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Flexible Design Guidelines: A Demonstration Case Study: Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam

Author: Dr. M. Tamer El Khorazaty Associate Professor Department of Urban Planning Faculty of Engineering Ain Shams University

Co-authors: Dr. Galal Abada

Lecturer Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Ain Shams University

Rowaida Rashed

Assistant Lecturer Department of Urban Planning Faculty of Engineering Ain Shams University

September 2004


Table of Contents: List of Figures

ii

Abstract

1

1. Introduction and Theoretical Hypothesis

2

2. Introducing Port Ghalib Resort Community- Marsa Alam

3

3. Introduction for Planning Guidelines on the City Level, Port Ghalib- Marsa Alam

4

3.1 Planning Guidelines for the Canals Village on the City Level

4

3.1.1 Parcel Plan

5

3.1.2 Architectural Character

5

3.1.3 Landscape Character

6

3.2 Design Guidelines for the Canals Village on the Urban Design Level

7

3.2.1 Setbacks

11

3.2.2 Roofs

12

3.2.3 Paving

15

4. Conclusion

18

Annex: General Design Theme- Canals Village, Port Ghalib- Marsa Alam

19

References

i


List of Figures: Figure (01) Diagram showing the strong association between guidelines and the different levels of planning and design.

2

Figure (02) Master Plan of Port Ghalib Resort Community, Marsa Alam.

3

Figure (03) Diagram showing the seven-district division of Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam.

3

Figure (04) One of the 7 districts of Port Ghalib.

3

Figure (05) An example of the suggested range of roof types for the district of the Canals Village.

5

Figure (06) An example of the suggested paving types for the district of the Canals Village.

6

Figure (07) Canals Village, Port Ghalib: the Master Plan

7

Figure (08) Canals Village, Port Ghalib: Parcelisation Plan and Character divisions.

8

Figure (09) Canals Village, parcel #22:setbacks. Plot #1 within parcel #22: setbacks.

11

Figure (10) Examples of Roof Types of Tunisian Character

12

Figure (11) Examples of Roof Types of Mediterranean Character

13

Figure (12) Examples of Roof Types of Mexican Character

13

Figure (13) Examples of Roof Types of Bedouin Character

14

Figure (14) Examples of Roof Types of Modern Character

14

Figure (15) Examples of Paving of Tunisian Character

15

Figure (16) Examples of Paving of Mediterranean Character

16

Figure (17) Examples of Paving of Mexican Character

16

Figure (18) Examples of Paving of Bedouin Character

17

Figure (19) Examples of Paving of Modern Character

17

ii


Abstract: Located on the Red Sea Coast of Egypt, approximately 180 kms south of Hurghada, is the resort community of Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam. Spread over an area of 750 hectares, this project represents a new generation of sustainable, environmentally sensitive resort communities, comprising a wide variety of landscapes such as valleys, open desert, mountains and sandy beaches. The new community is intended to accommodate approximately 50,000 residents and guests, and is organized around seven main districts, namely: VIP Compound, Highland Golf Estates, Lagoon Valley, Ridgeline Quarter, Tower Village, Marina Village and Canals Village. Each of the districts comprises residential communities of different levels, types and sizes… A master plan has been prepared for the whole vicinity, linking the districts visually and physically, thus creating a strong and cohesive development. In addition, a Primary Design Guidelines document has been prepared for the whole area on the city/ settlement planning level, tackling issues such as: Design Intents for each of the districts, General Themes and Characters and the Design Review Approval Process. Thus, the basic vision for the whole development has been set and the Design Guidelines provide a set of criteria that describe the overall land use and character of the resort. A parcelisation plan has also been prepared and the vision for each parcel has been defined through the suggested Architectural Character (massing, landmarks, façade materials, projections, shade structures, colours, roof types…), as well as the suggested Landscape Character (landscape strategy, plantation, lighting, street furniture, flooring…). Despite the fact that this document also deals with parcel plan topics such as areas, setbacks and building heights, it provides overall parameters for the design of each land parcel, while remaining flexible enough to encourage design inputs and interpretations. Design Guidelines are put in place merely to ensure that the overall character of each parcel fits within the character of the whole resort. Objective: The aim is to define how urban design guidelines could be flexible- case study: Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam. Hypothesis: Flexible urban design guidelines help sustain planned built environments- case study: Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam. Methodology: The paper starts out by introducing Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam and highlighting the Primary Guidelines document that has been prepared for the area on the city/ settlement planning level. It goes on to explain the items on which the document has been based, elucidating flexible spots. Following the above-indicated introduction, the paper illustrates a more specific Design Guidelines document for one of the districts within Port Ghalib, namely: the Canals Village. This is done with the aim of showing the difference in details between the Primary Design Guidelines prepared on the city/ settlement planning level and the Design Guidelines prepared on the urban design level. It is the intention to prove that flexibility evolves from the strong association between Guidelines and the different levels of Planning. The more this association is consistent the more flexible guidelines are. Guidelines on the regional scale are general, providing a primary adaptable vision although they are comprehensive and deal with somewhat detailed issues. Moving from this scale till the plot scale, guidelines are more specific and exclusive.

