Page 1


2000 – 2010

When the new millennium dawned a decade ago, no one could have imagined the changes that would occur at Nashville’s Belmont University. No one could have predicted the phenomenal growth Belmont would experience or that this small, private university would land, as The Tennessean recently noted, the “coup of the decade.” In his inaugural address on September 25, 2000, new President Bob Fisher praised Belmont’s rich history and commitment to excellence while also promising a dynamic vision for the future, a vision that quite frankly seemed out of reach. His initial dreams were formalized in Vision 2010, a document approved by Belmont’s Board of Trustees that called for a number of changes in the fabric of the university, including a rise to national prominence and a significant increase in enrollment as well as several new and upgraded facilities. Unquestionably, change was on the horizon at the start of the decade. Ten years later the word “change” seems a dramatic understatement when considering the remarkable transformations that have occurred at Belmont since 2000. Yet despite the university’s evolution, Belmont’s commitment to its mission remains permanently ingrained.


RECOGNITION

INNOVATION

FINANCIALS

LOOKING AHEAD

7

8

9

10

CAMPUS GROWTH

ATHLETICS 4

6

ACADEMICS 3

COMMUNITY

ENROLLMENT 2

5

MISSION 1

B

elmont University is a studentcentered Christian community providing

an

academically

challenging education that empowers men and women of diverse backgrounds to

engage and transform the world with disciplined intelligence, compassion, courage and faith. n


MISSION

ENROLLMENT

ACADEMICS

ATHLETICS

COMMUNITY

CAMPUS GROWTH

RECOGNITION

INNOVATION

FINANCIALS

LOOKING AHEAD

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

I

n 2000, Belmont’s student population hovered just under 3,000. In fall 2009, Belmont announced that its student population topped 5,400, an increase of 81 percent. But those numbers alone don’t tell the full story. Not only

are more students choosing Belmont, but those students are coming from an increasingly strong and talented applicant pool. These facts haven’t gone unnoticed by Belmont’s peers as can be seen by the annual U.S. News and World Report rankings. Consistently the highest ranked university in Tennessee in the Master’s South category, Belmont has risen from the position of 18th in 2000 to 7th in the 2010 listing of America’s Best Colleges. n


INNOVATION

FINANCIALS

LOOKING AHEAD

8

9

10

RECOGNITION

COMMUNITY 5

7

ATHLETICS 4

CAMPUS GROWTH

ACADEMICS 3

6

ENROLLMENT

2

F

or the past two years, U.S. News and World Report has also praised Belmont University as one of the top two schools to watch in the country, noting the university’s innovative approach to higher

education in the new millennium. Innovation is certainly evident in the new programs Belmont has introduced in the past decade including one of the only Songwriting majors nationwide, a perfect addition to the Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business. The Curb College itself was established in 2003, the nation’s first college dedicated to offering comprehensive education for careers in the entertainment industry. Belmont is also the first university nationwide to develop an undergraduate major in the evolving

field

of

social

entrepreneurship,

which tackles social problems and unmet community needs via entrepreneurial principles. The

interdisciplinary

program

incorporates

business courses and thematic tracks in the liberal arts, providing students practical knowledge to aid in their efforts to use their talents to meet the world’s needs.


Rendering of the College of Law


Two new graduate programs follow a similar model by integrating hands-on experience with demanding academic offerings. Belmont’s School

of

Pharmacy,

which

welcomed

its

first class in 2008, enjoys cross-disciplinary collaborations along with numerous community and industry relationships to prepare students for professional practice. Pharmacy faculty and staff have also established four fundamental tracks to uniquely guide all aspects of the school and prepare graduates for an ever-changing healthcare system: management, informatics, pharmacotherapy and missions. Most recently, Belmont announced the launch of its seventh college and fourth doctoral program. The first new law school in Middle Tennessee in nearly 100 years, Belmont’s College of Law will begin classes in fall 2011 with a focus on educating its students with the diversity of skills that will enable them to meet varied challenges across the legal landscape. Belmont law graduates will be empowered by their education and co-curricular experiences to provide legal counsel in a variety of settings, with a strong commitment to high standards of expertise and ethics. The College of Law will be housed on campus in a new building that will include a state-of-the-art law library. n


