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Belief in Something

GREATER BELMONT UNIVERSITY

PRESIDENT’S REPORT 2015

Celebrating 125 Years


Table of CONTENTS 125 YEARS

Belief in Something Greater

2

FROM THE PRESIDENT

4

TRANSFORMING LIVES

10

EMPOWERING PASSIONS

16

SERVING OTHERS

22

PURSUING FAITH

2 8

CONSERVING RESOURCES

34

SEEKING DIVERSITY

4 0

GIVING BACK

48

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION


125 Years.

When Ida Hood and Susan Heron purchased the dilapidated Belle Monte estate in 1889, it’s unlikely they imagined 125 years in the future. Instead, they were focused on overcoming the numerous financial and cultural barriers to their dream of opening a unique school for young women. These progressive and courageous schoolteachers had a vision, a belief in something greater than the traditional finishing school model so prevalent in that era. In the words of author Joy Jordan-Lake, Hood

125 YEARS | 2

and Heron were intent on establishing a college for young women built on “rigorous intellectual pursuit, ethical and spiritual formation and preparation for a life of purpose.�


Quite simply, the Belmont College they established against all odds in 1890 was meant to transform lives. Hood and Heron’s “belief in something greater” led the fledgling college to not only survive, but thrive, giving birth to countless alumni who would impact their world. It was a similar belief in the school, its purpose and each other that encouraged faculty and staff to continue their work in the wake of a devastating 1972 fire that burned down Blanton Hall, a cornerstone of campus destroyed. But like a phoenix rising from the ashes, Belmont overcame the catastrophe and forged ahead. Belief in something greater is also what brought faculty and staff to work every day during a time when finances were at a critical low and no one was confident another paycheck would come. With conviction and hard work, their dedication was rewarded, and Belmont College gradually developed into a strong and dynamic University. And it was belief in more recent years that gave rise to University leaders making bold and unexpected decisions that have

fueled unprecedented growth and even brought a presidential debate to this Tennessee campus, a first for the state. In fact, history overflows with examples of belief that Belmont was and could be… something greater. More than a century since this institution’s founding and with 125 years of faithful persistence as its foundation, the Belmont University of today remains a towering example of the extraordinarily great things such belief can accomplish. I hope you enjoy reading how that vision was brought to life yet again in 2015. Best regards, Bob Fisher

President

125 YEARS | 3


Transforming LIVES TRANSFORMING LIVES | 4

BELMONT UNIVERSITY PR E SIDE N T ’ S R E P OR T 2015

Belief in Something Greater


TRANSFORMING LIVES | 5 Students assisting with mayoral debate.


TRANSFORMING LIVES | 6


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o better proof can be found of Belmont’s mission to transform lives than in the stories of our students and alumni, individuals like 1950 alumna Mary Niederhauser who shared with StoryCorps, “I couldn’t be more proud of the college I went to than this one.” Aimed at capturing some of the country’s most powerful stories, the StoryCorps oral history project recorded interviews with more than 30 individuals as part of Belmont’s 125th anniversary celebration. While StoryCorps tells of transformations throughout Belmont’s history, 2015 was full of such stories being lived out on a daily basis. For example, the Bridges to Belmont scholarship program, serving mostly first-generation college students from low income homes, expanded its reach this year to more than 80 students from local high schools, offering a “life-changing” opportunity

according to Metro Nashville’s Director of Schools Jesse Register. In fact, Register and Karl Dean, Nashville’s mayor for eight years, were so impressed with Belmont’s impact on young lives that both public servants recently joined the University’s faculty, teaching in the education and history/political science programs, respectively. Recruiting former city leaders certainly aids in promoting students’ civic involvement, but at Belmont, students jump at the chance to engage with their community. In fact, seven students wrote profiles for local paper The Tennessean on Nashville’s mayoral candidates and served as hosts and participants in city-wide political debates held on campus. Junior political science major Hayden Rutledge said, “Through working with the Tennessean on the Nashforward debates, I was able to not only have an impact on my community, but I was also given the opportunity to better myself.”


