Page 1

Gamasa - Egypt

REPORT - SEPTEMBER 2014 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL

‫حوش يجمعنا‬

A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL Gamasa - Egypt


Editors: • Insaf Ben Othmane H. • Omar Wanas. Photos: Bassem Hany Insaf Ben Othmane H. Omar Wanas Mohamed Karam Medhat Kazem Mona Manoun Layla Zibar Supported by: • Schoolyard For All Technical Team • Schoolyard For All Volunteers Design Concept: Insaf Ben Othmane H. Print: Bayn Essarayate, Crytstal- Cairo

https://www.facebook.com/aschoolyardforall https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJZWJvX1fn4&feature=youtu.be

‫يجمعنا‬ © 2014

Copyright disclaimer: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form of by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher.

Cairo, September 2014.


5 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

6 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

STRUCTURE OF THE REPORT STRUCTURE OF THE REPORT ACKNOWLEDGMENT FOREWORD CORE RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

P6 P7 P8 P9

SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL PROJECT 1 Understanding Gamasa Madraset El Masyaf 2 Madraset El Masyaf, What’s wrong? 3 The project: Coexistence through Design – The Schoolyard

P13 P21 P37

- Introduction - Phase 1 & 2: Appreciative Inquiry – Networking & Preparation - Phase 3: Coordination & Preparation - Phase 4: The Workshop[s] Approach – Methodology & Preparations - Phase 4: The Workshop[s] Diary - Phase 5: Construction Phase

P37 P39 P43 P55 P61 P71

4. The Opening Event

P85

5. First Day of School

P97

List of Figures, Tables References Annexes

P99 P101 P103


7 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

8 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Foreword

This project would not have seen light or realized, if not for the hard work and cooperation of several members and organizations. Therefore, Oecumene studio and “A schoolyard for all” team would like to initially express its appreciation to the UNHCR team for it perseverance in seeing that the project was initiated in such a tight preparation schedule and unpredictable environment. We would also like to extend our thanks to the Syrian community in Gamasa for their hospitality and trust, the teachers, workers and watchmen of Gamasa Experimental School who supported us with ideas, working hours and hands –on help even on weekends. Finally, a warm thanks to the students and volunteers who brought life, happiness and joy to every brick laid in the schoolyard .

This report is a daily documentation of the “Schoolyard for All” project in which the redesign of a schoolyard of a governmental school in Gamasa was Co-designed with Syrian and Egyptian students of the school and constructed in a total of 17 hard working days [Design and construction]. In addition to the students, the project was enriched by input and help from several sincere local teachers, construction workers, parents and volunteers in a way that demonstrated how fruitful work can be in an atmosphere of peaceful coexistence. We believe that this is merely a step on the road to integrating the Syrian students into the Egyptian community and still needs grave efforts to sustain the spirit that we encountered through our brief stay in Gamasa.

The schoolyard is for many children in Egypt not just a place of education but is one of the rare open space they can access free of charge in a developing country where- in an ever dense urban pattern - open spaces are seldom and green spaces are even more scarce. In the light of the previous, it is safe to state that tending to schoolyards is not a privilege we were providing for a handpicked school, on the contrary it is a constitutional right to open space and education for every student in the school regardless gender, religion or nationality. Omar Wanas Insaf Ben Othmane.H

.


SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL PROJECT


13 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

14 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

1.Understanding Gamasa Madraset El Masyaf, Egypt Gamasa Masyaf, also called Gamasa resort, is part of Dakahlia Governorate. It lies in the Northern cost of Egypt and is juxtaposed to Gamasa El Balad, part of Damietta governorate. Both parts constitute Gamasa city. Gamasa Masyaf is a growing city. Its population is increasing and it is expected to host hundreds of new residents in the upcoming years. Different social housing compounds are under construction and expected to be finalized by the end of 2015. Moreover, Gamasa city has been hosting a significant number of Syrian refugees since 2012. Since then, Syrians have settled in Gamasa,

Figure 1: Geographic location of Gamasa.

some launched their own business, others have been working in several other domains: industry, retail, food/restaurants and construction. Today ,Gamasa city is shifting from being a transit city for Egyptians during the summer season -who seek seasonal job opportunities- and a ghost city during wintertime to being a residential city where Egyptians and Syrians are equally resident throughout the year. Nevertheless, Gamasa city [Masyaf and El-Balad] has only two public schools, one in each part of

the city. Both schools are being exposed to an in- quently their families. creasing flux of new students. It is reported that the school in Gamasa El-Balad is not accepting extra incoming students as it has already passed its full capacity of students. This leaves the experimental school in Gamasa Gamasa city has been hosting Masyaf as the unique option for both the Egyptian a significant number of Syrian and Syrian families. The school is already operating refugees since 2012. under the pressure of the number of students and the limited teaching staff. This lack of physical and human resources has participated in creating a gap between Syrian and Egyptian students and conse-

...

Figure 2: The Location of Gamasa Experimental School.


15 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

16 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014 The school is around four hours drive from Cairo, in the vicinity of the industrial zone . It is surrounded by a water station, industrial sites and is nearby to the Gamasa Prison. The school is in a remote zone in comparison to the urbanized areas of Gamasa City. Cars and Toc-toc are the only safe ways to reach the school.

1.Understanding Gamasa Madraset El Masyaf, Egypt

Surroundings of the School - Construction of housing compunds

The school

Water Station


17 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

18 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

1.Understanding Gamasa Madraset El Masyaf, Egypt The School, “Madraset El Masyaf” is located on affects the quality of education and threatens the EL Fateyh Street. It is a mixed gender governmental coexistence between the Syrians and Egyptians in school. It hosts different education levels: Gamasa. • Kindergarten (Two stages) around 55 registered students both Egyptians and Syrians. This number is expected to increase to 80 by the new educational year 2014/2015. • Primary (Six stages) around 603 registered students both Egyptians and Syrians. • Preparatory (Three stages) around 285 registered students both Egyptians and Syrians. • The school is expecting 200 new students this year 2014/2015. The number of enrolled Syrian students so far are around 375 students all grades. As stated above and as reported, the presence of a significant Syrian community in ‘Gamassa’ led to a high influx of Syrian students to the Gamassa Experimental School -a one class school- and thus led to an increase in the capacity of each classroom by nearly the double. The local Egyptian community and in particular the parents complained from this situation in the mid of 2013/2014 school year. Conflicts arised between Egyptians and Syrians in particular among secondary students that ended up by physical confrontations and a demonstration against Syrians in the school. The Syrian families have thus retired their children from school fearing more violence and conflicts. The coexistence of Egyptian and Syrian students seems difficult. Due to the lack of resources and feasible solutions, the students and teaching staff reside in an unfriendly environment that negatively

900 Students and expected 1100 students in 2014

The number of enrolled Syrian students are around 375 students within all grades. 40 kindergarten students are expected in the current year.

vs -One-Class School -Reduced number of Teachers -Unavailability of certain classrooms -Nonexistence and non-applicability of School Management Plan

Figure 4:Facts and figures about Gamasa Experimental School

Figure3: The solid and void analysis of the school.

