3 record and leada first year student and goaltender ing the OUA in shutouts (3), goals for the Gryphons men’s hockey against average (1.92), and leading team, might know this better than the entire nation with a .935 save anyone. percentage. His strong play did not After beginning the season in go unnoticed. In the days followRussia’s Kontinental Hockey ing the end of the NHL lockout, the League, Maxwell found himself Toronto Maple Leafs came calling. without a job and a place to play The Leafs were in need of a goalas locked out NHL players migrat- tender for the first two days of their ed overseas looking to endure the abbreviated training camp as their 113 day work stoppage. Luckily for AHL affiliate, the Toronto Marlies, both Maxwell and the Gryphons, were stranded in Newfoundland they had a goaltending position due to inclement weather, and available for him to fill. Maxwell reaped the benefits. “It was a good experience at Leaf “The Gryphons gave me a place to play and I was very lucky for camp. The players were all good them to do so,” said Maxwell. “I to me and obviously growing up had a great time. Probably the best so close to Toronto, it was a thrill teammates I have had, everyone to wear a Leaf jersey even though was great.” it was just for camp,” said Maxwell

who grew up in nearby Cambridge, Ontario. To make things even more interesting for Maxwell, he entered a Maple Leafs training camp sur-

gryphon athletics

Former Gryphon goaltender Brandon Maxwell is on his way to the KHL. rounded by plenty of hype amidst speculation that a trade could be in the works that would bring the Leafs one of the league’s top goaltenders, Roberto Luongo.

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“The rumours of the Leafs situa- to the KHL next season. This move tion didn’t really affect me. I was should benefit Maxwell as he will just hoping nothing happened so I look to smoothly transition into a could still attend camp,” said the league considered by many to be former Mississauga St. Michael’s only second to the NHL in both skill Major. and competitiveness. Less than a week after his Maple Unfortunately for the Gryphons, Leaf experience, Maxwell was they lose one of the top goalies in noticeably absent from the Gryph- the CIS with Maxwell’s departure. ons’s annual Frosty Mug which As a result, goaltending duties have took place Jan. 18 at the Sleeman fallen into the very capable hands Centre in Guelph. In the days before of third year net minder Andrew the Guelph winter homecoming, Loverock. In 11 games this season, Maxwell was offered a contract to Loverock owns a 5-5 record with return to Russia and an opportunity a 2.99 goals against average, a .907 to rejoin the KHL next year. save percentage, and one shutout. “I signed a contract with a team Loverock and the Gryphons won’t that will be moving into the KHL have much time to adapt to the next season. The team saw me play personnel change with only four while I was playing in the KHL games remaining before the beginat the start of the season,” said ning of the OUA playoffs and with a Maxwell. pair of crucial matchups this week. The team with which he signed The Gryphons will travel to Oshcurrently plays in a league that awa on Jan. 31 to face the last place serves as an affiliate to the KHL, UOIT Ridgebacks, and the Windsimilar to the affiliation between sor Lancers, who sit just a single the AHL and NHL. Although Max- point behind the Gryphons in the well was unable to disclose whom standings, will travel to the Gryphhe signed with, it shouldn’t remain on Centre on Feb. 2 in a battle for a mystery for too long as they move second in the OUA West.

Gryphon basketball preparing for doubleheader Both teams enter the weekend with a 5-10 record, looking to improve Chris Müller Only six games remain in the OUA regular season for both Gryphon basketball programs, two of which will be played in the upcoming weekend doubleheader against the Lakehead Thunderwolves on Feb. 1 and 2 in the W.F. Mitchell Centre. The men’s team will match up

against a Lakehead squad that has posted a 10-5 record in regular season play, good enough for second in the OUA West division. The Gryphons have posted a 5-10 record overall, but are 2-3 in their last five. Their three losses in that five-game stretch have been by a combined total of 20 points – indicating these games have been much closer than the final box score might suggest. Guelph will look for strong performances from Dan McCarthy and Michel Clark, the two Gryphons averaging the

most time on the court. The two combine for an average of 25.7 points per game. To combat Lakehead’s highflying offensive attack, Guelph could look to utilize Charles Amponsah from outside the paint. Amponsah has connected on 46 per cent of his shots from three-point range, and Guelph may need to lean heavily on the three-point game if they fall behind early. The men’s game will be a rematch of last year’s OUA quarterfinal when Lakehead defeated Guelph 93-70, and the early playoff exit is sure to be in the

memory of veteran Gryphons. The women will also host the Thunderwolves on the same dates, and with Guelph only one game behind the 6-9 Thunderwolves, this weekend could serve as an opportunity to jump up a spot in the standings. Erica McFadden and Kayla Goodhoofd provide the crux of the Gryphon’s offense, combining to average 24.7 points per game. Centre Jasmine Douglas, a fifth year senior, has spearheaded Guelph’s defensive efforts, totaling 113 rebounds in 14 games this season. Part of Guelph’s defensive

plan could be to attack opposing ball handlers early – the Gryphons have stolen an average of 10.2 balls per game, largely due to Guelph’s leader in steals, Goodhoofd. Goodhoofd has collected 39 steals on the season and will look to add to that total in the weekend’s games. Both teams currently sit on the cusp of playoff contention, but will have to make the most of this weekend opportunity at home to gain a foothold in the OUA standings if they wish to make a run beyond the first few rounds of the playoffs.


18 w w w.t h e on ta r ion . c om Women’s hockey continues to roll Another victory makes 11 in a row for the Gryphons Andrea Connell The Gryphons women’s hockey team is on a roll – a steam roll. The team won their 11th straight game by a score of 7-2 on home ice against the Queen’s Gaels on Jan. 26. The win moves the team to an 18-3-2 regular season record while Queens drop to 16-3-2. The win moved the Gryphons past Queen’s to second place overall in the OUA standings with 38 points. The Gryphons are now second to the Laurier Golden Hawks who sit at the top of the table also with 41 points. The loss saw the Gaels slip to third place with 36 points. Guelph’s offense was the key to the game. Forward Jenna Lanzarotta put Guelph on the board first, scoring on her own rebound six minutes into the first period. During the second period Guelph poured it on and added four more goals to the sheet. Amanada Parkins and Jessica Pinkerton worked their magic and scored on a power play. Kaitlyn Mora added a beauty on a breakaway, and Emily Corbett with an assist from Christine Grant netted another to make

it 4-0. Averi Nooren added the fifth on a rebound, assisted by Tamara Bell. The Gaels scored two quick ones in the third period but Guelph’s Parkins added number six to the board and then assisted on a goal by Grant shortly after. Goalie Stephanie Nehring played the full 60 minutes and made 21 saves for the win.

