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OK DINGHY www.okdia.org

International THIRD WORLD TITLE FOR BUDZIEN

rod davis on OKs

NOVEMBER 2018 LÖÖF WINS EUROPEANS • MORTEN ANDERSEN TALKS • SYNERGY MARINE


speed makes you happy

made by Greg Wilcox in Potsdam 7 World Championship Titles National Championship Titles all around the World AUS, BEL, DEN, FRA, GBR, GER, NZL, SWE

950,00 Euro inkl. Mwst. , DSV-Vermessung und Class Royalty Label

Turtle Sails, Juliane Hofmann und Greg Wilcox Alter Tornow 1, 14473 Potsdam • 0331 6012254 • mail@turtlesails.de • www.turtlesails.de

OK DINGHY PARTS AND SPARES | REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE ART OF RACING PARTS | FOILS | SEASURE | HARKEN | BOOKS Contact: Alistair Deaves alistair@icebreakerboats.co.nz • Tel: +64 (0)21 423 504 Full parts list at: www.icebreakerboats.co.nz/SHOP


OK DINGHY INTERNATIONAL Issue 4 - November 2018 The official magazine of the OK Dinghy International Association

President’s Letter

www.okdia.org Editor:

Robert Deaves, 2 Exeter Road, Ipswich, IP3 8JL, UK Tel: +44 7932 047046 Email: publicity@okdia.org

OKDIA COMMITTEE 2018-19 President Mark Jackson, AUS

Secretary Robert Deaves, GBR

Vice president Northern hemisphere Jonas Börjesson, SWE

Treasurer Nick Craig, GBR

president@okdia.org

vicepresident-nh@okdia.org

Vice president Southern hemisphere Mike Wilde, NZL vicepresident-sh@okdia.org

VICE PRESIDENT other Peter Robinson, AUS okdia@vigil.tech

secretary@okdia.org

treasurer@okdia.org

Webmaster Peter Scheuerl, GER webmaster@okdia.org

Chairman Marketing Committee Robert Deaves, GBR publicity@okdia.org

Chairman Technical Committee Alistair Deaves, NZL technical@okdia.org

The OK Dinghy International Association (OKDIA) is the world governing body for the OK Dinghy class. Its members consist of the National OK Dinghy Associations in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Sweden, The Netherlands and USA. Official website: www.okdia.org Worlds website: YEAR.okworlds.org Europeans website: YEAR.okeuropeans.org Class Rules website: rules.okdinghy.org Postal address: OKDIA, 2 Exeter Road, Ipswich, IP3 8JL, UK We are also on: You can also read this magazine online at: issuu.com/okdinghy

Dear OK Dinghy Sailors,

I

t has been a busy time for OK Dinghy sailors around the world and for your elected committee. It is hard to believe that we will be gathering for another World Championship in Wakatere, New Zealand in a few weeks’ time. We are currently preparing for the AGM, which will include some changes to the Constitution to continue our implementation of the Strategic Road Map.

I have personally had great fun sailing my OK Dinghy since the last newsletter, travelling to the Gold Coast in Queensland for the Australian Nationals in January, Wakatere New Zealand for the Interdominions in February, the Warnemünde in Germany for the World Championship. I am currently waiting to get back in my own boat after its return from Germany and then it is Sail Melbourne, followed by the Australian Championships at Black Rock in December/ January and then the boat is back in a container for shipping to Auckland for the Pre Worlds and Worlds in February 2019. I had a great time at Warnemünde. It was my first time sailing there and now I know why it was chosen as the venue for the 2018 Worlds. I would have loved to go to the Europeans in Bandol. It looked amazing. I only hope I can visit and sail there in the not too distant future. While I have been sailing OK Dinghies for many years, in the last few years I have seen a great number of really positive changes. The growth of the class in Europe, the introduction of new manufacturers, the quality and variety of products now available and the incredible new talent choosing the OK Dinghy as their boat of choice. Of course this latter point just pushes me further down the score board, but it makes for close and exciting racing right through the fleet. I look forward to catching up with everyone in New Zealand.

Mark Jackson President OKDIA

Advertising: Advertising opportunities are available in this magazine, on okdia.org and in the email newsletters. A Media Pack can be down‑loaded from okdia.org. Book a package to get coverage of your products across all OKDIA platforms and reach all registered OK Dinghy sailors worldwide. Content: Please send all content to publicity@okdia.org for the next issue. Published occasionally and some issues may only be published online. Disclaimer: The opinion expressed herein are not necessarily those of the editor or OKDIA. While every effort is made to ensure accuracy of content, no liability can be accepted for inaccuracies or omissions. NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

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NEWS c

hrOniKle is an anecdotal history of the OK Dinghy to celebrate its 60th anniversary in 2017. It includes 100 stories, many of which are illustrated, drawn from all periods of the class’s history. Old stories are complemented by new stories, with many class legends and tales of folklore told and embellished down the years in print for the first time.

Stories of derring-do from the past six decades are complemented by extracts from class archives and important turning points for the class. In these pages you can read about some of the defining

moments in the class: the famous European tours by Australians and New Zealanders in the 1980s, wise words from some of the supreme champions of the class, anecdotes about some of the larger than life characters who have sailed the OK Dinghy, reminiscences of events and boats long passed, dodging East German guards during the Cold War, the 1998 full monty, ditch hopping in Belgium, drinking jackets, the scandal at Olpenitz, fly tipping, drinking stories, personal perspectives, colourful fables from the past, the epic storm of 1982 and the even more epic prizegiving night that followed. Order here: http://mybook.to/chrOniKle

UK welcomes 2022 World Championship

editorial

News that the 2022 World Championship will be held in the UK has been warmly welcomed by the class’s UK chairman. Bill Bradburn was speaking after the International OK Dinghy Association approved Lyme Regis Sailing Club on the UK’s south coast. Based for many years at South Staffordshire SC, Bill said: “The successful bid was based on providing a great sailing venue and a fabulous place to visit and Lyme Regis ticks both boxes We also want to encourage the mid-fleet racers that this will be an event for them, as well as attracting sailors from other classes with tight competition and a first class location.” Lyme Regis SC has a large, easy launching area, a 10 minute sail to the race area and experienced race officers. There will be free food and drink at the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as free food and drink when competitors come ashore after racing. The venue is on the beautiful ‘Jurassic Coast’ with family-friendly sandy beaches. There will be free camping close by and the town has plenty of hotels, B&Bs and other campsites, as well as plenty of restaurants, pubs and cafes. Five-time OK World Champion Nick Craig also supported the bid and is a big fan of Lyme Regis. He said: “I have sailed there many times and on a good day the waves are perfect, matching the size and fun of Warnemünde; long rolling waves ideal for surfing an OK.”

his edition of the OK Dinghy Magazine is rather late. Good intentions to publish in April were blown to the four winds as summer approached with a busy regatta schedule that precluded work being completed.

Photo by James Loveridge

4

T

It has been a busy time for OKDIA, not just with events but also with admin and governance issues, many of which will be discussed at the AGM in Auckland in February. However, the number of people attending the main events is, I hope, proof that we are doing a few things right. At the moment there is a scrabble for boats for next year when a lot of new faces are joining the class. It is an exciting time to be sailing the OK Dinghy so hopefully these pages will encourage you to venture out somewhere in 2019 if you have not already done so. Robert

ok dinghy international magazine


2019 Calendar The 2019 OK Dinghy Calendar is now available featuring some of the best images from the 2018 season. Look for it on okdia.org or on www.lulu.com/spotlight/robertdeaves Cost is £13.99 plus handling OK Dinghy Calendar 2019

www.okdia.org

Equipment used by top 10 boats at major events 2017-2018

European Championship 2017 Pl. Sail No. Hull 1 NOR 428 Strandberg 2 GBR 1 Ovington 3 DEN 1471 Strandberg 4 SWE 100 VYS 5 NZL 573 Ovington 6 SWE 797 VYS 7 GER 772 Kraus 8 POL 1 Idol 9 GER 71 Idol 10 NZL 566 Synergy

Mast Celidh C-Tech C-Tech C-Tech C-Tech Ceilidh C-Tech C-Tech C-Tech C-tech

Sail Green North Green North North Green Green Green North Turtle

World Championship 2017 Pl. Sail No Hull Builder/shape 1 GBR 2195 Synergy 2 GBR 11 Synergy 3 NZL 546 O’Connell (Leech) 4 NZL 545 McDowell (Leech) 5 NZL 517 Cookson (Icebreaker) 6 AUS 749 Jason King (Delfs) 7 NZL 551 Icebreaker NZ (Delfs) 8 GBR2191 Ovington 9 NZL 566 Synergy 10 DEN 3 Synergy

Mast C-Tech Ceiledh C-Tech C-Tech C-Tech C-Tech C-Tech Ceilidh C-Tech Ceilidh

Sail Boom HD Needlespar HD Allen North NZ AoR Turtle AoR North NZ AoR Turtle North NZ AoR HD Allen Turtle AoR Green Allen

Rudder Synergy Synergy Chris Reid Stechmann Ron Bull Jason King Deaves Ovington C-Tech Synergy

Ron Bull Jason King Deaves Ovington Synergy Synergy

European Champioship 2018 Pl. Sail No. Hull 1 SWE 69 Ovington 2 GBR 6 Ovington 3 SWE 100 Vejle YS 4 DEN 1507 Strandberg 5 GBR 44 Ovington 6 FRA 11 Synergy 7 POL 1 Ovington 8 NZL 582 Synergy 9 POL 14 Concept Mysliszow 10 DEN 6 Icebreaker NZ

Mast Ceilidh Ceilidh Ceilidh C-Tech Ceilidh C-Tech Ceilidh/C-Tech C-Tech C-Tech C-Tech

Sail Green North North Green HD/HD Turtle Green Turtle Green Quantum

Boom Allen Allen AoR Sjögren Allen Needlespar Allen AoR Needlespar Sjögren

Rudder Ovington Ovington Ovington Strandberg Ovington Synergy Ovington C-Tech Concept Icebreaker

Board Ovington Ovington Kraus Strandberg Ovington Synergy Ovington Synergy Concept Icebreaker

World Championship 2018 Pl. Sail No. Hull 1 GER 71 Ovington 2 SWE 69 Ovington 3 GER 18 Strandberg 4 GBR 6 Ovington 5 SWE 100 Vejle 6 DEN 1507 Strandberg 7 NOR 428 Strandberg 8 NZL 582 Synergy 9 GER 803 Strandberg 10 NZL 573 Ovington

Mast Ceilidh C-Tech Ceilidh Ceilidh Celidh C-Tech Ceilidh C-Tech Ceilidh C-tech

Sail North Green North North North Green Green Turtle Green North

Boom Allen Allen Allen Allen AoR Allen Allen AoR Allen Allen

Rudder Ovington Ovington Strandberg Ovington Vejle Strandberg Strandberg C-Tech Strandberg Ovington

Board Ovington Ovington Strandberg Ovington Vejle Strandberg Strandberg Synergy Strandberg Ovington

NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

Rudder Strandberg Ovington Strandberg Kraus Ovington Kraus Kraus Szymik Idol C-Tech

Board Strandberg Owington Strandberg Kraus Ovington Kraus Kraus Idol Idol Synergy

Board Synergy Synergy O’Connell

5


GER Third World Title I

Andre Budzien clinches third world title after close series

n one of the closest finishes ever to an OK Dinghy world championship, André Budzien lifted his third world title after a dramatic final race decider following a close series fought at Warnemünde, Germany from 10-14 July.