Figure 5: The undesigned schoolyard in Gamasa Experimental School.


19 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

Figure 6: Aerial view of the Gamasa Experimental Schoolyard before intervention.

20 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014


21 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

22 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

2.Madraset El Masyaf what’s wrong? Madraset El Masyaf has several issues. It is important to highlight that the majority of problems are common to the most of Egyptian schools that suffer from lack of resources and high density classrooms. After several site visits, four clusters of problems were identified. They are namely: 1• Unfriendly educational environment due to : -High Density classrooms. -Unfunctional spaces as the Hard ground covers in Kindgarten yards. -Unsuitable furniture, they are either fragile, not suitable to their usage and not ergonomic or simply inexistent. -Unhygienic sanitation Units. -Unsafe conditions due to falling glass hazard by extreme wind pressure and vandalism, collapse of heavy elements as the flag column due to steel corrosion and uncontrolled access to the roof by primary students. -Lack of Sun or Rain protection within the schoolyard. -Poor distribution of vegetation and greenery in the outdoor spaces.

- The increase of the number of students in class. -Language barriers -Social class disparities between the different student groups. -The mix between primary and preparatory grades in one schoolyard. -Lack of the sense of belonging from both Egyptian and Syrian students. 3• High School Dropout rate as it seems that most of the students are not interested in learning, they are more attracted to work at early age, as one of the students says [10 years old]“Owning my own toc-toc is more fun and interesting. Studying will lead me nowhere”. This rate is also explained by the increase of truancy phenomenon and the incapacity of parents to cover school fees.

Figure 7: Shattered glass due to wind pressure in upper classrooms and vandalism.

Figure 8: The lack of fire extinguishers due to theft .

Figure 9: General state of the classrooms and furniture.

Figure 10: Poor vegetation and shade distribution in the schoolyard.

Figure 11: Unhygienic sanitation units.

Figure 12: Small white board installed in classrooms.

2• Conflict between Students, Egyptian Vs Egyptian, Egyptian Vs Syrians and Syrians Vs Syrians due to: -No allocation of recreational spaces -Domination of preparatory students in over schoolyard -Cultural differences -Signs of a rising xenophobia -Rebellious peer groups - Anti-social behaviour. -No representatives of Syrians on the PTA board


23 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

24 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

Figure 13: General mapping of issues in School El Masyaf showing the inter-connexion between physical elements and socio-eco. aspects.

2.Madraset El Masyaf what’s wrong?

Figure 14: An overlap between the Mapped behaviour patterns in the schoolyard throughout the school day and the Cast shade within the space demonstrates the contradiction between both .


25 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

26 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

2.Madraset El Masyaf what’s wrong? N

Figure 15: Poor distribution of vegetation and greenery in the outdoor spaces.


27 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

28 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

2.Madraset El Masyaf what’s wrong?

N

Figure 17: Excess solar radiation in Classrooms

Figure 19: Broken window panes due to strong winds

There are many building elements in the school that make it unsafe for the students and for any users in addition to the general lack of maintenance. The falling glass-hazards , corrosion of steel elements and the uncontrolled access to the roof plus the easy access to the school by the backyard are the main threats. Plus, the design of the building and classrooms are unfunctional as classrooms should be oriented North and not West for lighting levels and administration units shouldnt be far from the main entrance. Figure 16: Hazards due to strong winds and excess solar radiation

Figure 18: Flag pole corrosion due to local climate


29 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

30 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

2.Madraset El Masyaf what’s wrong?

N

Figure 20:Shade analysis of the school.

Figure 21:Panoramic views of the schoolyard.


31 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

32 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

2.Madraset El Masyaf what’s wrong?

A Spatial Reflection

Preparatory zone: The preparatory classrooms increased from three classrooms in the school year of (2013/2014) to six classes in the year of (2014/2015). In the same building there are the school library , science and computer labs , the theatre , administration and the principal’s office.

Toilets in the side elevation of both buildings for boys and girls.

Primary zone: In the past school year the primary classroom count was only 7 classrooms by the beginning of the school year of 2014/2015 the library and other unused spaces were converted into classrooms reaching a count of 10 classrooms ( five in each storey).

Kindergarten zone: two classes plus a toilet and a storeroom.The kindergarten has a private playspace cut off from the remaining schoolyard by iron gates. The playspace is tiled creatng a hard floor unsuitable for children of such age(5-7 years old). There are two slides available for the students but they are not fixed in the play space rather they ar stored in the classrooms after the end of te school day due to frequent theft of school property. The space is well shaded by trees planted outside the school premisis ( paralell to the school fence).. Concrete hard court, used by preparatory students for football and is unsuitable for younger students to play on due to the roughness of the ground cover.

Spaces in between the building and the fence are potential spaces for bullying plus are full of weed which pose the threat of snake infestation

N

Second Entrance to the school which is not functional and is always closed.

Parking zone for teachers and school visitors as it is one of the rare shaded places in the school and it is monitored due to the proximity to the school’s administration. Teachers and visitors refuse to park outside the school due to reported car theft .

Water reservoir obstructing the schoolyard

Open space for the Assembly in the morning and is dominated by preparatory students as a sand football filed ( 11 per team) in the afternoon.

Main Entrance to the school

Watchmen residence but as they are only part-time employees they are not always present.


33 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

34 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

2.Madraset El Masyaf what’s wrong? N

Falling glass hazard

Uncontrolled access to the roof.

Reported robbery specially in unmoinitored zones

Primary students burdened with the weight of academic books.

5.5 m

8.00 m

Weeds infested with rodents and snakes. Internally the classrooms suffer from : - Shattered windows - Small white board - Lack of storage units

- Unfunctional furniture - General lack of aesthetics

Zones for potential bullying behaviour

Overcrowded classrooms


35 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

36 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

Omar Wanas

“The design intervention should lead to a new use of the schoolyard space and hence a change in the students social and physical behaviour and hopefuly improve Egyptian/ Syrian Students relationship.”