“Our goal is to be a better team at the end of the regular season than we are right now...” – Head Coach Rachel Flanagan The Gryphon offense was strong, especially the powerhouses on the first and second lines. Amanda Parkins, Jessica Pinkerton, and Christine Grant make up Guelph’s first line and are the top three scorers in the OUA, with 106 points between them. The second line consists of Jenna Lanzarotta, Tamara

Andrea Connell

Kaitlyn Mora (12) of the Gryphons celebrates after scoring one of Guelph’s 7 goals on the day. Guelph would defeat Queen’s by a score of 7-2 on Jan. 26. Bell and Kaitlyn Mora. All six women are in the top 10 on the OUA scoring list. This makes the Guelph Gryphons a challenge for opposing teams to say the least. The team has no plans to slow down and with just three games left in the regular season, head coach Rachel Flanagan is looking toward to the playoffs. “Our goal is to be a better team at the end of the regular season than we are right now so every week, every game, we get better

Gryphons sweep Rams, lose heartbreaker to Toronto The men’s volleyball team split last weekend’s games, look to improve against Waterloo Chris Müller It was a tough ride for the men’s volleyball team on the last January weekend of the 2012-13 season. The Gryphons spent the Jan. 26 and 27 weekend in Toronto, first travelling to Ryerson to take on the Rams and then to the University of Toronto where they were hosted by the Varsity Blues. The Jan. 26 contest with the Rams was one of Gryphon excellence. The 3-0 sweep of the Ryerson team can be credited to the excellent serving the Gryphons produced – accounting for 14 aces in the match. Five of those aces can be attributed to fifth-year player Winston

sports & Health

Toronto jumped out to an 8-5 Rosser. Rosser also tallied 11 kills, and his current total sits at 191 lead over the Gryphons, and the – third best in the OUA. Rosser Gryphons simply couldn’t cut has been a statistical stud this the Toronto lead. Guelph lost in season, having nearly double the final set, 15-10. the total number of kills as the With the win, Toronto matchnext Gryphon on the list, Timo- es Ryerson’s record at 5-9 and thy Warnholtz with 105. the Gryphons drop to 4-11 on Guelph stormed out of the the season. gate to capture the first two sets The Gryphons will travel to 25-23, then ended Ryerson’s af- Waterloo to take on the second ternoon with a 25-19 drubbing place Waterloo Warriors (13-2) in the third set. Ryerson’s re- on Feb. 1 and will then return cord currently sits at 5-9, one home for the final two engagespot above Guelph in the OUA ments of the season against Western (Feb. 8) and Windsor standings. It was a different story against (Feb. 9). There’s room for optimism in the Toronto Varsity Blues on Jan. 27. the Gryphon camp, as more than Toronto secured the first set half the players on the team’s in a 25-21 back-and-forth af- roster are in third year or less, fair, but Guelph rebounded by setting the table for what could outscoring the Varsity Blues be a better result in the next 25-18 in the second set, tying season. the game at one set apiece. The Until that time, fifth-year teams traded the two remaining players Kevin Carey, Ryan sets, Toronto taking the third Killeen, and Winston Rosser 25-23 and Guelph taking the will look to finish their Gryphon fourth 25-22. This one was set- careers on a high note, and Watled by a tiebreaker. terloo looks ripe for an upset.

regardless of the outcome, so when we get into playoffs we are the best team we can be heading into playoffs,” said Flanagan.

The women’s next game is on Feb. 3 on home ice against the top-seed Laurier Golden Hawks.


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Into the homestretch Men’s hockey prepares for the conclusion of the 2012-13 regular season Chris Müller Andrew Loverock is proving to fans of Gryphon hockey that the departure of Brandon Maxwell to the KHL won’t affect the team’s chances in the playoffs. Since taking over starting goaltending duties on Jan. 18 in a 3-2 victory against Waterloo in the 2013 iteration of the Frosty Mug, Loverock has posted some impressive numbers, going 3-1 in the four games since claiming a starting spot between the pipes. In that span, he’s stopped 113 of the 120 shots he’s faced, posting a .941 save percentage in the process. The effort comes amidst 27 penalties committed by the Gryphons in that span, placing added pressure on Loverock in tight games. Recent efforts have improved Loverock’s overall record to 5-5

on the season after a shaky start in October before the arrival of Maxwell. The value of good goaltending is high, but it’s nothing without the other five men on the ice. Guelph has been good enough in the offensive end, scoring 81 goals in 22 games this season while holding opponents to only 64. For context, Guelph ranks ninth in the OUA in offensive production, while the defensive unit ranks third best in the OUA. Bolstering the offensive attack is recently named Gryphon athlete of the week Nicklas Huard. Huard, a forward, scored two goals against York on Jan. 24 and provided a hat trick on Jan. 25 that accounted for all of Guelph’s scoring in their victory over the Brock Badgers. The hot-handed Huard has increased his goal total to 10 on the season, adding 12 assists on the way. Huard will look to add to his totals against UOIT goaltender Bryce O’Hagen. In 22 games, O’Hagen has a 7-13 record and

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tasha falconer

Michael Hasson (44) of the men’s hockey team looks to move the puck into the offensive zone. has posted a .887 goals against Brock for last place in the OUA average. The UOIT Ridgebacks West. are led on offense by Luke VanIt should be business as Moerkerke and his 25 points this usual for the Gryphons against season. the Ridgebacks, but Guelph’s UOIT enters the matchup next big test will come on Feb. with an 8-15-1 record, and are 2 when they host the 16-73-7-0 in their last ten games. 1 Windsor Lancers in a battle The Ridgebacks are tied with for second place in the OUA

West. Windsor’s Spencer Pommells and Evan Stibbard are the second and third best point producers in the OUA, and are sure to challenge Guelph’s defense and goaltending throughout. for web-exclusive

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Women’s volleyball After shocking the York Lions on Jan. 18, the Gryphons have lost their last two

The Gryphons, now sitting at 4-11 in OUA play, have struggled to string wins together this season. Despite the team’s difficulties, Andzel believes the

Chris Müller It’s been a difficult week for the women’s volleyball team, dropping their last two games on the road. The difficulties came just a week after the Gryphons hosted the previously undefeated York Lions on Jan. 18, defeating the fourth-best ranked team in the CIS 3-1. A mere week later, the Gryphons were swept by the Ryerson Rams on Jan. 26. Set scores of 25-9, 25-20, and 25-17 showcased a difficult day for the Gryphons. “In the York game we really had the best performances out of our starting lineup but in our game against Ryerson it just wasn’t there,” said first-year setter Ashleigh Andzel. The Gryphons attempted to rebound on Jan. 27 when they travelled to Toronto, but experienced a close 3-1 loss with set scores of 22-25, 29-27, 23-25, and 15-25. It was a strong performance by the Gryphons, but ultimately it wouldn’t be enough to walk away with the victory.

“Unfortunately, we didn’t make the playoffs so it’s looking like the season didn’t go the way we wanted […] we still need to give it our all for the last couple games.” – Ashleigh Andzel team will continue to work hard moving towards the end of the regular season. “Unfortunately, we didn’t make the playoffs so it’s looking like

the season didn’t go the way we wanted […] we still need to give it our all for the last couple games,” said Andzel. Andzel’s first season with the team has been a learning experience, but one that the team can learn from next year. “I really do believe in my teammates and think we could have been at the top, but [our] best performances have come in later games rather than early games,” explained Andzel. Fortunately for Andzel and the rest of the Gryphon squad, the team still has an opportunity to end the season on a high note with games against Waterloo, Western, and Windsor in the coming weeks. In a season that hasn’t quite gone the way the Gryphons had planned, the team is surely putting the emphasis on finishing strong in their last three games. There may yet be a silver lining for the Gryphons’s 2012-13 campaign when they play Western on Feb. 8. “Western has always been a huge rival for Guelph so hopefully we can pull out a win,” said Andzel. The Gryphons travel to Waterloo on Feb. 1 then return home for the final two games of the season on Feb. 8 and Feb. 9.