1


1. Introduction and Theoretical Hypothesis:

Regional Planning City/ Settlement Planning Urban Design Architectural Design

ONE PLANNING / DESIGN LEVEL TO THE OTHER

EXAMPLES OF LEVELS OF PLANNING AND DESIGN

TOLERANCE SHOWN WITHIN GUIDELINES FROM

Design Guidelines are rules to help designers create comfortable, suitable and homogeneous built environments within a certain vision. They ensure the quality of the built environment and accordingly the quality of life. Design Guidelines are intended to present design rules and principles that encourage development, which promotes compatibility with an existing or desired character of an area. They are also intended to manage transformations (i.e. allowing for transformations under the controls of design rules in order to sustain the area). The aim of this paper is to define how Design Guidelines could be flexible, in order to help sustain planned built environments on different scales of development. Flexibility, in this case, emerges from the fact that there is a strong association between guidelines and the different levels of planning and design. The more this association is consistent, the more flexible guidelines are. To elucidate the above-mentioned fact, it is worth pointing out that as regards to the built environment; guidelines are designated on several levels of perception: regional planning guidelines, city/ settlement planning guidelines, urban design guidelines, and architectural design guidelines. Thus, guidelines may be classified into planning guidelines (from regional plan to city plan and may reach the settlement plan), and design guidelines (urban design/ architectural design). In general, guidelines produced on a higher planning level are binding for the following lower planning levels. For example, regional planning guidelines include environmental protection and sustainability measures, providing criteria for regional development decisions, which, in turn, are binding for city plans within the same region. Therefore, guidelines on the regional scale- set from regional planning schemes- are general, providing a primary, adaptable, flexible vision that, in turn, acts as a guide to planners and developers on lower planning levels, such as city planning within the same region and are binding to city planning guidelines, which- in turn- influence the Urban Design of a certain area within the city; as well as being binding to the area’s Urban Design Guidelines. This process moves on from one level to the other until it reaches the smallest scale, in which case, guidelines are very specific, exclusive and somewhat “rigid�, tailored for a certain case. This is demonstrated through an application on the Resort Community of Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam, highlighting its primary guidelines document on the city planning level. The paper then moves on to explain a more specific design guidelines document for one of the districts within the Resort Community, namely: the Canals Village.

RELATED PLANNING AND DESIGN GUIDELINES Regional Planning Guidelines City/ Settlement Planning Guidelines Urban Design Guidelines Architectural Design Guidelines

Figure (01) Diagram showing the strong association between guidelines and the different levels of planning and design. The more this association is consistent, the more flexible guidelines are.

2


2. Introducing Port Ghalib Resort Community- Marsa Alam: Located on the Red Sea coast of Egypt, approximately 180 kms south of Hurghada, is the resort community of Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam. Spread over an area of 750 hectares, this project represents a new generation of sustainable, environmentally sensitive resort communities, comprising a wide variety of landscapes such as valleys, open desert, mountains and sandy beaches. The new community is intended to accommodate approximately 50,000 residents and guests, and is organized around seven main districts, namely: VIP Compound, Highland Golf Estates, Lagoon Valley, Ridgeline Quarter, Tower Village, Marina Village and Canals Village. Each of the districts comprises residential communities of different levels, types and sizes. Thus, the Resort Community of Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam is divided into 7 districts, which are then again broken-up into 80 individual land parcels, each divided into many plots. Al-Quseir/ Marsa Alam Hig

A

B Red Sea

C

hway

E

D

To Marsa Alam International Airport

F

G Parcel Numbers

Figure (02) Master Plan of Port Ghalib Resort Community, Marsa Alam. This includes a clear network of roads, parcels and land uses.

