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OK DINGHY www.okdia.org

International new World No. 1 – Bo petersen

SECOND WORLD TITLE FOR BUDZIEN

the tiki story

APRIL 2016 PUCK • BARBADOS • QUIBERON • DUTCH PROFILE • SAILING LIGHT

APRIL 2015 • www.okdia.org


president’s letter OK DINGHY INTERNATIONAL Issue 2 - April 2016 The official magazine of the OK Dinghy International Association www.okdia.org Editor: Robert Deaves, 2 Exeter Road, Ipswich, IP3 8JL, UK Tel: +44 7932 047046 Email: publicity@okdia.org

OKDIA COMMITTEE 2015-16 President Bo Teglers Nielsen DEN president@okdia.org

Treasurer Rene Sarabia-Johanssen DEN treasurer@okdia.org

Vice president, Northern hemisphere Darek Kras POL vicepresident-nh@okdia.org

Webmaster Peter Scheuerl GER webmaster@okdia.org

Vice president, Southern hemisphere Mike Wilde NZL vicepresident-sh@okdia.org Secretary Juliane Hofmann GER secretary@okdia.org

Chairman, Marketing Committee Robert Deaves GBR publicity@okdia.org Chairman, Technical Committee Alistair Deaves NZL technical@okdia.org

The OK Dinghy International Association (OKDIA) is the world governing body for the OK Dinghy class. Its members consist of the National OK Dinghy Associations in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Sweden, The Netherlands and USA. Official website: www.okdia.org Worlds website: www.okworlds.org Postal address: OKDIA, c/o Turtle Sails, Alter Tornow 1, D-14473 Potsdam, Germany We are also on: Read this magazine online at: issuu.com/okdinghy Advertising: Advertising opportunities are available in this magazine, on okdia.org and in the email newsletters. A Media Pack can be downloaded from: okdia.org. Book a package to get coverage of your products across all OKDIA platforms and reach all registered OK Dinghy sailors worldwide. Content: Please send all content to publicity@okdia.org for the next issue. Published occasionally and some issues may only be published online. Disclaimer: The opinion expressed herein are not necessarily those of the editor or OKDIA. While every effort is made to ensure accuracy of content, no liability can be accepted for inaccuracies or omissions. APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

President’s Letter Dear OK Dinghy Sailors,

A

fter reading the draft of the magazine you now have in your hands I couldn’t stop smiling while thinking about the progression of our class.

I started in the OK Dinghy exactly 20 years ago. I was 21 and half a year before I had read an article in a Danish newspaper about the OK Dinghy class. The article described how the class both had great sailors and a great social atmosphere. I was in my university years and had stopped sailing when I was 15. At that time I was eager to get started with sailing again and I wanted to do it competitively, but did not know where to go. My last great success at the time was the local club championship in Optimist dating back to my 11th year. The class at the time was great, especially for a student with no money. It had suffered from a long downtrend due to the success of the Laser class so you could buy a decent competitive OK Dinghy for DKK 15,000 (EUR 2,000). The market was full of cheap masts as the OK Dinghy sailors were using old cut down Finn masts, which were available everywhere as the Finn class had swapped to carbon masts. The sails were made with soft cloth which lasted many seasons. My first regatta was the 1996 Danish Championship in Kaløvig. When looking at the list of competitors in that regatta 20 of the 49 sailors are still active sailors; this tells us that in terms of retaining members in the class we must be doing something right. Looking at the class today it is very different but at the same time a lot is the same. Today we are growing in numbers again and most importantly from an OKDIA perspective, numbers at international events are increasing. This year the World Championship will be in Quiberon in France, an amazing venue both on the water and on land. After having the pre-Europeans there in 2013, it was obvious that we should try and have a World Championship at that club. The water is great and on land they have the best facilities I have seen in any sailing club, enabling us to have easy logistics and a natural place for after sailing socialising. For sailors who are bringing their families, this is an ideal place as it is also a French holiday destination. Looking further ahead in 2017, we are going to Barbados. This will be a fantastic venue where the Finn Masters will start the week after the OK worlds. I hope I will have time for both events and that other sailors who are sailing in both classes will do the same. See you on the water

Bo Teglers President OKDIA

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ONE�DESIGN Contact your local representative: North Sails One Design T: +44 (0)1329 443430 E: info@northonedesign.com

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ok dinghy international magazine


NEWS

Class Rule Changes

The latest Class Rule Amendments and 2016 Class Rules have been published here: http://www.sailing.org/28246.php. They became effective from 1st February. All but one of the proposals approved at the 2015 OKDIA AGM (weight of fittings) passed some with slight modifications. The Technical Committee will reconsider the Rule that was not passed and submit it again at a later date.

European Championship 2017

2016 OKDIA AGM

This will be held during the first weekend of the World Championship. According to the OKDIA Constitution the Agenda must be published by May 23. Please send any submissions for the AGM by May 14 to be included. Class Rule Change submissions must be submitted by May 1. Any submissions received after these dates may be added to the Discussion section but will not be voted on. The Minutes of the 2015 OKDIA AGM in Puck, Poland are posted on the OKDIA website.

New Class Rules

The 2017 European Championship will be held in Faarborg, Denmark over four days in late-July. Confirmed dates and schedule will be published as soon as possible, but judging by past Danish events this will be an extremely well organised championship. Faarborg is a really nice, old port town located on the island of Funen (the middle part of Denmark).

The TC Chairman has put a lot of work into getting the new class rules together. They are taking shape nicely, although lot of rules and wordings have had to be modified to fit the SCR format.

Personal Sail Numbers

Following the direction given at the Technical Symposium in Puck there is now a OKDIA Personal Sail Number form. OKDIA requests that all Associations/Authorities that issue personal numbers use this form. It should be presented with the boat’s certificate at events to prove ‘ownership’ of the personal sail number. It is hoped that by creating a standard form means that there will be less confusion with event organisers and that sailors can now officially claim the right to use a specific number. It is important that all those issuing personal numbers adopt this form – it is part of the ongoing process to standardise a lot of the class’s, often very different, paperwork from country to country.

Hopefully the result will be a set of rules that is both simple and unambiguous.The Technical Committee will shortly be working through the current draft with a view to getting a working draft ready. See full article on page 22.

Barbados Worlds – 2017

Lots of information has recently been published on the event website at 2017.okworlds.org including full reports and photo galleries from the venue visit undertaken in December 2015. Pre-entry is already approaching 100 boats so it looks like it is going to be very popular. Please pay particular attention to the Important Information page as this contains all you need to know about shipping and entry (or at least as much as is known as this stage).

Quiberon Worlds – 2016

The event website at okworlds.org is now fully operational. Entry is open so please enter as soon as possible if you are planning on attending so we can plan ahead. There are also lots of local details as well as an accommodation form to book one of the rooms or camping at the sailing school. There is more information on page 21. Please remember to send all your regatta reports to both webmaster@okdia.org and publicity@okdia.org

Top 10 Gear – 2015 World Championship

e-Newsletter OKDIA publishes e-Newsletters throughout the year for event updates, news and important announcements. You can subscribe on okdia.org. Please send all news, photos, results, race announcements to publicity@okdia.org and we’ll include as much as we can.

APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

Sail No Hull builder/shape Mast 1 GER 789 Strandberg Marine C-Tech 2 GBR 2173 Idol Composites – Icebreaker C-Tech 3 DEN 1431 Strandberg Marine C-Tech 4 SWE 100 Jason King Delfs C-Tech 5 DEN 6 Strandberg Marine C-Tech 6 AUS 735 Jason King Delfs C-Tech 7 NZL 544 Icebreaker Boats NZ C-Tech 8 GBR 2154 Synergy Marine Aardspar 9 POL 14 Bumblebee Icebreaker C-Tech 10 GBR 2042 David Rose Aardspar

Sail North North Green Turtle Elvstrøm Turtle Turtle HD Sails Green North UK

Foils Strandberg Marine Idol Composites Strandberg Marine Jason King Strandberg Marine Jason King Deaves/C-Tech Synergy Marine Bumblebee Idol Composites

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page header

Andre Budzien secures second world title after tough week in Puck T

he 2015 OK Dinghy World Championship was held in the picturesque town of Puck in northeastern Poland. It was 22 years since the class last held its world championship in Puck. The 2015 championship was also characterised by wet and cold weather, shifty winds and great hospitality. The pre-entry list numbered around 110 sailors from nine nations, but 91 made it as far as Puck. It was a mixed group of sailors with current champions mixed with former champions, class legends and newcomers who have only recently discovered the joy of OK Dinghy sailing. Following a period of growth in the class, the world championship was wide open and no one was placing bets. Jørgen Lindhardtsen opened the week with a practice race win and then picked up two black flags before winning the final race of the week. Who says winning the practice race is unlucky? Bo Petersen opened his title challenge with two race wins on the first day after an epic day on the water. The fleet had

everything from 3 to 33 knots and hot sunshine to torrential rain as a squall passed over. Jim Hunt ended the day in second with Charlie Cumbley third. The races were a portent of what was to come with the constantly changing breeze and weather. Petersen won through superior upwind speed and tactics, taking the led in both races on the second beat after rounding the first mark in good shape. Budzien into the lead Petersen couldn’t repeat his form the next day, with 2012 World Champion Andre Budzien moving into the lead. He won the second race of the day while the first went to home favourite Paweł Pawlaczyk. It was a big day in Puck. Big winds and big shifts. Everyone was on the wrong side of one at some point, but the racing was intense, with no let ups and no place to hide. Many of the leaders picked up some high scores in the second race after the wind shifted 60 degrees on the second upwind and then died on the final leg, causing some huge place changes, and which changed the landscape for the rest of the week. It was all change again on day three as Jim Hunt, sailing his first OK Dinghy world championship since he won in 2004, took the overall lead. Budzien dropped to second and Petersen, now able to discard his black flag, moved up to third. It was a long day with a series of weather fronts

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2015 world championship - PUCK, POLAND

Top: Andre Budzien and Bo Petersen • Jørgen Lindhardtsen • Thomas Hansson-Mild Middle: Dawid Jania • Pawel Pawłaczyk Bottom: Top 10: Hansson-Mild, Stefan Myralf, Mark Jackson, Greg Wilcox, Simon Cowood, Pawłaczyk, Richard Burton • Top 3 Juniors: Kania, Johannes Dagerbrant, Michal Gaj

bringing heavy rain and strong winds. With forecasts of more than 30 knots, the fleet arrived at the venue to find a four-hour postponement flying. Most of the fleet spent the morning sheltering in coffee shops and cafes waiting for the rain to subside and for any further news from the water. The rain did subside, briefly, but there was no more news so at 14.30 the fleet prepared for sailing without a discernible change in conditions. It was wet, cold and windy. Budzien sailed the best downwind to lead at the final bottom mark and extend upwind for his second race win in a row. Petersen crossed in second and with Myrälf picking up a black flag, Hunt took third. With enough races now sailed for a valid championship, the race officer sent the fleet ashore.

knots. Hansson-Mild’s two race wins set up a fascinating battle for the top spots in Saturday’s final races with Budzien, Hunt, Cumbley, Petersen, Pawlaczyk and Hansson-Mild all within striking range of the title. The final day in Puck, brought an end to the rain, but not to the challenging conditions. It was certainly a day of two halves. The first half was one of mystery and confusion. While some of the fleet were mystified why the first attempt at race 8 was abandoned at the windward mark after a 70 degree wind shift, others were mystified why

Horrible day Friday was again a particularly horrible day in Puck, Budzien retook the lead though Thomas Hansson-Mild dominated both races for two big wins in the big wind and huge rainfall. Hunt dropped to second and Cumbley moved up to third, despite breaking his centreboard and not finishing race 7 after capsizing at the gybe mark. It was a cold, bleak and distinctly unpleasant day, but the racing was first class with a relatively stable breeze – and by relatively we mean just 20-30 degree shifts – at 16-25 APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

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2015 world championship - PUCK, POLAND the re-sail wasn’t abandoned when the wind deserted the course for 20 minutes on the final upwind and then popped up in the corners to completely change the finishing order. But everyone was confused by the pressure and direction changes that continued unabated all day long. Stranded Lots of the leading group were stranded in the middle with no way back. A few on the left found some pressure and ended up beating to the finish from way beyond the layline. Gradually the middle clocked up to the line while the right side reached down. Despite the disgruntled sailors, the race officer let it run. Dawid Kania won while regatta leader Budzien struggled across in 17th. Hunt was one of eight black flags and decided to call it a day. The final race was probably the best race of the week in brilliant sunshine and a more stable breeze. It was also time for the old man to show who was the boss. At 70 years of age, Jørgen Lindhardtsen put his bad luck behind him and led from start to finish and extending for a very popular win.

surely someone to watch closely in the years ahead. Petersen took the bronze, his first OK Dinghy Worlds medal after four years of trying. All told it was an interesting week in Puck, some extreme weather and extreme wind shifts, far too much rain, a little bit of sunshine, great hospitality and most importantly of all, a worthy champion in André Budzien.