Warnemünde is one of the more favourite venues for the OK Dinghy class so it was no real surprise that the 2018 World Championship attracted a huge entry. In the end 125 boats took to the water, with the fleet split into two groups during the week for the first time in the class’s history. While there were a high number of former world champions in the fleet, the real interest was in a few former top Finn sailors who had recently moved into the class, and the title was between three of them in the final race. Following weeks of hot and sunny weather along the Baltic coast, the week of the worlds was characterised by unsettled weather, with several fronts passing over. However, the wind remained largely good, apart from the Thursday, when no racing was possible because of light winds. Former Junior Finn world champion, Jan Kurfeld, from Germany was the leader after the first day with two races in 12-18 knots. He shared race wins with Budzien, Lars Johan Brodtkorb, from Norway and Fredrik Lööf, from Sweden. Brodtkorb was a former Europe world champion

and occasional Finn sailor, while Lööf was sailing only his second OK Dinghy event in 30 years, having won the Nordic championship a few weeks earlier on his return to the class he last sailed when he was 17 years old. Kurfeld. “I really enjoyed it today. We had perfect conditions with 5-6 Beaufort, sunshine all the time, nice waves, north-easterly wind so I guess everybody is really satisfied with today and it was just a brilliant start to the worlds.” Former European champion, Bo Petersen, from Denmark, noted, “It’s a tough fleet and you have to use all your energy just to keep on and not lose metres. You really have to be on it.” On the influx of new sailors over the past year. “I think it’s very good for the class. I think the class a value that has really brought in all those new faces and that’s good for the OK Dinghy class. Hopefully there will be more youngsters coming in as well.” Budzien initially took the lead on the second day of racing with two more races sailed in an unstable 8-12 knots, and damp conditions. Lööf and Kurfeld also won races, along with double world champion, Jim Hunt, from Britain. However, after late night redress hearings on Wednesday, Hunt was given a UFD disqualification after an incorrect identification of a premature starter. This left Kurfeld still leading overall from Budzien and Lööf. This trio were already beginning to build a small gap on the fleet. Steve Wilson, from Australia was sailing at his first OK Dinghy worlds outside Australia and relished the experience. “It’s fantastic. I have never raced anything like it in my entire

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ok dinghy international magazine


2018 world Championship | WARNEMUNDE

life. I’ve never sailed in any fleet quite like it. There are people from all over the world, with different abilities and different sailing skills and they are all fantastic sailors. It’s absolutely fantastic sailing against this calibre fleet. It’s a great boat for that and I thoroughly enjoy sailing it. The people, the camaraderie, everyone helps everyone else, the social side of it, everyone is very welcoming and hospitable. It’s a real pleasure of a class to sail and I recommend it highly to anybody.” Thursday was supposed to be the end of the qualifying series before the fleet was split into gold and silver groups, however with no wind, the qualifying series was extended into Friday with just one day of finals racing. Lööf had come into the championship as everyone’s favourite to take the title and on the final day of the qualifying series moved into a two point lead. Kurfeld and Budzien were locked together two points back in second and third, but with only 12 points between first and eighth, the world title was still wide open. Friday brought the conditions that everyone loves to come to Warnemünde to experience: westerly winds, big seas and challenging racing. Yellow fleet was dominated by Brodtkorb and Charlie Cumbley, from Britain, while Lööf and Hunt won the races in the blue fleet. The points battle at the top was already developing with Lööf and Kurfeld holding each other up, which let Hunt escape to take the win. Brodtkorb, “I had really good starts near the pin end in both races and tried to play the shifts. In the second race Charlie had a little bit of leverage on me from the start, so he had the better path to the mark and it was all over from there so he just won it by miles. But the first one was really tight. On the finish line I was on the right side and crossed by maybe two boatlengths. It was really nothing. It was so tight; I think maybe five boats finished in ten seconds. That one felt good. I really needed it to get back into contention.” Former world champion, Thomas Hansson-Mild, from Sweden, said, “It was a good day but not good enough unfortunately. I had a second and a fourth. It was a hard struggle. There are many guys that are really, really good. The level in the class is just getting higher and higher, so for me I have to step up every year, and that’s not easy.” Lööf, “We had nice races today. It was paradise sailing with 10-14 knots, small shifts, nothing major, On the downwind you just had to find a good track but once you got that it was easy, so a good day.” NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

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2018 world Championship | WARNEMUNDE

Speaking about the OK Dinghy fleet, “This is a really nice fleet with good competitors. The guys really know the boat and they are helping me out a bit, so I am getting around the course quite nicely. I want to sail in a class where you don’t need to train too much but still need to keep fit, and I enjoy this kind of sailing, like the Star and the Finn, but the OK is a lighter and easier boat to sail, but in a way is more technical so your body movements are really important, so I really enjoy it.” The final day was expected to be tight, but no one expected it to be at tight as it turned out. It was a dramatic conclusion as well, with Kurfeld thinking he had won the title, after winning the final race, only to find out on shore afterwards that he had been disqualified as a premature starter. After a week of close competition, the world title came down to three sailors. The conditions on the final day in Warnemünde were perhaps the best yet with 14-18 knots of breeze and perfect waves. The only thing lacking was the sunshine. Kurfeld make the first strike with an impressive win in Race 7 from Budzien and Hansson-Mild. Lööf was up there for a while but dropped to fourth at the finish. Going into the deciding race, there was one point separating the top three and it could not have been closer. Kurfeld was again the pace maker, leading the fleet around the course. Lööf was challenging hard and on the final upwind was pushing Kurfeld tack for tack in an attempt to force a mistake and a chance to pass. This pushed them both to the right side of the final beat, and this allowed Budzien the chance to escape to the left and make up some ground Coming into the finish, it was really close and the three boats approached the finish line from different directions. In the end Kurfeld crossed just seconds ahead 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

GER 71 Andrè Budzien 1 2 1 2 (4) 3 2 1 SWE 69 Fredrik Loof 1 3 2 1 1 2 (4) 2 GER 18 Jan Kurfeld 2 1 1 2 3 3 1 (ufd) GBR 6 Charlie Cumbley 5 4 2 1 3 1 (6) 4 SWE 100 Thomas Hansson-Mild 3 2 (8) 4 2 4 3 3 DEN 1507 Bo Petersen 2 3 3 3 2 4 (13) 7 NOR 428 Lars Johan Brodtkorb 3 1 6 (11) 1 2 5 10 NZL 582 Greg Wilcox 8 5 9 6 7 5 (21) 6 GER 803 Martin V Zimmermann 8 8 (11) 4 6 7 7 8 NZL 573 Luke Gower 4 (17) 5 9 7 10 10 5 POL 1 Tomasz Gaj 5 9 4 6 8 (11) 11 9 SWE 797 Mats Caap 7 7 5 7 8 9 12 (24) GER 77 Sönke Behrens 4 7 8 5 5 11 (19) 18 GBR 69 Terry Curtis 13 8 4 8 13 5 (16) 13 GBR 44 Chris Turner 12 (dnc) 10 3 6 7 17 11 AUS 768 Mark Jackson 6 6 6 (36) 10 6 25 15 GER 792 Lars Haverland 11 4 9 25 12 13 8 (dnc) DEN 10 Jens Lauge 21 11 7 5 13 6 (26) 19 GBR 2183 Richard Burton 9 6 (dnc) 36 5 9 9 12 SWE 139 Hans Börjesson 19 12 7 7 (24) 10 15 17 GER 2 Gunter Arndt 9 10 12 18 9 12 22 (27) GBR 17 David Bourne 14 13 16 10 10 18 14 (32) POL 14 Pawel Pawlaczyk 10 13 15 13 11 20 (28) 16 DEN 1510 Jan Hempel Sparsø 18 17 18 19 14 8 (43) 20 GBR 13 Alex Scoles 17 12 24 11 11 15 (33) 26 GER 3 Wolfgang Höfener 12 (dnc) 12 12 15 20 20 28 DEN 1487 Henrik Kofoed 24 16 24 15 12 8 (42) 21 GER 5 Ralf Tietje 15 11 10 10 (32) 23 31 22 DEN 22 Ask Askholm 15 9 22 14 20 17 29 (42) SWE 2846 Jonas Börjesson 18 23 11 20 15 14 32 (43) DEN 1477 Jørgen Holm 19 14 26 14 16 13 (49) 33 AUS 719 Glenn Williams 23 15 14 42 9 14 23 (46) DEN 12 Morten Andersen 13 15 28 22 27 17 18 (37) AUS 754 Brent Williams 7 27 (32) 19 23 18 27 25 GBR 28 Anthony Osman (41) 30 14 12 16 12 34 29 GBR 11 Jim Hunt 6 5 3 (ufd) 4 1 ufd dnc GER 823 Karsten Kraus 26 21 19 24 22 15 36 (50) GER 775 Jörg Rademacher 16 14 27 27 19 (39) 38 23 SWE 59 Lars Edwall 11 20 13 9 (dns) dns 30 14 POL 7 Marek Bernat 25 38 16 8 21 27 37 (52) GER 7 Andreas Pich 34 22 20 16 19 21 (46) 40 GBR 2179 Tony Woods 25 18 17 13 (dnf) 26 35 39 GER 11 Rainer Pospiech 20 24 18 26 20 24 47 (dnc) GER 75 Dirk Dame 22 21 41 17 34 23 (55) 30 DEN 1431 Joe Schubert 31 10 33 31 17 16 51 (dns) GER 81 Jan-Dietmar Dellas 10 19 (45) 40 18 42 24 36 AUS 741 Steve Wilson 32 35 15 29 14 30 41 (dnc) DEN 1509 Peter Wibroe 17 19 25 30 25 41 39 (dns) GBR 95 Duncan Ellis 20 30 28 23 23 29 (44) 44 GBR 2176 Keith Byers 22 23 13 45 25 33 (52) 38 NED 673 Stephan Veldman 31 26 21 17 31 21 (62) 55 GER 789 Ingo Ballerstein 14 16 37 27 43 31 (53) 35 GER 690 Carsten Sass 33 20 25 26 22 34 (48) 47 DEN 1442 Peter Heide (dsq) 18 37 28 26 25 40 34 DEN 1433 Henrik Kimmer Petersen 27 22 31 36 29 24 45 (48) SWE 99 Hans Elkjaer 16 26 23 43 35 29 (58) 45 GER 225 Jan Dissel 28 28 17 44 24 22 (60) 57 GER 715 Sven Beye 23 25 19 44 30 33 50 (51) GER 731 Thomas Glas 26 27 23 31 32 28 61 (dns) DEN 1407 Malte Pedersen 24 (ufd) 21 28 18 36 67 41

16 16 85 26 29 37 39 67 59 67 63 79 77 80 138 110 154 108 158 111 119 127 126 157 149 191 162 154 168 176 184 186 177 178 188 235 213 203 241 224 218 245 251 243 261 234 268 268 241 251 264 256 255 280 262 275 280 275 300 307

ok dinghy international magazine


2018 world Championship | WARNEMUNDE

61 GER 12 Stefan Rassau 27 31 42 16 38 19 65 (dns) 310 62 AUS 77 Shane Smith 35 38 30 21 33 28 54 (dns) 311 63 SWE 2809 Tomas Skeppmark 28 30.8 27 29 37 30 (59) 58 298.8 64 GER 9 Andreas Deubel 29 40 30 21 26 35 (63) 59 303 65 GBR 2188 Ian Hopwood 21 (ufd) 33 42 17 32 ufd 31 320 66 NZL 565 Simon Probert 32 36 39 41 27 26 (64) 49 314 67 POL 44 Przemyslaw Drozdzik 30 24 40 33 45 27 (66) 53 318 68 FRA 1820 Dejugnat Julien 43 (dnc) 29 25 29 19 56 56 329 69 GER 111 Rainer Haacks 36 35 20 30 33 34 (dnf) dns 332 70 GER 22 Dirk Gericke 29 39 39 18 36 47 (57) 54 319 71 AUS 735 Daen Dorazio 39 29 43 23 39 25 (dns) dnc 342 72 GER 21 Holger Krasmann 37 34 31 47 21 (dnf) 2 1.5 245.5 73 GER 8 Ronald Foest (53) 28 34 35 46 38 3 3 240 74 GER 777 Jörg Sylvester (41) 37 35 38 35 35 10 6 237 75 SWE 7 Bengt Larsson (dnc) dnc 58 20 34 16 1 1.5 274.5 76 GER 812 Michael Möckel 38 (dnc) 41 32 40 42 6 5 276 77 AUS 692 Bob Buchanan 33 36 38 (48) 42 41 7 10 255 78 DEN 1508 Thomas Olufsen Meyer 36 42 26 34 37 32 13 (dnc) 292 79 GER 746 Julius Raithel (52) 37 36 37 39 38 18 16 273 80 AUS 740 Richard Furneaux 34 31 44 (51) 44 50 14 7 275 81 GER 757 Falk Hagemann 38 33 (48) 39 38 48 16 20 280 82 DEN 1482 Tim Normann 42 40 (48) 46 41 31 27 11 286 83 AUS 759 Elizabeth Williams (49) 46 47 43 47 37 15 4 288 84 SWE 55 Ulf Sahle 46 (dnc) 40 38 41 40 21 13 311 85 GER 607 Gerd Breitbart 47 (51) 46 33 43 43 11 21 295 86 GER 781 Stefan Haage 30 33 38 49 45 45 5 (dns) 317 87 DEN 1419 Henri Skou (dnc) dnc 42 39 40 36 12 8 321 88 GER 695 Erik Bork 39 29 (dnc) dnc 47 43 8 12 322 89 NED 669 Sybren Hornstra 44 41 50 40 (51) 49 19 25 319 90 GBR 18 Deryck Lovegrove 42 42 55 (56) 48 54 17 14 328 91 GER 820 Heinz Ridder 48 47 34 53 (54) 53 25 17 331 92 DEN 1505 Peter Plesner 45 49 52 (53) 46 48 24 15 332 93 DEN 1392 Poul Vincents 48 39 49 47 (51) 49 30 19 332 94 AUS 727 Donald Williams 40 41 53 54 42 46 (ufd) 9 357 95 AUS 767 Glenn Yates 44 48 52 46 52 (54) 22 22 340 96 GBR 8 Tom Lonsdale 46 45 22 32 30 39 (dnc) dnc 358 97 GER 821 Jochen Lollert 54 32 44 45 36 (dnc) 4 ufd 359 98 POL 19 Grzegorz Salamon 43 34 36 34 28 40 dnf dnc 359 99 GER 751 Knut Ramin 52 44 47 50 49 (53) 29 18 342 100 GER 767 Juliane Hofmann (dnc) dnc 29 37 48 37 9 ufd 376 101 AUS 706 Erik Thompson 55 50 45 55 (57) 51 28 23 364 102 NZL 569 Phil Coveny 50 53 (54) 49 52 50 32 24 364 103 GBR 68 Rodney Tidd 51 52 49 48 44 46 23 (dns) 385 104 GER 809 Axel Fischer 37 32 35 24 49 (dnf) dnc dnc 393 105 DEN 1484 Olof Stenström 51 (dnc 51 52 53 45 26 dns 422 106 GER 178 Axel Propp 49 (dnc 50 51 56 44 33 dns 427 107 DEN 1424 Henrik Hamann (dnc) dnc 43 22 31 44 ufd ufd 428 108 GBR 2080 Paul Pike 56 (dnc) 57 57 55 dns 34 26 429 109 GBR 63 Brian Quayle 54 (dnc) 54 55 53 52 31 dns 443 110 DEN 1458 Søren Sigurdsson 53 43 55 54 50 47 (dnc) dnc 446 111 DEN 1463 Lars Andresen 40 (dnc) dnc dnc 28 22 ufd dnc 450 112 NED 667 Hessel Hoekstra (dnc) dnc 32 41 dnc dnc 20 dns 453 113 GER 784 Claus Stockhardt 50 (dnf) 51 52 50 51 dnc dnc 470 114 SWE 2791 Roine Ericson 45 (dnc) 56 58 55 52 dnf dnc 482 115 GER 79 Frank Strelow 35 25 dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 492 116 DEN 1417 Ingo Griem (dnc) dnc 56 56 54 55 dnc dnc 509 117 DEN 666 Peter Zeiler (dnc) dnc 46 35 dnc dnc dnc dnc 513 118 GER 567 Jan Beckmann (dns) dnc 53 50 dnc dnc dnc dnc 535 119 GER 686 Jaroslaw Soltys 47 (ufd) dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 551 120 GER 539 Uli Borchers 55 (dnc) dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 559

NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

of Budzien with Lööf only ten seconds back in third. It was perhaps the closest finish to an OK Dinghy world championship ever. Kurfeld thought he was world champion until it emerged once they were back to shore that he was a premature starter. The committee vessel was upwind of the finish and no one went to look. This left him third overall while Budzien and Lööf had exactly the same scoreline. Countback of results failed to break the tie, so it was decided on the result of the final race. Lööf’s decision to attack Kurfeld rather than defend against Budzien had cost him the title. But what an incredible finish; it was a close, exciting finish by three outstanding sailors; a brilliant display of boat handling, tactics and intense competition. Budzien commented, “First I am really happy to have won this world championship for the third time now. It was a long and hard week and I never had so many strong competitors with me. It was really nice to race against Jan and Freddy and also the others in the top 15 are really strong. The conditions were nicer than we thought. We had one day without sailing, but the others were perfect and it was a really tight victory in the end. At the end we have two winners; or even three.” Speaking about the current success and growth of the class he said, “Last year Jan started to think about OK sailing and it makes good sense if you are out of the Olympic circus and have not much time, then the OK Dinghy class is the best singlehanded class to sail, which has a special performance. I think the class will grow in the future much more than we think at the moment.”

9


.EWWINDSBLOWING INTHE7"/+SAIL

Robert Deaves

We have initiated a comprehensive development programme for our OK sail design, based on our success and experience with the Finn. Watch our website for progress and news.


Great Expectations Four years in to the Strategic Roadmap, we look at the way forward and what has been achieved so far

I

n 2013 the class held its world championship in Thailand. Not only was it an overwhelming success but it was also a turning point in the history of the class. It was the second time the class had chosen an ‘exotic’ location and the organisation and racing was fantastic. Everyone who went had a great time, but it was all done in the traditional OK way, by volunteers and on a shoestring. But that was the way OKDIA had successfully operated for decades.

One warm evening overlooking the Gulf of Thailand, after a few beers, a comment was passed that the event was so good that perhaps we should consider making it possible more often. And then, what would be needed to be put in place to make that happen. Then a discussion began about how as a class we could expand our horizons, make the class and the events more interesting, more attractive and grow the class. Everyone there knew how good the OK Dinghy was to sail and be involved in, but they also felt it had a lot of untapped potential. After the Thailand event finished, work began on a business plan that was to evolve into the Strategic Roadmap for the OK class. It was never initially intended to become so far reaching or ambitious, but once everyone started thinking, it kept expanding into the document that has become the blueprint for everything that has happened since. It took some time to get general acceptance but was formally ratified at the AGM in Melbourne in December 2014. A statement released by OKDIA in the lead up to its adoption is now an important reflection four years later; “the executive of the class cannot continue on the current basis and provide services and put on events that will achieve any growth beyond current borders. The funding of OKDIA is very small and the demands for an active OKDIA are rising. The Strategic Roadmap serves to give a list of ideas for a future Committee to pursue; it provides a variety of proposals for the benefit of the class. It is not a document carved in stone for any future Committee to follow, however it is needed as a mandate to support further initiatives.” The objectives of the roadmap could be summarised as: • To increase membership and increase participation • To build a strong class that has a foundation to sustain it for the next 10 years. NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

• To establish a more efficient operational structure incorporating the appointment of paid class officials. • To become the natural choice for non-Olympic singlehanded sailors • To become a leading class for media, marketing, communication and administration • To stage attractive global events that are well attended and competitive. While some of the goals stated in the Roadmap were over ambitious on purpose, others were more achievable in the short term: • Restructure committee and redefine roles with specific, and achievable, goals, including Paid Class Manager by 2016 • Rewrite Constitution and Class Rules • Class magazine, online and/or print • Increase revenue generation (memberships, event fees, advertising, sponsorship) • Use revenue for other tasks: website development, promotional materials and video, media etc In four years a great deal of progress has made and most of these goals have been achieved. Most have been possible by the increase in OKDIA’s financial strength, enabling the Committee to invest in areas that a few years ago would have been impossible. However, we are not even half way into a 10 year plan and the OKDIA Committee remains committed to working towards achievement and delivery of the strategic goals for the improvement and strengthening of the class worldwide. Of particular priority are; • Restructure committee and improve governance structure • Review and rewrite the Constitution. Consider smaller member (NCAs) or individual membership of OKDIA • Association incorporation and liability insurance • Increase professionalism of key roles for Secretary/Manager, Technical, Online and Media/Marketing and Publicity. • Improve functioning and administration such as the database of boats and members. We have come a long way in four years, and the next six years could see even greater change and greater opportunities to share the OK Dinghy with more sailors in more great venues. 11


stronger | stiffer | faster aor@artofracing.co.nz european agent | greg@turtlesails.de

Strandberg Marine strandbergmarine@gmail.com • +45 29 42 12 05

www.strandberg-marine.com


SWE Perfect Start In Race 6 at the European Championship in Bandol, Thomas Hansson-Mild (SWE 100) executed a text book port tack start

NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

13


MATS CAAP interview

GBR Synergized Speed An look behind the scenes at UK builder, Synergy Marine

O

ne of the more successful builders of OK Dinghies in recent years is Synergy Marine, located on the east coast of the UK. Run by the indomitable Simon Cox, they produced their first boats in 2011 and developed the product until the big breakthrough in 2016 when Jim Hunt won the 2016 World Championship in Quiberon, after borrowing one of the first boats built, and still regarded as one of the fastest OK Dinghies in the world, GBR 2151. Orders followed and at the 2017 World Championship in Barbados, Synergy boats took the top two places with Nick Craig winning and Hunt in second. Along with Jørgen Svendsen, these three won every race during the series.

Cox never intended to build OK Dinghies, but after being dissatisfied with the boat he had been sailing, and given a golden opportunity to take over a previously very successful mould, he built a few boats and then made the investment in a new mould. “I’d been sailing Larks for years (a British 2-man symmetric spinnaker dinghy) and was getting a bit fat for them and I needed a break. Jon Fish was also a former Lark sailor and was sailing OKs at my club. Fish had a spare boat and offered

14

to loan it. I had two weekends practice before I attended my first British Nationals in 2009. I think what hooked me on the class at the time was leading around the first mark of the first race. Unfortunately I was terrible downwind and spent a lot of time swimming. It was great learning new skills in a singlehander and that’s kept me coming back.” “I didn’t enter the class with the view of building boats. Synergy Marine was set up to build foils and repair boats. I liked the idea of building my own boat but not going into production.” “I borrowed Fish’s Aardvark Icebreaker copy for a couple of years to get an idea of what I liked and didn’t like. I was getting increasingly frustrated with my ability to get the boat going downwind. I’d often round the first mark at opens in the top three and then park. I’d see Terry Curtis, Ian Harris and Keith Byers motor past me. It was mostly technique but also, I felt, the difference between the hull shapes.” “Having seen most of the popular designs in action I decided that the Icebreaker shape just didn’t work for me and I needed a boat that could help make up for my lack of ability downwind. Andy Turner suggested that the original Skipper mould that had produced Ian Harris’ boat was available and had been unused for a number of years. I was soon pretty convinced that the Dave Rose/Skipper shape was the way to go.” The Skipper mould was the final development of various hulls built by David Rose during the 1980s and 1990s. It culminated with the mould that produced a handful of fast boats in 2003, most notably the 2003 European Championship winning boat, BEL 44, sailed by Bart Bomans. Cox decided to build a few boats with Paul Church for their own use using this old Skipper mould. Using an epoxy FRP construction from the old wooden mould, Church spraypainted the boats. Fish and a couple of others tried the first boat and ordered boats. As is often the case with boatbuilders, Cox ended up not having time to build his own boat. “In 2013 we decided to build a new GRP mould. We took a plug from the original mould, which was way beyond its useby date and also built a new deck mould. This is the mould that has produced all but the first three boats.” The shape is essentially identical to GBR 2105, GBR 2106 and BEL 44. They have a minimal sized keelband which is faired in around the centreboard case. Cox looked at a lot of different builders boats for inspiration on the deck. From the original Skipper boats, “The only real difference ok dinghy international magazine


BUILDER PROFILE | SYNERGY MARINE

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Building an OK Dinghy - The Synergy Way was changing from a plywood sandwich construction to a fully glass FRP construction. The boats are far more robust whilst being lighter.” But the Synergy build process is largely the same as it has always been. “New and improved resins and materials have come along which have helped improve the finish of the boats. We made a conscious decision to not gelcoat our boats due to the difficulties of adhesion between the polyester gelcoat and the epoxy resin. It can be done but having repaired lots of epoxy gelcoated boats from various manufacturers we decided that we didn’t want the hassle. Spray painting worked better for our boats.” “Then, when we started building International Cadet dinghies we had to use polyester resin due to the class rules. Rather than hand layup the boats we started infusing the boats as there was less mess and smell. We found that we could produce a very good quality infused boat that was NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

First st ep is to coa with ge lcoat, a t the mould messy a smelly nd job.

positioning . Shaping and am fo e th en th ps that would ...and not to leave ga so cut is crucial here The foam is al fill with resin. the to in nd to allow it to be e hull th of e ur at rv cu

Finally th bagged e boat is vacuu and int ake (res m outtake in) and (air) va lues an added d pipes are

stiffer and lighter with a polyester gelcoat. We built a couple of test OK hulls using the same materials and the results were very good. For a boat that doesn’t have high rig loads I’d say that the polyester infused boats are every bit as good as the epoxy boats and cheaper. But we still offer both construction methods.” He says the main advantage of the infusion process is that they can control materials, particularly resin, very accurately. “One of the issues with traditional polyester boats is that there is a high resin to glass ratio. Polyester resin is very stiff when cured. But when a panel flexes the resin and glass gradually degrade as the fibres fracture. Hence the reason polyester boats can go soft over time. Epoxy is far more resilient to flexing so the glass fibres don’t break. With infusion we are using a low ratio of resin to glass, so the laminate is thinner and less prone to fatigue. So the boats will remain far stiffer than has traditionally been the case for polyester boats. “ 15


“The other advantage is that the gelcoat is harder wearing than spray paint, particularly on the deck. And it’s far easier to repair a polyester gelcoat boat. Plus, if it means that someone can get a new boat at a cheaper price that has got to be good for everyone.” While he understandably thinks the Synergy hull is the best option right now, he admits the choice of design has to be a compromise. “My attitude to building and designing boats is that they shouldn’t be the fastest boats in any given condition. Championships are typically sailed in a wide variety of conditions so the best boats tend to be those that perform across a wide range of conditions. There’s no point in being the fastest upwind if you’re slow downwind. And there’s no point in being the fastest in big breeze when the championship is a light wind event.” “I think the Synergy hulls are pretty good upwind but very quick downwind. I think they have a wider competitive range of conditions than some other designs. Most typical OK sailors, of which I count myself, are good upwind but don’t have the time to get to the level of the top sailors downwind. It helps to have a fast hull downwind unless everyone is sailing the same design.” He considers the bow shape to be one of the crucial elements in an all-round performer. “I think for the OK there is a fine line between having too fine or too full a bow. The Dave Rose Skipper shape was designed to be more moderate compared to his previous designs. He actually used the Icebreaker for his inspiration. If I

16

was going to tweak the hull for a new mould I would probably tweak the bow fullness slightly. Most of the championships I’ve been to in recent years were sailed in quite choppy conditions where a slightly finer bow might help. I like the look of the Strandberg boats upwind. That said I wouldn’t want to change it too much at the detriment of the boat’s downwind performance.” To complement building the boats, Synergy also developed a carbon mast, but after a brief period, the production didn’t progress. “I keep getting asked about the masts. I really enjoyed building the masts, but there was a lot to learn. It was quite stressful selling the first customer mast, but to my knowledge they are all still in one piece. We built eight masts and they were good but not great. I had a good Europeans in Steinhude with one.” “We have a lot of data and knew what we wanted to do for the Mark 2 masts. However, it all comes down to time. When I eventually get to build my own boat, I’ll build a new mast mould and see how it goes from there.” Cox has strong views about the Class Rules and running the class, so we asked him what, if anything, he would like to see changed. “I’d really like to see the class a bit less restrictive in some areas of the rules. A lot of what has occurred over the last few years has been positive for the class. Things like the cockpit tubs have really improved the finish of the boats. These are great ideas but technically they weren’t class legal. Thankfully common sense has prevailed. There are a number of rules that have no impact on performance, but could make for more attractive or easier to construct boats. I think cost is less of a concern than some people might think.” “I’d like more events held at great holiday venues. Bandol and Barbados are prime examples. Most of the top sailors will go to an event wherever it may be but the rest of the fleet is there for a holiday sailing with their mates. A bit more thought to and representation further down the fleet to help grow the class wouldn’t hurt. Overall I think OKDIA is doing a very positive job for the class.” As a business, Synergy Marine also builds world championship winning Cadets. “We’ve also built swing keel sportsboats and National 12s. We make foils for most classes, repair everything from Oppies to carbon race cars. We’ve also become more involved in non-marine, composite engineering, which in all honesty is far better for my health and marital harmony.” What does the future hold for Synergy Marine? “I’ve absolutely no idea. Sailing in Bandol has reminded me why I got involved with the OK class in the first place. Despite my Scrabble score line it was a superb event. A great bunch of people and a fantastic boat. I love the European events. Really good competition goes right the way through the fleet. Although at times it doesn’t feel like it I still enjoy building the boats and we’re always looking to tweak the boats to find those small improvements.” “We’ve got a great product that has continually improved with some really good guys sailing our boats. We won two consecutive OK World Championships, one with three different boats winning all the races. It doesn’t get much better than that but we will still strive for more success.”

ok dinghy international magazine


BUILDER PROFILE | SYNERGY MARINE

ed in rt. Resin is suck The exciting pa over ld ou m e ound th and spreads ar the mesh.