Figure 22: Plasticine Model developed by the Children. - Schoolyard For All, 2014


37 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

38 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Introduction PHASE 1

The aim of the project was to reach a friendly coexistence between Syrian and Egyptian students through the enhancement of the built environment and the upgrade of the schoolyard. The schoolyard is where the students play, interact, observe and socialize. The design of the schoolyard involved a group of Egyptian and Syrian students through a series of workshops and activities. It is through this workshop and the redesign of the schoolyard that trust and friendship ties between Egyptian and Syrian community will be initiated. To carry out a series of participatory workshops with the Syrian and Egyptian students of the school is highly challenging within such a short time. “Housh Ygamaana” methodology and process ‫حوش يجمعنا‬ was developed to reach four main goals: 1• Strengthening community ties between the participating students . 2• Integration of the Syrian students and induction of the sense of ownership among the school users. 3• Provoking a strong sense of belonging to the school while stimulating the sense of creativity of students. 4• Redesigning and beautifying the schoolyard and recreational spaces.

Figure 23: Collective photos of both Egyptian and Syrian participants of the workshop.

05.06.2014 10.06.2014 20.08.2014

Appreciative Inquiry Site Visits Preperation PNA / Pre-Preparation Design and Preparation of construction works

PHASE 2 JUNE I JULY I AUGUST

PHASE 3 17.08.2014 25.08.2014

PHASE 4 29.08.2014 05.09.2014

Networking & Preperation Request for Permissions [Educational Administration] & Building network

Coordination & preperation The Technical Team / Call and selection of volunteers

Implementation and Preparations The Workshops

05.09.2014 16.09.2014

Construction Phase Implementation in 11 Days

17.09.2014

The Open Event 17/09/2014

PHASE 5

Figure 24: the phases of the project designed to fulfil the project’s goals.


39 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

40 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 1&2: Appreciative Inquiry Networking & Preperation

Creating the Project’s Identity: The first step for “A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL” project was to find a name that represents the vision behind the project. “Housh Ygamaana” [A schoolyard that gathers us] seemed to be the right name for this project. The general theme of the project’s graphics and identity concept targeted:

The produced graphics acted as the core of the social media and online outreach scheme in addition for the call for participants and volunteers that occurred in the coming phases.

- Inclusion : Outreach for Arabic speakers as well as non Arabic speakers, Syrians and Egyptians equally , adults and children, Males and females. -Expressive: Reflecting the raw artistic and design aspect of the project . in addition to the fact that the art is created by children. - Unique: tailored to the project and reflects the final environment of the school that will be designed. This reflected on the final output as following : 1- the logo was designed in Arabic due to the nature of the context of the project but with a geometrical composition that makes it appeal to non Arabic speakers as an icon to the project which is easily recognized and registers with the viewer. 2- The color theme of the project targeted shades of color that reflected : youth , fun, activeness and vibrance and in the same time be gender inclusive. 3- the artwork and strokes used were chosen from art tools used by children such as crayons, markers and colored pencils.

‫يجمعنا‬ ‫يجمعنا‬ ‫يجمعنا‬ ‫يجمعنا‬

Trials Trials Trials Trials

‫يجمعنا‬

Figure 25: work in progress on the project’s identity. Figure 26: Development of the project’s logo.

“Housh Ygamaana”

Creating the project’s identity

‫يجمعنا‬

‫يجمعنا‬


41 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

42 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 1&2: Appreciative Inquiry - Networking & Preperation

Different site visits were conducted in order to be able to understand the context of the school, and to assess the needs of the Syrian and Egyptian community.

Site visit 1/ Getting Acquainted with the Site: On the first visit(5th of August), the team of Oecumene studio met the school Head Teacher and school principal Mrs. Azza Al-Sayed, Mrs Olfa and Mr.Mohamed (two Syrian natural leaders). During this site visit, they discussed the needed documents in order to issue an approval to work in the school. The headmistress asked Oecumene to provide her with the schedule of the days they will be working within the school and to state the type of intervention that will be implemented to send it to the local educational unit to issue the approval. This was followed by a tour in the school and the city of Gamasa. The main outputs of the first site visit were: - Initiating contact with both the Egyptian and Syrian actors in the school. - Being informed of the primary educational problems of the school. - Observing and recording the spatial and design issues the school suffers from. - Exploring the city and the surrounding context. - Knowing the required paperwork required to proceed with the project.

Site visit 2/ Site measurements and paperwork: A second site visit was scheduled for the 10th of

August 2014. During this 2nd visit, Oecumene studio made contact with more representatives of both the Syrian and the Egyptian local community , took site measurements of the school and gathered quantitative data valuable for the upcoming steps of the project.

The Permission process lasted from the beginning of June until the 18th of August where finally the Ministry of Education delivered its approval for the project. By the end of these phases ,the project’s proposal was submitted and the preparation of logistics started.

The Schoolyard and School buildings

Figure 27: The entrance of Delta University on the international road.

Figure 28: The entrance to the city of Gamasa.

Figure 29: Road blocks in the street opposite to the school

Figure 30: The first site visit to the school , ( to the left) Arch. Omar Wanas, ( to the right ) Miss Azza the school principal.

Figure 31: Touring the city


43 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

44 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3. The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 3 Coordination & preperation

The Coordination & preparation phase was rate. However, new data was collected, the number highly challenging due to its short duration - two of classrooms had increased from 10 to 16 classes weeks -and the tremendous work it requires. The to absorb the new 200 enrolments and some school