20 w w w.t h e on ta r ion . c om sports & Health From the Bleachers: If you build it, will they come? Chris Müller At 3:00 a.m. on Jan. 30, Markham city council held a vote on whether to halt discussions surrounding the construction of a new 20,000-seat arena that would sit at the heart of a new downtown complex in the city of Markham. A 7-6 vote determined that this plan was in the best interests of the city of Markham, and plans to build the new arena are now in the pipeline for the city of 300,000. Under the financial plan that has been spearheaded by Graeme Roustan, the former leader of Bauer Performance sports Ltd., the city of Markham would take out a $162.5-million loan coupled with Roustan’s organization’s equal contribution. Markham residents have put forth their opposition to the project, believing the onus of paying for a facility such as this should come exclusively from the private sector and not from public funds. I could speculate on the reach of hockey fervor to help explain why Markham feels it needs a new arena, but there are more pressing issues at hand. Southern Ontario is the hotbed of hockey, there is certainly no denying that. In fact, the statistics prove this point beyond rebuttal. In Ontario there are two National Hockey League teams (Toronto, Ottawa), two American Hockey League Teams (Toronto, Hamilton), and 17 teams in the Ontario Hockey League. The top ten cities by population in Ontario are (in descending

order): Toronto, Ottawa, Mississauga, Brampton, Hamilton, London, Markham, Vaughan, Kitchener, and Windsor. Of these 10 cities, only Markham and Vaughan do not host a professional hockey team in the NHL, AHL, or OHL. I mention these things because Markham intends to go ahead with the arena project without any expressed interest from the NHL in adding an additional Southern Ontario team. This is assuming the $325-million arena is built within its budget, since other 20,000 seat arenas generally run a price tag of over $500-million. The estimated cost of the Air Canada Centre in today’s figures comes in at about $600-million. But let’s give Markham the benefit of the doubt: perhaps they feel that even if no NHL team comes calling for a new home, the arena will be able to host other events to alleviate the cost of construction and maintenance. As Michael Grange of sportsnet.ca points out in an article published on Jan. 29, large concerts held in NHL-caliber arenas rarely net around $100,000. Even if the arena held 120 events a year, as is outlined by the plan set before Markham city council, total profits would amount to only $12-million for the fiscal year. According to Roustan, it would cost about $20-million a year to keep the arena operating once constructed. Without an NHL team (or one that can bring in that kind of attendance), the arena is set to lose $8-million a year. It’s at this point that the logic gets kind of hazy.

Ken Danby

Could professional hockey be coming to Markham? According to the decision of Markham city council, it might - but should it? Councilors in favour of the arena (such as the sports industry, live $30,516. have side-stepped this potential fi- music, and the performing arts) work Markham is home to 301,709 nancial hazard by promoting a vision together to produce outlandish com- people in an area of 212.5 square of what downtown Markham could plexes in central locations that serve kilometers. The median income in be. The plan includes a satellite uni- as a hub for a group’s night out. Markham is $25,144. versity campus, a performing arts The Barclay’s Centre, home of Taking a low figure to determine centre, a high-performance athletic the Brooklyn Nets of the NBA, is the how much money the town has to facility, a casino, and condomini- $1-billion dollar complex that will also contribute to a local sports franchise, um development. It’s an ambitious serve as the home of the NHL’s New figures suggest citizens spend about project, but one the city might want York Islanders for the 2015-16 season. five per cent of their income on ento consider pumping the brakes on The centre is home to the arena/court tertainment. In Markham that figures before continuing along with their facility, high-end shopping, a the- to be a total of just over $379-million current plans. atre, and houses many restaurants of citizen dollars spent on entertainment. The plans to build this all-in-one varying tastes. This is effectually the In Brooklyn, that figure is almost entertainment complex borrow from central location of Brooklyn’s enter- $4-billion. trends in the United States that have tainment district, and the cool-factor It’s for these reasons that Markham seen local entertainment industries of potentially being within 300 yards is making a huge gamble in investiof sighting Jay-Z at the facility seems gating this arena further. Even if an to be enough to draw people in. NHL team moves to Toronto, how If Markham is trying to emulate do they expect to take business away Brooklyn’s success to some extent, from the Leafs? It feels like whoever came up with they may want to look at a few numbers before proceeding. this scheme has watched Field of Avid hikers believe the stress of Brooklyn is home to 2,532,645 peoDreams one time too many, and only modern society can be alleviated by ple in an area of 183 square kilometers. time will tell: if they build it, who will connecting back to humanity’s more The median income in Brooklyn is come? primitive relationship with nature – and the only equipment truly required is a decent pair of hiking boots/shoes and a comfortable pack full of water, food, and first-aid supplies. It’s estimated that a healthy young adult can burn upwards of 4,000 calories in an all-day hike. For com- Rafaela é, parison most largely sedentary adults aged 19-30 require between 2,000 – 3,000 calories a day to maintain body weight. By these estimates, the benefits of walking in the woods all day are universal. Many sites and blogs are easily found online if you’re interested in learning more about hiking and its many health benefits. As environmentally conscious young adults, it might be worthwhile to look into the benefits of this ancient pastime that requires nothing but spare time and a trail through the trees. Always ensure that appropriate safety measures are taken when beginning a hike, and beginners may want to consider finding an experienced hiker to introduce them to the hobby. Happy trails!

Hike your way to a healthier you One of humankind’s oldest hobbies might be one of the healthiest

comparison to other parts of the body, effective fat-burning exercises are conducted through the operation of the legs – larger muscles require more energy and thus more fuel is burned. Moderately paced exercise that Chris Müller activates these large muscles over a long period of time, a day-long hike It might be a little out of season, but for example, is largely believed to be it never hurts to think of how one in- beneficial to cardiovascular strength tends to stay healthy over the months and conditioning as well as strengththat do not alternate between snow, ening and toning muscles involved in sleet, and freezing rain. Despite what the exercise. the view outside your window might Those muscles are not isolated to the suggest, southern Ontario is one of the legs either, as walking requires about most beautiful and desirable locations 70 per cent of the body’s musculafor hikers, campers, and backpackers. ture according to the American Nordic In this light, going for a walk in the Walking Association. woods might be a little nicer to look The physical activity component at than the back-sweat of the mid- helps to address the physiological dle-aged man on the treadmill in front health benefits of exercise, but hiking’s of you at the local gym. In fact, a trip greatest strength could be in its psyto a local trail for an afternoon might chological capacity to alleviate stress. provide more than a little scenery, it Hiking, along with other forms of might be one of the better things you exercise, releases chemicals called encan do for your body. dorphins that work to improve mood The human body is designed to walk and relieve stress. The experience is – the largest muscle groups of the body known as a “runner’s high” in some occur below the waist in the quadri- circles, and is often associated with ceps, hamstrings, and gluteus muscles. a diminished perception of pain and Because these muscles are so large in mild euphoria.


21 Summer job searching is all “in the bullets” This Week Resume job in History descriptions should 170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

life

Rioting is Swift Sequel to Murder of Gandhi A few hours after the assassination of Mahatma Gandhi, The Globe and Mail reported that rioting was taking place in cities across India, describing that “widespread looting, arson and stabbing” occurred only two hours after Gandhi’s death. Fifteen people were reportedly killed and 54 injured when “Hindus and Moslems clashed in Bombay.” The shooter claimed to have carried out the assassination for political motives, with police stating that “some persons” did not agree with Gandhi’s belief of non-violence. In an obituary that followed the article, Gandhi was characterized as a “saint and agitator, [who] achieved his goal of independence for India.” (The Globe and Mail – Jan. 31, 1948)