TRANSFORMING LIVES | 8

Former Nashville mayor Karl Dean addresses a Belmont Honors class. Jesse Register Those are the kinds of opportunities Belmont seeks to provide, opportunities that develop the individual and help that individual then transform the world. To accomplish that mission, this University offers the best education possible with top-notch faculty who are experts in their field, including 2015 Tennessee Professor of the Year Dr. Ronnie Littlejohn (philosophy/Asian studies) and National Association of Black Journalists’ Journalism Educator of the Year Dr. Sybril Brown. That commitment to excellence—the striving to transform lives—is also why Belmont continues to be highly recognized by its peers, landing for the second consecutive year at No. 5 on the U.S. News Best Regional Universities-South and lauded for the eighth year in a row for its commitment to innovation.


DR. RONNIE LITTLEJOHN PROFESSOR OF PHILOSOPHY & DIRECTOR OF ASIAN STUDIES PROGRAM 2015 TENNESSEE PROFESSOR OF THE YEAR

TRANSFORMING LIVES | 9

In my 30 years at Belmont, I have seen an immense amount of change and even more transformation. Change can be viewed as an event, but transformation is always a process requiring significant commitment from the individual on an emotional and intellectual level. As a professor, it is my great joy to work with students on a daily basis. It is my greater joy to watch those students take part in these powerful transformations, largely thanks to the University they call home. At Belmont, we believe our students have been called to engage and transform the world with passion and faith. We are committed to providing an environment where they can experience this transformation, allowing them to go out after graduation and have a meaningful impact on their world. It is my honor to be part of this work in the lives of my students, and I look forward to what Belmont will continue to do in its next 125 years.


Empowering PASSIONS EMPOWERING PASSIONS | 10

BELMONT UNIVERSITY PR E SIDE N T ’ S R E P OR T 2015

Belief in Something Greater


EMPOWERING PASSIONS | 11 Battle of the Belmont Bands music festival


EMPOWERING PASSIONS | 12

A

chieving high rankings and winning peer accolades confirm that Belmont is succeeding in its work to provide an exceptional education to transform lives, but quite frankly, those accomplishments alone aren’t enough. Belmont’s mission begins with providing a student-centered environment, one that is more interested in individually empowered passions than collective data and awards.

with Music City insiders. That’s not difficult to do when Nashville is literally crawling with Belmont alumni whose artistic dreams have come true, on stage and off. In fact, as part of the University’s 125th anniversary celebration, the fall 2015 semester opened with an all-day music festival on the Lawn featuring six student acts in a Battle of the Belmont Bands along with concerts from critically acclaimed alumni: COIN, Steve Moakler and Kopecky.

Those passions were on fine display last summer as the College of Sciences and Mathematics launched the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships, which offered aspiring chemists and physicists the opportunity to partner with a faculty mentor on campus on a long-term research project with realworld applications.

That alumni base is expected to grow even faster now that students studying music business, audio engineering, motion pictures, songwriting, media studies and more can develop their skills in the newly opened, $87 million R. Milton and Denice Johnson Center. In addition to boasting the only Dolby Atmos rendering unit at a university in the country, the complex also features two screening theaters, a TV production studio and control room, a motion capture space, student edit bays and a 2,500-square-foot soundstage. It’s also home to a cafeteria that more than doubles the campus’s previous dining space.

Of course, when it comes to passionate pursuits and Belmont, it’s no secret that this University draws incredible musical talent from around the world, honing students’ skills and networking them


EMPOWERING PASSIONS | 13


EMPOWERING PASSIONS | 14

Christmas at Belmont

But alumni numbers aren’t the only thing growing at Belmont. More and more prospective students are seeing this University as the place to empower their passions, and overall enrollment grew in 2015 for the 15th consecutive year, this time to 7,425 students. The joy faculty and staff see each fall welcoming a new class is only exceeded by seeing those same students’ joy realized as they accomplish dreams that seemed potentially out of reach, whether it’s completing an independent study Honors thesis, performing for a national TV audience with “Christmas at Belmont,” competing in the NCAA tournament, passing the bar or any of the other myriad ways that Belmont helps them achieve a personal “belief in something greater.”


JEANETTE MORELAN SENIOR

HONORS PROGRAM

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP & MASS COMMUNICATION LUMOS TRAVEL FELLOW

EMPOWERING PASSIONS | 15

Belmont has always inspired me to dream more, do more and become more. In this community, we are all committed to using our talents and passions to engage and transform the world. In this environment, you can’t help but want to be part of something bigger than yourself. In my student leadership roles, including serving as Student Government president last year, I have experienced Belmont’s commitment to providing students with the tools we need to become our best selves. This past summer, I had the opportunity to do just that as I lived in South Africa as a Lumos Traveler and explored issues of community development, an area I am incredibly passionate about. Empowering students to develop their gifts and use them to bless others is central to Belmont’s legacy and is one of the many reasons I am so proud to call this place home.