A fifth for Budzien was enough to take the title for the second time. He took his second title following his victory in 2012. Cumbley won the silver at the first attempt and is

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

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GER 789 GBR 2173 DEN 1431 SWE 100 DEN 6 AUS 735 NZL 544 GBR 2154 POL 14 GBR 2042 DEN 1442 GBR 1 GER 693 GBR 13 POL 1 AUS 754 DEN 1397 GBR 2156 SWE 2810 SWE 16 GBR 2172 DEN 1420 DEN 1 GER 797 POL 27 SWE 2809 GER 775 POL 117 POL 10 GBR 2163

André Budzien 6 Charlie Cumbley 5 Bo Petersen 1 Thomas Hansson-Mild 17 Stefan Myrälf 13 Mark Jackson 12 Greg Wilcox 9 Simon Cowood 45 Paweł Pawłaczyk 8 Richard Burton 42 Rene Sarabia Johannsen 19 Jim Hunt 3 Martin v. Zimmermann 27 Alex Scoles 31 Tomasz Gaj 10 Brent Williams 11 Henrik Kofoed 21 Robert Deaves 36 Johannes Dagerbrant 25 Mats Clarsund 16 Dave Bourne 39 Jørgen Lindhardtsen 4 Bo Rekers Andersen 15 Andreas Pich 34 Dawid Kania 14 Jonas Borjesson 22 Joerg Rademacher 28 MiŁosz Wojewski 18 Janusz Stobiński 59 Gavin Waldron 48

7 4 1 13 5 11 3 19 28 dnf 6 2 9 15 17 40 8 20 36 29 14 bfd bfd 12 bfd 26 21 bfd 23 30

5 10 bfd 14 12 15 3 26 1 9 22 2 6 29 32 11 33 16 24 20 13 17 36 25 37 41 35 19 45 21

1 7 16 3 37 8 25 6 10 4 29 31 55 12 17 53 28 11 14 22 47 60 36 dnf 59 21 46 19 50 26

1 5 2 6 bfd 7 bfd 16 4 10 bfd 3 12 21 18 8 11 17 31 19 14 bfd 23 25 24 46 22 bfd 15 28

4 2 5 1 3 16 9 19 6 11 8 7 30 15 dnf 14 18 24 17 33 21 10 28 41 13 35 22 39 36 20

2 dnf 9 1 3 6 7 17 8 21 5 4 11 18 30 12 24 28 31 20 16 10 51 34 19 42 39 15 48 26

17 14 13 10 2 51 38 12 5 28 21 bfd 36 22 18 43 57 29 56 35 46 11 4 3 scp 8 52 16 15 67

5 31 2 49 9 56 11 59 3 78 12 87 4 98 19 134 dne 136 13 138 30 140 dnf 146 15 146 16 148 7 149 20 159 37 180 41 181 8 186 39 194 35 198 1 207 14 207 34 208 scp 2 09.4 57 241 33 246 31 251 24 256 63 262

ok dinghy international magazine


31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91

SWE 99 GER 787 AUS 719 SWE 2783 GBR 2145 SWE 2803 GER 765 POL 31 POL 4 SWE 2796 AUS 762 GBR 2151 POL 7 FRA 1823 DEN 1402 POL 19 AUS 725 GBR 2147 GER 665 DEN 1395 DEN 1407 GER 735 DEN 3 GBR 2171 POL 11 GER 750 POL 5 POL 44 SWE 2752 AUS 761 GER 688 DEN 77 DEN 1391 GER 731 GER 751 POL 40 DEN 1430 GER 695 SWE 2815 GER 640 DEN 7 GBR 46 POL 93 GER 767 POL 8 POL 189 DEN 1433 POL 9 POL 12 SWE 2763 GER 678 POL 333 SWE 2812 GER 539 SWE 2790 GER 633 POL 651 GER 649 DEN 112 DEN 1432 GBR 2170

Hans Elkjaer 41 Ralf Tietje 51 Glenn Williams 53 Jonas Andersson 20 Tony Woods 26 Marten Bernesand 68 Rainer Pospiech 30 Antoni PawŁowski 23 RadosŁaw Droździk 40 Larsson Bengt 37 Mark Roberts 29 Jonathan Fish 38 Marek Bernat 47 Guillaume De Kervenoael dnf Bo Teglers 7 Grzegorz Salamon 65 David Ketteridge 49 Tom Lonsdale 44 Peter Stephan 54 Henrik kimmer Petersen 50 Malte Pedersen 35 Dirk Gericke 75 Jørgen Svendsen 2 Simon Cox 57 MichaŁ Gaj 58 Dirk Dame 52 Darek Kraś dnf Przemek Droździk 63 Arne Malm 46 Andréw Baker 56 Ronald Foest 55 Jesper Strandberg 32 Nils Troland 67 Thomas Glas 33 Knut Ramin 78 Robert Święcki 64 Rene Brunn 84 Erik Bork 62 Per Westlund 66 Sven Marchot 72 Christian Hedlund 24 Kenneth Carroll 73 Maciej Chmielewski dnf Juliane Hofmann 61 Waldemar Czyż 81 Bartosz Chodakowski 69 Lasr Andersen 70 Kajetan Glinkiewicz 60 Waldemar Włóczkowski 85 Claes Heyman 80 Heinz Ridder 77 MichaŁ Gmaj 76 Magnus Gillgren 43 Uli Borchers 87 Ulf Sahle 71 Cornela Wirbeleit 83 WiesŁaw Janczak 79 Kai Wehmhorner 82 Svend Jakobsen bfd Ralph Eriksen 86 Robert Bourne 74

APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

31 42 35 41 37 24 56 bfd 18 51 bfd 27 49 32 50 62 38 33 46 22 bfd 64 10 bfd 58 39 55 45 59 65 71 25 34 16 66 52 43 47 bfd 61 bfd 48 68 57 44 70 dnf bfd 73 69 63 dnf 54 bfd 53 72 60 67 bfd dnf dnf

34 50 49 31 18 55 40 42 48 39 44 4 46 52 8 79 61 28 60 59 47 62 7 23 68 dnf 58 64 57 38 63 30 54 dnf 66 65 51 56 69 74 53 dnf 70 71 73 72 43 27 80 dnf 75 78 67 81 dnf 77 dnf dnf bfd 76 dnf

23 56 42 9 58 24 13 63 27 30 5 18 38 40 bfd 43 35 51 34 66 bfd 41 2 15 dnf dnf 32 64 48 20 45 dnf 68 dnc 49 39 54 dnf dnf 52 dnf dns 44 dnf 61 62 bfd dnf 67 dnc 57 33 dnf 65 dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf

30 29 13 42 20 37 34 dnf 41 35 9 bfd 33 49 bfd 38 45 32 36 40 27 dnf dnf 26 44 dnf 50 48 52 53 43 dnf 39 dnf dnf 54 47 dnf 51 dnf dnf dns 55 dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf 58 56 57 dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf

63 29 26 38 42 48 45 31 dnf 50 34 27 32 40 12 52 64 44 37 59 46 23 dnf 60 51 47 43 49 61 58 53 dnf 54 55 72 69 dnf dnf 62 66 25 57 74 71 73 68 dnf 56 75 70 dnc 67 dnf 76 dnf dnf dnf dnf 65 dnf dnc

46 25 14 45 27 54 38 23 dnf 36 22 13 49 41 bfd 44 59 37 53 dnf 33 35 dnf 29 50 32 40 52 56 47 58 dnf 55 dnf 61 65 dnc dnf 57 60 dnf 43 64 dnf 67 62 dnf dnf 66 63 dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnf dnc

9 19 64 69 59 25 bfd 6 24 37 77 bfd 62 26 50 33 27 dnf 49 40 58 34 dnf bfd 41 30 bfd 47 bfd dnf 63 44 bfd 39 20 dsq 54 7 45 55 31 48 74 32 66 68 23 42 78 72 dnf 60 71 53 73 61 70 65 76 75 dnc

51 265 27 272 42 274 59 285 dnf 287 28 295 47 303 22 304 17 309 46 310 dnf 314 dnf 315 25 319 40 320 18 333 10 347 44 358 dnf 363 70 369 38 374 45 385 53 387 dnf 397 dnf 398 32 402 21 409 43 415 49 417 48 427 dnf 431 52 432 23 436 68 439 26 451 56 468 60 468 55 482 29 483 54 498 61 501 dnf 509 58 515 73 522 50 530 67 532 74 545 36 548 dnf 561 75 572 69 573 65 582 dnf 596 dnf 611 72 622 62 635 64 639 66 651 71 661 dnf 705 dnf 707 dnc 732

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OK Dinghy sailing - redefined boom with two stage lever • accessories

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The Tiki story T

he Tiki is a piece of New Zealand OK Dinghy history. It came about by the virtue of Craig Pryce winning the last race of the day at a regatta on Lake Taupo back in 1990s. At the time, Craig would have been one of the younger members in the fleet, and as yet had not mastered the intricacies of sailing the OK Dinghy fast, so until then he had never won a regatta race before. By Adrian Coulthard To honour the fact that Craig had achieved something (he wasn’t in contention for a podium finish), two older members of the fleet, two of the Mannering brothers (Adrian and Nigel) decided to purchase a trophy to be awarded to Craig. As they were in Taupo (a central north island town, at the northern end of Lake Taupo, a tourist Mecca) there were plenty of gift shops selling Kiwiana. Once the brothers spotted the Tiki, they knew it would be perfect. They wanted something gaudy, something obtrusive, and something that would be slightly contentious – the Tiki fulfilled all these requirements. Originally a wall hung ornament, this Tiki is a glazed ceramic Maori icon, with polished paua shell eyes. The Mannerings added a rope so the Tiki could be worn around the neck like a medal. That evening, once Craig was wearing the Tiki, the whole fleet celebrated with a drink or two. As the evening progressed, thoughts turned to the Tiki, with various rules being made, starting with once you are wearing the Tiki, you don’t take it off until you suit up next morning for yachting. This meant that when the fleet had pre-loaded with drinks, and then moved to the pubs and clubs of Taupo, Craig had to keep wearing the Tiki. Then the second rule was decided – you can’t hide the tiki inside a t-shirt or jumper or put it in a pocket – you have to wear it with pride. Taupo has a rich and historic Maori culture, and with the Tiki being a Maori icon, it would have been quite funny for the elder members of the fleet to watch Craig justifying and explaining why a skinny white fella was wearing a Tiki to the local cuzzies. Once the regatta was over, the Tiki was returned by Craig to Ade Mannering, who was the original keeper of the Tiki – folklore has it that the Tiki was hung in Ade’s eldest daughters bedroom, to ward off evil spirits (or boys). The kaumatua’s (knowledgeable elders) of the fleet decided that the Tiki would be awarded for the regattas on the NZ tour, for winning the final race of the day. The Tiki is now a well travelled trophy, having been to Thailand, Australia, Europe, with trips to France and Barbados APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

planned in the future. When going overseas, the Tiki is often placed in the boat of somebody who was too busy to help load the container, as it’s thought a little bad luck may be bestowed on that person – maybe a capsize or a BFD. Over the years, the Tiki has been lost for a number of months, and was found by accident in a random boat shed in Napier. It’s also been in the wars a bit, wearing its scars with pride, all representing a different adventure. There are a number of superstitions related to the Tiki, disrespecting the Tiki has serious consequences – one Tiki winner at a national championships a couple of years ago decided to go home straight after racing, and did not wear the Tiki. Needless to say a Tapu or bad spirit was cast, and the consequences for the sailor meant he was dog tucker on the final day, and went from potentially winning, to not even making the podium. Some sailors won’t even touch the Tiki, for fear that they may jinx any chances they have of winning it in the future. And certainly, nobody has ever worn it that hasn’t actually won the right to wear it. Moving with the times, the Tiki now has its own Facebook page with around 200 friends across the globe. The winner of the Tiki gets posted online along with a photo, and as soon as the results are released, these also get posted. The Tiki has also been known to post various photos and comments to share the fun the NZ OK sailors have, and let the others who are not there know what they are missing. As a long lasting reminder of winning the Tiki, stickers have been produced, which are awarded along with the Tiki. Luke ‘Colt’ O’Connell is the current high scorer, with almost 15 wins displayed on his transom – soon there will be no space left for his association stickers. Over the years there have been a number of worthy winners including, Ade, and Nigel Mannering, Greg Wilcox, Paul ‘Gouch’ Rhodes, Russ ‘Mudsy’ Page-Wood, Ben ‘Benno’ Morrison, Steve ‘the lead dwarf’ McDowell, Rob Hengst, Jono ‘Rabbit’ Clough, Chris Fenwick, Dan Slater, Dan ‘Bushy’ Bush, Matt ‘Stechy’ Stechmann, Karl Purdie, Alistair Deaves, and a particularly noteworthy winner was Matt ‘Munter’ Stevens, who managed a yet to be surpassed Tiki and Harpoon double, in Napier, in a side room of the Thirsty Whale pub actually called the Harpoon room. So if you ever see a Kiwi sailor at a championship wearing a green Tiki around his neck, buy him a drink and have a chat – he may give you some valuable tips about sailing the OK Dinghy fast.