illustrate how you fit specific employers’ needs Wayne Greenway

Have you ever wondered why you received so few responses to the numerous applications that you sent out to apply for summer jobs last summer? In this article, we will explore how one hiring manager selects his students for the summer. Derrick Marsten has already begun selection process for hiring his summer job openings for his department in an small engineering firm. He screens comic by Abhishek Mohan 100-200 applications every year. I was curious about his selection procedure because I knew he regularly works 10–12 hours role and asked me which state- survey of 1,300 senior mana day managing the other func- ment would catch my attention: agers at companies with 20 or tions in his department, and I “Devised a highly successful more employees in the United wondered how he would ever training programme for the States and Canada showed how organize the screening process summer staff” or “Devised bullets with vague sounding with so many applications. and implemented a new sum- language are ineffective. Survey “I de-select first and then mer sales training programme respondents rated the followit’s all about the bullets,” which resulted in a 21 per cent ing words or phrases as the Marsten said. “I quickly elim- increase in new business. most overused or meaningless inate all the applications that Clearly, the first bullet dehave obvious errors, those that scribes what is expected of do not have cover letters, and anyone doing that job. The ones that are not customized latter bullet tells what was and likely sent to dozens of achieved and gives the magnitude of the achievement. employers.” Marsten’s rationale is that Marsten said that this second the amount of time and care bullet was also carefully tarsomeone puts into writing a de- geted at what he asked for in cent resume and cover letter is his ad. Marsten went on to say a good reflection of their style that if the candidate had anof work on the job. other summer job where she “I want students who really was successful in sales, then want to learn from the experi- she would be wise to highlight ence we have to offer. They are this history in her cover letter. the ones who will make that Linking the cover letter to the extra effort on the job,” said resume makes it easy to see how Marsten. Marsten looks for the person fits. The cover letter needs to be students who have the knowledge and skills to do the job, or written from a high level, dethe initiative, leadership, and scribing particular notable problem solving skills to quick- achievements and any “patly learn as they go. They must terns of success” that answer also “fit” with his department. the question “how do I fit pre“I have a great team. It is im- cisely what the employer is perative that they fit with our looking for.” For the hiring culture and the staff,” Mars- manager, the resume provides ten adds. “The bullets give me almost synchronistic details to an idea of how they might fit.” back up what is presented in When I asked him to elabor- the cover letter. For the job ate, he told me that with many seeker, getting the bullets right of the resumes he receives, the in the resume will inform and bullets under each job read to steer the content of a short, efhim like mini job descriptions. fective cover letter. phrases they saw on resumes: In many submissions, “there is “Every word, in every line “highly qualified, hard workalmost no connection between of both the resume and the er, team player problem solver, the cover letter and the resume cover letter has to have value flexible, people person, and bullets,” he added. These are and meaning” said Marsten . self-starter.” OfficeTeam Execthe kinds of submissions that “So many times I read resume utive Director Robert Hosking can be quickly screened out. bullets and say to myself ‘who summarized the meaning of the To illustrate his point, he cares’ or ‘so what.’” Marsten is survey’s results in a January gave me two sample bullets not alone in his thinking. The 2013 press release. describing exactly the same results of a recent OfficeTeam “A resume full of cliches but

“I quickly eliminate all the applications that have obvious errors, those that do not have cover letters, and ones that are not customized and likely sent to dozens of employers.” – Derrick Marsten

short on specifics won’t be memorable to hiring managers. Employers want concrete e x a m pl e s o f p r o f e s s i o n a l achievements as well as descriptions of any transferrable skills that can be applied to the open position,” says Hosking. Marsten told me that after de-selection, he cannot go too far wrong because most of the students who are left would have the capacity to perform the job at an acceptable level, but he wants the best. With so many applications to review, he needs to see how the applicant “fits” within seconds of scanning the cover letter and resume, and this explains the need for concise and compelling text. Marsten points out that many students write their letter and resume package to get the job, when they really need to write it to land the interview. Writing a resume to land an interview often results in a more focused and compelling document and the candidate is more likely to land the position. After this second phase of the de-selection process, the number of applications left is even smaller, allowing Marsten to do a detailed analysis to evaluate the resumes according to the qualifications and the key skills that he needs for each position. He will then call the most suitable candidates for a personal interview. In many ways, landing an interview is all in the bullets. It’s worth taking several hours to prepare a resume and cover letter that highlights how your achievements match with the employer’s needs, as it will pay big dividends in your summer job search.

From Washington; Abolition of Slavery In a vote of 119 to 56, the House of Representatives passed an amendment to the Constitution abolishing slavery on this day. Democrats and other politicians who voted for the amendment could hardly contain their excitement, and when the officer presiding over the voting announced that the resolution passed, “for several moments the scene was grand and impressive beyond description. No attempt was made to suppress the applause which came from all sides, every one feeling that the occasion justified the fullest expression of approbation and joy,” the article reports. Alongside the relatively short article on the topic appeared a headline stating, “The Peace Question; A Flag of Truce and a Parley,” a sign that the Civil War was in its final last months. (The New York Times – Jan. 31, 1865) Buddy Holly killed in air crash; Sid Vicious dies from drug overdose On this day, several significant musicians died, though in varying ways. Sid Vicious, the bass player for The Sex Pistols, had just been released on a $50,000 bail for the trial of his exgirlfriend’s murder. A celebration party for the bail ended badly, as the rock star took too much heroin and died of an overdose. Buddy Holly, Jiles P. Richardson, and Ritchie Valens, on the other hand, died in an airplane crash in Iowa while on their Winter Dance Party Tour. While the burial of the three musicians’ bodies posed no problems for family members and friends, Vicious’ burial caused a stir with his mother and Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren fighting over where he should be buried, which contradicted Vicious’s wishes to be buried in Philadelphia. (The BBC – Feb. 2, 1959, 1979)

Compiled by Alicja Grzadkowska


22 w w w.t h e on ta r ion . c om life Love/Sex/You: Let’s talk consent The Brew Review: A look at how consent can be complicated C.E. La Croix You’ve probably heard those quick and easy phrases “No means no!” and “Consent is sexy!” over and over again, repeated by every sex-ed course across the country. Here at L/S/Y – your new bi-weekly sexual health and queer issues column, we believe firmly not in that tired old “no means no” mantra, but instead proudly shout “Yes Means Yes.” Why ‘Yes means Yes’ See, there’s a small problem with that good ol’ no means no mentality – anything that isn’t understood as a “no,” even though it seems obvious to you, may not be obvious to your partner. Did you say the exact words “No I do not want to have sex right now”? No? Well then, you’re out of luck when it comes to this phrase, and that just isn’t right. Yes Means Yes champions the idea that only positive, active consent counts – hesitation and obscure language are right out! That means if your partner seems disinterested for

whatever reason (a headache, a paper, just not feeling it, anything like “well, maybe…”), that is not a sign of possible consent, and you should stop right there instead of trying to “Change their mind.”