Parcel …

District

Parcel … Parcel …

Etc.

Plot… Plot… Plot… Plot…

Figure (03) Diagram showing the seven-district division of Port Ghalib, Marsa Alam. A: VIP Compound B: Highland Golf Estates C: Lagoon Valley D: Ridgeline Quarter E: Tower Village F: Marina Village G: Canals Village

Etc.

Figure (04) One of the 7 districts of Port Ghalib, which is divided into several parcels, each- in turn- divided into many plots.

3


3. Introduction for Planning Guidelines on the City Level, Port Ghalib- Marsa Alam: These are guidelines that belong to the city scale. They influence the urban design of a certain area within the city; as well as being binding to the area’s urban design guidelines. Therefore, planning guidelines on the city level aid in the formulation of guidelines on the following level, namely: the urban design level. The Resort Community of Port Ghalib possesses- as a whole- a general Intent, theme and character. It is divided into seven districts, all within one master plan linking them visually and physically, thus creating a strong and cohesive development. It is based on this master plan that the primary guidelines for the whole vicinity are extracted. These primary guidelines are meant to provide a set of criteria that lead the developer in a certain design direction to ensure that the overall vision of the resort is adhered to. They remain flexible enough to allow for and encourage design inputs and interpretations made by planners, urban designers, architects and developers. The guidelines are like a cake recipe. The recipe sets out the ingredients to be incorporated within the cake and how in general those ingredients should be put together. Yet every cake ends up slightly different depending on the interpretation and flair of the individual chef. The guidelines serve to protect property values and personal investment by ensuring quality and consistency of design, continuity, a sense of order and the creation of a community. The document establishes a framework through which the textures of the seven districts of Port Ghalib and their spatial relationships create visual continuity, while accommodating the varied characters, which help enrich the built environment. The document starts out by drawing a clear vision, “dream” of how the whole resort is aspired to look and feel like. Told in a story-like way, using different figures of speech, as well as sketches and real-life images, the vision opens up different flexible points of departure for planners and developers. The main idea revolves around the seven above-mentioned districts, namely: the VIP Compound, Highland Golf Estates, Lagoon Valley, Ridgeline Quarter, Tower Village, Marina Village and Canals Village; all within one broad vision, but with each one possessing a separate characteristic vision on the city planning level. Thus, the vision for the resort includes the theme and character for the whole area, as well as environmental and economic aspects. A clear parcelisation plan is also illustrated for Port Ghalib Resort, associated with Parcelisation Tables, which include numeric information for the districts and each of the parcels within, such as: gross areas, developable land areas, allowed coverage areas, footprints, floor-to-area ratios, total built-up areas. In addition, global programs for parcels are presented in the form of tables. In the following sections, the paper focuses on the Canals Village- being one of the districts within Port Ghalib- highlighting its primary guidelines on the city planning level, then on the urban design levelfocusing on the parcel scale.

3.1 Planning Guidelines for the Canals Village on the City Level: The Canals Village on the city planning level possesses A General Theme (Intent) that draws a picture of how life within the district is aspired to feel and look like, expressed as follows: “The Canals Village builds on the maritime character of Port Ghalib. Four prime resort sites, with beachfront access and commanding views over the Red Sea, are situated in close proximity to the Marina Village south of the port entry channel. With 5 to 4-star ratings, the Island Harbour Hotel, Red Sea Point Hotel, Reef hotel and Cove Hotel offer a variety of resort experiences for a range of travellers. Water Taxis offer quick and pleasant links between Marina Village and Canals Village. Drawing off an ideal location on the waterways of harbour canals, the Canals Village villas and condominiums will capitalize on their private waterfronts while town homes and bungalows take full advantage of their dock locations. Resort homes located on the elevated slopes in the Bench-lands and Bluffs provide views over waterways and harbour. Canals Village shares public pedestrian pathways, access points to the waterfront “beachlets” and water-taxi stations with the other districts, as well as Boatyard Square and Port Ghalib Tennis Center and Fitness Club. A marine boat center, responding to local demand, will complement premium facilities offered for larger international vessels in Marina Village. An adjacent public space, Boatyard Square, will develop as an animated, neighbourhood focus with cafeterias and corner shops.” This theme provides a starting point for planners, architects and developers working in the area. 4