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Barbados is calling T

he 2017 OK Dinghy World Championships will be held in Barbados in the last week of May. It promises to be a fabulous regatta with warm seas, nice winds and perfect hospitality. Barbados has the distinction of being one of the most revisited islands in the Caribbean – and once you are there the reasons are obvious: beautiful scenery, fantastic weather, incredible beaches, exciting activities, and a very warm welcome. And of course, great sailing.

The few days we spent in Barbados were packed full of meetings and visits – too many to recall. Every day started the same way with a refreshing reef meeting in the sea facing the hotel, followed by breakfast overlooking the reef. It was here we got to grips with what was going on and got down to the nitty gritty detail of our Caribbean adventure – where we were going to eat that night and was it rum or Banks beer on the menu.

At the end of 2015 a small team were invited out by Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc (BTMI) to take a look at the club facilities and the wider island and begin to prepare for the regattas in 2017. There will be two regattas run consecutively, with the OK Dinghy World Championship being held immediately before the Finn World Masters. If you want a really good excuse to spend another week in the Caribbean, then why not do both events? A number of sailors are already planning to do this. The trip is an eight-hour flight from London. There are also direct flights from USA and Canada, as well as connections to many other Caribbean Islands. We flew out with Virgin Atlantic, which is one of the main sponsors of the event. On arrival we were fast tracked through passport control, but then had to wait with everyone else for the bags to arrive. Andy, from the Finn class, was mentally making a shopping list of what to buy to replace his luggage by the time his turned up, but everything eventually came through on the carousel and we were taken to our courtesy bus to head towards our hotel – the Coconut Court Beach Hotel. The Coconut Court is set on the beach along the island’s south-western strip, in the middle of a gaggle of hotels that lead all the way to the Barbados Yacht Cub. No sooner than we were dropped off than we were taken to the yacht club for first introductions and cold beers on the beach, as the sun set over Carlisle Bay. Rum punches followed in the club bar, then dinner, more rum and finally bed, almost 24 hours after waking up at Gatwick Airport.

From the Coconut Court it is a leisurely 20-30 minute stroll along the sandy beaches to the Barbados Yacht Club. Along the way you pass Amaryllis Beach Resort, Sugar Bay and Savannah Beach before turning the corner through the impressive Hilton. The Radisson is next up just past the quaint Barbados Cruising Club with its open-air raised restaurant overlooking the beach. To get past the Radisson it is either a short walk to the road and in the main gate or under the pier in knee depth water. The Barbados Yacht Club is right next door to the Radisson hotel on a pristine beach that stretches away into the distance towards Bridgetown. The walk back to the hotel by road is much quicker and passes the famous Historic Garrison, one of the world’s oldest military garrisons with a fine collection of canon overlooking the Garrison Savannah, a popular horse-racing venue. Walking beside the road, you will be tooted and honked at by passing taxis and buses, ever keen to deprive you of BD$ 2 to take you to your destination. Barbados is only 21 miles long and 14 miles wide and you can drive right round the coast in a matter of hours – but the temptation to stop, take in the view, and enjoy the local hospitality means it can take a lot longer than that – added to the fact that some of the roads on the east coast could best be described as interesting. On our third day there we did just that. Our host, Andrew Davies, martyred his hire car for the day-long excursion, with stops for suitably Bajan

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barbados 2017 refreshments and photo-ops along the way. There are many contrasting landscapes around such a small island, and there is something different to see around every corner. The capital, Bridgetown, is a busy business and shipping hub with one of the largest cruise ports in the region. From the club it is a 10 minute ‘boom box’ bus ride to the central bus station and from there you can walk across the town in 20-30 minutes. There are attractions around the island too numerous to mention, but must-sees include Oistin’s Fish Fry, Mount Gay tour, Barbados Museum, Garrison tour, Harrison’s Cave, St Nicholas Abbey and the Tyrol Cot Heritage Village. The island is the most easterly of all the Caribbean islands and is located in a relatively isolated position in the Atlantic, about 200 miles to the east of the east of Windward Islands. As such its eastern coastline bears the full brunt of the Atlantic swells and is in stark contrast to the largely affluent and well-developed west coast. The south-west coast, where the club is located, is sheltered from this Atlantic assault and provides fantastic sailing conditions. Every day we observed a stable, and warm, 12-18 knot breeze blowing in the same direction, building during the morning and calm at night. It was never too much nor too little. The Barbados Yacht Club sits on the sandy shores of Carlisle Bay, with a fantastic range of facilities including tennis courts, ample storage areas, meetings rooms and a fabulous beach bar just a few steps from where the boats will be kept. We hope, come June 2017, that your boat will be one of them. For a more complete and factual venue visit report please go to: 2017.okworlds.org

IMPORTANT INFORMATION This panel is a summary of the information on 2017.okworlds.org. It will be updated periodically so please check back for updates. Schedule The OK Dinghy Worlds will precede the Finn World Masters. The logistics of swapping one fleet for another are being worked out but there is plenty of space. The current plan is for the Finn containers to sit at the Barbados Yacht Club while the OK Dinghy containers will sit next to the Barbados Cruising Club next door. Tues 23-Tues 30 May (tbc) Weds 31 May - Thurs 1 June (tbc) Fri 2-Fri 9 June

OK Dinghy Worlds Day(s) off Finn World Masters

Entry The Notice of Race, entry process and entry fee will be announced as soon as possible. The entry fee will include shipping and sailing fee. Containers One of the event’s major sponsors is Geest Line in the UK. The line operates out of Portsmouth in the UK and Le Harve in France. Estimated costs are US$1750 (2016 price) plus insurance (estimated around GBP 50 per boat) plus any inland transport (though own arrangements or booked through Geest in some countries) to get the containers to one of the ports. Short sea shipping is also an option for countries that have access to a port. The transit time to Bridgetown is about 10 days, but if there is a large number of boats going shipments may have to be scheduled over several weeks to get them all there on time. The containers will be cleared in Bridgetown and trucked to the Barbados Yacht Club, where they will be stored for the duration of the event. All local costs in Barbados are being covered by the sponsorship. The website will also contain a list of contacts of those co-ordinating containers so if you want to book a space you know where to go. PLEASE DO NOT CONTACT GEEST. We would prefer one coordinator for each shipment who will make all bookings through OKDIA. Anyone sending a container from outside Europe and not using Geest will have to make their own arrangements, however the arrangements on arrival will be the same. Check 2017.okworlds.org for latest details. Flights Virgin Atlantic is also a major sponsor and as such will provide discounts with a code for booking nearer the time. Flights do not become available until 300 days before departure, so about August 2016. The majority of long haul connections are through London, while other airlines provide connections through USA, Canada, Colombia and several Caribbean islands. Hotels There is a lot of accommodation from self-catering bungalows to 5-star hotels. A selection of hotels will be available at discounted rates with a special booking code. Packages that include Virgin flights and hotels will be offered through Virgin Holidays and a discount code will be available. Provisional timeline 1 Jan 2016 to 1 Feb 2017 Jan-May 2016 (tbc) Jan 2017 1 August 2016 (suggested) 1 August 2016 (approx) April- early May 2017

APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

Book container space (see website) Codes for hotel discounts issued. Entry fee due Pay for boat transport Flights become available Geest Line Containers to be loaded

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World No. 1 talks about sailing, training and his fascination with the OK Dinghy

Bo Petersen interview T

here are several truly talented and dedicated sailors within the OK Dinghy class and one of them is definitely Bo Petersen from Denmark. After only a few years in the class he has already won several titles, including the European Championship in 2013, and has quickly risen to become one of the stars of the class. Jonas Börjesson spoke to the then current World No. 2 (now World No 1), as he was curious to learn more about his background and what motivated him to start sailing the OK Dinghy at the age 49 and his rapid rise to the top. The first time Jonas ever met Bo Petersen was at a one-day event on a lake south-west of Helsingør in April in 2014. In a light to medium wind and in a quite competitive fleet he won all four races in big style and he remembers being very impressed. Jonas never talked to him then but perceived him as being a bit loud. Since then, he has had the opportunity to meet him several times and his first impression has definitely changed. Early days How did Petersen get into sailing? “I got my first Optimist dinghy on my 10th birthday. It was a beautiful mahogany Optimist. Ever since I was six years old I had longed for one but my mother did not have much money (Bo’s father died when he was two years old) so it took her some time to save up the money.” When Bo was 14, he bought his first Europe dinghy. Later on, Henning Wind (the founder of Winner

dinghies) moved to Bo’s hometown and began building Winner Europe dinghies. “He thought I had talent and we began developing the Winner Europe dinghy to what it actually still is today. In 1981, I won the National Championship and should also have won the World Championships but finished just outside the podium.” From the autumn of 1981 Bo was on the Danish Olympic team in the 470. In 1984 Bo went back to the Europe and won the silver medal at the World Championships in Kiel. Then followed some years of 5o5 racing with great success including winning the Nationals and the Nordics and runner-up at the European Championships. “In 1990 we sold the 5o5 and from then on and it was mainly family for the next 20 years.” He realised that he had talent for sailing quite early. “More importantly I have always had a very strong desire to sail and practice to become better. As they say, talent is 10 per cent and the rest is just hard work and I have always been willing to put in the hard work to reach the top.” Petersen says one of his best sailing moments was winning his first championship at the age of 18. But there have been many highs and lows in his sailing career? “Winning the Europe dinghy Nationals in 1981 is of course one of my best sailing memories. Especially since it was in a fleet of almost 100 dinghies with plenty of talented sailors. In modern times, I felt very proud when I won the Europeans in the OK Dinghy in Carnac in 2013. It was a fantastic reward after a great many hours of training invested in the OK Dinghy.” Petersen stayed together with Stefan Myralf and his wife and daughter during the Carnac championship. On the evening before the last day of racing, when Bo was in the lead with

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bo petersen interview Stefan in second, they sat down together and over a bottle of wine they agreed upon how they should handle this situation on the course the next day. “The last thing we both wanted was to jeopardize the friendship we had built up between us over the last 18 months which had been strengthened during the week in Carnac. There was no racing during the final day (due to no wind) so the testing of our friendship did not happen.” The 1981 Europe World Championships in Hoorn is Bo’s worst sailing memory. Before the final day he led the championships. On the morning of the final day there was no wind and the sea was flat calm. The fleet was dragged out and kept waiting in their dinghies all day in the hot sun. “Then, late in the afternoon, after many of my competitors had started to congratulate me on the title, the race committee decided to send the fleet away in a sporadic 1-2 m/s breeze. After the first beat, there was a 90 degrees wind shift and they decided to shorten the race resulting in a downwind finish. I got a 38 and I had lost the gold. I cried like a little beaten up kid when they towed us in.” There were several protests against the final race but they were all overruled and Bo finished fourth. “I remember staring at the gold, silver and bronze on the podium and wishing never again to feel so humiliated by our lord. It took me many years to forgive him.”

one of them to Bo. “I thought I might give it a test but thinking back I remember I first of all saw it as an opportunity to meet Paul Elvstrøm, my hero of all heroes.” Paul happens to be Stefan’s father in law and lives in the same house as Stefan where he also keeps his OK Dinghies.

Getting into the OK Dinghy Bo Petersen started sailing the OK Dinghy when he was 49 years old, in 2012. By 2013 he had won the Europeans in France and in 2015 he won the Nordics and the bronze medal at the World Championships, in Puck, Poland. Why did he start sailing the OK Dinghy?

“We started to sail and I was immediately fascinated by the OK Dinghy since it reminded me of the old days when I successfully competed in the Europe. My physique was not the best though, which was a bit of a problem. I could not imagine how I would be able to get the OK Dinghy going in a breeze. After a while, I realised that the World Championship was to be held later that year in Vallensbæk in Denmark. I made a rental deal with Stefan on the boat and got started in the class.”