“When No suddenly doesn’t necessarily have the power it should, there should be a word that does.” Prior consent is not a guarantee I cannot emphasize this enough. Under the Yes Means Yes principle, active consent is sought after each time, for any sexual act. If you’re not sure, or your partner is unable to give sober consent, even if you have done something before, that

Inside Farming: Farming in a modern way Rudi Spruit Consumers are becoming increasingly more interested in their food and how it came upon their table. Consumers are concerned and interested in the production and distribution of their food. We don’t have to look far to see examples of this curiosity. Just look at shows like Oprah’s – she toured a Cargill processing plant back in 2011. Farmers have noticed this demand and because of this, the CanACT club at the University of Guelph has decided to start a new agriculture column called Inside Farming to bring agriculture back to the school. This new column will be here to try and answer questions and bring important agriculture news to the U of G eye. If anyone has any questions about agriculture to which they need an answer, there are many good resources to look at. One

of the best resources is Farm and Food Care’s homepage. It can answer many questions related to Ontario agriculture. The Farm and Food Care website also offers a glimpse at what a farm looks like with its “Virtual Farm Tours.” This online program lets you take an inside look at a modern farm and actually see what goes on without leaving your house. The program utilizes 360-degree cameras that give a full view of a modern, local farm as most of the farms are in Ontario. Things like a milking parlour, a furrowing (or birthing) pig barn, a milk-fed veal barn, a beef feedlot and a modern egg laying farm are pictured with descriptions which give visitors a chance to really see what an actual local farm looks like. Consumers are concerned about where their food comes from, and the agriculture industry is trying to meet that demand. But consumers must remember to get both sides of the story before making decisions.

doesn’t mean you can again until Brown Ale you have their say-so. A simple way of asking at any point is, “You Chris Müller want this?” or “Tell me what you want, babe.” This affirms their This edition of The Brew Review consent, and can sound damn was sponsored by regular Ontarion sexy if pulled at the right time. volunteer Andrea Connell, who proJust make sure they can, and do vided this week’s item of investigation respond! Don’t act unless they’re from the Neustadt Springs Brewery in clear in their desires (and, once Neustadt, Ontario. This relatively young brewery has again, sober). Remember to respect both their boundaries and only been producing beer for just over your own. two decades, but the 10W30 Brown Ale suggests years of tinkering with When playing coy (When No can an excellent transitional style of beer. mean Yes) I say transitional because brown ale Sometimes, you might want to is a sort of in-between style. It lacks have a bit of fun and pretend not the plentiful hop character of many to be into it, to make your partner pale ales, but delves into colours and work. That’s perfectly fine, and flavours generally associated with can be really enjoyable. However, porters and stouts. The brew possesses 5.5 per cent alyou really have to be clear when cohol content, common to the style. it comes to this. When No sudThe 473mL aluminum can should denly doesn’t necessarily have the be poured into a traditional Englishpower it should, there should be a word that does. Talk it over with style pint glass for full enjoyment. The your partner in depth and estab- pour unveils an attractive reddishlish a quick and memorable “safe” brown colour with a tan coloured word. No matter who your part- head – a very impressive looking ner is, or how long you have been beer. The aroma will provide notes together, don’t assume that they of fresh bread, oak, and an almondcan read your mind, or that they esque nuttiness that is common to will always pick up on subtle clues. beers of this style. The lightly hopped brew imparts a Remember, sex is supposed to robust offering of malted flavours like be safe and fun. Let’s keep it that almond, walnut, and a certain grainiway! ness that embodies the bread flavour encountered in the aroma. The beer produces a mild carbonation, providing a smooth drinkability that sides toward the lower carbonation levels of porter without the heavy mouth feeling of the darker brew.

vanessa tignanelli

The beer will imbue a heightened awareness of nut flavouring, but the mash that produces the wort (beer before fermentation) possesses no nut products, only whole grains simulating the nut flavour. If you’re interested in getting into dark beer (and winter is the time to do it), the Neustadt 10W30 serves as an excellent starting point for beer drinkers that have spent years nursing Coors Light. It’s an accessible entrance into the walnut, oak, and malt-flavour characteristics of the darker styles without overpowering the brew. Subtlety is the key with this beer, but when enjoyed slowly it can be seen as a good example of the British brown ales that preceded the popularity of stout. Do yourself a favour and pick up a can (or two) of this excellent brown ale. It will be good practice for next week’s review, when porter takes centre stage in The Brew Review.

p e t of t h e w e e k

Valerie Ziegler

Noodles may look like a regular old grey cat, but it has been said by many that he is the feline version of the Joker, due to his mischievous grin. He is indeed a troublemaker, always knocking things off tables, wrestling with other animals, and hiding in boxes. Keep a close eye on this one… madness is the emergency exit.


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

opinion

Hey Toronto Star…check your heteronormativity! Karalena McLean In the lead up to the Ontario Liberal Party leadership convention, an article entitled, “Kathleen Wynne causing second-guessing, soul-searching among Ontario Liberal delegates” was published by the Toronto Star. The author, Martin Regg Cohn, is a well-known columnist for the popular paper who has previously written about and supported Sandra Pupatello for the leadership of the Ontario Liberals. Looking past the author’s obvious bias, mid-way through the article Cohn feels the need to make reference to Kathleen Wynne’s sexual orientation, saying, “Oh, and she’s a lesbian. From Toronto.” Cohn further mentions that her orientation is “a non-issue,” for the politically correct crowd but, conversely “a non-starter,” for the politically canny crowd. The author seems to be inferring that Kathleen Wynne’s sexual orientation could possibly have some effect on the ability of the Ontario Liberals to keep power, or maybe even her ability to be a good premier.

Wait. What year is it again? Am I their jobs, considering they are the reading the Toronto Sun? “Progressive” Conservatives. So what does all of this mean? The article leaves the reader seriously confused, as the point seems It means we are in 2013, and the to be that Wynne is causing “sec- fact that the newspaper published ond-guessing and soul searching” an article making (I would argue) merely because of her sexual ori- homophobic inferences, is really disentation. Kathleen Wynne’s sexual appointing. We should expect more orientation, one can assume, has not from journalists. We should expect affected her ability to hold high profile them to talk about the real issues, and portfolios in the past, such as educa- not to write about people’s personal tion and Aboriginal affairs. Or maybe lives that have absolutely no effect it has; maybe that’s the reason people on the issues at hand. Further, we who work in Aboriginal affairs now should expect that those in charge of ride unicorns to work! informing the general public on poOne wonders how the columnist litical issues should not be inferring can make assumptions that Liberal that voting for Wynne is dangerous delegates are considering Wynne’s because she is gay, as in my opinion, orientation a major factor in their it would be the same as suggesting a decision, considering the general vote for her is dangerous because she progressive platform on which the is a woman. Would we allow Cohn Liberals run. One can make the logical to make openly sexist comments assumption that those who vote NDP and get away with it? I highly doubt also do not think that being openly it. The double standard that exists gay plays any role in one’s ability to when it comes to sexual orientation be in politics. In my opinion, it would is quite saddening, especially coming also be a stretch to say that members from someone in a position of power. of the Ontario PCs believe that one’s Since Kathleen Wynne won the Liborientation affects their ability to do eral leadership will one of her main

23

Courtesy Canadian Press

Kathleen Wynne’s Liberal leadership win represents a sign of progress, but the politician’s candidacy coverage was less than enlightened, says reader Karalena McLean. objectives as premier be that Ontario becomes a more equal place for everyone? The answer is probably yes. But God forbid anyone should have such a radical ideal for Ontario that includes something like equality! If Kathleen Wynne had lost the

Liberal leadership bid to Sandra Pupatello should we have been concerned that her heterosexuality would have played a major role in every political decision she made? According to Cohn’s logic, maybe we should have.

The views represented in the opinion section do not necessarily reflect the views of The Ontarion nor its staff.