Broad lines are also drawn for the criteria that guide development in the Canals Village, classified into the following items: 3.1.1 Parcel Plan: This item includes a description of the permitted land uses, permitted parcel sizes and design intents, followed by numeric data that cover such information as parcels’ developable areas, site coverage, setbacks, floor-to-area ratios and any other numeric criteria that influence the formation of the Canals Village. The numeric information is used in a later stage by the urban designer, as a guide that influences the production of the plan of the Canals Village; knowing the ranges of plot sizes, the allowed footprints, how much buildings should set back from the roads,‌etc. the shaping of the plots, and their relationships with their constituents and surroundings, as well as the positioning of buildings and structures, all take a certain direction of design. 3.1.2 Architectural Character: This item describes the various architectural components and massing intents for parcels. Included are components and features such as façade types, a range of materials, roofs, colour palette, windows, doors, recesses and allowed projections. The following figure illustrates one example of the above-indicated architectural components, namely roofs:

Figure (05) An example of the suggested range of roof types for the district of the Canals Village 5


3.1.3 Landscape Character: This section begins with a brief description of the landscape design intent, followed by descriptions of the various landscape components to be found or used within that Canals Village. These include such items as site amenities, paving, signage, outdoor lighting, site furniture, site conditions, landscape strategy and parking, as well as any other unique components. The following image illustrates one example of the above-indicated landscaping components, namely paving:

Figure (06) An example of the suggested paving types for the district of the Canals Village

6


3.2 Design Guidelines for the Canals Village on the Urban Design Level: It is due to the fact that the guidelines on the city planning level are flexible that the paper has easily formulated more specific guidelines on a closer level for one of the districts within the resort community of Port Ghalib, namely the Canals Village. The Urban Design Guidelines document of the Canals Village focuses on the parcel scale. It is on the Urban Design level that a more specific, clearer design intent is formulated on behalf of the urban designer, building on the previous, more global design theme illustrated within the primary guidelines document for the Canals village. The General Design Theme for the Canals Village may be examined through the attached annex at the end of the paper. In general, it involves a thorough description of the Canals Village, starting out by an illustration of the district boundaries and its main approaches and access points. Then it moves on to explain general environmental and natural issues, while drawing relationships with the aspired atmosphere and uses. The ambience is explained clearly through words, figures of speech, real-life images, as well as sketches. In addition, the reader is taken on a journey throughout the whole district, moving along a closed loop and catching glimpses of the surroundings. Finally, the suggested program is also demonstrated and the master plan is shown. A major aspect within the Canals Village design intent on the urban design scale is the following: “Generally speaking, the design of the Canals Village offers immense marketing flexibility, as the options are endless… Parcels possessing the same number and consecutive alphabetical letters (A, B and C) may be merged together forming one or two compounds. In addition, each parcel- with its own plots- may act as a separate compound. Nevertheless, all plots may be sold individually, each one with its own villa… Finally, each of the parcels has its own unique architectural character that acts as the “embellishing element”, adding flavour to the residential neighbourhood… Suggested architectural characters- apart from the special “Modern Art Village”- include Mexican, Mediterranean, Tunisian, and Bedouin; each one with its special vocabularies, colours and urban spaces… Each as a complete lifestyle on its own!” The phasing plan, the land-use allocation plan, the land-use allocation program, the parcelisation plan and the general parcelisation table are all items that complement the elucidation of the master plan of the Canals Village. After introducing the design theme and describing the master plan, the document moves on to set important criteria for each parcel. These criteria include the design intent, uses, suggested program, total area, developable area, site coverage, setbacks, floor-to-area ratio, maximum number of floors, footprints…etc. Afterwards, all parcels possessing the same character are dealt with as one unit, elucidating all the items that help in creating, as well as sustaining the desired character, namely: parcels with Tunisian character, parcels with Mediterranean character, parcels with Mexican character, parcels with Bedouin character, and parcels with Modern character.