joining

the

Sun

Conference

LOOKING AHEAD 10

RECOGNITION

7

FINANCIALS

CAMPUS GROWTH 6

9

COMMUNITY 5

INNOVATION

ATHLETICS 4

8

ACADEMICS

3

A

fter

Atlantic in

2001,

Belmont’s student athletes were thrown into a very large pond, competing with the top NCAA Division I athletes

in the country. In 10 short years, Belmont’s men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s cross country, men’s tennis, women’s soccer and volleyball teams have all won conference titles and competed in their respective NCAA Tournaments. In fact, the men’s basketball team landed cards for the Big Dance three years in a row, garnering international attention for its near upset over powerhouse Duke in 2008. To date, Belmont has won a total of 27 conference championships since joining the Atlantic Sun–the most of any league member over that span. But no win could ever compete with the trophy that Belmont’s student athletes have won seven of the last eight years, the A-Sun All-Academic Trophy, an award which further signifies Belmont athletic and academic prowess. n


LOOKING AHEAD 10

FINANCIALS

INNOVATION 8

9

RECOGNITION

7

COMMUNITY 5

CAMPUS GROWTH

ATHLETICS

4

6

B

elmont students are wellknown for making an impact on

the

lives

Tennesseans,

of

Middle

starting

from

their first week on campus. Each freshman class kicks

off their Belmont career by spending a day of Welcome Week volunteering their time to more than 30 area charities collectively. This spirit of volunteerism doesn’t end with orientation, as numerous students participate in Bruin Den Day, a unique opportunity for students to give back to the local community each spring. Many student organizations are involved in “Read with Me,” a 10-year-old event which encourages neighborhood children to read with a day of activities to promote family literacy. Throughout their time at Belmont, students perform outreach and are involved in engaging and transforming their Nashville community. There are many service initiatives that set Belmont apart, such as sponsoring 100 Kings, a program that provides academic and cultural mentoring to African American young men, and the Hispanic Achievers Program, which promotes professionalism and academic excellence for Hispanic youth. Belmont student-athletes organize “Camp Bruin” each year, conducting games and activities for students in a local elementary school. Oftentimes students have the opportunity to take what they learn in the classroom and use it to help the community, like Belmont nursing students helping local Sudanese refugees with basic health and hygiene needs, or business students working with English as second language adults to help them with banking and financial planning.


Belmont’s Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE) Team organizes numerous projects in the community addressing issues such as refugee resettlement, financial literacy, business ethics, success skills and environmental sustainability. Students spend more than 1,300 volunteer hours a year developing and completing their projects in addition to their class work and other extra-curricular activities, and have received top honors from the national SIFE organization including Rookie of the Year team in 2006 and champion of the region in 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009. While Belmont’s commitment to community begins with the neighborhoods adjacent to campus, it certainly doesn’t end there. Rather, Belmont’s notion of community extends around the world. International missions and global outreach have always been and remain top priorities for Belmont. Recent trips include students volunteering at hospices and daycares in South Africa, partnering with ministries in Mexico, leading sports camps in Rio de Janeiro, exploring social reality through visual sociology in India, and lending health science skills to patients in Guatemala and Cambodia. n


CAMPUS GROWTH 6

Entering 2010, Belmont shows expansion beyond what anyone would have dreamed at the start of the decade. In 2003, the University opened the $52 million Curb Event Center and Beaman Student Life Center. Three years later came the Gordon E. Inman Center, providing a state-of-the-art facility for several of Belmont’s Health Science programs. This fall, the university will open a building for the School of Pharmacy, creating a venue where students and faculty resources can intersect to help meet the needs of the community and the world. In 2007, the 350-seat Troutt Theater opened and has since played host to numerous student productions as well as collaborative efforts with local professional ensembles. Moreover, since 2000, Belmont has served its student body with the addition of 2,000 structured parking spaces and a second phase of Hillside apartments as well as the construction of new residence halls: Thrailkill, Kennedy, Maple and two new structures that will welcome more than 400 students in fall 2010. All together nearly 1,300 residential living spaces have been added to the university since 2000.