Serving OTHERS BELMONT UNIVERSITY SERVING OTHERS | 16

PR E SIDE N T ’ S R E P OR T 2015

Belief in Something Greater


SERVING OTHERS | 17 Family Literacy Day


SERVING OTHERS | 18

Conclusion of ‘125 Hours of Service’


SERVING OTHERS | 19

S

ince its inception, Belmont has focused on “something greater.” Ida Hood and Susan Heron founded Belmont College 125 years ago to prepare young women for a life of purpose, and today, Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher advises every incoming freshman of a similar sentiment: that their greatest privilege in life is to have the intelligence, resources and abilities to serve someone else. What better way to celebrate the 125th anniversary than to put those themes into action? Belmont did just that with the “125 Hours of Service” project in November which saw more than 600 students, faculty, staff and alumni volunteer around the clock for five days. Together, the Belmont community donated more than 1,700 hours of service in Nashville that week, hosting homeless families, sorting clothes, knitting blankets, serving meals, making

fundraising bracelets for veterans and contributing to their local community in a variety of ways. Service projects aren’t limited to quasquicentennial celebrations, though. Rather, they are woven throughout the Belmont experience, from the longstanding traditions of the freshmen SERVE project during Welcome Week to the annual Family Literacy Day event hosted for children at a nearby park. Faculty and staff also embrace the opportunity to volunteer locally with the annual “It’s Bruin Time in the Community” event, which allows employees a day off campus to support a local nonprofit. In 2015, the event was focused on Second Harvest Food Bank where Belmont volunteers sorted more than 15,000 pounds of frozen foods and 30,000 pounds of sweet potatoes for packing and delivery.


SERVING OTHERS | 20

The commitment to serve is such an integral part of campus culture that it’s not unusual for Belmont students to be singled out as role models in their community. Last year alone saw social work major Bailey Hazouri receive the state-wide Harold Love Outstanding Community Service Student Award for her work as co-founder of the Edgehill Neighborhood Outreach Program, and men’s basketball senior Jeff Laidig was named to the Allstate Good Works Team for his work with Best Buddies and at the Nashville Rescue Mission. Even grad students adopt the service mentality, as seen with 2015 College of Law graduate Sara Page, who was selected by the Tennessee Bar Association as Law Student Volunteer of the Year for her work with numerous pro bono organizations including Belmont Legal Aid Society, Justice for Our Neighbors and Magdalene.


SARA PAGE COLLEGE OF LAW

CLASS OF 2015

TENNESSEE BAR ASSOCIATION LAW STUDENT VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR

SERVING OTHERS | 21

My passion for service to others and the Nashville community was built on the dedication and influence of my fellow students and faculty members at Belmont’s College of Law. Although the school had only been open for two years when I arrived, a passionate group had already formed the Belmont Legal Aid Society. Through the mentorship of that group, I quickly got involved with pro bono projects and took on leadership roles. After I had my first client and saw the positive impact a few hours had on her life, I was hooked. I was lucky to have wonderful faculty members, like Professor Jeffrey Usman, who helped me implement new service programs and motivate students to get involved. Thanks to that experience, I know I will bring the same passion for service to the community as one of Nashville’s newest attorneys.


Pursuing FAITH BELMONT UNIVERSITY PURSUING FAITH | 22

PR E SIDE N T ’ S R E P OR T 2015

Belief in Something Greater


PURSUING FAITH | 23

Women’s basketball team serving in Rio.


PURSUING FAITH | 24

Passion Contata

W

hile service is a hallmark of many liberal arts institutions, at Belmont it reflects more than developing students’ civic responsibility, as important as that is. As a Christian university, service is also central to cultivating students’ spiritual growth. Abundant opportunities exist to put faith into action through local ministries and medical mission trips, like the College of Health Sciences and Nursing’s annual trip to Guatemala. Supported by the Gabhart Missions Fund, over the past seven years more than 150 aspiring physical and occupational therapists provided direct therapy interventions, home assessments and staff training at the Hope for Tomorrow Children’s Home.