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NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

After the resin sets, the bulkhe ads and centreboard ca se are added

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17


MATS CAAP interview

BAR The Beer was Cold N

Fifth world title for Nick Craig in Barbados

ick Craig won a record fifth World title at the 2017 OK Dinghy World Championship in Barbados, the first time the class had held a championship in the Caribbean. He dominated the conditions better than any of the other 80 sailors, showing incredible speed and an uncanny ability to find the best route to the top mark.

Craig, along with defending world champion Jim Hunt, were two the favourites going into the championship. Craig had not been fast in practice and the lead up regattas in Europe while Hunt had dominated early season regattas. The showdown in Barbados was more one sided than expected, with few other sailors really getting a look in at the front. A group of sailors from New Zealand were largely in the running for third place, with Luke O’Connell, the 2014 runnerup ending up with the bronze medal. When the opportunity arose for the OK Dinghy class to hold its World Championship in the Caribbean, it was pretty much a unanimous vote in favour of sunshine, blue water sailing and the famous Caribbean hospitality. Three years and a lot of planning later, the OK fleet descended on the island for two weeks of great racing, great camaraderie and perhaps a little rum. The event was hosted by both the Barbados Yacht Club and the Barbados Cruising Club, which are located almost

18

side by side on the south-western corner of Barbados in Carlisle Bay. The team delivering the event was the same team that had delivered the Fireball, 505 and more recently the GP14 World Championship. Craig had learnt some lessons having already sailed the GP 14 World Championships in 2016 in Barbados. Craig surprised everyone by winning the first three races. Hunt and O’Connell were always close behind, but Craig clearly had an edge and was sailing very well tactically to cope with the huge shifts and pressure changes. Jørgen Svendsen, from Denmark, won the fourth race and Hunt won the fifth, before Craig won the next three and went into the final day only needing one top 12 place to secure the title from two possible races. In the end, only one race was sailed on the last day as the wind became even more shifty and difficult. A second place for Craig was enough to secure the title. Hunt was a clear second after never placing worse than fifth all week, with a score line that would have easily won most world championships. O’Connell was the best of the rest, another 20 points back. He faltered mid week but then came back strong for the remaining races to secure the bronze by 11 points from several of his New Zealand team mates. The conditions were challenging, with wind from 12-25 knots, huge wind shifts and a tendency to run races too close to the shore resulting in many one sided upwind legs and gybe marks set just off the shore. Several finish lines were even set in the moorings in Carlisle Bay. In addition, carpets of Sargasso weed that arrived mid-week added to the ok dinghy international magazine


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80

GBR 2195 Nick Craig 1 1 1 2 -3 GBR 11 Jim Hunt 2 3 4 -5 1 NZL 546 Luke O’connell 3 2 2 4 (bfd) NZL 545 Steve Mcdowell 4 16 8 -17 4 NZL 517 Paul Rhodes 5 9 5 6 6 AUS 749 Roger Blasse 10 15 3 7 5 NZL 551 Mark Perrow 20 4 7 3 2 GBR 2191 Chris Turner 6 8 -25 8 8 NZL 566 Greg Wilcox 9 10 -20 10 11 DEN 3 Jorgen Svendsen 19 14 14 1 23 POL 14 Pawel Pawlaczyk -24 5 17 18 10 POL 1 Tomasz Gaj 8 6 28 22 7 NZL 567 Chris Fenwick 18 -31 13 23 14 DEN 1402 Bo Teglers Nielsen 16 17 10 13 -26 GER 778 Soenke Behrens 15 13 34 15 19 AUS 768 Mark Jackson 27 7 6 11 9 GER 772 Oliver Gronholz (ret) 12 26 16 22 NZL 498 Jono Clough 17 20 12 14 12 DEN 1397 Henrik Kofoed - Larsen 28 34 11 9 15 NZL 523 Joe Porebski 14 24 24 (dsq) 27 GER 5 Ralf Tietje 21 21 -33 12 17 AUS 754 Brent Williams 11 18 21 20 33 GBR 10 Robert Deaves 12 29 19 21 21 DEN 22 Ask Askholm 25 23 23 19 -30 AUS 750 Peter Robinson -43 37 9 26 20 GER 803 Martin V.Zimmermann 7 11 15 33 (dnf) GER 775 Joerg Rademacher 22 25 -40 27 35 NZL 575 Michael Wilde 33 28 -44 29 16 NZL 531 Adrian Coulthard 29 30 32 40 13 NZL 536 Eric Rone 13 22 36 36 25 AUS 719 Glenn Williams 37 26 22 -43 40 NZL 571 Rob Hengst 34 36 30 -45 28 GER 7 Andreas Pich 35 -41 35 31 31 NZL 565 Simon Probert 39 48 31 32 39 DEN 1335 Mogens Johansen 40 39 18 34 34 GBR 2163 Gavin Waldron 52 44 16 41 18 GER 75 Dirk Dame 45 38 39 42 -51 GBR 13 Alex Scoles 26 19 29 30 (bfd) NZL 563 David Hoogenboom -50 32 50 24 36 SWE 2791 Lennart Hansson 38 43 41 (ret) 29 POL 19 Grzegorgz Salamon 32 33 (dnf) ret 44 GER 6 Fabian Gronholz -60 35 48 49 46 DEN 1442 Peter Heide-Jorgensen 36 42 27 28 43 DEN 1481 Nils Troland 41 45 -59 37 42 GBR 2176 Keith Byers 30 27 55 51 37 GER 11 Rainer Pospiech 23 40 47 55 38 NZL 568 Dean Neil Coleman -57 53 43 25 49 GER 8 Ronald Foest 47 (ret) 63 35 56 DEN 1399 Christopher Joe Schubert (dsq) 46 46 44 45 DEN 1407 Malte Pedersen 42 51 57 68 24 GER 22 Dirk Gericke 48 59 45 47 50 NZL 564 Sefton Powrie 59 52 56 39 (dnf) GER 757 Falk Hagemann 51 55 42 38 54 GER 12 Stefan Rassau 53 (dnf) dnf 52 41 AUS 736 Grant Wakefield 61 57 51 54 32 AUS 688 David Haseldine 55 -58 53 46 58 GER 767 Juliane Hofmann 54 47 58 56 53 GER 731 Thomas Glas 44 49 37 48 (dnf) AUS 725 David Ketteridge 58 64 38 50 (dns) NZL 574 Philip Rzepecky 46 50 (dsq) 53 dnf NZL 569 Phil Coveny 31 63 (dnf) 59 52 AUS 767 Glenn Yates 49 61 (dnf) 63 47 GER 777 Nadine Tietje 62 54 60 60 48 GER 678 Heinz Ridder 64 -70 64 62 57 AUS 766 Robert Buchanan 66 69 60 60 (dns) FRA 1833 Fabien Capeilleres 56 56 49 (dnf) dns POL 40 Robert Swiecki 69 60 52 64 (dnf) DEN 1458 Soren Sigurdsson 72 65 (dnf) 67 55 SWE 55 Ulf Sahle 63 62 62 57 (dns) AUS 738 Kevin Knott 68 67 65 58 (dns) AUS 706 Erik Thompson 65 68 54 66 (dnf) GER 697 Joerg Posny 70 66 (dnf) 65 ret GBR 2116 Tim O’leary 75 74 (dnf) 69 59 AUS 716 David Swales 67 72 (dnf) 70 ret NZL 550 Tony Bierre 71 71 (dnf) dns dns GER 539 Ulrich Borchers 76 76 (dnf) 71 dns GER 788 Jessica Finke 73 75 (dnf) dns dns GBR 2058 Mary Reddyhoff 74 73 (dnf) dns dns BAR 12159 Charlie Gloomeau (dns) dns dns dns dns GBR 2159 Russell Ward (dns) dns dns dns dns

NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

1 1 4 5 17 3 6 4 3 14 9 -22 (dsq) 2 8 9 10 6 5 8 13 10 23 11 22 7 16 19 -40 15 11 (dns) 7 21 19 20 15 12 27 23 31 17 2 16 -37 32 26 25 20 13 12 26 32 24 18 33 25 -43 29 -38 14 35 44 29 35 39 28 -59 (dnf) 41 38 36 33 27 24 34 39 45 46 31 21 30 36 44 43 46 30 18 53 48 45 56 41 52 42 40 34 47 47 58 50 53 dns 37 51 -64 52 28 (dnf) 54 55 50 49 55 dns 51 dns 49 dns 42 57 57 54 60 (dnf) 65 48 62 dns 70 dns 63 58 66 56 67 dns 61 dns 69 dnf 68 dns 72 dns 71 dns 74 dns dns dns 75 dns 73 dns dns dns dns dns dns

1 2 2 1 8 3 4 7 7 -20 3 4 14 12 9 9 16 6 12 (bfd) 19 8 -29 10 21 5 10 26 5 13 32 30 15 14 -26 24 22 (bfd) 6 16 25 18 46 (bfd) 13 21 11 17 35 36 17 bfd 37 11 28 28 30 23 33 29 23 34 18 25 24 22 27 33 51 27 43 -54 31 40 54 bfd 36 37 41 31 48 15 40 19 56 (bfd) 50 59 -57 32 49 (bfd) 47 43 38 38 67 35 42 (bfd) -64 39 20 49 60 58 61 41 55 48 58 44 -63 57 39 dns 45 50 44 42 70 53 69 46 53 60 65 52 34 45 52 61 66 64 68 62 74 56 59 65 73 63 62 51 71 67 72 69 dns 47 dns 68 75 70 dns 66 dns 55 dns dns

10 22 42 53 55 56 64 65 78 96 100 115 123 127 129 133 133 138 146 161 162 167 168 169 196 202 213 213 222 223 231 244 252 277 284 288 295 297 299 300 304 317 321 322 333 353 353 363 364 389 391 393 409 411 412 419 429 430 435 439 442 449 463 474 486 499 499 512 516 532 538 548 567 586 594 609 609 618 622 648

challenges the sailors faced. Each upwind was characterised by pressure from the land that lifted those on port into the top mark. Often it was a case of overstanding the top mark to get into the bigger pressure and then using that pressure to free off, faster, into the top mark. Either way Craig had it down to a tee and put on a masterclass of sailing in challenging conditions for the fleet. He showed a tactical awareness with great speed to completely dominate the fleet, winning races seemingly with ease and by big margins. Sailing the UK built Synergy Hull, with a New Zealand C-Tech mast and an HD sail, actually made by Hunt, his scoreline discarding his third place in race five was impressive by any standards.

19


FRA Beautiful Bandol Fredrik Lööf wins a very close European Championship at Bandol on the Mediterranean

B

ack in 2013, as the story goes, after a nice lunch, two old sailors dragged an aged OK Dinghy, FRA 1472, out of a garden on the Côte d’Azur. The boat belonged to Daniel Dahon, and in the heat of the moment, and under the influence of some Bandol rosé, Henri Bérenger agreed to take the boat and get it back on the water. The boat had been in Dahon’s garden for 30 years, so needed some work.