Belmont University Campus - 2000


Kennedy Hall - 2003

Thrailkill Hall - 2006

Hillside - 2002

Residence Halls - Fall 2010

Gordon E. Inman Center - 2006


Troutt Theater - 2007

Beaman Student Life Center - 2003

Curb Event Center - 2003

Pharmacy, Physical Therapy & Psychology Building - Fall 2010

Maple Hall - 2008


By The Numbers _________________________ 2000

2009

Enrollment

2,976

5,424

Average ACT

23.6

26

Freshman Retention

73 percent

82 percent

Graduation Rate

50 percent

68 percent

Student Service Hours

7,000

23,666

2009_ ______________________________________________ Total Undergraduate Students: 4,378 Total Graduate Students: 1,046 Tuition and Fees: $22,360 Student to Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded: 994 Master’s Degrees Awarded: 224 Doctoral Degrees Awarded: 54


INNOVATION

FINANCIALS

8

9

LOOKING AHEAD

RECOGNITION

7

10

CAMPUS GROWTH

6

T

hough

the

past

10

years

have been characterized by unprecedented

growth

and

achievement, the University’s biggest

coup

topped

all

expectations. At the turn of

the century Bob Fisher challenged Mike Curb to imagine building a state-of-the-art entertainment and athletic complex on Belmont’s campus, a 5,000-seat arena that might one day host a future American president. In the fall of 2008, Belmont hosted the Town Hall Presidential Debate between then Senators Barack Obama and John McCain, an event moderated by NBC News’ Tom Brokaw. Suddenly, Belmont University’s Curb Event Center was live onscreen in more than 62 million American homes. Of course, this wasn’t Belmont’s only foray into the national spotlight in this decade. 2003 marked the first time that the much-heralded “Christmas at Belmont” concert was broadcast nationally on PBS. Long known for its top-notch music and music business programs, Belmont has helped launch the careers of numerous artists including Trisha Yearwood, Josh Turner and “American Idol” finalist Melinda Doolittle, all of whom have returned home to their alma mater to host “Christmas at Belmont.” Many other notable alumni have recognized Belmont as part of the formula for their success, including artists Brad Paisley, Steven Curtis Chapman and Ginny Owens as well as Miss USA 2007 Rachel Smith.


Belmont’s

renowned

School

of

Music

is

gaining national prominence for more than just successful alumni. In 2008, Belmont joined an elite group of only 88 colleges, universities, conservatories or schools worldwide to have the distinction of being an All-Steinway School. Four Belmont faculty members were also acknowledged for outstanding and innovative teaching with the awarding of four Tennessee Professors of the Year in this decade. Additionally, numerous faculty, students and alumni have participated in Fulbright programs, the United States

government’s

flagship

international

exchange program. BusinessWeek ranked Belmont among “The Best Undergraduate Business Schools” in the country in 2008 and 2009, and ranked the parttime MBA program 18th in the country in 2009. This decade also saw Belmont’s College of Business accredited by AACSB International, the highest level of accreditation possible for business schools. n


LOOKING AHEAD 10

INNOVATION 8

FINANCIALS

RECOGNITION

7

9

F

or two years in a row U.S. News & World Report honored Belmont University as one of the top two “Schools to Watch” nationwide for “leading the pack in improvements and innovative

changes.” Components of Belmont’s nationally recognized general education program were specifically identified as “outstanding examples of academic programs that are commonly linked to student success.” In addition, Belmont landed a ranking of third in its category for its strong commitment to undergraduate teaching, one of only 80 colleges and universities nationwide to be so honored by its peers. Innovation doesn’t merely come in classes, though. A Belmont education empowers students to engage and transform the world by intentionally intersecting classroom scholarship with practical experiences.

Service-learning

courses

and

countless volunteer opportunities are presented to help connect Belmont students to their community and to demonstrate how their skills and talents can meet real-life needs.


Experiential learning doesn’t always require a drive off campus. Business students can take advantage of the on campus electronic financial trading room, the first to be opened at a Tennessee college. Equipped with the latest technology— including a nine-foot data wall, a 60-inch plasma monitor and a 12-foot ticker tape lighting up the back wall—the trading room brings Wall Street to Belmont Boulevard for students learning investment and portfolio management. In addition, approximately 3,500 square feet of prime retail space has been set aside by Belmont University for students to use to develop retail or service businesses. Three student-run businesses—Boulevard Studios, Buzzy’s candy store and Feedback Clothing Co.—are currently operating in this space. In addition, Student Business Hatcheries provide an environment with basic resources and support that help students develop their entrepreneurial ventures.