Figure (07) Canals Village, Port Ghalib: the Master Plan 7


Figure (08) Canals Village, Port Ghalib: Parcelisation Plan and Character divisions Primary guidelines of the Canals Village on the city planning level are classified according to the Parcel Plan, the Architectural Character and the Landscape Character. In case of design guidelines for the Canals Village on the urban design level, more detailed, specific items have to be examined on the parcel scale. Therefore, the division is somewhat different, but still strongly related to the previous division on the city planning level. The division is as follows: A. Land uses and Activities B. Placement of Masses C. Forms of Masses D. Spaces “Land uses and activities” and “placement of masses” are associated with the parcel plan; “forms of masses” with the architectural character; and “spaces” with the landscape character. Components of the urban design guidelines document for the Canals Village: A. LAND USES AND ACTIVITIES B. PLACEMENT OF MASSES i. Setbacks

ii. Structure Positions

C. FORMS OF MASSES i. General character and building typology

Setbacks determine the limits of the zone within which developers are allowed to place structures, for every plot and land parcel. Structures are forbidden outside those limits. They determine exactly where significant structures are positioned within the urban context of an area and where buildings are exactly situated on a piece of land within the above-indicated setback zone.

The general architectural character, the atmosphere, social life, building types...etc. Types help define fundamental relationships between a building and its neighbours; how it sits on its site and how it relates to the street and the sidewalk. Buildings of different styles and uses can sit very comfortably side-by-side if they have certain elements in common. 8


ii. Floor-to-area ratio

This is the maximum allowable floor area of the buildings in relation to the total area. E.g. FAR 2.0 means that the building floor area can be up to twice the area of the parcel. FAR= total built-up area / total land area.

iii. Built-up area

This is the summation of floor areas within a building.

iv. Building heights v. Roofs vi. Building bulks

This deals with massing and dimensions (the massing concept establishes the formation of building volumes, determining their locations and envelopes suited to the architectural style.

vii. Skyline

Skyline studies demonstrate building silhouettes: their “cutouts” from the sky. The skyline should be well-examined to provide variety and enhancements in significant spots.

viii. Transparency and Permeability

How the building interacts with the surrounding urban environment. Is the building an “introvert”? Does it allow people to pass through easily on its ground floor level? How much glass relative to the entire wall?

ix. Locations of entrances

Are entrances properly determined on the façade? How are they marked?

x. Façade materials and textures

How suitable are the materials to the environment?

xi. Building Colours

Colours should have codes related to the different districts of a certain urban design project.

xii. Façade articulation/ façade details

Which parts of the façade need to be articulated? What is the level of detailing?

xiii. Façade horizontal or vertical treatment

Dominant horizontality or dominant verticality.

xiv. Solid-to void ratio xv. Façade opening proportions, sizes, shapes xvi. Terraces and balconies

Shapes, styles, orientation and functions.

xvii. Ground-floor treatment xviii. Corner articulation xix. Building accessories

Building signs, lights, house numbers…etc.

xx. Building shade structures 9


D. SPACES i. General character and space typology

The general atmosphere, social activities, types of spaces: vehicle roads, pedestrian walkways, vistas, parks...

ii. Ground-floor activities

Ones found on the ground floors of buildings surrounding spaces; influencing and influenced by the atmosphere within the outdoor space.

iii. Percentages of space surface uses

What is the percentage of pedestrian paths with respect to greenery? How much space is taken up by a cafeteria…? Percentages of all activities within the space are determined with respect to each other .

iv. Space profile

Walls defining the spaces may be the buildings that encircle them or any other three-dimensional defining elements… How high are these elements? What are their proportions with respect to spaces?

v. Plantation

Types, forms and colours.

vi. Waterscape vii. Paving materials

Textures, patterns and colours.