project naturally needed precise coordination and items had been deteriorated and others gone misscomplementation between different tasks, events ing such as taps, fire extinguishing fixtures and aluand people to reach a coherent plan, methodology minium windows from inside the classrooms. and low risk implementation. - A collective meeting with the teachers of the school th Recruiting the Technical team: On the 16 of Au- took place the same day where they provided input gust, the technical team was interviewed and con- on the proposed design and elaborated on existing stituted( See Annex) . A meeting was held on the issues in the schoolyard such as ( issues with plant18th of August for coordinating and presenting the ing fruitful trees& the access and parking of cars in the school yard ). This session with the teachers project and its process to the team. modified the content of the workshop plan by addWorkshop preparations: The preparation of visibil- ing a parallel workshop with the teaching staff. ity items, the launch of the call for volunteers and Interviews and literature review: the preparation of working documents and logis- All along phase 1, 2 and 3, research on schoolyard tics were the next step of the 1st week of this phase. projects and co-designing with children approaches Indeed, during this phase, the facebook page and and methodologies were carried out. Within the two the branding of the project were completed1 and weeks, meetings and interviews with academics, the call for application was launched on the 18th of consultants and teachers were conducted to create August and extended to August the 25th. The call a solid literature base for the project. The interviewresulted in a good diversity of applicants regarding: ees are listed in the table below: nationalities (Egypt, Syrian) also locally ( Damanhour , Gamasa, Cairo & Alexandria) , ages ( Fresh Name Profession graduates, undergraduates and practitioners), aca- Marry Curran Irish school teacher demic and professional backgrounds( architecture , Hedia Madiouni Architect and painter - founder Urban , Medicine, Pharmacy ..Etc) of crÊakids Tunisia[Art workshops for children] Site visit 3/ Introducing the team to the site: th Architect, primary school teacher - A third site visit took place on the 24 of Au- Renet Korthals Altes and designer playground gust with the technical team. This site visit aimed Architect, Researcher Post doc. to inform the local community (teachers, headmis- Marwa Dabaieh Lund Univ. Sweden tress and Syrian community leaders) about the work Architect – Tunisia schedule and process and to verify the measure- Zeineb mediouni Egyptian School teacher ments gathered during the first site visits were accu- Soha Mohamadi 1 https://www.facebook.com/aschoolyardforall

Table 1: Interviews conducted between the 21.08 to 25.08.2014

Figure 32: General impressions from phase three.

TT meeting preparation & Interviews

...


45 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

46 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3. The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 3 Coordination & preperation

A call for volunteers and participants was designed and launched on social media platforms. The project sought to not only have volunteers but also participants by embedding them within a design workshop where the volunteers would interpret the outcome designs of the students into construction drawings.

Workshops Preparation

A range of documents were designed for the workshops from colour scheme standards to certificates for both the students and the design charette participants.

Figure x:

Site visit with TT

Figure 33: Proceedings of the third site visit to the school with the technical team.

Figure 34: Final design documents prepared for the workshop.


47 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

48 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

Documents Coordination

Phase 3. Coordination & Preparation

...

Workshops Preparation

Figure 35: Paper work preparation for the workshop (timetables, task division and contracts)

Workshops timetables were developed based on brainstorming session with different members of the TT. A Design Brief and Guide Booklet were also developed for the group of volunteers and participants. The majority of documents were translated to Arabic.


49 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

50 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3. The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 3 Coordination & preperation

August.2014 M

T

W

T

F

S

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Week 2: 1•

W1 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 W2 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

September.2014 M W3 1

T

W

T

F

S

S

2

3

4

5

6

7

W4 8

9

10

11

12

13

14

Project Lifetime

W5 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23

29

30

24

25

26

27

28

Remove the weeds and replace soil

Change of ground cover

Site visit

-Exploring Gamasa city’s available facilities [flats, Restaurants, Retails, Pharmacies, etc] -Meeting with the teaching board and headmistress -Renting flats for the team accommodation 2•

Selection of volunteers

Outputs of phase three (2 weeks) are as follows:

Selecting 7 out of 22 applicants through a selection committee formed of the project director, the execuWeek 1: tive manager and the project coordinator. The volunteers/ Participants were: 2 from Alexan1• Team building and Orientation dria University, 1 from Helwan University and 3 from Ain Shams University and 1 From Aleppo University -Introduction to tasks and time line in Syria. Three more local Syrian volunteers were -Signing the contracts with the Technical Team (TT) also selected ( See Annex). -Work meetings and brainstorming sessions. Each of the volunteers received a folder containing block-notes, The PNA [Need Assessment] Report, 2• Faceebook and Twitter Design Brief and Guide Booklet. A Facebook group was also created to share updates, references and -Social Media and publicity campaign including the other working documents. background of the project. 3•

Call for volunteers

3•

Needed plantations Plantation zone for the science club

Need to use the reservoir

Division of space without affecting its continuity

Needed shade and seating areas

Zone 2

- Active play for Girls and Primary students

Zone 1

Logistics before departure:

-List of workshop requirements and documents + -Deadline was on the 23rd then was extended until purchase of materials. the 25.08 for better outreach. 4• Interviews -Different interviews took place either by direct contact or via video conferences to gain advices on organisational issues and feedback before kick-off of the workshops.

Needed shade and seating areas

Zone 3

4• Pre-design of the Schoolyard (see the following figures). - Expected parking zone / Extension to quite play zone

- Quite play zone & social zone

- Assembly - Rough play zone / Sports

- Entrance zone - Social zone


51 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

52 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3. The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 3 Coordination & preperation

Shaded outdoor theater & outdoor classroom

Hard court for basketball and painted games on the ground Mini Football court ( grass) for primary students.

Social Seating zone

Three soft court football fields to maximize the number of students playing the game all at once,while allowing the transferability into one court.

Entrance &Social seating zone


53 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

54 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

Citations

“It is important to have a well functional playground to encourage children to practice activities and to design element that increase their abilities to be always open for change. Keep in mind that each day of the workshop new elements will pop up and it is important to be open to change.” “There is different ways of involvement with children to really understand and to know their dreams, fears and that they become capable to understand what they themselves need to play in the playground”

“We wished that our kids joined the workshops. We heard about it only few days after your arrival. Nobody told us, it has been posted on the wall of Syrian community Facebook group later. One of the Syrian parents, Gamasa - Egypt.

“Participation is very delicate to ask the right questions and also depending on your participants the results of what the children says, some children can express themselves through words, others through drawings and others by just playing and some are more of listeners. Then, you observe them”, Renet Korthals Altes, Interview 22.08 - Maadi, Cairo.

“The schoolyards in public school are not playgrounds for children. The child/Student doesn’t have a well functional recreational space. Not playing leads to a more frustrated, closed and violent child.” , Soha Mohamadi , interview 25.08 - Nasr City, Cairo.

“A child needs a particular attention. He needs to be listened, cared about. You need to understand and to know the child interests. What attracts him, what brings his attention. Every child is unique, you can’t force a child to do something he is not open to it. Play is the right way to build friendship and to break the ice with a child” , Mary Curran, interview 19.08 - Zamalek, Cairo.

“I have enjoyed playing. I prefer this school than El-maahad. I have made new friends. [Syrians?] ...No [Smiling]...Egyptians....3 Egyptians We decided to meet afterwards. [Do you want to say anything else?] ...Yes. Thank you all”, Syrian Student, 12 years old Interview 10.09 - Gamasa, Egypt.