Soon afterwards, this reborn OK Dinghy was joined by another and then another, and what followed was the amazingly successful revival of the Mediterranean OK Dinghy fleet with many former and new sailors joining the class. In 2017 they initiated the Mediterranean Championship at the Société Nautique de Bandol (SNB), an indicator of the growing interest and potential of this fledging fleet. News of the revival reached the north of Europe and people started to take notice, and to provide encouragement and support for this growth, they were offered the chance of running the 2018 European Championship. In the last week of September 2018, Daniel Dahon’s old boat, which started the whole

Cumbley, Lööf and Hansson-Mild

revival, was one of 77 OK Dinghies that took to the waters off Bandol for the class’s first major championship on the Mediterranean for half a century. The SNB sits just across the narrow waterway from the island of Bendor, which hosted the OK Dinghy World Championship in 1969. Some of those present in 1969 were present again this year. In 1969 Daniel Dahon placed 15th in the 72 boat fleet and while not sailing this year he was there driving the press boat, which also doubled as the coach boat to several French sailors as well as the eventual winner, Fredrik Lööf. Three places higher than Dahon in 1969, was Jørgen Lindhardtsen, who also took part in 2018, and delighted everyone by leading around the first mark in the opening race. The French fleet has been growing for several years, but now it is also beginning to attract top sailors from other classes. One of those is former Europe world champion, and Finn sailor, Valérian Lebrun, who took part in his first OK Dinghy event, with an eye towards getting a boat soon. A further group of top Finn sailors are also planning to move into the OK Dinghy for next year. Pre-regatta practice was cut short when a strong mistral arrived unexpectedly, followed by some equally strong easterlies on the following day, the first day of racing. Late in the day the wind dropped enough to encourage the race committee to send the fleet out, and 57 boats ventured out

20

ok dinghy international magazine


2018 European championship | Bandol

1

SWE 69

Fredrik Lööf

3

SWE 100

Thomas Hansson-Mild 3

2

4

5

6

7

8

9

GBR 6

Charlie Cumbley

DEN 1507 Bo Petersen GBR 44

Chris Turner

POL 1

Tomasz Gaj

FRA 11

NZL 582 POL 14

10 DEN 6

11 GER 77 12 GER 7

13 GBR 41 14 GER 5

Valerian Lebrun

1

2

(8)

4

2

2

1

7 (16) 1

1

10

(13) 2 7

5

1

5

1

4

8

2

6

6

8

8

5 10 5

13

3

4

Stefan Myralf

15 13

4 10

17

Andreas Pich

(28) 16 15 9 19

21

Ralf Tietje

16 15

William Heritage

15 DEN 1485 Johan Bjorling

6

10 (23) 9

3

29 12 8

14 19 13 13 18 9

Fredrik Lööf:“It’s a nice change. For the last few years I have been sailing bigger boats, catamarans and keelboats, but to be in the OK Dinghy, it is just a fantastic boat. The boat is so light, and racing against the likes of Greg Wilcox, Thomas and especially Rod Davis is just awesome. It’s challenging and just good racing. It was a fantastic regatta and the class is colourful and a lot of smiles all the time, on the shore and out there sailing, so just fantastic. The OK is great.” Rod Davis: “There are about 20 guys that are all really, really good at sailing OK Dinghies and dealing with 80 boat fleets. This is the biggest fleet I have dealt with in a long, long time and I am just understanding the tactics and positioning of the boats when you are not leading. The OK Dinghy for me is a great boat to race. That’s probably 50 per cent of it, and the other 50 per cent, maybe more, is the people. The people in the class make the class. I often compare it to joining the mob, or a cult. Once you get in don’t get out, and you don’t want to get out. It’s great fun, the camaraderie and stuff both on and off the race course. I just think it is a magic class.” Valérian Lebrun: “I am pretty happy with my first experience in the OK Dinghy. Unfortunately it was very windy before the racing and I only had 45 minutes of training, which was definitely too little, but I was able to improve race after race and day after day and finally I was able to feel good in the boat and was able to sail well against the best ones here.” “I have to say the best part was of the regatta was the people. They were all very interesting persons and all very nice. The time we spent onshore was great as well. I think the venue - and despite being a French sailor it was the first time I am sailing here – we just had perfect conditions during the four days so I think everyone will keep a good souvenir about this championship.”

7

10

5

28

4

6 (dnf) 5

Greg Wilcox

Sönke Behrens

4 11

3

2

7 (17) 15 7

4

What they said...

10 2

(9)

Pawel Pawlaczyk

21

1 (15)

3

8

6

1

6

9 (33) 15

25 23 21 12

9

2

6

5

4

3

8 (24)

7

16 5

6

33 (dnf)

12 (29)

20 NZL 592

Rod Davis

21 DEN 1510 Jan Hempel Sparsø 22 DEN 142

28

16

34 19

11

Marek Bernat

25 32 20 19 (37) 32

27 GER 75

Dirk Dame

(dnc) 21 25 28 22

29

29 NZL 575

Mike Wilde

30 20 (44) 37 25

22

30 GER 775

Rainer Pospiech Joerg Rademacher

9

35 (dnc) 21 11 16

14

25 POL 7

28 GER 11

3

17 32

21 23 24 (31) 26

26 FRA 1838 Timothe Petetin

26

24 38

40 39

28 14

24 27 19 17 34 (39) 31 13 23 35 16 27 (43) 47 39 36 30 14 23

22 39 27 36 20

NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

74

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23 DEN 1435 Mogens Johansen 24 FRA 1820 Julien Dejugnat

57

12

13 (dnf)

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Jørgen Lindhardtsen (ocs) 18 12 26 11

55

109

10

9 (31)

27 17 (32) 7 17

12 12 38 (39) 13

53

32 7

19 22 14 25 21 (30) 14 8

Anthony Osman

39

15

19

18 DEN 1477 Jorgen Holm 19 GBR 28

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105

17 11 11 3 14

11 (33) 26 18 24

33

15 10

16 DEN 1450 Anders Andersen 17 DEN 1431 Joe Schubert

27

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18

22 26

25 12

23 34

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26 (43)

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2018 European championship | Bandol the next race he had to make up a few places after rounding the top mark in the pack and didn’t take the lead until the final upwind, when the wind was becoming even more shifty and patchy. The two bullets for Cumbley took him into the lead with Lööf up to second and Stefan Myralf up to third.

to have two short races in the shelter of the bay, with very tight racing, packed mark roundings and tactical sailing right through the fleet. Lindhardtsen may have led at the top mark, but was unfortunately OCS. Lööf took the lead on the second upwind to lead round to the finish, though he was pushed hard by Charlie Cumbley and Thomas Hansson-Mild. It was these three boats that dominated the rest of the week and won all eight races sailed, though it would be another seven races before Lööf found the front again. Lebrun was fastest to the top mark in Race 2, but couldn’t hold onto the lead. The lead changed several times, with Greg Wilcox leading round the second lap, before eventually Hansson-Mild took the lead on the downwind to lead the fleet up the final beat for another close finish. After the first day Hansson-Mild led from Sönke Behrens and Lööf. The second day was benign in comparison with a gentle and shifty westerly in place. Cumbley managed the pressure and direction changes well, as well as having great speed to lead Race 3 from the first downwind mark, while in

22

The wind remained in the same direction for the third day, but was much stronger for what was the best day of the championship – and probably the best day of sailing the class has had in years; everyone came ashore smiling. The wind built from 7-8 to 15-18 knots and the waves increased throughout the day for great sailing, and great racing in perfect weather. It was a day of Swedish domination. Hansson-Mild had had a high scoring day on Thursday, but came out strong on Day 3, despite struggling with a chest cold, and produced two confident race wins, leading at every mark in both races. Lööf followed him round each race for two second places while Lebrun and Bo Petersen took a third apiece. Going into the final day, it was all still wide open. There was yet another change of conditions for the final day of racing, with a light easterly in place. The fleet was sent round the corner to race in the bay off Sanary in perhaps the most tricky conditions of the week with large shifts, holes and pressure bands to navigate through. Most of the leaders got it wrong at some point. Cumbley put down the first marker with a win in Race 7 to retake the overall lead. He rounded second and was in the lead by the bottom to lead the fleet round the remainder. Both Hansson-Mild and Lööf had poor first beats and took a while to get back into contention. The left was definitely paying on the first upwind, with a number of new faces at the front. The final race would be the decider between the top three, but a big shift soon after the start left Hansson-Mild

ok dinghy international magazine


2018 European championship | Bandol 31 GER 8

Ronald Foest

34 38 18 22 29

25

37 (51)

203

33 GER 78

Stefan Haage

18 34 43 30 33

35 (44) 16

209

32 FRA 1828 Laurent Petetin 34 DEN 1407 Malte Pedersen 35 DEN 1419 Henri Skou 36 DEN 70

Bo Jensen

38 GER 81

Jan-Dietmar Dellas

37 GER 22

Dirk Gericke

39 DEN 1484 Olof Stenström

20 31 (51) 48 35

26 29 (57) 50 31

33 (42) 20

33 26 48 (57) 30

24

35 55

37

18 50

32 28 39 42 27 (dnf) 36 28 31 (dnc) 40 43 52

(52) 45 31 38 44

42 NZL 564

Sefton Powrie

42 49 35 52 41

43 SWE 2849 Sverker Härd 44 FRA 86

Patrick Debaere

45 FRA 1824 Alain Renoux

46 FRA 1836 Jean Louis Petetin 47 FRA 17

48 FRA 794

Henri Berenger Didier Soulie

20 30

37 37 36 29 38

Ulf Sahle

Bob Buchanan

27

11 23

41 30 22 20 40 (48) 48 21

40 SWE 55

41 AUS 692

36

44 41 41 (49) 36

(dnc) dnc 34 24 42

(dnc) dnc 28 40 32

43 40 (53) 44 48

(dnc) dnc 47 35 49

46

40

30 17

43 18

43 (55) 25 51

41 22

45

49 37

41

54

27 52

29 27

40 44 49 61 53 (55) 45 40 55 46 (60) 47 46

38

52 47

50 FRA 1837 Jean Christophe Morin (dnc) dnc 56 54 28

50

38 42

49 FRA 1833 Fabien Capeilleres

49 (dnc) 52 46 47

51 POL 40

Robert Swiecki

48 48 46 (60) 50

53 NZL 574

Philip Rzepecky

38 42 65 (68) 55

52 FRA 1829 Pierre Arrighi 54 NED 677

45 50 (58) 45 58

Peter Van Der Schaaf 36 24 (dnf) dnc 39

55 BEL 2178 Frederic Vandenberghe 51 43 50 56 56 56 DEN 14

57 NZL 590

Peter Thybo Tony Bierre

58 FRA 1709 Patrice Rovere 59 SWE 2816 Claes Avellan 60 GER 640

Sven Marchot

62 GBR 4

Simon Cox

61 GBR 58

Mary Reddyhoff

(dnc) dnc 37 34 59

44

52

53

42

59 36

56 46

57 45

62 60

51 53

47 51 64 63 (65) 61

50 41

50 47 (61) 59 60

58 58

46 (dnc) ufd 41 51

57

(dnc) dnc 33 32 66

63

49

53 54

65 48

29 14 (ufd) dnf dsqj 31 dnf dnf 60 59

65 FRA 1852 Philippe Chelle

(dnc) dnc dsqj 65 61

68

47 44

(dnc) dnc 63 62 67

64

63 57

67 FRA 1756 Gerard Bonnet

68 FRA 1472 Jean-Luc Arrighi

(dnc) dnc 42 55 57 dnf 39 dnf 56

64 49

54 52 70 72 (dnc) dnf 70 61

69 GBR 2100 Pierre Gary

(dnc) dnc ufd 69 68

71 FRA 769

(dnc) dnc 66 64 69 dnf 69 64

70 DEN 99

Edouard Koch

72 NED 675

Robert Bancken

Florent Delacourt

73 FRA 1764 Frederic Lamarque 74 FRA 1846 Xavier Beckius 75 FRA 104

76 NED 668

Jean Pierre Gailes Alex Rijnink

77 FRA 1843 Glen Bishop

(dnc) dnc ufd 73 62

(dnc) dnc 69 67 64

65

66

67 56

66 63

62 dnf dnf

(dnc) dnc 62 53 dnf dnf dnf dnf (dnc) dnc 67 71 dnc 67

68 dnf

(dnc) dnc 55 66 dnf dnf dnf dnf

(dnc) dnc 59 bfd dnf dnf dnf dnf

(dnc) dnc 68 dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf

NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

232

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259

263

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287

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306

319

326

331

333

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54 (62)

53 (dnc) 45 58 45 dnf 61 35

(dnc) dnc 71 70 63

230

58

59

60

66 GBR 2045 Paul Dutton

222

367

(dnc) dnc 54 51 54

Andy Osman

213

34 dnf dnf

63 FRA 1810 Jean-Claude Lidon 64 GBR 59

204

369

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and Cumbley well back and struggling to catch up. Lööf got it right to tack at the pin and lead round the entire race from Petersen and Lebrun. These three extended on the fleet and while the two other contenders closed on the leaders they could not get close enough to challenge Lööf’s victory. Finally they ran out of race track and a delighted Lööf crossed the line, hat in the air, and smiling from ear to ear. Cumbley discarded the race, to take silver while Hansson-Mild was only one point behind to take bronze. The prizegiving was held on top of the roof of the SNB overlooking the race area on a beautiful, hot and sunny afternoon. Will Heritage, from Britain won the Junior prize, while Mary Reddyhoff, also from Britain won the Ladies prize. Fifty years after he sailed the OK Dinghy World Championship here, Jørgen Lindhardtsen won the over 70s prize. Art of Racing sponsored a prize with a raffle for a new boom, which ended up being presented to Laurent Petetin, the President of the SNB. The SNB was the perfect host and the OK Dinghy class looks forward to coming back to Bandol soon. Even so, the next Mediterranean championship has also been arranged for May 2019 and you get the feeling that quite a few sailors racing this week might be back. It was just so much fun.