Inordinate Ordnance Chris Carr

develop a better popular culture. Oh, your 15-year-old brother Every generation is dumber than said something stupid like YOLO? the last, right? Come on, admit Really? Had you expected a teenit; in your day, your fashionable ager to come up with something so idioms and wicked cool clothes deep it makes you reevaluate your weren’t stupid – they were just life choices? These teenagers today what you did at the time. It was won’t get off their cell-phones? nothing more than childish antics, Why the hell would they? Is it inbedazzled, stoned and televised. terfering with their critical review We wreck the visage of the pop of War and Peace? WTF? You hear it all the time: “These star today. Justin Bieber fans must hide their purple sweater under kids today, they just don’t get a thick, black fur-lined coat and it.” This seems like such an odd yoga pants. Just like the gener- paradox to me, as if the older ation before with their N*SYNC generations are expecting somet-shirts. And the generation be- thing better to be spewed from the fore that, New Kids on the Block? mouths of the generation parentEach replacing the other, and even ed by Snooki. Of course teenagers now, we’ve got the acne-addled today have a different agenda to boy band One Direction cashing deal with than past generations. in on the tween stock these days. They have to deal with cyberAnd we make fun. We mock bullying instead of the Cold War. those who say, YOLO, BRB or They have to deal with parents who LOL in common conversation. As are guilty of parental absence that if these abbreviations should not comes with an addiction to Farmhave a starring role in their per- ville, instead of alcoholism. sonal lexicons. How stupid these But still it surprises “adults” that kids are with their nu-words, flat- the younger generation is so unhats rotated to douche-o’clock educated about world affairs. No and their electronic devices per- shit, because they don’t have to be. manently bolted to their hands. Currently circulating around the This disturbs me. Internet is a video advertising the To be clear, the use of ab- dead browser Internet Explorer. breviations in lieu of actual It’s like those scientology videos sentences doesn’t bother me. that show you all that awesome These flavor-of-the-month pop stuff, then, like a punch in the dustars, dumbfounding fashions and odenum, say, “Join Scientology.” techno-kids, evolving with smaller But this one makes you reminisce fingers to text faster, do not bother about Pogs, Snackables and Super me. What bothers me is the expec- Soakers, just before the Internet tation exacted upon teenagers to Explorer logo slides its greasy hand

under your shirt, firmly into second base. It’s cheap advertising, and I am sure people like to reminisce, but doesn’t this type of foray into yesteryear invoke a disdain for the current popular culture? I’m sure after seeing it, more than a few YouTubers put down their tub of icing, wiped their mouths and exclaimed in all caps on their blog about how the current generation of kids suck and how they should be ashamed. That’s so incredibly ridiculous. In ten years the same commercial will come out asking you to remember Ray Bans, iPods and skinny jeans. To diminish current popular idioms is like cynical masturbation, where you’re really just angrily screwing yourself. It’s like shooting yourself in the Uggs. So lay them some slack. It’s not like your generation in its younger state ever re-wrote the constitution. Young people suck, but it’s their suck to deal with, not yours. However, feel free to rave about the Kardashians. They aren’t teenagers and they should know better. Chris Carr is Editor-in-Chief of The Cannon. “Inordinate Ordnance” publishes every Thursday in The Cannon and in The Ontarion. The opinions posted on thecannon.ca reflect those of their author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Central Student Association and the Guelph Campus Co-op, or The Ontarion.


24 w w w.th e on ta r ion . c om Opinion - Begging for a change Colleen McDonell I’ve become a little bothered with a fundraising fad on campus. And it’s not the 17 different bake sales you will find on any given day. There seem to be a lot of groups actively begging at or around our beloved Old Jeremiah lately, for what seems to be a grand competition of Who Can Raise the Most Money with the Least Amount of Effort. You know what I’m talking about. You’ve dragged your butt out of bed at 7 a.m. just to make it to your morning class, and you just want to hide behind a nice XXXL coffee and shuffle on to your lecture. As you walk across campus, however, you are hounded on as your peers ask for spare change. Visitors to campus may think that students have actively become homeless. Last semester, I was one of very few on campus on a cold Tuesday morning. As I walked by the cannon, I was harassed by a large group of students raising funds for some sort of illness. I’m not of the apathetic variety; I don’t put on some headphones and pretend not to hear or see anything. I

try to interact with the fundraisers if they approach me, find out what the event is all about, and then I sometimes give and I sometimes don’t. Yet, the beggars this day went straight to business and would not take no for an answer. “Spare change for the _____ society?” “Sorry – my wallet is buried in my bag. I’ll donate on my way back after class…” I said, with true intentions. At that particular point, however, I had no motivation to search for my change purse underneath my assortment of binders and granola bars. “We won’t be here later, can you just donate now?” the group demanded. Of course, this was a lie; I saw the group there hours later. At this moment, they had forced me into a corner, and I relented, giving my change. I’m not insinuating that my money was not going to a worthy cause – many student organizations raise funds and awareness for very deserving charities. My $2.50 was definitely better given to this group than spent on a couple of overpriced cookies from the UC. However, I was offended by the approach that was taken by

this group to extract my hard-earned money. I felt that if I didn’t donate right at that moment, I would be severely judged by a large group of fellow students. Although conceptually similar to the fundraising cashiers do at the grocery stores and LCBO, when they ask if you are willing to add a dollar or two to your purchase, these student groups make you feel outnumbered and that you are an uncharitable or bad person if you don’t donate. They often don’t acknowledge that you may be living a cashless lifestyle in only using debit, credit, or your student card to make purchases. As well, they often don’t allow you time to explain how you already give to the community in many different ways. I urge any student-run organizations to not only be considerate to others, but also make greater efforts to entertain and actively engage the U of G community when fundraising at the cannon. I applaud the students who busk, the engineers that teeter-totter,

opinion

vanessa tignanelli

Students on campus rush to get to class and do not want to feel hounded on by beggars at the cannon. and the rowing team that row atop the cannon all day to raise money for worthy causes. Begging should only be reserved

for events such as Five Days for the Homeless, not become a trend for everyday money grabbing at the centre of campus.

Celebrities worth celebrating Carleigh Cathcart Two weeks ago, there were two pieces featured in The Ontarion that I liked very much. Chris Muller’s “From the Bleachers: Men of character, man without” and Alicja Grzadkowska’s “Newsology: Awards shows” both touched on the subject of celebrity status; the former on prominent sports figures and the latter on Hollywood big-namers. I found these articles especially endearing in a time and place where our reverence is directed towards reality television stars and hockey players who are unsatisfied with the seven figure paycheques they ring in for accurately hitting cylinders of rubber (don’t get me wrong, though, I confess to being a huge hockey fan). The authors focused on the examples of character these famous people set for our society, or the sad lack thereof. Getting on a show because you’re pregnant, single, or have a familial trend for every family member’s name to start with K is an unfortunate testament to the fact that our priorities of idolization are extremely messed up. Perhaps even worse is the fact that many of these celebrities deem themselves worthy of whining and complaining about media invasion and/or lack of privacy, when it this very exposure that earned them their fame and fortune, and to which they usually subject themselves willingly. In celebration of the realization that I have other peers to share my view on the over-glorification of “celebrities,” I would like to share with you a few of my own idols: people I would – if possible – love to have a conversation with, and likely on about human rights or current events, and not one’s favourite make-up brands or latest breakup.