“I had not sailed very much over a 20-year period when on a walk in Hellerup harbour in 2009 I came upon a Contender.” Bo thought it would be an interesting experience to learn how to sail the technically difficult Contender and once his Lisbeth had given him permission he found himself sailing a dinghy again. “When I started up, there were many talented Contender sailors in Hellerup but quite soon they dropped out one after one and I found myself sailing alone most of the time. I had also noticed that there were 3-8 OK Dinghies on the water every other day but I had no desire to switch from trapeze to hiking straps.”

Best in the world What was his goal with OK Dinghy sailing when he started? Was it just for fun or was he aiming for the top from start? “After the first few months of sailing the OK Dinghy I decided to see if I could reach the top. I knew the conditions for such a challenge were great in Hellerup where you get to sail with Jørgen Lindhardtsen, Stefan Myrälf and Jørgen Svendsen. These sailors are among the best in the world and I have great respect for all of them. Also, there were several other OK Dinghy sailors who were pretty good as well making it a quite a competitive fleet to practice with.”

One day in March 2012 Stefan Myrälf approached Bo and asked him if he would like to come out and test the OK Dinghy. Stefan had two OK Dinghies and was happy to lend

Bo explains that he always strives to get in a mode where he sails without reflecting on the different sailing techniques. ”Your body and the dinghy should work together as one integrated part, and you should not need to think about your boat handling. Then, your mind can totally focus on the tactical and strategic aspects of the race. I think one of my strengths might be that I am aware of this and constantly work to reach this mode.” For many OK Dinghy sailors this mode is seemingly unattainable since it requires so much time on the water, time which most do not have. Bo also talks about the importance of being in good shape. For obvious reasons you need to be in good shape sailing in strong winds. ”To be able to hike effectively during the whole race saves you hundreds of meters.” But Bo also emphasizes the importance of fitness for your ability to maintain your concentration. ”If you are in bad shape, then it is easy to loose your concentration and that will affect your sailing immediately. Thus, good fitness is important not only when it

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bo petersen interview master a good steering technique upwind.” Bo says that he is very aware of this and by sailing a lot in windy conditions his steering comes naturally without thinking about it, which means he can fully concentrate on tactics and strategy. “Downwind I just concentrate on catching as many waves as possible so that I can spend most of the time surfing.”

is very windy but also in light wind conditions since it enables you to stay focused longer than your competitors.” He still considers his determination to practice as his main strength. ”Dinghy-sailing consists of so many different areas that need to be mastered if you want to become a successful competitor. I have always been aware of that and kept practicing the areas I feel I need to improve. Thus, I always plan what to practice so that my two hours on the water become as effective as possible. Perhaps, the planning of my training and following a game plan is one of my strengths.” When coming to fitness and training running, cycling and going to the gym is good substitute but Bo’s best advice is to practice in strong winds. ”The best training for your thighs is lots of sailing in windy conditions. In addition, when practicing in +10 m/s your learning-curve regarding boathandling is much steeper.” And on weaknesses. “I have been a dinghy sailor for so many years and one thing I really have learned is that there is a very strong correlation between your physical form and boat speed when there is some wind. But, as I have got older I have found it more and more difficult to motivate myself to do all the physical training that I know is needed.”

How often/much does he sail? “One of the main reasons I started dinghy sailing again in 2009 was actually because I had a bad conscience for not really doing any physical training. Sailing was a fun way to get in better shape and thus feel a little better with myself.” In the same way the exerciser goes for a run every second day, Bo went sailing. After a while he realised that the sailing also had an effect on a mental level. “When I was out on the water, there was no phone and I was free of all obligations. It was like an indispensable space of leisure that every grown up deserves. Today, I can not do without this space and during this autumn and winter when I have had no dinghy I can see that it is not so much the racing I miss, but more the daily meditation that the sailing on the sound outside Hellerup gives me.” Boats have personalities and souls It is obvious that Bo has a bit of a philosophic view on sailing and his boat. Just as people are all different, the same goes for OK Dinghies and Bo says that he perceives that his boat, mast and sail have all got personalities and souls. “Assuming that your boat is basically well set up, which is true for most OK Dinghies today, I would actually say what is most important for speed is boat-handling, physical fitness and the ability to concentrate.” “The souls of the boat, mast and sail must all play in tune with each other. They should also be tuned to your specific sailing style, whether it is aggressive or more calm. I like to think of myself as a musician and the boat and rig as my instrument and I always strive to be in harmony with my instrument. Once the weather changes or you switch sail you must tune your instrument. It could be a 2 mm change of your mast position or just sheeting a little different that puts you back in tune again.”

Motivation to get into better shape Bo says he had a lot of pain he had in his thighs after the first day of the World Championships in Puck last summer. It was quite windy on the first day and he won both races. “Day 2 and 3 were extremely painful and I had problems with lactic acid in my thighs and I was not able to perform at mt best. I then promised myself that I would never experience that again. That, plus the fact that I am only 80 kg and 177 cm is my greatest motivation for getting in better shape for the coming season.” Even though he is not that heavy and he is still considered as one of the best in windy conditions. “I guess I am a quite strong hiker and I am always aware of the boat speed and try to steer as effective as possible in waves. During a beat you may sail your boat through 250 waves and every time you fail to pass the wave effectively you may loose two or three meters. Thus, there is lot of distance to win if you are able to 16

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bo petersen interview Equipment choice Bo has chosen to sail with the combination of SOTA hull, C-Tech mast and Green sails. “I am very pleased with this combination. Boatbuilder Jesper Strandberg and I have a good relationship and he builds boats with great souls. The SOTA is a ‘little’ OK Dinghy which suits my weight perfectly.” Bo has always raced with Green sails and got to know Jørgen Holm Nielsen back in the 1970s. “Jørgen is probably one of the sailmakers who has made most sails for unstayed masts in the world and I have great trust in his knowledge. I sail with the 4 CC model that is quite flat and open in the top, which gives me great speed in most conditions.” Green also produces another model, 8 CC, which is fuller and suits the heavy sailors. “Since my sail is quite flat, my steering must be precise otherwise the boat will tend to stall. I work a lot with the outhaul to get the right depth according to wind and waves. The inhaul is used to set the angle of entry of the wind and is also used a lot. The Cunningham can be stretched rather late due to the fact that the sail is designed quite open in the top from start.” Like most other OK Dinghy sailors, Bo uses the C-Tech mast. C-Tech has developed a mast principle where the mast is very soft at the bottom up to the gooseneck and rather stiff between the bands. This means that the sail shape is almost the same in windy conditions since not so much happens to the mast curve between the bands when you sheet in. ”The traditional masts tend to flatten out the sail when you sheet in resulting in lost height and difficulty holding your course. The C-Tech has been a success but now it seems that Ceilidh is catching up and is ready to take up the fight. It will be interesting to follow their new masts in the upcoming season.” World Championship every week When asked to describe a typical training session in Hellerup, Bo laughs and explains that the fleet in Hellerup is actually not that good to set up and perform proper training sessions. “It always turns into a World Championship. Normally, there are 4-12 OK Dinghies and we do five or six up and downwind races with rabbit starts. We all use our best gear and full power setup since no one wants to lose.” After sailing, there are always discussions about who was the fastest and sometimes these are quite loud, according to Bo. He thinks the best training session is when this concept is dropped and you do either speed training through line-ups or just practice boat handling through specific exercises. “I have had many great training sessions with Stefan Myrälf and Jørgen Lindhartdsen. They have sailed so many line-ups and they know both how to do it properly to get the maximum out of it. The three of us just fit really well together, and it is great to test masts, sails and their settings together with them.”

in the OK Dinghy class is more than willing to help out. If you have the possibility, try hiring a good OK Dinghy sailor for a training camp. But otherwise I would just say, get out on the water and sail as much as possible. Sail a lot in windy conditions since that will give you three times as much training. Sail the boat to its limits and if you capsize, it is just good fun. I always tend to capsize when I train in windy conditions. If I did not, I would not consider it as proper training since I have not pushed for the extreme limit.” The future He has firm views on the future for the OK Dinghy class. “A couple of years ago, Jørgen Svendsen said to me: ‘Don’t you think the class will die with us? And I remember answering him that I thought he was right. Since then, I have revised my thoughts on the OK Dinghy class. Today, there are so many new boats being built, and they are built with great quality and cool designs. These new fancy boats match the Finns and Europes in style and I believe there will be Finn sailors who will find the slightly less physically demanding OK Dinghy very attractive. The same goes with Europe and Laser sailors that have become too heavy. Suddenly, there is a cool alternative in contrast to how it used to be with the old and battered wooden OK Dinghies. No, Mr Svendsen, I no longer believe the OK Dinghy will die with us. I actually think the OK Dinghy class can continue to grow and become really big and keep attracting many good sailors into the class in the future.” What are his future goals in the OK Dinghy? ”I just had a half year break from OK Dinghy sailing but once I get my new boat from Strandberg Marine in February I will start to sail again and my goal is to be 100 percent prepared for the upcoming World Championship in France. After the 2016 season I will once again take a little break to recharge my batteries and build up mental power before the preparations for the Worlds in Barbados, in 2017, starts up. After Barbados, I really do not know. Perhaps I get into another class, for instance the Star. Let us see what life will offer.”

For a mid-fleet racer that wants to get closer to the top, Bo recommends time on the water. “For all sailors that want to improve I can only say find the desire to train hard and sail often. Whenever you have questions or technical issues you do not grasp, ask for advice. I would say that every good sailor APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

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grant wakefield

Not too light to be OK by Grant Wakefield

I

am a lightweight sailor who found myself enticed into the OK Dinghy class by a combination of chance and opportunity.

The OK Dinghy is often considered to be solely the reserve of heavier sailors (in the range of 80 to 100 kg and mostly towards the upper end). Through personal experience and by witnessing the performances of some skilled lightweight OK Dinghy sailors I have learnt that there is much more to the story. To fill in a bit of background, before raising a family and not doing much sailing, I had spent some time keelboat racing with friends, with windsurfing thrown in here and there. I dabbled in catamaran sailing and also restored a historic wooden dinghy and sailed this for a couple of years, along

with a season or two racing a Laser. None of this has involved a prolonged and committed period of time in any particular class and none of it contributed much towards building a base of competitive racing skills – let’s call it mucking around in boats. I wanted more and four years ago I was looking for a class of boat that I could commit to and which would help me get as good as possible at sailing a particular class of boat and through this improve my overall sailing ability. With the help of some particularly persuasive characters at the Drummoyne Sailing Club in Sydney, especially veteran OK Dinghy sailor and OKDIA Hall of Fame member, Bill Tyler, I was convinced one Sunday to participate in a race in an OK Dinghy. I knew of the OK Dinghy and prior to succumbing to Bill’s persuasive skills, I was convinced that my relatively light weight (around 70kg) was too light for the class. Nevertheless I borrowed a boat and had a go. I was given a few basic tips and away I went. I sure worked hard but completed the race without major incident – in last place of course and I spent the following 2 to 3 days hobbling about with sore thighs. Despite that, I was looking forward to the next opportunity. During the following winter I acted on some advice, again from Bill, and picked up a mid-priced OK Dinghy from Melbourne and started the learning process. That small step was my passport into the OK Dinghy world and with that came lots of support, fun, learning, frustration, satisfaction, camaraderie and even the occasional good result. The OK Dinghy world is a place where you quickly belong through just becoming involved. The sharing of knowledge is always only a question away and the encouragement and support of fellow competitors made the steep learning curve a little shallower. I always asked questions, especially when amongst the experienced OK Dinghy sailors at Drummoyne Sailing Club, and I always got helpful and encouraging answers. For two seasons I competed at or near the back of the fleet, but by the third I was consistently finishing in the middle and occasionally near to the front, especially in lighter conditions. My speed is up, the errors are fewer and I am getting better