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DEN In the Mix Morten Andersen describes why he took up sailing again at age 40, and his positive experience with the OK Dinghy

T

he Danish OK Dinghy fleet is forever growing and bringing new people to the class. One of those in 2018 was Morten Andersen, who, after turning 40 decided he needed to get back into an active sport. He spent the autumn of 2017 sourcing equipment from all over Europe before starting his training for the worlds in Warnemünde. This is his story about how his journey has so far evolved.

Morten began sailing the Optimist at the age of nine. His parents also had a yacht and he wanted to try out sailing for himself. “Somehow I got hooked and had great experiences later on, one of the highlights being sailing the Opti worlds in Greece in 1991. I have kept the records from back then and had a moment of glory showing my wife, while watching

Olympic sailing, that I actually beat a young Ainslie back in the day; he must have had a bad week. I continued sailing the Europe for a couple of years but did not find it easy to combine with school and sailing ended up losing that battle. Instead, I carried on as a national sailing coach for the Optimist class, which seemed more compatible with studies… at first. Finally that came to an end as well and for the next 23 years I did not touch a dinghy.” “The last 15 years of corporate life, getting married, adding three kids and living abroad for most of the time has not left me a lot of slack capacity for active sports. However, as I turned 40 last year and we had just seen the end of buying diapers, I felt it was time for a change. Initially, I wanted to start kite-surfing like the rest of that segment, however, having never surfed before, my wife soon got me back on track with the argument that I’d have much more fun picking up something I had done before.” “That year the OK Europeans were held on Funen (Faaborg) in Denmark close to where we live and a quick visit onsite including a chat with Charlie Cumbley convinced me. With my 80kg, the OK seemed like a much more doable option compared to the Finn, and the class has grown significantly in Denmark last few years. For me, it makes a big difference with a fleet of 80+ boats on the starting line, especially if you are new to the class and not on top of how to get the last 10 per cent of boat speed, then positioning and playing your tactics well can make a big difference.” It was time to get a boat. “Through contacts, I got introduced to Greg Wilcox and he kindly opened a lot of doors in my search for the right equipment. For my first regatta – the 2017 Danish nationals in Horsens - I borrowed a former Nick Craig boat that is now owned by the Danish OK Dinghy Association. Greg lent me a sail and off I went for my first sailing regatta since my youth. With three races in 20 knots on the first day and a mast that did not seem to bend at all, I remember waking up next morning seriously doubting I would be able to get into the dinghy again for Saturday’s races. It was clear that I needed to step up my physical training as part of this comeback. However, finishing seventh in one of the final races provided the famous light at the end of the tunnel and with help from Greg we went back and found an optimal bend curve for a new Ceilidh mast and started searching for a boat.” “I was faced with plenty of options acquiring a boat and just as many opinions on ideal hull shape, construct and

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ok dinghy international magazine


INTERVIEW | MORTEN ANDERSEN

manufacturer. In the end there seemed to be consensus that an original NZ Icebreaker would be a good choice provided I could find one in the market. Luckily, Robert Deaves wanted to upgrade to a new Synergy with more volume at the bow, which made me the proud owner of his original 2013 Icebreaker. At the same time, an OK colleague from the local club had a new Idol in production so we arranged for me to pick up both boats in December. It was a long drive from Denmark via the ferry from the Hook of Holland to Harwich and a bit of an adventure on UK roads [top left pic], but nonetheless a great experience with plenty of anecdotes. By Christmas I was fully equipped and will forever have a great story to tell about how I sourced every piece of equipment from around the world.” Morten said his goal for his first season was to get into shape and make it to the Worlds in Warnemünde. “I started running three times a week and downloaded a push-up app promising you would be able to do 100 pushups in one go by week six. That was probably overstretching marketing, but a clear effect was visible nonetheless. I admit the baseline was very poor, however, I was so encouraged that I joined a local gym for serious exercise – a place I had never imagined I would end up. In month seven of my recovery plan, the gym performed one of these popular bodyage tests and came back with a claim that I could consider myself 27 again. Another clever act of marketing, I guess.” “On the water, I joined the local fleet for the weekly Monday race-evening and participated in a few 1-2 days training camps. Although I initially had a much more ambitious schedule in mind, I ended up doing only a couple of regattas before sailing the Worlds in July. My son has started sailing the Optimist and since we moved back to Denmark in the Spring of 2018 we have often sailed together. This is a great way of spending time together, however, admittedly also a very effective distraction from my own sailing as I ended up supporting him at various Optimist regattas instead of sailing myself.” At Warnemünde, the learning continued. “I have to say it was a great experience participating in the worlds even though I arrived a bit rusty, having not sailed much in the previous months. Physically, I felt on top though and actually hoped for a full week of racing in windy conditions and big waves. People have said it was probably one of the toughest worlds ever in terms of competition and NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

it definitely felt that way. With more than 120 boats racing including former Olympic medallists and a large batch of sailors with more than 20 years of experience sailing the OK Dinghy, it made for high-intensity racing and showcased the global OK class at its absolute best.” “My personal highlight includes one of the legends – Mats Caap from Sweden. On the second last day we were very close in one of the races and I passed him on the second up-beat just to see him fly away downhill ending ninth while I came in 17th. This had happened quite a few times during the week so I approached Mats that same evening and he revealed his insights on how to accelerate the OK when reaching. The day after, in the final day of racing in the gold fleet, I remember going all in downhill as I’d had a perfect start and did not want to see boats passing me again. It worked out and for the first time that week I actually gained a few boats on the reach and proudly finished 18th, right in front of the grand master Greg Wilcox for the first time ever. I think this tells a lot about a great personality like Mats who openly shares his wisdom and also about a class that increasingly attracts top sailors like him wanting to have fun and race at their best – for all the rest of us to benefit from.” For the time being Morten’s OK ambitions are slightly on hold, as he now finds himself pulled in another direction – being an Opti-Dad. [Middle top pic.] “I have adjusted my aspirations sailing the OK Dinghy and am enjoying facilitating my son’s venture into the art of sailing. However, I plan on keeping my gear and will likely do the Europeans next year in Kiel and potentially some other big events.” the Danish fleet is now the strongest in the world, having increased its membership out of all recognition over the past 10 years, with many local fleets emerging and supporting a busy national schedule. In addition, the class association acquired three complete race-equipped dinghies available for aspiring OK sailors for try-out. “All in all this makes for a great sailing community with a wealth of collective experience anyone can tap right into. If you fancy, and family allows, you can go racing almost every weekend from spring to autumn often with fleet-sizes up to 60-80 boats if you do the bigger events. What’s not to like?”

25


DEN First Norwegian Lars Johan Brodtkorb wins the 2017 Europeans in Faaborg

L

ars Johan Brodtkorb became the first Norwegian to ever lift a major title in the OK Dinghy after taking out the 2017 European Championship in Faaborg, Denmark in July. The event was the culmination of the classes 60th anniversary celebrations and attracted a huge fleet from eight nations. The regatta began with a coached clinic run by a group of ex-champions, in very light winds and sunshine, followed by the practice race the next day in moderate winds and heavy rain. When racing finally got underway, the fleet enjoyed the best weather of the week with sunshine and light to moderate, though extremely shifty, winds, before the

1 NOR 428 2 GBR 1 3 DEN 1471 4 SWE 100 5 NZL 573 6 SWE 797 7 GER 772 8 POL 1 9 GER 71 10 NZL 566 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

26

Lars Johan Brodtkorb 1 Charlie Cumbley 2 Bo Petersen (10) Thomas Hanson-Mild 1 Luke Gower (11) Mats Caap 4 Oliver Gronholz 9 Tomasz Gaj (27) Andre Budzien 2 Greg Wilcox (19)

DEN 1485 Johan Bjorling 41 GER 3 Wolfgang Hofener 41 DEN 1450 Anders Andersen 49 GER 803 M. v Zimmermann 53 DEN 10 Jens Lauge 55 DEN 1495 Jesper Højer 63 DEN 1397 Henrik Kofoed 66 GBR 2179 Tony Woods 74 POL 14 Pawel Pawlaczyk 75 GBR 2188 Ian Hopwood 77 GER 806 Jan Kurfeld 86 GBR 21 Christopher Arnell 86 DEN 1492 Jesper Bendix 86 GER 7 Andreas Pich 88 DEN 1477 Jorgen Holm 92 DEN 1 Bo Reker Andersen 94 SWE 2803 Marten Bernesand 100 SWE 59 Lars Edwall 100 SWE 2830 Jonas Borjesson 101 GER 775 Jorg Rademacher 102 GER 5 Ralf Tietje 112 DEN 3 Jorgen Svendsen 113 SWE 2788 Jan-Erik Engholm 115 SWE 6 Hakan Tornqvist 115 GBR 2185 Ed Bradburn 117 GER 789 Ingo Ballerstein 118 DEN 1433 Henrik Kimmer 119 POL 19 Grzegorz Salamon 119 DEN 140 Jan Hempel Sparsø 119 GBR 67 Andrew Rushworth 121

41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70

1 (3) 2 (9) 7 7 4 2 4 3

2 1 3 8 2 5 4 7 8 3

2 1 1 2 8 2 4 3 6 1 4 (16) 5 (14) 3 6 3 (10) 10 4

1 (4) 3 1 2 4 5 3 3 6 6 2 5 3 4 10 8 8 6 12

8 10 21 24 25 28 30 32 33 38

GER 791 Frank Strelow 124 GER 731 Thomas Glas 125 SWE 2812 Stefan Fagerlund 126 DEN 1442 Peter Heide 129 SWE 8 Bengt Larsson 131 POL 7 Marek Bernat 132 DEN 22 Ask Askholm 132 GBR 2145 Douglas Powell 134 DEN 1463 Lars Andresen 135 DEN 703 Christian Thomsen 138 DEN 1303 John Skjoldby 139 DEN 1304 Chr. Midtgaard 140 DEN 77 Jesper Strandberg 151 GER 721 Jørn Wille 152 POL 44 P. Drozdzik 162 BEL 230 Jacques Pirenne 162 DEN 1457 Christian Teller 163 GER 11 Rainer Pospiech 164 POL 9 P. Kryszczynski 168 SWE 3 Jonny Billstrom 168 DEN 1395 Anders Buhl 169 DEN 1454 Fritz Banner 173 GER 4 Lutz Boguhn 176 SWE 2809 Thomas Skeppmark 180 DEN 1465 Niels Bjørling 181 DEN 1481 Nils Trolland 182 GER 8 Ronald Foest 182 DEN 8 Frederik Svendsen 183 GER 12 Stefan Rassau 189 DEN 1382 Stig Lassen 193

rain returned and largely stayed for the remainder of the regatta. For the first six races Brodtkorb was never out of the top two. Unfortunately for second overall Charlie Cumbley, they were in the same group, so traded first and second places almost every race. The defending champion was Bo Petersen, not only of the home country, but also a former member of the club. He felt under a lot of pressure to perform and though he had a few upsets kept the focus until the end and was happy with third overall. The final day started with rain and winds of 30 knots as the sailors were held on shore. Cumbley was keen to go racing, but by early afternoon, the race officer had pulled the pin and racing was abandoned. Brodtkorb had won without having to sail again. In winning the title, Brodtkorb became the first Norwegian to ever win a major OK Dinghy Championship. 71 GER 767 Maja Hansson-Mild 194 72 GBR 4 Simon Cox 195 73 DEN 1483 Henri Skou 197 74 SWE 2804 Ingmar Janson 199 75 DEN 1316 Jesper Sommer 206 76 DEN 1424 Henrik Hamann 208 77 DEN 7 Malte Pedersen 208 78 SWE 20 Stefan Pavia 210 79 GBR 2124 Will Croxford 210 80 DEN 1396 Stig Frandsen 214 81 SWE 2749 Jan-Eric Nystedt 218 82 NED 667 Hessel Hoekstra 219 83 SWE 80 Arne Malm 219 84 DEN 1430 Rene Brunn 219 85 DEN 66 Frank Berg 222 86 DEN 1473 BrianTerp 222 87 DEN 1415 Thomas Christensen 228 88 DEN 1484 Olof Stenstrom 231 89 GER 22 Dirk Gericke 235 90 DEN 1441 Peter Korsbjerg 239 91 DEN 1482 Tim Normann 240 92 GER 678 Heinz Ridder 240 93 DEN 107 Joe Schubert 242 94 GER 777 Jorg Sylvester 243 95 DEN 1392 Poul Vincents 249 96 DEN 70 Bo Jensen 258 97 DEN 1336 Thomas Kvist 262 98 DEN 1333 Mads Bjorndal Robl 265 99 DEN 1377 Jonathan Prom Scharff 268 100 SWE 55 Ulf Sahle 269

101 GER 607 Gerd Breitbart 274 102 DEN 1461 Soren Nielsen 274 103 GER 680 Jan-Dietmar Dellas 277 104 DEN 126 Lars Moller 280 105 NED 669 Sybren Hornstra 282 106 DEN 1489 Morten Jensen 286 107 SWE 2802 Claes Heyman 290 108 SWE 111 Bertil Eliasson 292 109 DEN 1499 A. Gerhardt-Hansen 295 110 SWE 2792 Anders Widding 297 111 SWE 2816 Claes Avellan 298 112 NED 638 Sipke Heokstra 300 113 GBR 2163 Gavin Waldron 301 114 DEN 666 Peter Zeiler 303 115 DEN 1437 Per Sorensen 307 116 DEN 1305 Flemming Hostgaard 310 117 DEN 1458 Soren Sigurdsson 315 118 BEL 203 Joost Rommelaere 320 119 GER 539 Uli Borchers 331 120 GBR 2080 Paul Pike 339 121 DEN 1262 Dirch Zibrandtsen 339 122 GER 788 Jessica Finke 345 123 DEN 14 Peter Thybo 357 124 BEL 214 Paul Verrijdt 363 125 DEN 1417 Ingo Griem 369 126 DEN 1212 Klaus Jørgensen 369 127 GER 651 Frederik Rontgen 372 128 DEN 112 Svend Jacobsen 38

ok dinghy international magazine


TC Rules Update How the new Class Rules are evolving, by Alistair Deaves

E

lsewhere in this magazine you will read about the Strategic Roadmap and the progress that has been made over the past four years. Among many other jobs, one of the fundamental objectives of the Roadmap was a long overdue, major updating of the Class Rules. For a growing class with new builders starting up with new ideas, it was imperative that a consistent and robust set of rules were put in place. The future of the class depended on manufacturers building boats that were alike and that there were no, or at least very few, inconsistencies in the rules. With this in mind the Technical Committee set about rewriting the rules into the World Sailing Standard Class Rules (SCR) format using the Equipment Rules of Sailing (ERS) definitions.