Belmont’s widely-known Music Business program was

impressive client roster. In addition, a partnership between

among the first in a long-line of innovative, interdisciplinary

the Mike Curb Family Foundation, the Country Music Hall of

academic programs to link theory and practice. Songwriters,

Fame and Museum and Belmont University allows students

audio engineers and performers alike enjoy state-of-the-art

access to historic RCA Victor Studio B where more than

recording space in on campus studios and in the Belmont-

1,000 top 10 hits were recorded by classic artists such as

owned Ocean Way Studios on Music Row, which operates

Elvis Presley and Dolly Parton. n

as a world-class teaching laboratory while still serving an


INNOVATION

FINANCIALS

LOOKING AHEAD

8

9

10

Statement of Financial Position May 31, 2009 Assets Cash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,777,225 Investments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65,707,715 Receivable from Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,575,640 Property, Buildings and Equipment, net. . . . . . . 204,707,885 Other Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3,122,147 Total Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300,890,612 Liabilities Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities . . . . . . . 7,737,967 Notes Payable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88,381,495 Other Liabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,922,151 Total Liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102,041,613 Net Assets Unrestricted. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124,612,479 Temporarily Restricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22,036,404 Permanently Restricted. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52,200,116 Total Net Assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198,848,999 Total Liabilities and Net Assets. . . . . . . . $300,890,612 Statement of Activities - All Funds Year Ended May 31, 2009 Revenue and Other Support Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104,272,076 Less: Scholarships and Fellowships. . . . . . . . . . . (16,258,759) Net Tuition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88,013,317 Gifts, Grants and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,803,891 Endowment Spending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,526,569 Auxiliary Enterprises Sales and Services. . . . . . . . 18,326,359 Other Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,330,629 Total Revenue and Other Support . . . . . . 120,000,765 Expenses Instruction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41,640,450 Academic Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11,237,840 Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,482,670 Institutional Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18,772,795 Auxiliary Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14,742,149 Total Expenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102,875,904 Non-operating Activities Private Gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,805,398 Decrease in market value of investments. . . . . . (19,902,407) Change in value of interest rate swaps. . . . . . . . . (2,061,280) Net Decrease from Non-operating Activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (20,158,289) Net Decrease in Net Assets. . . . . . . . . . . . (3,033,428) Net Assets at Beginning of Year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201,882,427 Net Assets at End of Year. . . . . . . . . . . . $198,848,999


h h h

Growth Growth Growth

h

42,732,346 42,732,346 Growth 42,732,346 44,976,951 44,976,951 44,976,951 42,732,346 48,052,328 48,052,328 48,052,328 44,976,951 51,184,574 51,184,574 51,184,574 48,052,328 55,854,685 55,854,685 55,854,685 51,184,574 63,556,232 63,556,232 63,556,232 55,854,685 73,300,902 73,300,902 73,300,902 63,556,232 82,999,021 82,999,021 82,999,021 73,300,902 93,932,923 93,932,923 93,932,923 82,999,021 103,657,873 103,657,873 103,657,873 93,932,923 117,513,292 117,513,292 117,513,292 103,657,873 132295577 132295577 132295577 117,513,292

owth

5.253% 5.253% 5.253% 6.838% 6.838% 6.838% 5.253% 6.518% 6.518% 6.518% 6.838% 9.124% 9.124% 9.124% 6.518% 13.789% 13.789% 13.789% 9.124% 15.332% 15.332% 15.332% 13.789% 13.231% 13.231% 13.231% 15.332% 13.174% 13.174% 13.174% 13.231% 10.353% 10.353% 10.353% 13.174% 13.366% 13.366% 13.366% 10.353% 12.58% 12.58% 12.58% 13.366%

132295577

12.58%

107,418,404 107,418,404 107,418,404 107,523,999 107,523,999 107,523,999 107,418,404 123,116,352 123,116,352 123,116,352 107,523,999 185,528,349 185,528,349 185,528,349 123,116,352 201,372,147 201,372,147 201,372,147 185,528,349 209,593,522 209,593,522 209,593,522 201,372,147 260,089,051 260,089,051 260,089,051 209,593,522 277,868,059 277,868,059 277,868,059 260,089,051 293,440,653 293,440,653 293,440,653 277,868,059 310,949,060 310,949,060 310,949,060 293,440,653 300,890,612 300,890,612 300,890,612 310,949,060 351,078,901 351,078,901 351,078,901 300,890,612