viii. Street furniture ix. Parking schemes

Whether parking areas are on-site or on streets. If on-site, where are they located with respect to streets and buildings?

x. Lighting

The lighting theme as regards to colours of lights, light intensities, light poles…

xi. Advertising

The theme according to which advertisement panels are distributed without causing visual pollution.

xii. Public art xiii. Fences, walls and buffers xiv. Landmarks xv. Fittings for handicapped Design guidelines of the Canals Village on the urban design level are not intended to be prescriptive or restricting imagination; they are put in place to ensure that the overall character of each parcel fits within the character of the whole resort. This is achieved through a design review and approval process, intended to ensure that the principles, core values and overall vision of Port Ghalib are adhered to by individual development parties. In order to elucidate the difference in details between the primary guidelines prepared on the city planning level and the design guidelines prepared on the urban design level for the Canals Village, the same items will be examined, namely: Setbacks, Roofs and Paving. Setbacks lie beneath “Placement of Masses”, associated with the Parcel Plan; “Roofs” lie beneath “Forms of Masses”, associated with the Architectural Character; and Paving lies beneath “Spaces”, associated with the Landscape Character.

10


3.2.1 Setbacks: In order to demonstrate how setbacks are outlined on the urban design level of the Canals Village, one parcel has been chosen from within the district, namely parcel #22- refer to figure (08). Then, setbacks for one specific plot within the same parcel are designated, namely plot #1, as follows:

Figure (09) Canals Village, parcel #22: setbacks. Plot #1 within parcel #22: setbacks.

11


3.2.2 Roofs: The Canals Village is divided into parcels- refer to figure (08)- which are grouped according to five architectural characters suggested on behalf of the urban designer, namely: Tunisian Character, Mediterranean Character, Mexican Character, Bedouin Character and Modern Character. Different roofs are suggested for each of the above-indicated architectural characters. Each of the following five figures demonstrates the locations of parcels possessing a certain architectural character and the suggested roofs for the same character, in addition to their technical specifications.

Figure (10) Examples of Roof Types of Tunisian Character

12


Figure (11) Examples of Roof Types of Mediterranean Character

Figure (12) Examples of Roof Types of Mexican Character

13


Figure (13) Examples of Roof Types of Bedouin Character

Figure (14) Examples of Roof Types of Modern Character 14


3.2.3 Paving: The Canals Village is divided into parcels- refer to figure (08)- which are grouped according to five architectural characters suggested on behalf of the urban designer, namely: Tunisian Character, Mediterranean Character, Mexican Character, Bedouin Character and Modern Character. Different paving types are suggested for each of the above-indicated architectural characters. Each of the following five figures demonstrates the locations of parcels possessing a certain architectural character and the suggested paving for the same character, in addition to technical specifications.

Figure (15) Examples of Paving of Tunisian Character

15


Figure (16) Examples of Paving of Mediterranean Character

Figure (17) Examples of Paving of Mexican Character

16


Figure (18) Examples of Paving of Bedouin Character

Figure (19) Examples of Paving of Modern Character

17


4. Conclusion: It is thus noticed that flexible guidelines are produced by providing liberty to planners and developers on higher scales of development, while decreasing the amount of liberty as the development moves onto lower, more specific scales, all the while keeping consistent relationships between the guidelines and the different planning levels. Throughout the paper, the application on Port Ghalib resort community demonstrated how flexible guidelines on the city planning level are, thus allowing for the formulation of urban design guidelines on the smaller scale. It also elucidated the difference in details between the primary guidelines prepared on the city planning level and the guidelines prepared on the urban design level; therefore proving that flexibility evolves from the strong association between guidelines and the different levels of planning and design: the more consistent, the more guidelines are flexible.