“Working on Syrian and Egyptian coexistence is very Challenging. I think it is important to keep working on that and myself I would like to participate more in that track.” Egyptian Volunteer, 05.09 - Gamasa, Egypt

“We love you so much !! [Really] ...Yes, cause you respect us and you hear us...Because of that we love you.“ Egyptian Student, 9 years old- While her daily visit to the site during construction works. Gamasa, Egypt.


55 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

56 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 4 :The Workshop[s] Approach - Methodology & Preparations

On the contrary of what conventional designers may like to think, any educational space represents more than its physical entity which as stated by Woolner (2009) “is a complex interaction of setting and behaviour”. Designers may take into account anthropometrics, certain indoor environmental conditions such as thermal conditions, lighting and acoustic levels and space needs but the behavioural aspect and exact needs of the user remains only a prediction to be confirmed. These predictions may be validated and verified by either direct conversation with the user or on site observation of the user for a significant amount of time and under various conditions or both as recommended by Iltus & Hart (1991)based on time availability . In the case of “A Schoolyard for All”, Time restrictions and school year schedules was an obstacle to achieve the latter, where the project was launched in the school’s summer vacation. The timing left the team with predictions of the behavioural patterns of the students within the schoolyard which could only be further explored by holding a series of workshops with the students themselves as design partners where they would express, create ,co-design, discuss, negotiate and choose their future environment.

“It was the pupils who gave us some of the most useful insights into what needed to be different. We simply cannot believe that school design will be effective without asking pupils their views” (Wright, 2004: 42).

of local interests (Rich and Wandersman 1983); the psychological benefits of self help (Stokes 1981); the facilitation of supportive social network ties (lllich 1974); increased knowledge of environmental development issues (O’Riordan 1976); enhanced self-esteem and control over one’s life (Iacofano 1985); and a reinforcement of community responsibility and resourcefulness (Francis et al. 1981).” Despite the previous, the use of the term “participation” or “Co-design” sometime is merely a catchphrase or slogan for various projects, but for this project the process was a goal by itself due to the diversity of users from: primary to preparatory students, both male and female, Syrians and Egyptians and the need to initiate and pave the path for coexistence between all the aforementioned groups. Hence, the Co-design of the schoolyard seemed a natural choice.

As for the definition of the term, Co-design was defined by Elizabeth Sanders as “collective creativity applied across the whole Span of a design process”. Based on several practical Co-design workshops with children in which she witnessed the outcomes of a Co-design were further more than the design itself proposed a more detailed definition , Naranjo (2012) defines it as” a collaborative Co-design for Coexistence: generative activity that aims at gaining information Child Participation and including children in planand inspiration about people, contexts and design ning and design is no new trend to the field, espepossibilities”. The second definition was more adcially when it is stated in the unconventional that equate to the schoolyard for all’s team experience “children have the right to be involved in decisions where the discussions, debates, personal opinions which affect their lives including the empowering exthat were expressed during the workshop were as perience of contributing to the design of their local valuable as the final design and was what made the environments” (Loebach, 2012).Moreover, The prodesign experience unique and specific to the context cess of participatory design with children has many of Gamasa. benefits as summed up by Kaplan: “the expression

beginning of the project but a workshop was scheduled with the educational administration in the design phase.

3• The students: Direct contact and involvement in the process from the beginning of the workshop On deciding on the method to apply, there were two and throughout the whole process of design and of the most important questions in any participation part of the construction phase. The primary students process to ask: who participates? What is the level were the main participants of the Co-design workof participation of each stakeholder? shop whereas the preparatory students were modAs for the first question, Woolner (2009) states that erators of the workshop and aided in the design when designing educational spaces specifically “if ,construction phase and in organising the opening participatory processes in school design are to aim event. to be genuinely inclusive they must involve as wide 4• The Parents: The parents were planned to be a cross-section of the school community as possi- reached indirectly through the students and directly ble.” In Gamasa, The list of stakeholders ranged through after workshop talks with parents coming to from: the local educational administration, teach- pick up their children. ers, the school principle, school workers, day and night watchmen, the students, the parents , the Syr- 5• The local community: The local population ian community leaders and the local community. of Gamasa were not directly addressed during a The stakeholders were mapped and grouped based workshop but other strategies were applied to inon the interrelations between one another and the form the local community about the project taking ability to address them collectively. Post to the stake- place in their local school. These strategies were: holder analysis, the design of the participation pro- -Renting flats for the technical team and volunteers cess was plotted to address as many stakeholders in distributed areas in Gamasa and not concentratas possible – either directly or indirectly- based on ing them in one zone. Flats were rented in the vicinavailable time and resources. The groups and the ity of the school, close to the market street and in means of addressing each were as follows: areas of Syrian concentration. -Holding group meetings and working studios in 1• The principal, Teachers and school workers , one of the local cafes. This lead to the direct contact watchmen and the Syrian community leaders: direct and availability of the team for any inquiries regardcontact through workshops on the primary site visits, ing the project. the arrival day and in the design phase. -Using local shops transport to and from the school and hiring local Construction labour. 2• The Educational Administration: Contact (indirect)was initiated through the principal at the


57 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

58 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 4 :The Workshop[s] Approach - Methodology & Preparations

The second question has been addressed in various literatures especially by Arnstein (1969) and Heart (1997) in the ladder of participation ranging from “manipulation” till “citizen control”. Woolner (2009) emphasis on the need defining the level of participation in any process but explains that as the complexity of the project increases and the number of stakeholders to be addressed rises then “The process depends on who is involved and where their involvement rates on a ladder of participation and so It might be helpful to see this as adding another dimension to the ladder”. This was carried out in the preparation phase of the project adding not only the second dimension but by taking the factor of time into consideration (see Figure) .

- Initiate contact with the school stakeholders and demonstrate examples of Oecumene studio’s previous work in the domain of Co-design with students. - To know the needs of the school curriculums and problems facing the teachers and students within the school grounds. • Site visit with the Technical team (24th August): This encounter took place in the school theatre due to the large number of teachers and school staff attending. The main purpose of the meeting was to: Figure 36: The child’s role in a Co-design process, Durin, 2002

a- The Education personnel workshop: Who?

Table 2: The level of participation of each actor in the project.