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not too light to be ok and better at finding the right way around the course. Starting well is still an issue and dealing with a big blow and waves is something that I need to improve a lot. However, it is a huge amount of fun being on the steep part of the learning curve where there are big gains to be made. What things have contributed the most to the improvements over the three years? Do lots of sailing and enter the regattas In the three years since I have been racing the OK Dinghy I have competed in several State and Australian Championships, I competed in a local World Championship at Black Rock YC on Port Phillip Bay, Melbourne and travelled to New Zealand to compete in the NZ National Championship on Auckland Harbour. Few of these regattas I felt competent to participate in but without question, the quantity of sailing, the good things done and mistakes made, along with the input and advice from the good sailors, can’t be matched any other way. Let the traveller down Maybe this is particular to the OK Dinghy but after battling for too long vainly trying to sail high with the traveller not eased enough for the wind conditions and especially for my weight, a kind soul convinced me to “let it out” and go for the ride. Much easier, less battling, faster, and surprise, surprise – also pointing high. The mast and a matching sail are important My first boat had a very stiff MkI C-Tech carbon mast, which was fine for a heavyweight sailor but put a 70kg sailor ‘on his ear’ at each little puff. Greg Wilcox at Turtle Sails generously recommended optimum mast bend numbers suitable for my weight and this information was passed on to C-Tech who built a really cool two-piece mast to suit. This mast, combined with a matching sail also made to suit my weight, made a significant difference. Small tweaks of the Cunningham tension make nice progressive adjustments to the openness of the leech and the mast bends away nicely in the puffs. Depowering became much easier. Dealing with a blow A lightweight OK Dinghy sailor in a breeze that most would call medium (8 –12 knots), is looking to depower and sail as though they are in strong winds. During a coaching regatta held by the New South Wales OK Dinghy fleet, at which Tom Burton, one-time lightweight OK Dinghy sailor and current World No. 1 Laser sailor was the coach, I learnt a few tips for dealing with ‘my’ heavy conditions. Before this regatta, I had been dealing with heavy conditions through the wrong option of easing the mainsheet for the puffs. Tom suggested I use block-to-block mainsheet tension with the traveller right out and sail to the breeze, i.e. anticipate and feather up in the puffs and bear away in the lulls. When block-to-block the main flattens and the leech opens, whereas my easing of the mainsheet in the puffs contributed to a fuller and more powerful sail shape (like what we should do in the light to get maximum power). Of course this is with lots of inhaul, maximum outhaul and a suitable amount of Cunningham. Starting My biggest weakness remains starting and I look forward to fixing this problem, however since competing in the Australian and World titles in Melbourne some significant gains have been made – especially regarding positioning on a crowded line. It is very daunting to enter a line up of 80 boats, containing so many world-class sailors, and to jostle APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

for a clear position. However, it is impossibly hopeless to start anywhere but the front row in such a large fleet. I learnt that I simply must make every effort possible to position myself in a clear front-row position. There is no room for timidity and every sailor has an equal right to be there. After some lousy and punishing starts at State and National competitions, I decided while heading out to the start line of heat 1 of the 2014 Melbourne Worlds that I might as well go hard or go home. With some trepidation I found a front line position and held until I got pushed up and, I thought at the time, over, in the last seconds by a leeward boat. Before I could regroup the starters gun went. As it turned out I was nowhere near over the line. I had clear air, front-line starting position and it was fantastic – setting me up for a middle of the fleet result. A good lesson leant. I still have to work on acceleration and starting speed but that will come. Get fit and strong Since starting to sail in the OK Dinghy, I learnt pretty quickly that I would need to be fit and strong if I were to even approach the pace of the heavier sailors. If I can hike for longer and harder and make fewer mistakes through fatigue then I will be more competitive. In my case this meant ramping up some cardio work and also core strength through Pilates and Karate. The latter making a surprisingly beneficial contribution to strength, flexibility, agility and control for sailing. There are plenty of great sailors in the OK Dinghy world. Some, whose international success I grew up reading about in the New Zealand press during the 1980s, are still competing in the class. There are sailors that have a wealth of international success across many other classes and sailors who have built up an enviable skill level over many years in OK Dinghies and who still compete at a high level despite some being well into their 60s and 70s. At the other end there is a growing number of younger and very quick and skillful sailors in the class. Mixing with all these sailors both on and off the water is great fun and I look forward to many years and many regattas – local, national and international – in the OK Dinghy. The next OK Dinghy Worlds are in 2016 in Quiberon, France and the following year in Barbados. Both venues are mustn’tmiss opportunities and I intend to compete at both, with a few Australian and New Zealand national and state titles in between. The OK Dinghy represents my sailing future. The pleasure of sailing the boat, the camaraderie among the people in the class and the wonderful opportunity to compete in World Championships in a dinghy class that contains so many good people makes a compelling case. 19


quiberon 2016 a boat behind, the price of the autoroute tolls should be the same as for a standard car. In France, boats, and only boats, are allowed to travel for free. For those driving, the advice is to avoid entering or leaving the Halfisland during ‘beach time’, since it can be massively crowded. Venue The National Sailing School is located at: ENVSN – Beg Rohu – 56150 Saint Pierre Quiberon. ENVSN is a huge private campus, with all necessary facilities. The place is really used to hosting world-class events.

T

he 2016 OK Dinghy World Championship is being organised by the sailing club La Société des Régates de Saint Pierre Quiberon (SRSP), and will be held in the French National School for Sailing and Sports (ENVSN). The ENVSN is located right beside the sea in St Pierre Quiberon. It is a unique and magnificent sailing complex with great facilities specifically designed for racing sailors. The sailing area is sheltered from the open Atlantic by the Quiberon peninsula and a few islands to the south. The west coast of the peninsula is called the Côte Sauvage – the wild coast, as the next land to the west is Newfoundland and here the waters of the Bay of Biscay can be wild indeed. The east coast, where the sailing area is, can deliver perfect sailing conditions, already experienced by many OK sailors during the 2013 Pre-European regatta and the 2013 Europeans in Carnac, which is located along the coast from Quiberon, but on the same waters. Travel The closest airports are Vannes, Lorient (both of them are small ones), Nantes and then Paris. The closest train station is Quiberon. It is accessible by a special train that is to be taken at Auray station. The latter station is served by high speed train from Paris. From Paris it is a 4h30 drive. The train is about the same. Remember that when you are driving in France with a car and

A look ahead to the 2016 World Championships in Quiberon

The sailing complex includes: • 4 changing rooms for up to 100 persons • A self service restaurant with 150 seats • 100 bedrooms / 135 beds • Drying rooms for wetsuits on each floor • A hangar for boats and outside storage area • 14 classrooms available for meetings • Wifi available in four buildings • 15 RIB motor boats with professional crew • Also available, a crane used to lift coach boats for €20

ENVSN is offering various packages of rooms, breakfasts, packed lunches and evening meals. There is a form on the event website to complete and send back to book a room, meals or camping place. The campsite is divided in approximately 20 adjacent parts, and within any of them there is enough space for several tents or vans (two to 5 depending on the size of the tents). The restaurant is not really a restaurant; it is more like a canteen where one has to buy your own tickets at the beginning of the week. The village is a 5 minute bike ride away. In the village there is everything you need including several bars and restaurants and all the shops that you’d to find in a village. Schedule Friday 22- Sunday 24 - Registration and Measurement Saturday 24 – Opening Ceremony
and Practice Race Monday 25- Friday 29 – Racing
 The event will be open entry, so national quota will not apply. The Notice of Race has been published at http://2016. okworlds.org/2015/11/09/notice-of-race/. Online Entry is also open. Remember to send the entry fees to your National Association. All details are in the Notice of Race. If in doubt check: okworlds.org

APRIL 2015 • www.okdia.org

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Rewriting the Class Rules

F

or any one design class, the Class Rules forms a fundamental foundation of stability and growth. A good set of rules will ensure that the sailors who win races do so more by their talent than by design and development. Maintaining consistent building practices also lowers costs and encourages growth. A one-design class is defined as a class built from a strict set of rules that has some small tolerances, so the OK Dinghy is certainly one-design. However, to date the OK Dinghy Class Rules have been sometimes interpreted as being ‘open’ by various builders, and that has led to some unwanted developments which has then led the class to make rule changes in order to prevent. That could all be about to change. Unlike most manufactured and development classes, the OK Dinghy is a measurement controlled one-design class and as such, the boat is defined by a set of measurements that have small tolerances. As part of the OKDIA Strategic Roadmap and the subsequent decisions made by AGM vote, we are in the process of rewriting the Class Rules to bring them into line with World Sailing’s Standard Class Rules (SCR), using the Equipment Rules of Sailing (ERS) and the ERS definitions. This process has been discussed for many years and now finally it is getting done. The most important change in the new rules will be that they become ‘closed’ rules. (Closed is the new term for one design, while Open is the new term for development.) But it is more than just a name change. It means that if the rules do not specially say that you can do something, then you cannot do it. To achieve this we have had to add many items into the Rules that have either previously just been assumed or not mentioned at all. The other main difference will be that all rules must be strictly

measurement based. All subjective inference to intent and spirit will have to be removed. And all rules prone to any open interpretation must be modified to make them clear and objective. The SCR are easily structured into seven separate sections. There are sections for administration and certification, and for each of the main pieces of equipment. (i.e. hull, hull appendages, rig and sail) There is also a section (Section C) for where a measurement requires more than one piece of equipment (eg Centreboard drop or the lower point on a mast). For reasons of simplicity, we are trying to get as many rules as possible out of Section C and into their relevant section, and this means that a few rules have to be modified. The conversion process has been underway for many months now and started off with a professional first draft by a UK rules expert who has carried out many such class rule re-writes over the years. This first draft had several subsequent re-workings and now we are at a stage where the Technical Committee is refining a few wordings and deciding on the modifications as described above. What we are trying to achieve is to include current practices and methods while, at this stage, making sure we don’t open the door to any unwanted developments. It is a tricky process and sometimes challenging, but also rewarding. The primary aim at this stage is to have a smooth transition from current to new without too many changes. The new rules will also change the way boats are measured and will require a re-writing of the measurement form. This is a job for later though. The hope is that there will be a provisional draft ready for discussion at the AGM in France this July. While this may or may not be the final version, it will certainly be something that members can discuss and comment upon. As the class grows and builders find new ways to make their boats more attractive to customers, the introduction of a fully closed set of rules is both timely and needed. As a Technical Committee we are increasing stretched in working out if something is correct or not, and it is often the case that we have to use existing rules to make decisions on developments that were probably not even envisaged by the original design. The ultimate aim is to keep boats more evenly matched so the best sailors win the racing, because that is how it should be. Alistair Deaves Chairman, OKDIA Technical Committee

22

ok dinghy international magazine


Strandberg Marine strandbergmarine@gmail.com • +45 29 42 12 05

www.strandberg-marine.com

APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

23


P

erhaps you noticed them. Sailing their OK Dinghies with the NED sail numbers. After two decades the boys from Holland are returning with their OK Dinghies. So where were they, what did they do and most of all who are they and what are they up to? By Wietze Huitema

A historical view In the past there was a nice fleet from the Netherlands that raced in their own country and also in Europe and beyond. No European or world champions, but we did win races and took podium finishes. Famous names from the sixties are Hans van Pagee (third in the Europeans 1970), Rolf Vrolijk (Deptford Cup winner, 1971), Roel Wester (Winner of the Kiel Week) and later Piet Verstelle, Hans Hoedeman and Ids Bakker in the seventies and early eighties. When the Laser was introduced the decline of the class started, and in the early nineties the OK Dinghy disappeared from the many lakes of Holland. The last known fact was the Dutch nationals in the mid-nineties were won by Erik Vliegenthart. The sail numbers slowly stalled at 662.

Return of the Dutchmen

24

Resurrection Around 2008 a small group of OK Dinghy sailors found each other at small races in Friesland and soon the visited the Spring Cup in Medemblik. A young Jan Siebe de Vries with his all-wood 1972 boat looked a bit odd in the fleet of modern OKs but nevertheless he showed some nice sailing and was noticed. Also Robert Bancken was present as the sailing figure from the old Dutch OK Dinghy association that was in some sort of hibernation. A new website was put online to keep in touch with each other and to bring information from around the world to the Netherlands and Dutch OK enthusiasts who slowly gained numbers. Boats from other countries were bought and the 663 and 664 sail numbers handed out by the national authority. Also a lot of old boats (Wester, Henriksen, etc) were refitted to hit the lakes. In 2013/2014 a new Dutch association was officially formed to claim its place and to encourage Dutch sailors to step into this great class with history and a prosperous future. New regattas emerged like the international Eastersee Regatta in Oosterzee, with 37 entries in 2015 and soon sail numbers 665 and 666 were on the water. The association currently has 20+ members.