Terry Fox: I don’t think it’s neces- strong and relentless demand for sary to explain to any of you who this the rights to which we are all entiman was or what he did. Terry Fox tled, and the courage to understand is a man known for his selflessness, doing so is dangerous but necessary. courage, determination, and generosity. He has changed the world Albert Einstein: His name and genof cancer forever, and deserves the eral theories are common knowledge, respect of every person ever touched but the premature judgement he by this tragic illness (which is virtu- faced and numerous quotes of insight ally all of us). and wisdom are not quite as popular. This man was deemed unintelligent Anne Frank: Another figure that re- thanks to a late start at speaking, but ally doesn’t need to be explained. I modern society knows that was a find her stubborn nature admira- very inaccurate assumption. And ble, and believe that she was wise besides his obviously advanced unbeyond her years. It’s a shame that derstanding of the universe, the man she was not given a long life, as the also made some exceptional quotes. contributions she could have offered My favourite: “Everybody is a genius. society then and now are likely lim- But if you judge a fish by its ability to itless. Sadly, we’ll never know. climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” Sarah McLachlan: Yes, I suppose she is a celebrity, but she is a rare one to A few other people in the public be looked up to. Her lyrics actually eye (or were, or should have been) relate deeply to the world, sinister who have earned my respect include as it may be. She doesn’t just write/ Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger (hero sing love songs or the chart toppers, pilot), Reese Witherspoon, Michelle but if you take time to truly listen to Obama, J.K. Rowling, Harriet Tubher music and values, you will see man, Rosa Parks, and Martin Luther that she has a beautiful talent that King Jr. she utilizes with the greatest passion. I won’t pretend I’m on a high horse and above my peers for those Malala Yousafzai: For those of you to whom I give notice. I’m a fan of unfamiliar with the 15-year-old, country singers, athletes, and acMalala is a vocal activist for girls’ tresses just as much as the next guy. education rights in Pakistan. Her But I don’t idolize them - I’m enteractivism is extremely unacceptable tained by them. To earn my respect to the violent and repressive Taliban, and admiration, one must show who last year made an assassination character and effort. The above attempt on her. Despite this fright- are but a few of the unrecognized, ening event and continuing threats discredited, and/or unvalued “ceof taking her life, it is highly unlikely lebrities” that we should venerate that this brave young woman will but in general do not. So before you give in to demands for silence. She go wishing you had the butt of Kim represents the real influence stars Kardashian, maybe instead you could should have upon us: inspiring a resolve to have the vision of Terry Fox.


170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

editorial

New bus schedule destined to fail It’s hardly news anymore: changes are being made to Guelph’s bus routes again. Ever since the city’s transit system was redesigned in Jan. 2012 – to, shall we say, “mixed” reviews – the agency has been tweaking routes here and there. They added routes 15 and 16, experimented with platform placement at the UC, and acquired more buses from Ottawa’s transit authority. But complaints about the service persisted. Notably, the biggest complaint was that the scheduling was so tight on some routes that if a bus was even a few minutes late due to traffic, weather, or road construction, it would not arrive in time for passengers to make their transfers to another bus. When the city actually looked into the matter, they found that an astonishing 25 per cent of connections are missed. That’s a big number, and particularly problematic due to the transit system’s hub-and-spoke design, which necessitates transfers. To remedy this, Guelph Transit has undertaken their standard route-tweaking, altering a total of eight routes effective Feb. 3 to find efficiencies. But they are also making a more drastic change that same day: 15-minute peak time service is being reduced to 20-minute peak time service. This is purportedly to allow buses an extra five minutes of leeway to make it to the UC or Guelph Central Station in time for connections to be made. Touted as an “improvement” that will make Guelph Transit more “reliable,” we are actually witness to a 25 per cent service reduction during peak time hours. You may recall that prior to January 2012, when the old routes were still in place, Guelph Transit offered 20-minute service throughout the day. Since bus service will now only run on a 20-minute schedule during the absolute busiest times of the day, we are even witnessing a loss of service as compared to before any changes were implemented at all. Hardly reliable, and hardly an improvement. As it stands, every morning, buses along busy corridors such as Gordon Street are veritable sardine

The Ontarion Inc. University Centre Room 264 University of Guelph N1G 2W1 ontarion@uoguelph.ca Phone: 519-824-4120 General: x58265 Editorial: x58250 Advertising: x58267 Accounts: x53534 Editorial Staff: Editor-in-chief Tom Beedham Arts & Culture Editor Nicholas Revington Sports & Health Editor Christopher Müller News Editor Alicja Grzadkowska Associate Editor Colleen McDonell Copy Editor Stacey Aspinall vanessa tignanelli

It might be time for Guelph Transit to start thinking outside the box to move rush-hour passengers in the south end efficiently, comfortably, and punctually. cans of dreary-eyed students. Countless would-be passengers are left stranded by the words “Sorry Bus Full” in orange LED lights. While this is a common sight, it was even more common before creating 15-minute service. Common sense dictates that it’s going to be a major problem again – fewer buses means lower capacity to carry passengers. Less frequent service also means that even though you are less likely to miss a transfer, if you do miss it, the consequences are greater. You need to wait five minutes longer for the next bus to arrive. It’s also contrary to the city’s Transit Growth Strategy, which calls for increased ridership over five years, and specifically advocates for 15-minute service, among other visions. While the city and council claim to stand behind the Transit Growth Strategy, it seems pretty easy to dismiss this as all talk. The lower service frequency obviously fails to achieve the goal of 15-minute service, but will also negatively impact the goal of increased ridership. Not only does it hamper the ability of the system to carry more passengers, more crowded buses will make transit less attractive to those who can choose other modes of

Corrections In last week’s “Helping out some furry friends” article, the first line read, “the University of Guelph hosted a presentation led by Jo-Anne McArthur.” The University of Guelph did not help organize or fund this event; the event was hosted by Campus Ubuntu as well as the Guelph Students for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

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Last week’s print coverage of the Adverteyes cassette release party was accompanied by a photo as well as a web-exclusive photo reel credited to Mira Beth. In actuality, the photos were taken by Brandon Marsh. The online byline has been corrected.

transportation. All this leads to the conclusion that maybe it is time for Guelph Transit to start thinking outside the box. While 20-minute peak time frequency will certainly reduce missed transfers, in the south end, making transfers is of limited concern to most passengers. Most south end passengers are students on their way to class. Most of them are hoping that if they took the trouble to get up early for class, they can at least get there in reasonable time, and maybe buy a coffee at the UC on the way. That’s simply not possible when the first three buses that pass your stop are already full. So what if Guelph Transit stopped fixating on missed connections, and started focusing on moving the largest contingent of passengers in the south end to their destination efficiently, comfortably, and punctually? The savings from making cuts to 20-minute peak time service across town could be applied to establishing new routes in the busiest areas. They would run in between the standard 20-minute routes, effectively creating a 10-minute service frequency in the areas with the highest demand. The concept is not entirely unlike Toronto’s shortturn streetcar and bus routes. Of course, Guelph transit does already run an extra “Gordon Corridor” bus along Gordon Street from Clairfield Drive to campus. The problem is that guessing when it comes is a crapshoot: there is no schedule posted at the bus stops. So what generally ends up happening is that several buses synchronized to arrive on campus in time to meet a connection drive by within a couple minutes of each other and load up to over-capacity, and the

last one picks up the stragglers and arrives on campus half-empty. By making more frequent, regularlyscheduled routes that operate at staggered times, demand would be better equalized. The buses would be full enough to warrant them, but without being so tightly packed as to make the experience the worst part of one’s day.

“Touted as an “improvement” that will make Guelph Transit more “reliable,” we are actually witness to a 25 per cent service reduction during peak time hours.” Not only would this reduce uncomfortable crowding on buses, the high service frequency would make transit more appealing to those who generally don’t use it. There would be no need to worry about missed connections, because the longest you would have to wait for a missed connection on these busiest of routes would be 10 minutes – fairly reasonable. If Guelph Transit and the City of Guelph are serious about the transit growth strategy, they’ll have to start getting a little more creative.