It’s worth mentioning that within the workshop with the primary students the roles of the participants varied throughout the day and sometimes combining various roles such as informant to design and design partner at the same time (Durin , 2002). The exact roles and their variation are explained in the following:

Moderated by: The technical team Participants: - From outside the school: The head of the educational unit in Belkas and The head of the educational unit in Mansoura and the Head of the city council. - From inside the school: The principal of the school, the teachers, the watchmen and other school staff.

Why & When?

• Kick off site visits (5th June, 10th June): These meetings were held separately lasting for the duration of 3 hours per time. The main aim of the meetings was to:

• Session with the external education stakeholders (4th of Sept.): This session was held in order to demonstrate the primary results of the workshop with the students and consult the participants on the overall design of the schoolyard. Outputs: - The need to supply the school with non-potable water for the irrigation of plants and trees. - The will of the city council to cooperate in the installation of the irrigation pipes.

- To inform the attendees on the timetable and methods being used in the project. This is a vital step in any Co-design process with children as Iltus (1991) states “we often have to educate the adults about the children’s ability to take part and why it is important” in addition it gives the chance for the school staff to collaborate whenever possible as they have been already briefed beforehand. This was important as opinions that underestimate the students’ capacity to design and their knowledge of the problems of the schools were expressed by some of the school’s staff and rather asked us to talk to them as they know better the more prioritized issue to address in the school. - To gather ideas and opinions regarding the design of the schoolyard Issues raised ranged from: school property theft, parking within school grounds, Danger hazards due to the concentration of weed in the rear facade of the school, the need for a secluded zone for women to pray and the lack of shade in the schoolyard. Figure 37: The workshop with the teaching staff of Gamasa School.


59 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

60 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3. The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 4 :The Workshop[s] Approach - Methodology & Preparations

b- The “Children as design partners” workshop:

preferred in the case of the presence of two proposed designs or made hands on changes in the model when there was a single design.

Moderated by: The technical team, volunteers (Syrian & Egyptian) and Preparatory students from the science club. Participants: 40 -60 primary students both Syrian and Egyptian, age ranging from 7 ill 11 years old as “ Children in this age group are generally very expressive in sharing their ideas and dreams, and they’re not biased about how the world should work and Methods involving friendship pairs work particularly well for this group”( Woolner, 2009). The “Children as Co-designers” workshop was held for 6 consecutive days in the kindergarten classrooms in Gamasa Experimental School. Day 1(30.08): The first day of the workshop was initiated by the reception of the students and their registration. This was followed by a brief session where the students were asked why the thought they were here and then the moderating team explained the purpose of the workshop. Post to this, a series of liberating art exercises were held with the aim of initiating group interaction and introducing methods of self expression through art which is specifically important when dealing with displaced students. While the warm-up session was taking place the volunteers set out to the schoolyard and used recycled materials to create simple interventions for the students to play with. This step introduced the students to the potential of creation with simple materials, the hidden potential of unused spaces in the schoolyard and most of all enhanced group dynamics.

Day 2 to 5 (31.08 to 4.09): In these days the zones specified for playscape were designed with the students. The students were led out to the space required to be designed and were introduced to a “Make Tool Kit” which consisted of connectable PVC tubes of various lengths, plastic water hoses, tyres , wooden boards and fabric. The toolkit was proposed through literature by Vaajakallio Et al. Where they explained that “Make tools can be blocks with various shapes and sizes which can be easily attached and detached, can represent forms, buttons or displays and can be easily reconfigured into new combinations by potential users.” The students used the kit to deign installations together and the moderating team observed and intervened to re-stimulate the students whenever they lost track of the task in hand. The Make tool kit proved to be suitable for the process as they were adaptable to all the types of play (Symbolic play, Creative play, Locomotor play, object play ...etc) by turning into various objects based on children interpretation and interests as the ideal “play kit”. The kit also was a tool to not force kids into participation whoever wanted to follow the design task did and the others were open to free play. The behaviour patterns, the output designs and the types of play in each space were documented by photos. Videos, sketches and notes which acted as the base of the afternoon design charette with the volunteers. At the beginning of the following day, the volunteers and moderating team presented the overall design of the space they had developed in the form of plasticine models and photos in front of the students. A debate, negotiation and consultation session started instantly in which the students offered feedback, modifications and finally voted on which design they

Day 6(4.09): This was the closing ceremony of the workshop in which the students celebrated the end of the workshop, were submitted their certificates of participation and their private photo and a group photo was taken for the whole workshop participant.

c-The Design Charette:

Moderated by: The design officers Participants: 10 Syrian and Egyptian Graduates and students from schools of architecture and urban design, commerce and teaching. On the arrival day in Gamasa (29/8/2014) the volunteers were taken for their first visit of the school. An on site lecture was delivered to them by the design officers on the functional organisation of the school and the issues facing it. The tour of the school was concluded by introducing the volunteers to the three zones that would be designed throughout the following days. 30.08 to 4.09: The design charette took place in the afternoon of each day. The session began by summing up the outcomes of the morning workshop with the students, discussing and reflecting on the volunteers observations from which the general theme and design brief of the zone was specified. This was followed by design studio time in which the volunteers interpreted, added and refined the students’ designs and represented them in plasticine models to be presented to the students the following day.

Input lectures and references were delivered to the volunteers on arrival by the design officers on topics like: the theory of play, safety standards for children and toolkits for the children to use during the workshop. On the first day of the design charette a Skype lecture from Norway was prepared for the participants on “Design for Playing” presented by our external consultant Renet Korthals Altes (an architect ,Primary school teacher & a designer of playgrounds). On the final day of the workshop, the volunteers refined their designs and prepared them for construction and for sending them to Renette for feedback . A final presentation of the work was held by each group of volunteers and certificates of participation were handed out. The design charette was concluded by a social dinner to celebrate before the departure of the volunteers.

The Project

Student workshop

Design Charette

Teacher workshop

Figure 38: The Russian doll was the more expressive symbol of the several interlinked workshops


61 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

62 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 4 :The Workshop[s] Diary

29.08

Friday

Saturday

- Departure and arrival in Gamasa. - Visiting the school with the volunteers. - Input lectures provided by the technical team.

- First day of the students as Co-designers workshop. - Students registration. - Liberating and warm-up activities.

30.08


63 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

64 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 4 The Workshop[s] Diary

31.08

Sunday

Monday

- Collective drawing . - Co-designing the Link zone.

- Presenting the refined design of the Link zone to the students - Public discussion and feedback from the students. - Designing the Backyard zone.