New numbers and builds Sailors from the past re-entered the class with real good results. Strandbergs were bought (668 and 669) and the Dan Leech kit is really getting numbers up. First 667 was built and sailed by Hessel Hoekstra (he sailed the Europeans in 1974 and returned to the class in 2015). “Building the Leech OK Dinghy isn’t really difficult, except for the front end of the bottom panels. I thought long about the extra parts for the fittings. Also working with epoxy resin can give you a rash. It

ok dinghy international magazine


RETURN OF THE DUTCH

takes a little time to get the hand of working with the resin in order to make it perform the way you want it to. I’d say every beginner is able to build his or her own Leech OK Dinghy using his kit. I like to work alone, but working together is more fun and the extra hands are a great help on fitting some parts.” In his boatbuilding shop in Medemblik, Peter van der Schaaf is working on wooden OK Dinghies based on the Leech design. He builds them on request and with already three ordered numbers in the Dutch class are really going up. With restorations underway of a Kjolhede and a Hein we hope to see number NED 675 by the start of the season. A look at the future Dutch sailors are slowly moving up leaderboards as Sybren Hornstra won a race in the International Eastersee Regatta and Stephan Veldman took one in the Belgian nationals. The Dutchman to beat is Peter van der Schaaf who is most consistent and best Dutchman in most regattas, like in the German nationals. Looking at 2016 we hope to have a nationals to have a new Dutch national champion and bridging the 20-year gap. The Dutch association is looking into the possibility to have the Eastersee Regatta 2016 event count as the Dutch nationals. The Dutch class is really pleased with the help from the other associations and OK Dinghy sailors throughout Europe. The interest and information really helps us build the Dutch class. It is an amazing international class that shows really good sportsmanship and comradeship. So this year the Dutchmen hope to see everyone on the water. If anyone is thinking on coming over to the Netherlands, here is the provisional international calendar for 2016: Easter Regatta (Loosdrecht) Spring Cup (Medemblik) Sneekweek (Sneek) Eastersee Regatta / Dutch Nationals (Oosterzee)

Easter Early May Early August Late August

Photos: Left, top and right: Easterseeregatta 2015. Photos by Willem Stokjer. This page: top row - Hessel Hoekstra newbuild Bottom two rows: Peter van der Schaaf newbuild

APRIL 2015 • www.okdia.org

25


RESULTS Interdominions 2016

Manly SC, New Zealand, 24-27 Mar 1 NZL 562 Dan Slater

2 NZL 546 Luke O’Connell

3 AUS 735 Mark Jackson

4 NZL 560 Ben Morrison

5 AUS 750 Peter Robinson

6 NZL 550 Peter Lester

7 AUS 753 Mark Skelton

8 NZL 526 Russell Page Wood

9 NZL 561 Rod Davis

10 NZL 536 Eric Rone

Danish Championship 2015 11

17

34

34

41

1 AUS 735 Mark Jackson

2 AUS 754 Brent Williams

3 AUS 750 Peter Robinson

4 AUS 739 Tim Davies

5 AUS 734 Edward O’Donnell

6 AUS 733 Folkert Janssen

7 AUS 741 Stephen Wilson

8 AUS 719 Glenn Williams

9 AUS 742 Gareth Wells

10 AUS 761 Mark Fisher

1 NZL 546 Luke O’Connell

2 NZL 560 Ben Morrison

3 NZL 551 Mark Perrow

4 NZL 545 Steve McDowell

5 NZL 557 Paul Rhodes

6 NZL 562 Dan Slater

7 NZL 504 Adrian Mannering

8 NZL 512 Nigel Mannering

9 NZL 303 David Hoogenboom

10 NZL 533 Rob Hengst

1 THA 444 Morten Jakobsen

2 THA 7

Thanakan Korkerd

4 A 1

Wiwat Poonpat

6 1278

Kevin Whitcraft

3 THA 99001 Pornthep Pumyam

5 THA 7273 Pariwt Aleemin

7 THA 1

9 4405

10 4401

Anusorr Ngamrit

Natthawut Paenyaem

59

65

1 NZL 546 Luke O’Connell

10

28

38

41

45

46

48

71

72

73

9

17

23

29

31

33

39

44

60

62

5

9

24

25

27

30

34

42

45

8 NZL 526 Russell Wood

9 NZL 530 David vd Wende 10 NZL 501 Jim Turner

26

8

29

7 NZL 550 Peter Lester

5 DEN 1420 Jørgen Lindhardtsen

41

7 GER 772 Oliver Gronholz

52

50

9 GER 693 Martin V. Zimmermann 58

10 DEN 1433 Lars Andresen

84

1 SWE 100 Thomas Hansson-Mild

2 SWE 2809 Jonas Börjesson

3 SWE 2782 Peter Rudblom

7

19

24

4 SWE 2783 Jonas Andersson

24

5 SWE 2776 Tomas Skeppmark

24

6 SWE 2804 Ingemar Janson

25

7 SWE 22 Lasse Hansson

34

8 SWE 2805 Stefan Pavia

38

9 SWE 2792 Anders Widding

40

10 SWE 2815 Per Westlund

41

1 GER 792 André Budzien

14

2 GER 800 Ralf Mackmann

3 GER 693 Martin v. Zimmermann

4 GER 772 Oliver Gronholz

5 GER 731 Thomas Glas

18

25

29

30

6 NZL 544 Greg Wilcox

31

7 GER 695 Erik Bork

31

8 GER 767 Juliane Hofmann

32

9 GER 778 Sönke Behrens

32

10 GER 799 Stefan Rassau

32

Stefan Myrälf

Tomasz Gaj

5 POL 5

Darek Kras

7 POL 7

Marek Bernat

6 POL 10 Janusz Stobinski

8 POL 19 Grzegorz Salamon

9 POL 40 Robert Święcki

10 POL 8

Waldemar Czyż

18

22

33

37

40

55

65

67

Lacanau, 28–30 Aug 1 Alain Renoux

15

3 Jean-Pierre Gailes

28

2 Julien Dejugnat 4 Patrick Nicolas

5 Frederic Lamarque 6 Jean-Louis Petetin 7 Raymond Dodard 8 Noel Masseron 9 Eric Kopka

10 Patrice Derouet

22 34 35 51 52 63 64 65

Lacanau, 28–30 Aug 1 Alain Renoux

15

3 Jean-Pierre Gailes

28

2 Julien Dejugnat 4 Patrick Nicolas

5 Frederic Lamarque 6 Jean-Louis Petetin 7 Raymond Dodard 8 Noel Masseron 9 Eric Kopka

10 Patrice Derouet

22 34 35 51 52 63 64 65

Easterseeregatta 2015

Rantzausminde 19-20 Sept

3 DEN 6

3 POL 1

4 POL 31 Antoni Pawłowski

11

17

Southern French Championship 2015

Potsdam, 1-4 Oct

Jørgen Svendsen

1 POL 14 Paweł Pawlaczyk

2 POL 27 Dawid Kania

Southern National Championship 2015

KSSS, Stockholm, 3 – 4 Oct

1 DEN 3

Gdansk, 11–13 Sept

8

2 DEN 1442 René Sarabia Johannsen 18

4 DEN 1420 Jørgen Lindhardtsen

5 DEN 10 Jens Lauge

6 GER 740 Günter Arndt

21

26

32

47

7 DEN 1397 Henrik Kofoed

52

8 DEN 1448 Mikael Nielsen

61

9 DEN 1344 Peter Wibroe

64

10 DEN 22 Ask Askhoim

66

Oosterzee, Netherlands, 29 - 30 Aug 1 GER 791 Frank Strelow

2 GER 790 Thorsten Schmidt

3 GER 799 Stefan Rassau

4 GER 750 Dirk Dame

5 GER 77 Ralf Mackmann

6 GER 595 Daniel Gröschl

7 NED 664 Peter van der Schaaf

8 BEL 220 Ronny Poelman

9 GER 642 Claus Stockhardt

10 GER 737 Christian Heinze

10

27

29

30

30

41

43

44

47

55

Belgian Open Championships 2015

4 NZL 560 Ben Morrison 6 USA 536 Eric Rone

32

37

Svendborg Sund 2015

12

5 NZL 545 Steve Mcdowell

Frederik Svendsen

4 DEN 10 Jens Lauge

German Championship 2015

2 NZL 51 Dan Slater

3 NZL 549 Matt Stechmann

27

Olympic Classes Regatta 2015

Auckland Rum Bucket 2015

Wakatere Boating Club, 24-25 Oct

Stefan Myrälf

8 DEN 1442 Rene Sarabia Johannsen 53

47

Piyapong Chantarawong 33

8 GBR 2083 Chris Biscomb

3 DEN 7

24

59

King of Thailand’s 88th Birthday

Invitation regatta, 18-20 Dec 2016

2 DEN 6

Jørgen Svendsen

6 DEN 1431Bo Petersen

New Zealand Championship 2016 Napier, 1-3 Jan

1 DEN 3

44

Australian Championship 2016 Adelaide Sailing Club, 4-8 Jan

Polish National Championship 2015

Lundeborg, 21-13 Aug

27

33

35

42

43

59

71

Lake Galgenweel, Antwerp, 12-13 Sept 1 GER 799 Stefan Rassau

2 GER 595 Daniel Gröschl

3 BEL 220 Ronny Poelman

4 FRA 1824 Alain Renoux

5 GER 77 Ralf Mackmann

6 NED 663 Stephan Veldman

7 GER 642 Claus Stockhardt

8 GER 737 Christian Heinze

9 BEL 230 Jacques Pirenne

10 LUX 1

Michel Lesure

19

20

21

23

24

28

35

36

37

38

ok dinghy international magazine


results British National Championships 2015 Weymouth Sailing Club, 27 - 30 Aug 1 GBR 2173 Charlie Cumbley

2 GBR 7

Lee Child

3 GBR 2042 Richard Burton

4 GBR 2151 Jon Fish

5 GBR 2118 Terry Curtis

6 GBR 85 David Carroll

7 GBR 1

Andy Rushworth

8 GBR 2156 Robert Deaves

9 GBR 2145 Tony Woods

10 GBR 245 Ed Bradburn

3 NZL536 Eric Rone

11

20

30

31

40

9 NZL369 Martin Douglas

61

Warnemünder Woche 2015

82

1 GER 693 Martin v. Zimmermann

50

71

1 DEN 1442 Rene Sarabia Johannsen 9 Bo Reker Andersen

7 NZL475 Phil Coveny

8 NZL547 Sefton Powrie

10 NZL510 Mark MacDuff

Runns Segelsällskap, Falun, 13-15 Aug 2 SWE 100 Thomas Hansson Mild

5 NZL500 Dean Coleman

6 NZL478 David van der Wende

46

Swedish National Championships 2015

3 DEN 1

4 NZL303 David Hoogenboom

13

19

10 -12 July

2 GER 792 André Budzien

3 NZL 544 Greg Wilcox

4 DEN 1420 Jørgen Lindhardtsen

5 DEN 1

Bo Reker Andersen

6 GER 797 Andreas Pich

7 POL 27 Jakub Kania

4 SWE 2809 Jonas Börjesson

28

6 SWE 2776 Thomas Skeppmark

46

10 GER 778 Sönke Behrens

56

Nordic Championship 2015

5 SWE 99 Hans Elkjaer

7 SWE 2804 Ingemar Janson

8 SWE 2796 Bengt Larsson

9 SWE 2784 Lasse Lantz

31

56

57

10 SWE 2810 Johannes Dagerbrandt 58 Northland OK Dinghy Champs 2015 Whangaruru Sailing Club, 1-2 Aug 1 NZL550 Peter Lester