Impact overseas also comes through international sports evangelism projects, like the women’s basketball team’s August trip to Rio de Janeiro. In reflecting on the experience, freshman guard Darby Maggard wrote, “Everyone that I was around that week has made me want to serve those around me and love God’s people as much as I can. This has been a life changing experience and one that I will remember forever.” Every player on the team commented about how this experience opened their eyes to a different culture and put their own lives into perspective. But such life-changing experiences don’t occur only in foreign countries. Belmont students can explore their


PURSUING FAITH | 25

Amy Grant


PURSUING FAITH | 26

Faith and Culture Symposium

faith through a vast array of means on campus as well, including chapels held every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. These services draw nationally recognized academics, spiritual leaders and authors, such as author Bob Goff, activist Sister Helen Prejean, musician Amy Grant and scientist Dr. Cymbeline Culiat. The University’s stunningly beautiful and serene chapel space is also home to numerous worship services throughout the year, including an annual Ash Wednesday service and a Passion Cantata. This year Belmont also hosted the National Lilly Fellows Conference and the second annual Faith and Culture Symposium, bringing faith-filled academics together to discuss topics like worship, creativity, music and culture. Through these events and others hosted by Belmont’s College of Theology and Christian Ministry, students are exposed to ideas and experiences that allow them to deepen their faith and open their minds to new perspectives.


CAMERON NEWBAUER HEAD COACH

BELMONT WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

PURSUING FAITH | 27

I recently had the privilege of accompanying our women’s basketball team on a sports evangelism trip to Rio de Janeiro where we spent time with some of the children who live there, spread the love of God and played a little basketball, too. The trip was completely transformative for our players, our staff and myself, and it still reminds us of what’s most important—loving God and loving people. We want our teams to be great—the greatest, if possible—but that greatness is much more than our athletic performance. At Belmont we know that greatness lies in something bigger than wins and losses. It comes from living your life as a servant, sacrificing, blessing others and giving away what you’ve received. Because in the end, that’s the eternal victory and where greatness truly lies.


Conserving RESOURCES CONSERVING RESOURCES | 28

BELMONT UNIVERSITY PR E SIDE N T ’ S R E P OR T 2015

Belief in Something Greater


CONSERVING RESOURCES | 29


CONSERVING RESOURCES | 30


CONSERVING RESOURCES | 31 Richland Creek clean up

F

or Belmont University, the commitment to take care of its resources has been a cornerstone of campus life since the very beginning. When the University’s founders dreamed of an institution of higher learning in Nashville, it was “the old tower that did it,” attracting them to the site where Belmont now stands. Its singing carillon, hand-laid bricks and flowering vegetation inspired Hood and Heron to build a school that would educate young people for years to come. Protecting and enhancing those grounds—and conserving the resources across the 75-acre campus—continues to be a priority today.

At Belmont, taking care of God’s creation is more than a cause; it’s a charge. It’s why the University installed multiple green roofs totaling more than 35,000 square feet of natural habitat to provide homes for plant species and their wildlife including hummingbirds, monarch butterflies, pigeon hawks and honey bees. It’s why this campus serves as an arboretum to preserve more than 100 species of trees and shrubs, leading to recognition in 2015 as a Tree Campus USA site. And it’s why new buildings are carefully constructed to LEED-certified standards. In fact, Belmont’s Wedgewood Academic Center was recognized in 2015 as the only LEED-platinum new construction of any university in Tennessee.


CONSERVING RESOURCES | 32 The commitment to sustainability is becoming engrained in Belmont students and the lives they want to live, like Missy Martin, a sophomore and passionate environmentalist who believes in the power of conservation and global citizenship. Those beliefs empowered Missy to compete in the 2015 Project Green Challenge and surpass 13 other finalists to become the competition’s global champion. Those same beliefs have fueled the student-led ECO Club to adopt local creeks to clean up at quarterly community service events. For the Belmont community, conserving resources is a covenant—the Conservation Covenant— and it challenges every individual on this campus to take good care of that which takes such good care of us.


LINDSAY MILLARD SENIOR

BIOLOGY

ECO CLUB PRESIDENT

CONSERVING RESOURCES | 33

During my time at Belmont, I have seen the University acknowledge a true responsibility for environmental conservation, most notably through our recent campaign, the Conservation Covenant. Belmont has taken many steps to illustrate this covenant including reducing carbon emissions across campus, building thousands of square feet of green roofs and supporting student-led clubs committed to educating our community on the value of these efforts. As a leader in the Eco Club, it’s inspiring to have the support of University administration as we explore how to advocate for the environment both on campus and off through convocations, guest speakers, fairs and courses. Belmont actively encourages conservation and sustainability in the lives of students, faculty and staff through its academics, campus life and most importantly, its own actions.