1.09


65 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

66 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 4 The Workshop[s] Diary

2.09

Tuesday

Wednesday

- Presenting the refined design of the Backyard zone to the students. - Consultation and feedback session. - Co-designing the Library zone

- The students creating the model for the Library zone.

3.09


67 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

68 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 4 The Workshop[s] Diary

4.09

Thursday

- Final ceremony of the students as Co-designers workshop. - Handing out the certificates and photos to the participating.

- Taking a group photo with the students. - A consultation workshop with the external education actors from Belkas and Mansoura , The head of the City council and the principal.


69 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

70 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 4 The Workshop[s] Diary

The final design of the schoolyard zones produced from the students/Volunteers workshop, (see annexes for final designs).

Climbing Crossing Balancing Relaxing Rolling tires Barriers Climbing

Sitting Climbing sliding Shooting Free play

Sitting Crossing Sitting Climbing Learning


71 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

72 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 5 :Construction Phase

Description of the construction work :

CONSTRUCTION TIMETABLE

Internal works :

*10 wooden pergolas covered with waterproof vine sheets. *Tiles over the seats and theatre and as paving for the platform under the seats.

-Providing 140 mete square of natural grass in-Installation and painting of 2 Iron doors on the stalled in the kindergarten and as a mini football staircase leading to the roof in the primary building. court in the courtyard. -Painting the walls and doors of 14 classrooms -Providing and planting of over than 70 trees ( fruitin both the primary and preparatory building two ful trees, shade trees )and 100 m of shrubs and coats. scented plants. -Installation of large white boards in 14 classrooms in both the primary and preparatory building.

-Installing and supervision of the connection of nonpotable water for irrigation in the school.

-Installing and providing missing glass panes in 14 classrooms.

-Building over 100 m of brick flower boxes parallel to the school wall.

-Installing protective sticker sheet on the glass panes in 10 classrooms.

-Providing and installing a basketball loop.

-Installing and painting of 300 lockers installed in the corridors and classrooms of the primary buildings. External works: -Installing: *10 seats each of a capacity of 5 person / seat *15 seats each of capacity of 6 person/ seat *1 outdoor classroom/ open air theatre with capacity of 30 persons. *15 tiled seats each of capacity of 2 persons. *10 painted iron goal posts . * 6 posts for the fabric shade over the open theatre.

-Outdoor painting of the school fence .

29.08 - 06.09

Internal work: White boards installation, Painting of 14 classrooms ,Installing lockers, Installing iron doors plus 1st painting coat] +Preparation external site

07.09 - 10.09

Brick Work and Masonry

11.09

Brick Work and Installing grass

12.09

Brick Work Buying indoor glass panes Tiles work Non potable water Irrigation connection Visit of Belqas Education representative

13.09

Brick Work Tiles work Iron Work (Goal Posts - Iron Fixtures) Wood Work: Installing pergolas Shielding windows Non potable water Irrigation connection

14.09

Wood Work Preparation for planting Iron work: Shades Installation Tiles work

15.09

Preparation for planting Planting Installing games (Outputs of design workshops) Tiles Work Painting outdoor

16.09

Cleaning up Decorating work Tiles work Shading theatre zone Painting outdoor


73 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

74 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 5 Construction Diary

29.08

Friday

to 12.09

Friday

- Installing the wood lockers in the in classrooms and in the corridors. - Installing white boards in 14 classrooms. - Double coat painting of the walls and doors of 14 classrooms. - Installing two iron doors on the staircase to the roof.

Friday

- Beginning the masonry work on site.

29.08 to

Friday

12.09


75 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

76 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 5 Construction Diary

29.08

Friday

to 12.09

Friday

- Installing grass on the primary students mini-field and in the kindergarten yard. - Continuing the masonry works.

Friday

- Connecting the Non-potable water to the school for irrigation. - Continuing the masonry works. - Beginning the tile work for the seats and platforms

29.08 to

Friday

12.09


77 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

78 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 5 Construction Diary

13.09

Saturday

to 16.09

Tuesday

- Beginning the installation of pergolas and woodwork. - Beginning the ironwork : goalposts and pergola connections. - Shielding of the glass window. - Painting the wooden lockers. - Preparing the plants .

Saturday

13.09 to

Tuesday

16.09


79 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

80 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 5 Construction Diary

17.09

Wednesday

Figure 39: The fabric shade over the theatre , ©UNHCR/Ravy.

Wednesday

Figure 40: Aerial view of the entrance zone in the schoolyard, ©UNHCR/Ravy.

17.09


81 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

82 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 5 Construction Diary

17.09

Wednesday

Figure 41: Aerial view of the schoolyard after construction, ŠUNHCR/Ravy.

Wednesday

Figure 42: Ground view of the schoolyard after construction.

17.09


83 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

84 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

3.The Project : Coexistence through Design- The Schoolyard

.Phase 5 Construction Diary

17.09

Wednesday

Figure 43: Aerial view of the shaded outdoor theatre/ outdoor classroom.

Wednesday

Figure 44: Aerial photo of the connecting zone between the football fields and the quiet play zone .

17.09


85 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

86 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

4.The Opening Event :

“Bringing together Egyptian and Syrian communities”

The opening event, on the 17 September, also called open ceremony aimed to celebrate the results of Schoolyard For all - Hoosh Yegam’ana project and to open the re-designed schoolyard to both the Egyptian and Syrian community. UNHCR Regional Representative, Mr.Mohamed Dayri and officials from Ministry of Education in Damietta attended the opening ceremony. They had a tour in the schoolyard, the new shared recreational space and classes to witness the renovation works and the beautification of the school before the beginning of the new school year.

means of sustaining the positive spirit in the school.

A welcome session took place after the guided tour in the school theatre, followed by the official announcement of the opening of A Schoolyard for all. As the project’s expected result was that the Syrians attend classes in the school the debate began during the welcome session. The delegates from MOE guaranteed after-school tutoring classes for both Egyptians and Syrians. The headmistress has also promised the Syrians free academic books to be delivered on the 21st of September. Nevertheless, a week after the opening ceremony Mrs.Azza has rescheduled the distribution of the books to after the El Adha Feast. The schoolyard and a Syrian cuisine buffet had been opened to the public at 12.00 am. Egyptian and Syrian parents along with their children attends the event. The children were playing in the schoolyard and interact with Hoosh Yegam’ana team as well as with the construction team who supported the project from the beginning. The event ends up with a debate session in the theatre were the Syrian families and Egyptians represented by the MOE and the headmistress agreed upon terms of enrolment and Figure 45: Photos of the school tour, ©UNHCR/Ravy.