After two to three years of hard work, the new rules were brought into use on June 1st 2017, just after the Barbados worlds. At the 2018 AGM in Warnemünde we passed a few minor changes which are currently with World Sailing for approval. These changes were mainly tidying up wordings and some clarifications on a few rules that were unclear. In the upcoming 2019 AGM in Auckland there will again be some housekeeping changes and a few clarifications. It is inevitable that each year there will be small changes. As with any Class Rules they are a work in progress and will slowly evolve to make them easier to understand and consistent with current practice. If the Technical Committee is vigilant enough then we can keep the boat the same so that any boat is capable of winning with the right skipper.

The ERS definitions are an important part of the rules. When a definition is used, everyone understands what it means. In the old rules some words produced inconsistencies as they often had different meanings in different sections. The word ‘hull’ is just an example. In the new rules the word hull (in bold because it is an ERS definition) has the same meaning wherever you see it, and anyone who can read the ERS can find out exactly what it means. Part of the process of conversion was to make sure that the ERS definition fits the intended meaning and in some cases this didn’t work so we had to make our own definitions. The OK Dinghy is a measurement controlled one-design class and as such builders are in the fortunate position of being able to design and build their equipment within a set NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

of defined tolerances. There is scope for variation and this allows us to build equipment that suits individual sailors and conditions. Manufacturer classes rely on manufacturing tolerances to maintain their one-design status and in some cases, to be competitive, sailors buy up vast quantities of equipment, built to these manufacturing tolerances, in the hope of finding the ideal characteristics that they are looking for. Innovations and new ideas are great but we race a onedesign class to ensure fair and fun racing and we should not forget that. So it is also worth remembering that we are not a development class. The intention of our set of closed class rules is, as mentioned in the introduction to the rules, to “ensure that the boats are as alike as possible in all respects affecting performance”. With this in mind, it is the responsibility of the Technical Committee, the measurers and the manufacturers to make sure that building practices that are outside of the intended design are not accepted into the class. With each new innovation we often see an increased cost for the sailor and an increasing gap between the homebuilt boat, which has been the core of the class for decades, and the professionally produced ‘Super OK’. If one manufacturer starts an arms race this would be detrimental to the class and ultimately to the builder himself. We should all work to prevent such development as far as we are able, and a lot of the responsibility here lies with the sailors who try to incorporate radical new ideas into their boats without any consultation. Some development is essential, such as the introduction of carbon masts, but if manufacturers produce equipment that improves the performance of their boat to a significant degree then that will ultimately have a negative impact on the class. Many times we have seen builders or sailors coming up with some innovation and introducing it into their boats without checking with the Technical Committee. Some are fine, but many times the measurer, or ultimately the Technical Committee, has ruled against and the builder has had to change the boats. So, if you have a good idea, please run it past the Technical Committee or a measurer before you implement. We are growing and flourishing as a class because we all sail boats that are very similar, so we should all try and keep it that way.

27


The Ovington OK Dinghy The Ovington hull has been drawn by Phil Morrison with a great deal of input from both Jim Hunt (World Champion) and Terry Curtis (ex-Class technical committee). Phil has a great reputation and has worked with Chris Turner (Ovington Boats MD) for over 25 years on many projects. The first year was very successful for the Ovington OK. With over 30 boats built and another 20 on order, it is becoming a popular choice amongst the fleet all around the world. Our OKs are proving to be competitive straight out of the factory taking 1st at Kiel week, the Australian Championship, Medemblik Spring Cup, and the UK Nationals in the first year, followed by the World and European Championships and many other victories in 2018.

Ovington Boats Ltd | Tanners Bank North Shields | Tyne & Wear NE30 1JH | United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0)191 257 6011 Email: mail@ovingtonboats.co.uk www.ovingtonboats.com


NZL Rod Davis on OKs After his first International OK Dinghy event

I

did my first OK Dinghy international regatta in Bandol, France a few weeks ago. I have done regattas in New Zealand where the Australians have come over, but still with just fleets of 40 to 50 boats.

The 2019 World Championships are in Auckland, at Wakatere Boating Club, my home club. To prepare, I need 80 plus boat experience. It’s been a long time since my Olympic Star boat days, when I sailed in big fleets. So it was a no brainer to go to the European Championships and get on with it. There was a five strong Kiwi contingent, really nine, as our wives came to be our support crews and to keep the fun going, no matter what happened on the race course. I chartered a great boat from Robert Deaves, built by Synergy, and had Greg Wilcox build me a sail. Back home I use North New Zealand sails, but always looking to check in with other ideas. Practice days got scuttled by the wind gods, except for a 50 minute evening sail. The first day of official racing brought 20 plus knots, thus it was game on. Bottom line was I had good results in the breeze and was less than stellar in the lighter air. You might think I was faster, relatively, in the breeze, but I don’t think so. It came down to big fleets and bad decisions, by me in the lighter winds. Lesson #1: Momentum in the last 15 seconds. You need

momentum on the boats around you just before the start. That is how you pop out of the start line. Lesson #2: Good decisions in the first three minutes. The number of times I got a marginal start – marginal means not great, but not a shocker. Thought I had a gap to tack, duck a transom, and shoot across the bows of the other starboard tack boats, only to find I could not quite cross them, so was forced to tack under. That was it, game and set. You would not believe how far ahead the top ten boats are after a couple of decisions like that. Lesson #3: The guys in 20th-40th are fast, they are just like you, fast, but made poor decisions early on. You are not going to just sail past them. You are going to fight, win a few and lose a few, but they are as fast as the top boats, and there are a lot more of them. The lessons’ list goes on for pages, so I won’t bore you with all of it. But a lesson for running future regattas, including the Wakatere worlds, was taught by the club in Bandol. You can have great racing, and create an environment of camaraderie at the same time. Bandol showed a big regatta can be relaxed and fun on shore – you don’t have to be up tight and focused all the time. Of course the OK Dinghy sailor helps with that too. Think of the OK as the Mob. When you become an OK sailor, you’ve joined that Mob, you’re a brother to all the other OK sailors around the world; you’re part of the family. Sharing go-fast ideas, friendly banter, even the occasional disagreement, but always brothers. That is what I have learned in my six years and four boats in the OK world. My favourite kind of sailing.

NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

29


Results Rum Bucket 2018 Wakatere BC, NZL • 20-21 October 1 NZL 485 Josh Armit 2 NZL 583 Eric Rone 3r NZL 579 Steve McDowell 4 NZL 584 Rohan Lord 5 NZL 559 Andrew Phillips 6 NZL 567 Chris Fenwick 7 NZL 578 Luke O’Connell 8 NZL 592 Rod Davis 9 NZL 517 Paul Rhodes 10 NZL 498 Jono Clough

22 35 41 46 48 48 55 55 60 61

Southern French Championship 2018 Lacanau • 23–25 August 1 FRA 1820 Julien Dejugnat 2 FRA 1824 Alain Renoux 3 FRA 1838 Timothe Petetin 4 AUS 692 Bob Buchanan 5 FRA 1764 Frederic Lamarque 6 FRA 1828 Laurent Petetin 7 GBR 85 Patrick Debaere 8 FRA 1810 Jean-Claude Lidon 9 FRA 1044 Jean Michel Roux 10 FRA 1836 Jean Louis Petetin

German Championship 2018 Schwerin • 6-9 September 1 GER 71 Andrè Budzien 12 2 POL 1 Tomasz Gaj 37 3 NZL 582 Greg Wilcox 46 4 GER 772 Oliver Gronholz 53 5 GER 77 Sönke Behrens 54 6 GER 803 Martin V Zimmermann 67 7 GER 18 Ulli Kurfeld 74 8 GER 5 Ralf Tietje 75 9 GER 7 Andreas Pich 92 10 POL 7 Marek Bernat 105

British National Championships 2018 Brixham Yacht Club • 16-19 August 1 GBR 6 Charlie Cumbley 2 GBR 2183 Dave Bourne 3 GBR 2134 Fergus Barnham 4 GBR 41 Will Heritage 5 GBR 2188 Ian Hopwood 6 GBR 28 Anthony Osman 7 GBR 2179 Tony Woods 8 GBR 2176 Keith Byers 9 GBR 2136 Nick Logan 10 GBR 44 Chris Rhodes

Danish National Championship 2017 Marstal • 31 August-2 September 1 DEN 1450 Anders Andersen 19 2 DEN 1507 Bo Petersen 35 3 DEN 1463 Lars Andresen 42 4 DEN 1 Bo Reker Andersen 53 5 DEN 10 Jens Lauge 59 6 DEN 1477 Jørgen Holm Nielsen 59 7 DEN 1419 Henri Skou 64 8 DEN 142 Jørgen Lindhartsen 66 9 DEN 1433 Henrik Kimmer Petersen 68 10 DEN 1509 Peter Wibroe 78

Swedish National Championships 2018 Träslövsläge • 10-12 August 1 SWE 69 Fredrik Lööf 5 2 SWE 100 Thomas Hansson-Mild 9 3 DEN 1507 Bo Petersen 10 4 SWE 797 Mats Caap 10 5 NZL 582 Greg Wilcox 15 6 SWE 139 Hans Börjesson 22 7 SWE 722 Stefan Jaenson 23 8 DEN 1487 Henrik Kofoed 26 9 SWE 16 Mats Clarsund 30 10 SWE 9 Håkan Törnqvist 30

2018 Turangi & North Is. Championship Turangi YC, NZL • 3-4 March 1 NZL 578 Luke O’Connell 5 2 NZL 542 Alistair Deaves 13 3 NZL 545 Steve McDowell 25 4 NZL 546 Thomas Olds 25 5 NZL 575 Mike Wilde 34 6 NZL 559 Andrew Phillips 35 7 NZL 561 Brett Daniel 36 8 NZL 564 Sefton Powrie 41 9 NZL 580 Rod Davis 42 10 NZL 568 Dean Coleman 44

Poland, National Championship 2018 Gdańsk • 30 August-1 September 1 POL 1 Tomasz Gaj 2 POL 14 Pawel Pawlaczyk 3 POL 7 Marek Bernat 4 POL 44 Przemysław Droździk 5 POL 71 Jarosław Radzki 6 POL 4 Radosław Droździk 7 POL 19 Grzegorz Salamon 8 POL 40 Robert Święcki 9 POL 8 Waldemar Czyż

Kieler Woche 2018 Kiel, GER • June 16-19 1 GER 18 Jan Kurfeld 18 2 DEN 1507 Bo Petersen 20 3 DEN 100 Mads Bendix 25 4 SWE 797 Mats Caap 42 5 NZL 582 Greg Wilcox 54 6 GER 772 Oliver Gronholz 72 7 GER 77 Sönke Behrens 74 8 DEN 1487 Henrik Kofoed 75 9 GER 803 Martin V Zimmermann 78 10 DEN 22 Ask Askholm 91

Interdominion & NZL Nationals 2018 Wakatere BC, NZL • February 9-11 1 NZL 578 Luke O’Connell 2 NZL 562 Dan Slater 3 NZL 560 Ben Morrison 4 NZL 526 Russell Page-Wood 5 NZL 545 Steve McDowell 6 GBR 536 George Cooper 7 NZL 559 Andrew Phillips 8 NZL 570 Matthew Mason 9 NZL 580 Rod Davis 10 AUS 753 Mark Skelton

Nordic Championships 2018 Gottskär, SWE • 9-10 June 1 SWE 69 Fredrik Lööf 4 2 DEN 1507 Bo Petersen 8 3 NZL 582 Greg Wilcox 17 4 SWE 139 Hans Börjesson 24 5 SWE 100 Thomas Hansson-Mild 26 6 DEN 1487 Henrik Kofoed-Larsen 31 7 SWE 59 Lars Edwall 33 8 SWE 2846 Jonas Börjesson 35 9 SWE 797 Mats Caap 38 10 DEN 1433 Henrik Kimmel Petersen 42