Seeking DIVERSITY BELMONT UNIVERSITY SEEKING DIVERSITY | 34

PR E SIDE N T ’ S R E P OR T 2015

Belief in Something Greater


SEEKING DIVERSITY | 35 MLK Week Candlelight Vigil


SEEKING DIVERSITY | 36

C

ommitted to educating women in a time when formal education was reserved for men, two brave school principals began a tradition of inclusivity and a rejection of the status quo back in 1890. Now, 125 years later, Belmont University continues on a path of seeking diversity in a new era, hoping to enable every individual to find their place to belong on this campus. Through annual events like MLK Week, Black History Month, Culture Fest and more, campus-wide diversity is not only recognized, but widely celebrated. Furthering that effort, in 2015, in commemoration of its anniversary year, Belmont held an inaugural Diversity Week featuring events that encouraged

collaborative dialogue, empowered discussion and celebrated all people. With film screenings, a spoken word event highlighting dance and musical performances and a keynote address by Belmont’s first African-American graduate Dr. Fannie Hewlett, the spirit of diversity and inclusivity across campus was honored in a powerful way. As Dr. Hewlett said of her time at Belmont in the late 1960s, “I always felt that Belmont was welcoming me into its family.� Continuing in the celebration of diversity across the institution, Belmont commissioned local artist James Threalkill to design a mosaic art installation consisting of tiles created by faculty, staff, students, alumni and visitors. Through words, images and colors,


SEEKING DIVERSITY | 37

Culture Fest


SEEKING DIVERSITY | 38

James Threalkill and the community art piece

community members reflected the campus culture as it appears to them, ultimately producing a 24-squarefoot piece that highlights the variety that makes Belmont special and providing a visual legacy that will live on campus for generations.

Alumna Dr. Fannie Hewlett speaks with students.

Issues of diversity are also being tackled beyond racial, cultural and ethnic barriers; Belmont is seeking to give greater attention to another often underserved audience, student veterans. With the University’s participation in the Yellow Ribbon Program, student veteran enrollment at Belmont has nearly quadrupled in the past five years, and military family enrollment has more than doubled. Thanks to receiving a $95,000 grant this year to further support veteran student success, Belmont faculty and staff can now invest even more resources into helping veterans feel at home.


JUSTIN LANG JUNIOR

PSYCHOLOGY & SOCIOLOGY

PRESIDENT, BLACK STUDENT ASSOCIATION

SEEKING DIVERSITY | 39

The daily realities of minority students on Belmont’s campus are consistent with those at predominantly white institutions across the nation: hypervisibility and yet invisibility, tokenization and yet exclusion. Along with typical school stressors, minority students are forced to engage with harmful stereotyping and play the role of “cultural competency” educators, often at the expense of their own well-being. As we seek to make Belmont a more diverse place, we must continue investing in institutional efforts to create a more optimal experience for students of all backgrounds. Initiatives such as the Welcome Home Team must continue seeking to institute culturally-affirming spaces and organizations, increase the number of faculty and staff of color and create opportunities for critical dialogue and education. The creation of H.O.P.E. Council, Vision 2020 Council and the addition of new Black Greek-letter organizations are recent steps towards our goal of inclusion. I am hopeful that this is only the beginning of our search for a more diverse campus.


Giving BACK BELMONT UNIVERSITY

GIVING BACK | 40

PR E SIDE N T ’ S R E P OR T 2015

Belief in Something Greater


GIVING BACK | 41

Milton and Denice Johnson with Bridges Scholars


GIVING BACK | 42

The late Clayton McWhorter and his wife Michelle


GIVING BACK | 43

D

eeply rooted in Belmont’s rich 125-year history is the spirit of giving back. From the $13,000 gift from Ward-Belmont’s 1928 graduating class to support troops overseas during World War I to College of Business namesake Jack C. Massey’s first $250,000 gift in 1966, a commitment to philanthropy continues to be woven through the Belmont story told today.

who are pursuing careers in health science fields went beyond monetary donations; he carved out time each year to mentor student recipients of this scholarship. His death in January 2016 was deeply felt by everyone on Belmont’s campus, but his legacy lives on through the scholars his endowment supports and the lives he influenced.