0.098% 0.098% 0.098% 14.501% 14.501% 14.501% 0.098% 50.694% 50.694% 50.694% 14.501% 8.540% 8.540% 8.540% 50.694% 4.083% 4.083% 4.083% 8.540% 24.092% 24.092% 24.092% 4.083% 6.836% 6.836% 6.836% 24.092% 5.604% 5.604% 5.604% 6.836% 5.967% 5.967% 5.967% 5.604% -3.235% -3.235% -3.235% 5.967% 14.295% 14.295% 14.295% -3.235% 14.295%

wth wth wth

2000

2,976 351,078,901

2001

3,129

wth

2002

76,669,897 3,344 76,669,897 76,669,897 77,881,783 3,629 77,881,783 77,881,783 76,669,897 90,441,842 3,941 90,441,842 90,441,842 77,881,783 94,560,707 4,319 94,560,707 94,560,707 90,441,842 102,426,346 4,481 102,426,346 102,426,346 94,560,707 117,975,430 4,756 117,975,430 117,975,430 102,426,346 143,467,931 5,023 143,467,931 143,467,931 117,975,430 165,604,682 5,424 165,604,682 165,604,682 143,467,931 191,274,803 191,274,803 191,274,803 165,604,682 201,882,427 201,882,427 201,882,427 191,274,803 198,848,999 198,848,999 198,848,999 201,882,427

1.581% 1.581% 1.581% 16.127% 16.127% 16.127% 1.581% 4.554% 4.554% 4.554% 16.127% 8.318% 8.318% 8.318% 4.554% 15.181% 15.181% 15.181% 8.318% 21.608% 21.608% 21.608% 15.181% 15.430% 15.430% 15.430% 21.608% 15.501% 15.501% 15.501% 15.430% 5.546% 5.546% 5.546% 15.501% -1.503% -1.503% -1.503% 5.546%

198,848,999

-1.503%

29,507,245 29,507,245 29,507,245 34,413,140 34,413,140 34,413,140 29,507,245 34,942,945 34,942,945 34,942,945 34,413,140 40,150,040 40,150,040 40,150,040 34,942,945 46,318,288 46,318,288 46,318,288 40,150,040 54,096,864 54,096,864 54,096,864 46,318,288 63,061,806 63,061,806 63,061,806 54,096,864 72,350,379 72,350,379 72,350,379 63,061,806 81,813,737 81,813,737 81,813,737 72,350,379 91,858,501 91,858,501 91,858,501 81,813,737 97,575,150 97,575,150 97,575,150 91,858,501 110,394,031 110,394,031 110,394,031 97,575,150

16.626% 16.626% 16.626% 1.540% 1.540% 1.540% 16.626% 14.902% 14.902% 14.902% 1.540% 15.363% 15.363% 15.363% 14.902% 16.794% 16.794% 16.794% 15.363% 16.572% 16.572% 16.572% 16.794% 14.729% 14.729% 14.729% 16.572% 13.080% 13.080% 13.080% 14.729% 12.278% 12.278% 12.278% 13.080% 6.223% 6.223% 6.223% 12.278% 13.137% 13.137% 13.137% 6.223%

110,394,031

13.137%

e e e

e

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

0 0 0 17,307,933 17,307,933 17,307,933 0 52,268,788 52,268,788 52,268,788 17,307,933 67,569,107 67,569,107 67,569,107 52,268,788 69,490,631 69,490,631 69,490,631 67,569,107 75,720,924 75,720,924 75,720,924 69,490,631 111,145,159 111,145,159 111,145,159 75,720,924 119,144,406 119,144,406 119,144,406 111,145,159 129,025,157 129,025,157 129,025,157 119,144,406 145,001,785 145,001,785 145,001,785 129,025,157 183,788,181 183,788,181

Budget Budget Growth Growth Budget Growth

$150,000,000 $150,000,000 $150,000,000

Budget Growth

$150,000,000 $120,000,000 $120,000,000 $120,000,000 $120,000,000 $90,000,000 $90,000,000 $90,000,000 $90,000,000 $60,000,000 $60,000,000 $60,000,000 $60,000,000 $30,000,000 $30,000,000 $30,000,000 $30,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

00-01 00-01 00-01

01-02 01-02 01-02

02-03 02-03 02-03

03-04 03-04 03-04

04-05 04-05 04-05

05-06 05-06 05-06

06-07 06-07 06-07

07-08 07-08 07-08

08-09 08-09 08-09

09-10 09-10 09-10

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

Asset Asset Growth Growth Asset Growth

$400,000,000 $400,000,000 $400,000,000

Asset Growth

$400,000,000 $320,000,000 $320,000,000 $320,000,000 $320,000,000 $240,000,000 $240,000,000 $240,000,000 $240,000,000 $160,000,000 $160,000,000 $160,000,000 $160,000,000 $80,000,000 $80,000,000 $80,000,000 $80,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