18


Annex:

General Design Theme- Canals Village Port Ghalib- Marsa Alam

19


Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

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Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

No. of plots

Max. no. of floors

Plot Coverage %

Max. building footprint

_

2

25.00

Parcel 21A

21

2

Parcel 21B

24

2

34 Parcel 23A Parcel 23B

Parcel No. Parcel 20 Parcel 21 Parcel 22 Parcel 23

GENERAL PARCELISATION TABLE

Parcel 24

Parcel area

Parcels( A,B,C)

FAR

Total building area (sqm)

Open spaces within parcels (fed)

m2

fed

%

m2

fed

%

6665.71

0.50

13331.43

_

26662.85

6.35

2.64

26662.85

6.35

2.64

32.77

7935.72

0.66

15871.44

8347.04

24218.48

5.77

2.40

23.70

7960.91

0.47

15921.82

17673.70

33595.52

8.00

3.33

57813.99

13.77

5.72

2

28.10

12028.25

0.56

24056.50

18752.91

42809.41

10.19

4.24

42809.41

10.19

4.24

26

2.5

30.33

16829.14

0.65

35858.80

21836.98

55495.27

13.21

5.49

18

2

34.33

11096.22

0.78

25258.03

10133.29

32325.73

7.70

3.20

87821.00

20.91

8.69

30

2

27.06

10205.23

0.54

20410.46

17305.70

37716.16

8.98

3.73

37716.16

8.98

3.73

93613.35

22.29

9.27

78298.94

18.64

7.75

Ö

35910.62

8.55

3.55

K

11357.61

2.70

1.12

O

32154.55

7.66

3.18

Parcel 25

Parcel 25A

20

2.5

28.60

11681.95

0.67

27218.16

17478.10

40842.00

9.72

4.04

Parcel 25B

33

2

27.97

14761.39

0.56

29522.78

23248.57

52771.35

12.56

5.22

Parcel 26

Parcel 26A

20

2

27.97

6597.80

0.56

13195.61

10396.69

23592.29

5.62

2.34

Parcel 26B

29

2.5

28.89

15802.46

0.63

34376.76

23101.73

54706.65

13.03

5.41

Parcel 27

Parcel 27A

10

2

33.06

3624.16

0.66

7248.32

3715.34

10963.66

2.61

1.09

Parcel 27B

20

2

28.76

7174.20

0.58

14348.40

10598.56

24946.96

5.94

2.47

Parcel 28

Parcel 28A

13

1

31.03

2566.27

0.31

2566.27

3137.21

8269.74

1.97

0.82

Parcel 28B

_

2

70.00

2161.51

1.40

4323.01

_

3087.86

0.74

0.31

Parcel 29A

11

1

34.35

2189.70

0.34

2189.70

1995.21

6374.61

1.52

0.63

Parcel 29B

4

1

50.00

3244.86

0.50

3244.86

0.00

6489.73

1.55

0.64

Parcel 29C

26

1

27.09

5226.40

0.27

5226.40

8837.42

19290.21

4.59

1.91

Parcel 29

P L A

m a y

2 0 0 4

N


Canals Village – Port Ghalib – Marsa Alam

No. of plots

Max. no . of floors

Plot Coverage %

Max. building footprint

FAR

Total building area (sqm)

Open spaces within parcels (fed)

m2

fed

%

Parcel 30A

26

2

32.57

8666.66

0.65

17333.32

9279.71

26613.03

6.34

2.63

Parcel 30B

48

2

31.81

15673.63

0.64

31347.26

17929.22

49276.48

11.73

4.88

Parcel 31A

12

2

33.43

4597.38

0.67

9194.75

4558.01

13572.76

3.27

1.36

Parcel 31B

30

2.5

31.04

17577.73

0.71

40309.82

21469.21

56624.66

13.48

5.60

Parcel 31C

_

2

30

2482.26

1

4964.53

_

8274.21

1.97

0.82

16

2

22.91

10078.09

0.46

20156.17

23839.68

Parcel No.

Parcel 30 Parcel 31

Parcel area

Parcels( A,B,C) m2

fed

%

75889.51

18.07

7.51

78651.63

18.73

7.78

43995.86

10.48

4.35

43089.95

10.26

4.26

Art Park

72056.33

17.16

7.13

72056.33

17.16

7.13

Total area of parcels

747183.05

177.9

73.95

Public spaces

46979.13

11.19

4.65

External roads

216170.19

51.47

21.40

Total project area

1010332.37

240.6

100

Parcel 39

Ö K O P L A

m a y

2 0 0 4

N


Flexible Design Guidelines