Australian National Championships 2018 Southport Yacht Club • 2-7 January 1 AUS 777 Rob McMillan 12 2 AUS 566 Greg Wilcox 30 3 AUS 768 Mark Jackson 31 4 AUS 779 Tim Davies 32 5 AUS 708 Kelvin Holdt 48 6 AUS 753 Mark Skelton 52 7 AUS 774 Peter Robinson 59 8 AUS 754 Brent Williams 73 9 AUS 733 Folkert Janssen 81 10 AUS 741 Steve Wilson 91

Dutch Championship / Easterseeregatta 2018 Oosterzee • 25 - 26 August 1 GER 7 Andreas Pich 2 GER 3 Wolfgang Hofener 3 GER 75 Dirk Dame 4 GER 12 Stefan Rassau 5 GER 809 Axel Fischer 6 NED 673 Stephan Veldman 7 GER 773 Ralf Mackmann 8 GER 775 Jorg Rademacher 9 GER 9 Thorsten Schmidt 10 GER 777 Jörg Sylvester

30

6 12 21 22 30 34 35 49 50

19 24 28 32 40 43 45 53 59 62

7 19 24 33 36 36 52 53 53 64

Mediterranean Championship 2018 Bandol • 10-12 May 1 DEN 666 Peter Zeiler 2 FRA 1820 Julien Dejugnat 3 FRA 1838 Timothe Petetin 4 1824 Alain Renoux 5 FRA 1837 Jean Christophe Morin 6 GBR 2100 Pierre Petetin 7 FRA17 Henri Berenger 8 NED 670 Peter van der Schaaf 9 1836 Jean Louis Petetin 10 FRA 1764 Frederic Lamarque

7 18 28 28 36 38 42 47 81 84

Spring Cup 2018 Medemblik, NED • 27-29 April 1 GBR 6 Charlie Cumbley 2 GBR 11 Jim Hunt 3 NZL 573 Luke Gower 4 GBR 2179 Tony Woods. 5 NZL 582 Greg Wilcox 6 GBR 13 Alex Scoles 7 GER 77 Sönke Behrens 8 POL 1 Gaj Tomasz 9 GBR 2185 Ed Bradburn 10 GER 772 Oliver Gronholz

15 19 31 35 53 54 57 61 75 77

11 12 22 37 39 42 46 47 62 62,5

11 12 26 26 26 28 28 31 46 49

ok dinghy international magazine


RESULTS World Rankings - October 2018 - Top Half 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85

Greg Wilcox NZL Bo Petersen DEN Thomas Hansson-Mild SWE Tomasz Gaj POL Charlie Cumbley GBR Sonke Behrens GER Fredrik Lööf SWE Pawel Pawlaczyk POL Mats Caap SWE Henrik Kofoed Larsen DEN Ralf Tietje GER Andre Budzien GER Martin von Zimmermann GER Mark Jackson AUS Andreas Pich GER Jorgen Holm DEN Jorg Rademacher GER Jonas Borjesson SWE Marek Bernat POL Joe Schubert DEN Wolfgang Hofener GER Dirk Dame GER Ask Askholm DEN Jim Hunt GBR Jan Hempel Sparso DEN Luke Gower NZL Jens Lauge DEN Brent Williams AUS Hans Borjesson SWE Rainer Pospiech GER Julien Dejugnat FRA Alex Scoles GBR Jan Kurfeld GER Luke O’Connell NZL Henrik Kimmer Petersen DEN Gunter Arndt GER Lars Edwall SWE Malte Pedersen DEN Jorgen Lindhartdsen DEN Tony Woods GBR Glenn Williams AUS Steve McDowell NZL Peter Heide DEN Oliver Gronholz GER Ingo Ballerstein GER Anders Andersen DEN Jan-Dietmar Dellas GER Stephan Veldman NED Stefan Rassau GER Henri Skou DEN Mike Wilde NZL Lars Johan Brodtkorb NOR Anthony Osman GBR Rod Davis NZL Hans Elkjaer SWE Simon Probert NZL Ronald Foest GER Bengt Larsson SWE Timothe Petetin FRA Johan Bjorling DEN Peter Robinson AUS Dirk Gericke GER Mogens Johansen DEN Lars Haverland GER Chris Turner GBR Mark Perrow NZL Bob Buchanan AUS Chris Fenwick NZL Mark Skelton AUS Richard Burton GBR Carsten Sass GER Bo Reker Andersen DEN Thomas Glas GER Ben Morrison NZL Ian Hopwood GBR David Bourne GBR Hakan Tornqvist SWE Peter Wibroe DEN Jono Clough NZL Keith Byers GBR Morten Andrersen DEN Russell Wood NZL Ulf Sahle SWE Jorg Sylvester GER Sven Beye GER

975.46 947.17 946.40 918.09 897.56 872.40 862.47 856.89 812.76 796.42 796.16 786.48 774.31 764.95 752.94 721.72 706.19 693.06 689.44 684.05 671.77 670.74 668.80 664.17 655.33 651.56 650.82 621.74 621.00 604.07 595.23 587.21 586.31 586.13 579.45 555.15 552.22 549.07 548.01 546.60 543.95 535.13 522.09 519.77 518.16 513.36 512.73 501.89 489.80 487.56 483.24 475.85 475.19 471.64 468.27 466.12 465.47 463.35 448.92 443.35 438.98 431.64 430.87 422.46 420.75 419.43 416.86 414.35 411.85 411.43 407.89 405.22 403.89 393.35 391.27 390.59 384.46 380.37 379.93 378.53 368.69 366.37 364.94 364.67 364.60

86 Jan-Erik Engholm 87 Tomas Skeppmark 88 Steve Wilson 89 Jesper Hojer 90 Stefan Haage 91 David Hoogenboom 92 Joe Porebski 93 Alain Renoux 94 Paul Rhodes 95 Grzegorz Salamon 96 Przemyslaw Drozdzik 97 Ralf Mackman 98 Tim Normann 99 Karsten Kraus 100 Jesper Bendix 101 Sefton Powrie 102 Dan Slater 103 Patrick Debaere 104 Thorsten Schmidt 105 Ingmar Jansson 106 Jean Louis Petetin 107 Don Williams 108 Olof Stenstrom 109 Gerd Breitbart 110 Juliane Hofmann 111 Falk Hagemann 112 Duncan Ellis 113 Frank Strelow 114 Jean Christphe Morin 115 Thomas Meyer 116 Andrew Phillips 117 Roger Blassé 118 Laurent Petetin 119 Rob Hengst 120 Henri Berenger 121 Lars Andresen 122 Axel Fisher 123 Stefan Pavia 124 Frederic Lamarque 125 Alistair Deaves 126 Sybren Hornstra 127 Philip Rzepecky 128 Rainer Haacks 129 Christian Thomsen 130 Hessel Hoekstra 131 Dean Coleman 132 Kelvin Holdt 133 George Cooper 134 Heinz Ridder 135 Elizabeth Williams 136 Richard Furneaux 137 Dan Bush 138 Bo Jensen 139 Claus Stockhardt 140 Stefan Myralf 141 Nick Craig 142 Folkert Janssen 143 Jochen Lollert 144 Peter Plesner 145 David van der Wende 146 Andrew Rushworth 147 Peter Zeiler 148 Brett Daniel 149 Per Westlund 150 Grant Wakefield 151 Eric Rone 152 Poul Vincents 153 Daniel Groschl 154 Glenn Yates 155 Ed Bradburn 156 Claes Avellan 157 Mathew Mason 158 Holger Krasmann 159 Phil Coveny 160 Lutz Boguhn 161 Adrian Coulthard 162 Jan Dissel 163 Robert Deaves 164 Joost Rommelaere 165 Remi Blandureau 166 Thomas Olds 167 Jean Claude Lidon 168 John Skjoldby Petersen 169 Rohan Lord 170 Claes Heyman 171 Valerian Lebrun 172 Shane Smith

NOVEMBER 2018 • www.okdia.org

SWE SWE AUS DEN GER NZL NZL FRA NZL POL POL GER DEN GER DEN NZL NZL FRA GER SWE FRA AUS DEN GER GER GER GBR GER FRA DEN NZL AUS FRA NZL FRA DEN GER SWE FRA NZL NED NZL GER DEN NED NZL AUS NZL GER AUS AUS NZL DEN GER DEN GBR AUS GER DEN NZL GBR DEN NZL SWE AUS NZL DEN GER AUS GBR SWE NZL GER NZL GER NZL GER GBR BEL FRA NZL FRA DEN NZL SWE FRA AUS

364.59 362.87 354.67 354.10 350.94 350.86 347.62 346.21 343.10 342.86 337.07 336.36 328.88 324.78 321.65 316.66 316.14 310.28 307.49 306.71 302.91 301.63 301.35 300.46 300.22 299.96 299.69 296.75 291.23 286.86 286.33 285.84 285.30 284.84 283.37 282.24 281.09 276.57 273.22 271.72 271.66 260.60 259.72 259.29 258.91 256.38 255.85 255.44 249.14 245.76 245.55 239.19 237.33 235.46 234.22 234.21 232.71 232.43 231.95 231.39 228.35 228.19 227.17 227.13 226.12 221.60 221.47 219.92 218.68 218.67 217.72 217.22 215.80 212.80 209.55 206.49 205.59 204.04 203.89 198.19 197.22 194.80 194.37 191.67 191.59 190.57 190.46

173 Peter Thybo DEN 174 Christian Midtgaard DEN 175 Peter van der Schaaf NED 176 Tim Davies AUS 177 Andreas Deubel GER 178 Deryck Lovegrove GBR 179 Jacques Pirenne BEL 180 Julius Raithel GER 181 Philippe Cowez BEL 182 William Heritage GBR 183 Fritz Banner Pedersen DEN 184 Sverker Hard SWE 185 Peter Rudblom SWE 186 Maya Hansson Mild SWE 187 Dave Ketteridge AUS 188 Daen Dorazio AUS 189 Bo Teglers DEN 190 Simon Cowood GBR 191 Knut Ramin GER 192 Michel Lesure LUX 193 Terry Curtis GBR 194 Anders Gerhardt-Hansen DEN 195 Jorgen Svendsen DEN 196 Nils Trolland DEN 197 Henrik Hamann DEN 198 Michael Mockel GER 199 Niels Bjorling DEN 200 Adrian Mannering NZL 201 Axel Propp GER 202 Chris Arnell GBR 203 Lasse Hansson SWE 204 Soren Sigurdsson DEN 205 Robert Swiecki POL 206 Tim McDowell NZL 207 Francois Podevyn BEL 208 Jan Bechmann GER 209 Arne Malm SWE 210 David Haseldine AUS 211 Mats Hovde SWE 212 Jaroslaw Radzki POL 213 Frederik Roentgen GER 214 Erik Thompson AUS 215 Jacob Bang DEN 216 Tom Lonsdale GBR 217 Rodney Tidd GBR 218 Gavin Waldron GBR 219 Jan Carlsson SWE 220 Rob Mcmillan AUS 221 Nick Gray AUS 222 Patrice Rovere FRA 223 Christian Rasmussen DEN 224 Fabien Capeilleres FRA 225 Jesper Strandberg DEN 226 Michael Wolf GER 227 Troels Trabjerg DEN 228 Florent Delacourt FRA 229 Anders Buhl DEN 230 Peter Korsbjerg DEN 231 Rod Andrew BEL 232 Jean-Pierre Gailes FRA 233 Mark Rutherford AUS 234 Didier Soulie FRA 235 Olle Albrektsson SWE 236 Sipke Heokstra NED 237 Jorn Wille GER 238 Peter Lynch AUS 239 Christian Teller DEN 240 Brian Terp DEN 241 Mads Bendix DEN 242 Paul Verrijdt BEL 243 Erik Bork GER 244 Stefan Jaenson SWE 245 Will Croxford GBR 246 Marten Bernesand SWE 247 Pierre Arrighi FRA 248 Fabian Gronholz GER 249 Simon Cox GBR 250 Michael Horvath AUS 251 Susanne Mackmann GER 252 Gerard Bonnet FRA 253 Andre Blasse AUS 254 Rob Ligtenberg NED 255 Palle Larsen DEN 256 Tony Bierre NZL

190.38 188.64 187.25 184.79 184.41 183.26 180.52 176.32 174.44 173.16 171.76 171.17 170.21 169.94 168.50 163.24 157.88 157.30 156.36 152.98 152.64 152.13 151.66 151.20 149.69 148.11 147.28 145.67 144.82 143.91 143.66 143.30 143.28 142.19 142.11 141.36 141.03 140.89 136.28 134.77 134.11 134.08 130.31 128.95 128.20 127.98 125.19 125.17 124.88 123.76 123.22 123.03 122.71 121.20 120.42 119.55 119.09 118.72 117.92 117.51 116.95 116.55 116.13 115.48 115.15 114.38 112.86 112.82 112.34 112.19 111.81 110.77 110.39 110.13 110.09 109.61 107.69 107.59 105.53 105.39 103.64 103.04 102.78 102.63

For positions 257-512 see okdia.org

31


Profile for OKDinghy

OK Dinghy International - November 2018  

The official magazine of the OK Dinghy International Association

OK Dinghy International - November 2018  

The official magazine of the OK Dinghy International Association

Profile for okdinghy
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