Alumni provide powerful examples of a giving spirit as they offer their own resources to create opportunities for current Bruins. Milton Johnson and his wife Denice exemplified that theme in 2015. A Nashville native and graduate of Stratford High and Belmont College, Johnson, now CEO of HCA, provided a $10 million gift to endow the Bridges to Belmont program, a way for many first-generation college students to receive a college education when they might not have otherwise.

Even Belmont’s own have gotten involved in providing opportunities for other Bruins. Faculty and staff—like Darrell and Donna Gwaltney and Charles and Leslie Higgins—give of their own resources to build scholarship funds for students interested in ministry or nursing, respectively. Louie and Laurel Buntin, active supporters and parents of a Belmont alumna, honored Louie’s grandparents (Louie and Betty Phillips) through Phillips Foundation gifts, contributing close to $750,000 to advance Belmont’s Christian, educational mission.

Another example can be seen from late health care executive Clayton McWhorter, a devoted 30-year supporter of Belmont, and his wife, Michelle. With a lifetime giving total to Belmont in the millions, in 2015, the couple invested again in the endowed scholarship program that bears their name, the McWhorter Scholars. But Clayton’s profound interest in Belmont students

Of course, alumni and longtime friends aren’t the only ones giving back to this University. Belmont continues to attract new supporters eager to inspire the next generation. Take country artist Miranda Lambert, who established the Miranda Lambert Women Creators Fund for young women with big dreams in the Curb


GIVING BACK | 44

Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame induction ceremony

College of Entertainment and Music Business. Or the Gibson Foundation, which created the Les Paul Music Innovation Award in the legendary musician’s honor to fund research for faculty and students to express innovation and creativity to strengthen the music economy. Or native Nashvillian Millie Rice, who always prayed “that her Heavenly Father would let her know how best to give what she had to be used to His Glory,” and then put feet to that prayer, establishing an endowed scholarship via a planned gift to help needy students. Sometimes, giving back doesn’t even involve an individual gift. For example, through the establishment of the Tennessee Health Care Hall of Fame and its inaugural induction ceremony last fall, more than $278,000 was raised to support student scholarships and academic success. It’s all of these types of commitments that further build upon the beliefs of Ida Hood and Susan Heron—beliefs of a greater calling, a desire to impact the world, a belief in something greater.


SUMMER SHACK JUNIOR

THEATRE

BRIDGES TO BELMONT SCHOLAR

GIVING BACK | 45

I always knew that I possessed the drive, skills and determination to attend and be successful in college, but the financial burden that would’ve been placed on me or my family made me nervous. So when I learned I had been blessed with the opportunity to attend Belmont on a full scholarship, I felt like God had answered all my prayers. Most of all, I felt like my hard work and dedication had finally paid off. Belmont’s commitment to giving back has played a major role in strengthening my faith, guiding me towards a better relationship with God and instilling confidence, motivation and ambition in me. Additionally, being an active part of the Belmont family pushes me to better myself so I can contribute to the betterment of my community the way Belmont has contributed to me. I AM part of something greater.


FINANCIALS | 46


FINANCIALS | 47

125 YEARS

of Belief in Something Greater

BELMONT UNIVERSITY


Budget Growth Budget Growth Budget Growth

$250,000,000 $250,000,000 $250,000,000 $200,000,000

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

May 31, 2015 ASSETS

Cash...........................................................................45,806,469 Investments.............................................................129,633,845 Receivable from Other.............................................19,651,926 Property, Buildings and Equipment, net...............546,454,776 Other Assets...............................................................2,401,710 Total Assets..................................................... $743,948,726 LIABILITIES Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities..............20,776,970 Notes Payable.........................................................161,183,573 Other Liabilities........................................................11,700,397 Total Liabilities................................................ $193,660,940 NET ASSETS

FINANCIALS | 48

Unrestricted.............................................................444,846,369 Temporarily Restricted.............................................38,065,772 Permanently Restricted............................................67,375,645 Total Net Assets......................................................550,287,786 Total Liabilities and Net Assets....................... $743,948,726

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES ALL FUNDS

Year Ended May 31, 2015

$150,000,000 $150,000,000 $100,000,000 $200,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $50,000,000 $150,000,000 $50,000,000 $50,000,0000 $100,000,000 0 $50,000,0000 0