2 NZL526 Russell Wood

11

17

APRIL 2015 • www.okdia.org

8 GER 695 Erik Bork

9 POL 14 Pawel Pawlaczyk

Præstø 13-14 June

17

18

37

10 DEN 22 Ask Askholm

46

Kieler Woche 2015

51

1 GBR 2173 Charlie Cumbley

46

50

6

9

16

4 DEN 3

5 GBR 1

Jørgen Svendsen

Jim Hunt

6 GER 792 André Budzien

43

48

22

23

28.0 42

49

49

7 NZL 544 Greg Wilcox

54

9 DEN 10 Jens Lauge

65

8 DEN 1420 Jørgen Lindhardtsen

25

10 DEN 1442 Rene Sarabia Johannsen 75

26

2015 Brass Monkey

25

28

32

Napier Sailing Club, NZL, 30-31 May 1 NZL 546 Luke O’Connell

2 NZL 509 Chris Fenwick

3 NZL 545 Steve McDowell

3 DEN 10 Jens Lauge

20

Jørgen Svendsen

2 SWE 100 Thomas Hansson-Mild

35

36

19

20

11

5 SWE 2797 Mats Caap

25-28 June

3 DEN 1431 Bo Petersen

2 DEN 1442 Rene Sarabia Johannsen17

6 DEN 3

9 SWE 2791 Lennart Hansson

46

1 DEN 1431Bo Petersen

4 DEN 1420Jørgen Lindhardtsen

7 SWE 99 Hans Elkjaer

8 DEN 1340 Christian Olsen

23

25

30

4 NZL 498 Jono Clough

5 NZL 550 Peter Lester

6 NZL 303 David Hoogenboom

7 NZL 533 Rob Hengst

8 NZL 531 Adrian Coulthard

9 NZL 549 Matt Stechman

10 NZL 539 John Shirley

61

9

14

20

21

26

26

33

33

36

42

27


2015 IN PICTURES

28

ok dinghy international magazine


2015 IN PICTURES

APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

29


world ranking list march 2016

30

Name

Sail no.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68

Bo Petersen DEN Greg Wilcox NZL Rene Johannsen DEN Andre Budzien GER Jørgen Lindhartdsen DEN Mark Jackson AUS Jørgen Svendsen DEN Martin v Zimmermann GER Jim Hunt GBR Robert Deaves GBR Pawel Pawlaczyk POL Bo Reker Andersen DEN Stefan Myralf DEN Charlie Cumbley GBR Thomas Hanson-Mild SWE Andreas Pich GER Tomasz Gaj POL Henrik Kofoed Larsen DEN Brent Williams AUS Alex Scoles GBR Simon Cowood GBR Hans Elkjaer SWE Bengt Larsson SWE Tony Woods GBR David Bourne GBR Johannes Dagerbrant SWE Jorg Rademacher GER Richard Burton GBR Jens Lauge DEN Rainer Pospiech GER Jonas Borjesson SWE Ralf Tietje GER Oliver Gronholz GER Marek Bernat POL Christian Olesen DEN Dirk Dame GER Thomas Glas GER Malte Pedersen DEN Antoni Pawlowski POL Ben Morrison NZL Radoslaw Drozdzik POL Glenn Williams AUS Gunter Arndt GER Jesper Strandberg DEN Guillaume d Kervendael FRA Gavin Waldron GBR Luke O’Connell NZL Sonke Behrens GER Tom Lonsdale GBR Lee Child GBR Mogens Johansen DEN Marten Bernesand SWE Dawid Kania POL Ralf Mackman GER Jon Fish GBR Mark Roberts AUS Peter Milne AUS Erik Bork GER Peter Robinson AUS Dirk Gericke GER Ask Askholm DEN Simon Cox GBR Tim Davies AUS Dave Ketteridge AUS Henrik Kimmer Petersen DEN Alain Renoux FRA Peter Heide DEN Grzegorz Salamon POL

1431 544 1442 792 1420 735 3 693 1 2156 14 1 6 2173 100 797 1 1397 754 13 2154 99 2796 2145 2172 2810 775 2042 10 765 2809 787 772 7 1340 750 731 1407 31 560 4 719 740 77 2133 2163 546 778 2147 2167 1335 2803 27 771 2151 762 694 695 750 735 22 2171 739 725 1395 1824 1354 19

Pts Events 958.39 922.60 908.56 864.21 855.98 836.20 821.92 815.46 807.47 771.76 761.17 739.92 738.66 737.50 737.02 726.06 725.80 661.84 661.15 654.54 642.58 634.61 630.19 629.28 621.51 618.73 616.83 613.60 608.06 601.11 594.51 592.83 566.45 557.53 546.92 542.42 540.84 535.42 533.41 517.44 514.92 514.27 508.75 503.49 499.66 495.08 493.01 488.42 465.85 465.35 463.49 459.27 458.71 455.71 454.24 451.44 446.51 441.21 434.81 430.92 425.70 403.95 397.54 390.39 383.39 379.92 378.76 377.12

12 15 15 8 15 7 8 12 8 6 7 16 7 5 5 11 6 9 6 5 5 9 6 7 7 5 7 5 6 9 5 10 7 7 5 8 8 16 4 7 4 7 7 8 9 4 4 11 6 5 6 4 3 9 5 7 5 5 8 10 9 5 5 4 5 5 5 4

69 Mark Skelton AUS 753 70 Jorg Sylvester GER 726 71 Janusz Stobinski POL 10 72 Peter Wibroe DEN 1344 73 Nils Trolland DEN 1391 74 Ronald Foest GER 688 75 Lennart Hansson SWE 2791 76 Stefan Rassau GER 799 77 Matt Stechmann NZL 549 78 Mike Williams AUS 730 79 David Hoogenboom NZL 330 80 Lars Andresen DEN 1433 81 Eddie O’Donnell AUS 734 82 Niels-Kristian Terkildsen DEN 1453 83 Christian Hedlund DEN 7 84 Eric Rone NZL 536 85 Andrew Baker AUS 761 86 Hakan Tornqvist SWE 2786 87 Jorgen Holm DEN 1377 88 Steve McDowell NZL 545 89 Adrian Coulthard NZL 531 90 Ingmar Janson SWE 2804 91 Frederik Svendsen DEN 7 92 Stefan Pavia SWE 2805 93 Mats Clarsund SWE 16 94 Peter Stephan GER 665 95 Frederik Dahl Hansen DEN 1405 96 Per Westlund SWE 2815 97 Rene Brunn DEN 1430 98 Bo Teglers DEN 1402 99 Folkert Janssen AUS 733 100 Nick Craig GBR 2150 101 Darek Kras POL 5 102 John Skjoldby Petersen DEN 1303 103 Jonas Andersson SWE 2783 104 Christian Heinze GER 737 105 Mats Caap SWE 2797 106 Juliane Hofmann GER 767 107 Volker Paatz GER 769 108 Will Turner GBR 2169 109 Falk Hagemann GER 757 110 Christian Midtgaard DEN 1304 111 Ronny Poelman BEL 220 112 Roger Blassé AUS 749 113 Keith Byers GBR 2176 114 Rod Davis NZL 561 115 Milosz Wojewski POL 117 116 Frank Strelow GER 791 117 Ken Carroll GBR 2139 118 Peter Horne AUS 764 119 Paul Verrijdt BEL 214 120 Russell Wood NZL 526 121 Rob Hengst NZL 533 122 Michal Gaj POL 11 123 Thorsten Schmidt GER 790 124 Fritz Banner Pedersen DEN 1454 125 Lasse Hansson SWE 22 126 Andre Hennings GER 762 127 Jesper Petersen DEN 1356 128 Arne Malm SWE 2752 129 Mark Perrow NZL 551 130 Rob Mcmillan AUS 766 131 Ulf Sahle SWE 2790 132 Raymond Dodard FRA 1820 133 Alistair Deaves NZL 542 134 Anders Andersen DEN 1346 135 Chris Fenwick NZL 509 136 Magnus Gillgren SWE 2812 137 Stig Frandsen DEN 1396 138 Gareth Wells AUS 742

366.46 364.50 357.50 354.03 351.73 350.48 347.98 345.56 341.93 340.08 337.02 336.97 330.10 329.63 329.51 324.52 315.80 315.02 309.35 307.09 306.42 305.34 303.91 299.53 299.00 297.82 297.40 296.82 294.43 293.96 293.46 292.90 292.11 290.59 289.59 288.68 288.45 287.30 283.71 281.60 280.26 276.56 275.10 274.80 269.51 268.77 267.00 265.38 264.88 264.74 264.52 263.56 263.05 262.08 261.47 261.19 257.61 253.19 249.15 248.47 242.68 239.60 236.69 236.21 230.52 230.30 229.76 229.42 228.57 226.21

4 6 3 4 6 10 6 5 4 4 4 7 5 4 5 5 5 4 4 4 7 5 2 4 1 3 4 4 9 3 5 4 4 4 2 5 3 4 5 3 5 4 5 3 4 5 1 5 5 4 7 5 5 3 7 4 4 4 5 4 2 4 7 6 3 3 4 8 7 3

139 Thomas Albrectsen DEN 140 Antony Nossiter AUS 141 Simon dan Petersen DEN 142 Frederic Lamarque FRA 143 Sven Marchot GER 144 Dan Slater NZL 145 Adrian Mannering NZL 146 Paul Rhodes NZL 147 Julian Dejugnat FRA 148 Claus Hoj Jensen DEN 149 Jono Clough NZL 150 Grant Wakefield AUS 151 Nigel Mannering NZL 152 Knut Ramin GER 153 Jurgen Illers GER 154 Finn Gheury NZL 155 Jan Bechmann GER 156 Dan Bush NZL 157 Bruce Ashton AUS 158 Gailes Jean Pierre FRA 159 Paul Bouts BEL 160 Lars Jorgen Andresen DEN 161 Sefton Powrie NZL 162 Heinz Ridder GER 163 Jakub Kania POL 164 Czyz Waldemar POL 165 Simon Davis GBR 166 Gerd Breitbart GER 167 Robert Swiecki POL 168 Terry Curtis GBR 169 Sam Jedig DEN 170 Elizabeth Williams AUS 171 Gary Lokum AUS 172 Claus Stockhardt GER 173 Carsten Sass GER 174 Matt Coutts NZL 175 A per Sorensen DEN 176 Per Jaensson SWE 177 Przemyslaw Drozdzik POL 178 Marty Pike NZL 179 Joe Porebski NZL 180 Anders Buhl DEN 181 Jorg Posny GER 182 Patrick Nicolas FRA 183 Andre Blasse AUS 184 Michael Wolf GER 185 Claus Moller Christensen DEN 186 Soren Christiansen DEN 187 Antony Rich GBR 188 Brad Douglas NZL 189 Andy Turner GBR 190 Per Sorensen DEN 191 Peter Lester NZL 192 Sven Beye GER 193 Glenn Collings AUS 194 John Ball GBR 195 Chris Visick AUS 196 Joe Schubert DEN 197 Poul Vincents DEN 198 Peter Lynch AUS 199 Fabian Gronholz GER 200 Tim Normann DEN 201 Richard Furneaux AUS 202 Karsten Kath GER 203 Jean Claude lidon FRA 204 Chris Devine NZL 205 Yves Kaminski GER 206 Ian Harris GBR 207 Peter Rudholm SWE 208 Uli Borchers GER 209 Toby Ramsay GBR 210 Stephan Veldman NED 211 Ulf Dagerbrandt SWE 212 Remi Blandureau FRA 213 Bob Buchanan AUS 214 Michael Horvath AUS 215 Daniel Groschl GER 216 Claes Avellan SWE 217 Jan-Dietmar Dellas GER 218 Cornelia Wirbeleit GER 219 Jonas Jemt SWE 220 Jacques Pirenne BEL 221 Deryck Lovegrove GBR 222 Paul Pike GBR 223 Peter van der Schaaf NED 224 Mads Brockhuss DEN

1434 765 1375 1764 640 562 504 557 0 1400 498 736 512 751 643 558 567 478 728 104 151 1428 547 678 27 8 2141 607 40 2118 1438 759 741 642 690 519 1052 2804 44 554 523 1347 697 0 729 774 1403 1382 2121 369 2123 1437 550 715 535 2158 758 1399 1275 726 776 1392 740 793 1810 548 755 2142 2782 539 2100 663 2741 1769 766 744 595 2816 680 633 60 230 2130 2080 664 1419

225.13 224.82 224.01 221.37 221.28 219.19 218.16 216.81 216.79 216.67 215.36 212.80 212.44 211.98 211.06 209.65 207.99 205.60 197.83 197.41 196.57 195.62 194.85 193.19 193.03 192.55 191.52 190.29 188.57 188.32 185.86 185.37 184.39 183.41 179.08 175.66 175.40 174.87 174.50 173.97 171.43 171.17 171.00 164.88 163.82 162.17 161.99 160.59 159.67 159.08 159.04 158.99 158.17 157.03 156.71 156.50 154.43 154.13 150.48 149.38 148.72 145.02 140.66 138.77 138.61 135.82 134.88 133.64 133.15 132.68 132.04 131.20 129.49 127.12 126.96 126.72 126.69 125.05 124.93 124.21 123.78 122.99 121.43 117.21 115.04 114.87