Production Staff: Photo & graphics editor Vanessa Tignanelli Ad designer Sarah Kavanagh Layout Director Jessica Avolio Web Assistant Jordan Sloggett Office Staff: Business manager Lorrie Taylor Office manager Monique Vischschraper Ad manager Al Ladha Board of Directors President Bronek Szulc Treasurer Lisa Kellenberger Chairperson Curtis Van Laecke Secretary Alex Lefebvre Directors Aaron Francis Heather Luz Kevin Veilleux Lisa McLean Marshal McLernon Michael Bohdanowicz Shwetha Chandrashekhar Contributors Andrew Bonter Chris Carr Carleigh Cathcart Andrea Connell Sarah Cordeaux Kelsey Coughlin Samantha Dewaele Andrew Donovan Laura Douglas Tasha Falconer Wayne Greeway Sylvia Nayoung Han C.E. La Croix Leigh Lichtenberg

Nadine Maher Karalena McLean Abhishek Mohan Robyn Nicholson Adrien Potvin Natasha Reddy Jeff Sehl Wendy Shepherd Kimberly Snider Rudi Spruit Elias Tsafaridis Bryan Waugh Olivia Zollino

The Ontarion is a non-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors. Since the Ontarion undertakes the publishing of student work, the opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect those of the Ontarion Board of Directors. The Ontarion reserves the right to edit or refuse all material deemed sexist, racist, homophobic, or otherwise unfit for publication as determined by the Editor-in-Chief. Material of any form appearing in this newspaper is copyrighted 2011 and cannot be reprinted without the approval of the Editorin-Chief. The Ontarion retains the right of first publication on all material. In the event that an advertiser is not satisfied with an advertisement in the newspaper, they must notify the Ontarion within four working days of publication. The Ontarion will not be held responsible for advertising mistakes beyond the cost of advertisement. The Ontarion is printed by the Guelph Mercury.


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crossword Edward 42- Bandleader Brown 43- Rice cooked in broth 45- Climber’s challenge 46- Georgia, once: Abbr. 47- Adversaries 48- Gaucho’s rope 51- Military address (acr.) 52- Preceding, poetically 53- Exorbitant 56- ___ impasse (2) 57- Coffee dispenser 58- Dry red wine 62- Pineapple vendor 63- Implore 64- Edible pale-bluish mushroom 65- Hill toy 66- Dreyer’s partner in ice cream 67- Firstborn

bestcrosswords.com

Across 1- One of the three Magi 7- Skirt stitching 10- Inquires 14- Certifiable 15- Poetic pugilist 16- Ballet bend 17- Like some inspections 18- Like Abner 19- Must’ve been something ___(2) 20- Capital of Utah 23- Be in a bee

26- Loser to DDE 27- Country singer Tucker 28- Heap 29- Letters on a Cardinal’s cap 30- Leafs’ org. 31- Adapt for new use 33- Luau chow 34- Entirely 37- Henri’s here 38- Not ‘neath 39- Computer key 40- Carnival site 41- Abbreviation of the name

Down 1- AFL partner 2- Abby’s twin 3- Conscription org. (amer.) 4- Pattern of colorful curving figures 5- Conductor Dorati 6- Spool 7- Hebrew liturgical prayer 8- Inventor Howe 9- Dairy product 10- Of the top 11- Killed 12- Young purrer 13- I’m outta here! 21- Spuds 22- Morals 23- Nautical pole 24- Portion

25- Spanish hero 29- Bed down 30- Polite refusal (2) 32- Worn around the neck 33- Individual 34- Threepio’s buddy 35- Unit of volume 36- Unfettered 44- Proposed 45- Did penance 46- Like angel food cake 48- Peruses 49- Sing the praises of 50- Start of a Dickens title (2) 51- Ventilated 52- In the least (2) 54- Pipe 55- French clergyman 59- Be in the hole 60- Fleur-de-___ 61- Baseball’s Mel

Last Week's Solution

Congratulations to this week's crossword winner: Michaela Wintjes. Stop by the Ontarion office to pick up your prize!

SUBMIT your completed crossword by no later than Monday, February 4th at 4pm for a chance to win TWO FREE BOB’S DOG’S!

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170.4 ◆ january 31st, 2013

community listings 107 (Goldschmidt room). Admission free – donations gratefully appreciated. Everyone welcome! Friday February 1 Better Sleep Program: Learn how to decrease insomnia, fall asleep (or back to sleep) more easily, and get more energy from sleep using proven, drug-free strategies. This five-session program meets Fridays from 12:30 to 1:30pm. Details at www.uoguelph.ca/~ksomers.

Thursday January 31 Better Sleep Program evening group begins at 7:30 pm. Learn how to decrease insomnia and fall asleep more easily. Details at www.uoguelph.ca/~ksomers.

Economics Visiting Speaker Seminar - Prof. Fred Bereskin from the University of Delaware will discuss “Corporate Philanthropy and Innovation.” For more information, visit www.uoguelph.ca/ economics/node/1322 or contact jgoertz@uoguelph.ca 3:30 -5pm in MacKinnon, Room 307.

welcome. Mondays 7pm -9pm, Innovation Guelph (111 Farquhar Street). Strategic advice and support; guest presentations; motivation to stay on track; worldwide Information exchange. PWYC. Info:1 866 873 7633 www.careeraviators.com Tuesday February 5 Guelph Life Drawing. Tuesdays (7-10pm) and Saturdays (1-4pm). Admission/$15 or 5 classes/$50. Open to beginners and the experienced alike. Come and enjoy gestural drawing (Tuesdays) or a single sustained pose (Saturdays). Any medium welcome. Contact: Garth.Laidlaw@

gmail.com; blogspot.ca

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Wednesday February 6 Central Student Association and Guelph Pride present the Winter Pride Open Mic Night where you can showcase your talent on stage! The mic is open for anyone. Free event. 7:30-Midnight, Bullring, 107 Trent Lane. Www.Guelphpride.Com/Winterpride2013. TransCanada Institute Reading Series -Suzette Mayr, awardwinning author of Monoceros, a 2011 Giller Prize nominee, will read at noon at the TransCanada Institute. A light luncheon will be provided. Register at transcan@ uoguelph.ca. Information: www. transcanadas.ca.

Guelph: Silence. An exciting portal in Guelph for adventurous and innovative sound events covering a wide range of music. 8pm [$10 or pwyc] at Macdonald Stewart Art Centre (358 Gordon St. Guelph). www.silencesounds. ca

Saturday February 2 19th Environmental Sciences Symposium. From 10am until 5pm we will be exploring Traditional Knowledge and Cultural Perspectives on the Environment through a variety of speaking sessions, workshops, and displays. For more information visit enviroscisymposium2013.com

CSA Annual General Meeting: Calling all undergraduate students! The CSA needs 200 students for quorum. Find out what your student union is up to, learn more about student issues, ask questions. For more information, visit https://www.facebook. com/events/127658220734301/. 5:30pm in University Centre, Peter Clarke Hall (basement).

Thursday At Noon Concert Series. Concerts start at 12:00p.m. Thursdays in Mackinnon room

Monday February 3 Career Aviators Business Career Club: Students and professionals

Thursday February 7 LGBT Social Justice Workshop @ 7:30-9pm, CSA Board Room,

2nd Floor UC. Free workshop -come learn about various social justice issues facing the LGBT community both locally and internationally. Space is limited, first come, first served.

classifieds SERVICES NEED ESSAY HELP! All subjects, research, writing and editing specialists, toll free 1 888 345 8295 customessay@bellnet.ca. Join our advertising team and make great commissions by placing posters around campus. Details: 416-280-6113.


Congratulations to Twitter contest participants

@ranciddy, @erinnnna, @Hamiltonkevin, @alexekruger, @sashaodyssey, @Susannah_pizza, and @wendellshep.

You’ve each won a pair of passes to a Hillside event of your choice. Selection is limited, so come into the office and claim yours now! First come, first served!


The Ontarion January 31st 2013 170.4