Asset Asset Growth Growth Asset Growth

$320,000,000 $320,000,000 $480,000,000 $160,000,000 $160,000,000 $160,000,000 $320,000,0000 0 $160,000,0000 0 $500,000,000

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

04-05 04-05

05-06 05-06

06-07 06-07

07-08 07-08

08-09 08-09

09-10 09-10

10-11 10-11

11-12 11-12

12-13 12-13

13-14 13-14

14-15 14-15

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 Net Net Asset Asset Growth Growth

12-13

13-14

14-15

$500,000,000 $600,000,000 $500,000,000 $400,000,000

Net Asset Growth

Net Asset Growth

$400,000,000 $400,000,000 $480,000,000 $500,000,000 $300,000,000 $300,000,000 $300,000,000 $360,000,000 $400,000,000 $200,000,000 $200,000,000 $200,000,000 $240,000,000 $300,000,000 $100,000,000

0 $250,000,000

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

01-02 01-02 04-05

02-03 02-03 05-06

03-04 03-04 06-07

04-05 04-05 07-08

05-06 05-06 08-09

06-07 06-07 09-10

07-08 07-08 10-11

08-09 08-09 11-12

09-10 09-10 12-13

10-11 10-11 13-14

11-12 11-12 14-15

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

$250,000,000 $250,000,000 $200,000,000

Tuition Revenue 06-07

07-08

Tuition Revenue Tuition Revenue Tuition Revenue

$200,000,000 $200,000,000 $250,000,000 $150,000,000 $150,000,000 $150,000,000 $200,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $150,000,000 $50,000,000 $50,000,000 $50,000,000 $100,000,000 0 0 $50,000,0000

0

Net Assets at Beginning of Year..................... $473,988,954 Net Assets at End of Year............................... $550,287,786

Asset Growth

$480,000,000 $480,000,000 $640,000,000 $320,000,000

0 $100,000,0000

Increase in Net Assets..............................................76,298,832

04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16

$640,000,000 $640,000,000 $800,000,000 $480,000,000

Tuition and Fees.....................................................205,339,283 Less: Scholarships and Fellowships.......................(38,827,842) Net Tuition and Fees..............................................166,511,441 Gifts, Grants and Contracts.......................................3,864,951 Endowment Payout....................................................2,182,542 Auxiliary Enterprises Sales and Services.................32,783,239 Other Sources.............................................................5,785,965 Total Revenue and Other Support.................. $211,128,138 EXPENSES

Gifts..............................................................................9,046,278 Increase in Market Value of Investments..................4,273,158 Change in Value of Interest Rate Swaps......................390,108 Net Increase from Non-Operating Activities.........13,709,544

04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16

$800,000,000 $800,000,000 $640,000,000

$100,000,000 $100,000,000 $120,000,000 $200,000,000 0

NON-OPERATING ACTIVITIES

04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16

$800,000,000

REVENUE & OTHER SUPPORT

Instruction..................................................................66,568,942 Academic Support....................................................15,583,680 Student Services.......................................................24,704,183 Institutional Support.................................................21,665,486 Auxiliary Exterprises.................................................20,016,559 Total Expenses................................................ $148,538,850

Budget Growth

$200,000,000 $200,000,000 $150,000,000 $250,000,000

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

04-05 04-05

05-06 05-06

06-07 06-07

07-08 07-08

08-09 08-09

09-10 09-10

10-11 10-11

11-12 11-12

12-13 12-13

13-14 13-14

14-15 14-15

04-05

05-06

13-14

14-15

$550,000,000

06-07 07-08 Investment 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 Cumulative in Construction

Cumulative Investment in Cumulative Investment in Construction Construction Investment in Construction

$550,000,000 $550,000,000 $440,000,000

Cumulative Investment in Construction

$440,000,000 $440,000,000 $550,000,000 $330,000,000 $330,000,000 $330,000,000 $440,000,000 $220,000,000 $220,000,000 $220,000,000 $330,000,000 $110,000,000 $110,000,000 $110,000,000 $220,000,000 0 0 $110,000,0000

0

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

04-05 04-05

05-06 05-06

06-07 06-07

07-08 07-08

08-09 08-09

09-10 09-10

10-11 10-11

11-12 11-12

12-13 12-13

13-14 13-14

14-15 14-15

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15


1900 BELMONT BOULEVARD | NASHVILLE, TN 37212 | BELMONT.EDU

2015 Belmont University President's Report