00-01 00-01 00-01

01-02 01-02 01-02

02-03 02-03 02-03

03-04 03-04 03-04

06-07 06-07 06-07

07-08 07-08 07-08

08-09 08-09 08-09

09-10 09-10 09-10

00-01

01-02

02-03

Net Asset Growth 03-04 Net04-05 Asset 05-06 Growth06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

99-00 99-00 2000 99-00

00-01 00-01 2001 00-01

01-02 01-02 2002 01-02

02-03 02-03 2003 02-03

05-06 05-06 2006 05-06

06-07 06-07 2007 06-07

07-08 07-08 2008 07-08

08-09 08-09 2009 08-09

99-00

00-01

01-02

02-03 Tuition 03-04 Revenue 04-05 05-06 Tuition Revenue

06-07

07-08

08-09

$250,000,000 $250,000,000 $250,000,000 5,500 $250,000,000 $200,000,000 $200,000,000 $200,000,000 4,750 $200,000,000 $150,000,000 $150,000,000 $150,000,000

04-05 04-05 04-05

05-06 05-06 05-06

Net Asset Growth Enrollment Growth Net Asset Growth

4,000 $150,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $50,000,000 3,250 $50,000,000 $50,000,000 $50,000,000 $0 $0 2,500 $0 $0

03-04 03-04 2004 03-04

04-05 04-05 2005 04-05

Tuition Revenue

$125,000,000 $125,000,000 $125,000,000

Tuition Revenue

$125,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $100,000,000 $75,000,000 $75,000,000 $75,000,000 $75,000,000 $50,000,000 $50,000,000 $50,000,000 $50,000,000 $25,000,000 $25,000,000 $25,000,000 $25,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

00-01 00-01 00-01

01-02 01-02 01-02

02-03 02-03 02-03

03-04 03-04 03-04

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05 04-05 04-05

05-06 05-06 05-06

06-07 06-07 06-07

07-08 07-08 07-08

08-09 08-09 08-09

09-10 09-10 09-10

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

Construction Construction Construction

$200,000,000 $200,000,000 $200,000,000

Construction

$200,000,000 $160,000,000 $160,000,000 $160,000,000 $160,000,000 $120,000,000 $120,000,000 $120,000,000 $120,000,000 $80,000,000 $80,000,000 $80,000,000 $80,000,000 $40,000,000 $40,000,000 $40,000,000 $40,000,000 $0 $0 $0 $0

00-01 00-01 00-01

01-02 01-02 01-02

02-03 02-03 02-03

03-04 03-04 03-04

04-05 04-05 04-05

05-06 05-06 05-06

06-07 06-07 06-07

07-08 07-08 07-08

08-09 08-09 08-09

09-10 09-10 09-10

00-01

01-02

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

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07-08

08-09

09-10


It’s been a remarkable 10 years in the history of Belmont University. The past decade was undoubtedly one of significant transformation, causing many to marvel at Belmont’s progress and impact. From enrollment and campus growth to athletic success and community engagement to educational innovations and peer recognition, Belmont has truly been blessed beyond measure. Still, one theme is always clear:

It’s Not only Where We’ve Been...

It’s Where We’re Going While students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends can all take great pride in this university’s accomplishments in recent years, it’s also easy to acknowledge that the future looks even brighter. A new building to house the School of Pharmacy along with a residence hall with spaces for 400 freshmen will both open this fall. In addition, Belmont’s new College of Law will welcome its first students in 2011, and those students will enter a new campus building in fall 2012 that will include a state-ofthe-art law library. Meanwhile, plans for renovating athletic facilities at Rose Park promise not only new home fields for athletic teams but also deepened community partnerships with Belmont’s neighbors. Of course, those are only a few of the plans known to be in place for the near future. Given Belmont’s history these are sure to represent a mere tip of the iceberg. With so much growth, so much change, so much achievement, it leaves one wondering what surprises the next 10 years could possibly hold....

FINANCIALS

LOOKING AHEAD

9

10


10: A Decade of Transformation  

Looking back at the past 10 years at Belmont University

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