4 2 3 3 7 2 4 2 2 3 3 7 4 5 2 8 7 4 4 3 5 3 4 10 4 4 2 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 1 4 2 2 5 3 4 6 2 1 3 2 3 4 1 3 6 4 6 1 2 4 3 4 4 3 4 5 7 3 5 3 1 3 7 3 3 2 6 2 4 2 4 4 3 3 2 4 4 3 3

ok dinghy international magazine


world ranking list march 2016 225 Niels Arntoft DEN 226 Majiej Chmielewski POL 227 Lasse Lantze SWE 228 Eric Kopka FRA 229 Jean Loiis Petetin FRA 230 David Rose GBR 231 Jacob Lunding DEN 232 Don Williams AUS 233 Martin Stender DEN 234 Mikael Nielsen DEN 235 Katharina Huss GER 236 Philippe Cowez BEL 237 Henrik Bohm Jensen DEN 238 Yann Rialland FRA 239 Stephen Moore AUS 240 Laurent Petetin FRA 241 Mike Wilde NZL 242 Joost Rommelaere BEL 243 Christian Senst GER 244 Jan Eric Nystedt SWE 245 Michel Lesure LUX 246 Wilhelm Kath GER 247 Bartosz Chodakowski POL 248 Dean Coleman NZL 249 Patrice Rovere FRA 250 Ralph Eriksen DEN 251 Ray Hall NZL 252 Svend Jacobsen DEN 253 Frank Berg DEN 254 Patrick Debaere FRA 255 David Carroll GBR 256 Martin Bower GBR 257 Andrew Rushworth GBR 258 Ron Fergusson AUS 259 Michael Morrison NZL 260 Johnny Leif Hansen DEN 261 Patrice Derout FRA 262 Samuel Haines AUS 263 Lars Hansson SWE 264 Thomas Skeppmark SWE 265 Julian Burnham GBR 266 Nigel Comber NZL 267 Claes Heyman SWE 268 Robert Bancken NED 269 Gunnar Goronzi GER 270 Stephen Wilson AUS 271 Tim McDowell NZL 272 Dave Carroll GBR 273 Ed Bradburn GBR 274 Glenn Yates AUS 275 Rod Andrew BEL 276 Noel Masseron FRA 277 Erik Dubreuil FRA 278 Anders Widding SWE 279 Kai Nickelkoppe GER 280 Waldemar Wtoczkowski POL 281 Bjorn Lindvall SWE 282 Mitchell Wilson AUS 283 Tim Smith AUS 284 Kai Wehmhoerner GER 285 Michal Gmaj POL 286 Christian Teller DEN 287 Uwe Bohm GER 288 Chris Hall AUS 289 Jessica Finke GER 290 Dave Cooper GBR 291 Jesper Vogelius GER 292 Simon Probert NZL 293 Jan Siebe de Vries NED 294 Mikael Nielsen DEN 295 Jan Dissel GER 296 Mark Fisher AUS 297 Kajetan Glinkiewicz POL 298 Hayden Whitburn NZL 299 Gavin Poulloin GBR 300 Ken Zier DEN 301 Hamish Fenwick NZL 302 Norbert Petrausch GER 303 Jan Taelman BEL 304 Julien Dejugnat FRA 305 Darius Heinemann POL 306 Bob Bourne GBR 307 Philip Dubbin AUS 308 Erik Thompson AUS 309 Susanne Mackmann GER 310 Tom Pedersen DEN

1366 93 2784 1257 325 2168 61 727 1409 1448 606 221 1443 1663 755 1825 535 203 710 2749 1 748 189 500 1709 1432 502 112 66 1044 85 2149 2134 618 555 1342 110 708 2783 2776 2102 511 2763 638 766 741 466 2175 2116 767 1 29 2133 2792 788 12 21 695 740 649 333 1212 599 758 788 2161 672 90 652 1448 225 761 9 515 66 1367 506 630 207 1827 201 2170 729 706 771 1261

114.79 114.00 114.00 113.58 110.60 110.18 108.46 108.04 107.20 107.12 106.18 105.33 105.08 104.88 103.97 102.98 102.75 102.66 102.01 101.15 100.18 100.15 100.00 99.35 96.67 95.53 95.33 93.13 92.92 91.43 91.03 90.52 88.24 87.79 87.59 86.72 86.07 86.04 85.73 85.21 85.12 84.31 82.18 82.05 81.62 81.43 81.18 80.53 79.85 78.42 78.41 77.50 76.90 76.73 76.42 76.14 75.71 73.55 73.36 72.65 71.75 70.91 70.60 70.57 70.42 70.41 70.00 69.42 69.13 68.20 68.00 67.14 67.00 66.52 65.88 65.38 65.02 64.19 63.72 63.67 63.52 63.48 62.95 62.85 62.72 62.68

APRIL 2016 • www.okdia.org

3 3 3 3 2 2 1 4 3 3 2 3 2 2 5 2 3 3 2 2 2 3 2 4 2 5 1 4 2 2 1 4 1 4 3 2 2 2 2 1 3 5 3 6 1 1 3 1 1 3 3 1 2 2 1 2 3 4 2 3 2 2 3 2 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 6 2 2 2 2 1 4 2 2

311 Henri Berenger FRA 1472 312 Jens Makholm DEN 1389 313 Thomas Christensen DEN 1415 314 Jesper Sommer DEN 1316 315 Peter Scheuerl GER 618 316 Chris Coleman NZL 497 317 Luke Cromie AUS 672 318 Ken Kier DEN 1441 319 Lars Haverland GER 789 320 Dellwig GER 78 321 Francois Podevyn LUX 1053 322 Magnus Flach SWE 2807 323 Nicklas Heide DEN 1324 324 Michael Lindh SWE 2814 325 John Shirley NZL 539 326 Kevin Gibb GBR 2122 327 Frederic le Delaizir FRA 1812 328 Brett Graham RSA 32 329 Philip Cossen DEN 1266 330 Tim Hurst GBR 2032 331 Michael Brown AUS 736 332 Sean Homan AUS 694 333 Edward Crichton GBR 2093 334 Mary Reddyhoff GBR 2058 335 Ashley Parkinson AUS 711 336 Sybren Hornstra NED 6 337 Frederik Rontgen GER 651 338 Bob Bourne GBR 2170 339 Freddy Ottosen DEN 885 340 Dirk Loewe GER 789 341 Michael Flavell AUS 543 342 Chris Perry GBR 2148 343 Yannick Laumans BEL 128 344 Thomas Kvist DEN 1336 345 Gerard Bonnet FRA 0 346 Jean Jacques Charpentier FRA 186 347 Tony Rae NZL 524 348 Andy Couch GBR 2150 349 Jonny Billstrom SWE 2775 350 Jesper Hansen DEN 1313 351 Ute Witke GER 576 352 Harmen de Vries NED 555 353 Jacob Bang DEN 1317 354 Marc Magendie FRA 0 355 Johanna Andrew Becker BEL 29 356 Marty Weeks NZL 479 357 Mieczyslaw Poplonyk POL 333 358 Pierre Debicki FRA 1819 359 Philippe De Kervenoael FRA 2133 360 Philip Rzepecky NZL 474 361 Marc Vande Ghinste FRA 1811 362 Alan Atkin GBR 2129 363 Andreas Deubel GER 760 364 Sven Thuresson SWE 2811 365 Craig Macauley AUS 678 366 Marek Jarocki POL 16 367 Thomas Egeskov DEN 1456 368 Mike Walker AUS 655 369 Mark Berry NZL 5 370 Francis Pons Jean FRA 1067 371 Justin Barr AUS 721 372 Marina Dellas GER 680 373 Philippe Thomieres FRA 820 374 Philippe Darcos FRA 129 375 Bernard Coursieres FRA 1117 376 Krister Carlsson SWE 2779 377 Rodney Tidd GBR 2178 378 Mike Edwards GBR 2126 379 Manca Maxime FRA 1336 380 Mathias Fisker DEN 1345 381 Susanne Mackman GER 723 382 Wieslaw Janczak POL 651 383 John Groth DEN 1387 384 David van der Wende NZL 492 385 Tim O’Leary GBR 1966 386 Daniel Lutaud FRA 0 387 Kim Hagelskjaer DEN 1301 388 Patrick Moreau FRA 0 389 Norman Byrd GBR 2159 390 Anders Johannsen DEN 13 391 Hessel Hoekstra NED 667 392 Jack Arnell GBR 0 393 Dave Hall USA 490 394 Phil Coveny NZL 475 395 Douglas Parker AUS 752 396 Maxine Manca FRA 1336

62.26 60.77 59.54 59.00 58.46 58.28 57.99 57.74 57.71 57.52 57.17 56.12 55.61 55.54 55.54 54.71 54.05 53.33 53.08 53.03 52.91 52.86 52.52 50.82 50.25 49.62 49.60 48.25 47.50 47.09 46.61 46.38 46.37 46.06 45.36 45.13 44.38 44.38 43.88 43.51 43.48 42.73 42.31 42.14 41.28 41.15 41.00 40.00 39.08 37.70 37.18 37.18 37.14 36.89 36.61 36.50 36.15 36.02 35.24 34.52 34.10 33.84 33.10 32.98 32.50 32.41 32.35 32.00 31.67 31.40 31.34 31.00 30.00 29.64 29.56 29.29 29.10 29.05 28.63 28.11 28.00 26.76 26.72 26.69 26.57 26.07

2 1 3 1 1 1 4 2 1 1 4 2 1 2 3 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 3 2 1 2 1 1 4 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 3 2 1 1

397 J P Williams GBR 398 Jens Thomsen DEN 399 Zbigniew Dryzner POL 400 Neil Williamson USA 401 Matt Bates GBR 402 Julian Bishop NZL 403 Lars Moller DEN 404 John Hendersen AUS 405 Stefan Haage GER 406 Bertil Eliasson SWE 407 Jesper Jakobson DEN 408 Egon Petersen DEN 409 Neil Goodhead GBR 410 Didier Soulies FRA 411 Brett Daniel NZL 412 Soren Sigurdsson DEN 413 Simon Shaw GBR 414 Nik Wallis AUS 415 Magnus Bager SWE 416 Dieter Senst GER 417 Per Hansen DEN 418 Drummond Sydenham GBR 419 Kevin Knott AUS 420 Slava Ustovytskyi AUS 421 Phil Benton GBR 422 Arne Johansson SWE 423 Sword GBR 424 Hans Genefke DEN 425 Jens Wehmeier GER 426 Mathieu Chenuil FRA 427 Bill Macky NZL 428 Frederik Roentgen GER 429 Flemming Hostgaard DEN 430 Christian Huss GER 431 Michael Jorgensen DEN 432 Peter Korsbjerg DEN 433 Robert Jarocki POL 434 Gareth Caldwell GBR 435 Jean-Yves Costa FRA 436 Jesper Andersen DEN 437 Ben Steel GBR 438 James Cowsmeadow AUS 439 Benoit Devillers BEL 440 Marc Grise NZL 441 Will Branton GBR 442 Alex Rijnink DEN 443 Paul Aldridge GBR 444 Per Bo Hansen DEN 445 Graham Arcus NZL 446 Lars Fagerberg SWE 447 Anders Oestergaard DEN 448 Jakub Krynicki POL 449 Paul Deane GBR 450 Benoit Bourgoin FRA 451 Ingemar Stig SWE 452 Peter Aebeloe SWE 453 Terrence Benade AUS 454 Claes Ahlstrom SWE 455 Michal Kimszal POL 456 Robert Kemp AUS 457 Mathew Cock GBR 458 Asa Holmquist SWE 459 kevin Rialland FRA 460 Yves Papegaai BEL 461 Simon Greening GBR 462 Xavier Beckius FRA 463 Mikotaj Pugowski POL

2112 1284 1361 678 2125 516 126 715 781 111 1314 1318 2125 794 470 1458 2137 720 2746 653 1341 1957 640 760 1985 2480 2122 1410 749 723 479 0 1305 742 1330 1441 6 2124 0 43 2152 562 0 472 2171 1421 2065 1341 360 2768 1331 95 1644 0 2703 2784 673 2800 94 667 20 2753 1110 283 2062 1117 81

25.25 24.65 24.40 24.08 23.97 23.85 23.85 23.75 23.31 23.25 22.31 22.20 21.88 21.67 21.23 20.77 20.75 20.30 20.09 20.00 19.90 19.63 19.52 18.88 18.38 17.92 17.90 17.69 17.47 17.21 16.92 16.57 16.15 15.43 15.30 14.62 14.00 14.00 13.21 13.08 12.79 12.77 12.00 11.95 11.75 11.54 10.63 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 9.90 8.20 7.75 7.69 7.25 6.50 6.13 5.75 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00

1 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

31


fast around the world made by Greg Wilcox in Potsdam

2015 1st, 4th World Ranking List 4th, 6th, 7th World Championship 1st Australian Nationals 1st Belgian Nationals 1st French Nationals 1st Lindhartsen Classic 2nd Swedish Nationals 2nd New Zealand Nationals 2014 3rd, 4th World Championships 1st Australian Nationals 1st Swedish Nationals 1st French Nationals 1st Interdominion Championships 1st Warnemunde Woche 3rd German Nationals 3rd Danish Nationals 2013 1st, 2nd World ranking list 1st in 6 national Championships

925,00 Euro ready to go fast inkl. Mwst. und DSV-Vermessung

Turtle Sails, Juliane Hofmann und Greg Wilcox Alter Tornow 1, 14473 Potsdam • 0331 6012254 mail@turtlesails.de • www.turtlesails.de

The ‘Icebreaker’ OK Dinghy

Contact: Alistair Deaves alistairdeaves@yahoo.co.nz • Tel: +64 (0)21 423 504 www.icebreakerboats.co.nz

Profile for OKDinghy

OK Dinghy Magazine – April 2016  

Official magazine of the OK Dinghy International Association

OK Dinghy Magazine – April 2016  

Official magazine of the OK Dinghy International Association

Profile for okdinghy
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