Figure 46: Photos of the public discussion for the inclusion of the Syrian students in the new school year , ©UNHCR/Ravy.


‫‪88 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014‬‬

‫‪87 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014‬‬

‫‪“Bringing together Egyptian‬‬ ‫”‪and Syrian communities‬‬

‫‪4.The Opening Event :‬‬

‫‪Visibility Items For the Opening‬‬ ‫‪Event:‬‬ ‫‪Different visibility items were designed for the Open‬‬‫‪ing Event, they are namely:‬‬

‫يجمعنا‬

‫‪Invitations‬‬ ‫‪Name Tags for the children‬‬ ‫‪Name Tags for the group of volunteers‬‬ ‫‪Banners 150x65cm‬‬ ‫‪A1 Posters‬‬ ‫‪Certificate of Merit For the School‬‬ ‫)‪Stickers (A3 / A4‬‬ ‫‪Postcards‬‬ ‫‪Envelopes‬‬

‫‪Medhat Kazem 2014‬‬

‫حوش يجمعنا‬

‫حوش يجمعنا‬

‫‪01‬‬ ‫‪4‬‬ ‫‪I2‬‬ ‫‪I9‬‬ ‫‪17‬‬

‫التصميم بمجموعة ممثلة عن الطالب و طاقم العمل بالمدرسة‬ ‫للعمل سويا من خالل ورش عمل فنية و تصميمية من شأن‬ ‫زرع روح االنتماء و التعاون بالمدرسة باالضافة الى‬ ‫التوعية باهمية الحفاظ على الممتلكات العامة‪ .‬الغرض من‬ ‫هذه الورش الحث على المشاركة االيجابية لالطفال اثناء‬ ‫عملية تنسيق و تجميل فناء مدرسة ‪.‬‬

‫يجمعنا‬

‫‪l‬‬

‫‪al‬‬

‫‪to‬‬

‫حو‬ ‫ش‬

‫‪Fo‬‬ ‫‪r‬‬

‫‪I2‬‬ ‫‪01‬‬ ‫‪4‬‬

‫‪I8‬‬

‫يج‬

‫‪29‬‬

‫معنا‬

‫‪d‬‬

‫‪m‬‬

‫م‬

‫‪ya‬‬ ‫‪r‬‬

‫رح‬

‫‪ho‬‬

‫با ب‬

‫‪M‬‬

‫‪E‬‬

‫‪A‬‬

‫‪EL‬‬ ‫‪CO‬‬

‫م‪.‬عمر ونس‬ ‫م‪ .‬انصاف بن عثمان‬

‫‪W‬‬

‫‪9/14/14 12:19 PM‬‬

‫كم‬

‫يترشف فريق ورشة معل «حوش جيمعنا» بتقدمي جزيل الشكر و التقدير‬ ‫اىل ادارة مدرسة مجصة التجريبية و هيئة التدريس املوقرة لتعاوهنم‬ ‫املمثر حنواجناز اهداف الورشة و من اجل حتسني فراغات املدرسة و‬ ‫تجشيع اساليب العمل امجلاىع و املشاركة الفعالة من جانب طالب‬ ‫املرحلة االبتدائية و االعدادية باملدرسة و ذلك ىف الفرتة من‬ ‫‪ 2014/08/29‬اىل ‪2014/09/17‬‬

‫‪Figure 48: Samples of Postcards designed for the‬‬ ‫‪Opening Event.‬‬

‫‪Sc‬‬

‫مدرسة جمصة التجريبية‬

‫يجمعنا‬

‫‪Fr‬‬ ‫‪o‬‬

‫شهادة تقدير‬

‫‪ol‬‬

‫‪2014/09/17‬‬

‫ •‬ ‫ •‬ ‫ •‬ ‫ •‬ ‫ •‬ ‫ •‬ ‫ •‬ ‫ •‬ ‫ •‬

‫‪Figure 47: Few Samples of vis‬‬‫‪ibility Items designed for the‬‬ ‫‪Opening Event.‬‬

‫‪Certificate Of Miret.indd 2‬‬ ‫‪9/14/14 11:33 AM‬‬

‫‪Banner_65x150cm;.indd 1‬‬


89 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

90 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

4.The Opening Event :

“Bringing together Egyptian and Syrian communities”

Figure 49: Students celebrating the new schoolyard, ©UNHCR/Ravy.

Figure 50: A primary student observing the opening ceremony , ©UNHCR/Ravy.


91 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

92 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

4.The Opening Event :

“Bringing together Egyptian and Syrian communities”

Figure 51: Primary students enjoying the Syrian cuisine buffet , ©UNHCR/Ravy.

Figure 53: Primary students enjoying the shade , ©UNHCR/Ravy.

Figure 52: The Syrian buffet prepared specially for the event .

Figure 54: The multi-use play installations in the schoolyard.


93 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

94 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

4.The Opening Event :

“Bringing together Egyptian and Syrian communities”

Figure 55: The grass court and the entrance zone of the schoolyard.

Figure 56: General impressions from the opening event.


95 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

96 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

4.The Opening Event :

“Bringing together Egyptian and Syrian communities”

Figure 57: The fun continues in the schoolyard way after the opening ceremony .


97 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

98 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

5.First Day of School

“New Space, new behavioural patterns

Figures 58: Impressions from the first day of school reported to Oecumene studio by Amr Mohamed a preparatory student in the school and a member of the science club.


99 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

100 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

List of Figures, Tables

Figures

strong winds Figure 20: Shade analysis of the school Figure 1: Geographic location of Gamasa Figure 21: Panoramic views of the schoolyard Figure 2: The Location of Gamasa Experimental Figure 22: Plasticine Model developed by the School Children. - Schoolyard For All, 2014 Figure3: The solid and void analysis of the school Figure 23: Collective photos of both Egyptian Figure 4: Facts and Figures about Gamasa and Syrian participants of the workshop Experimental School Figure 24: Diagram of the phases of the project Figure 5: The non-designed schoolyard in Gamasa designed to fulfil the project’s goals Experimental School Figure 25: work in progress on the project’s Figure 6: Aerial view of the Gamasa Experimental identity Schoolyard before intervention Figure 26: Development of the project’s logo Figure 7: Shattered glass due to wind pressure in Figure 27: The entrance of Delta University on upper classrooms and vandalism the international road Figure 8: The lack of fire extinguishers due to theft Figure 28: The entrance to the city of Gamasa Figure 9: General state of the classrooms and Figure 29: Road blocks in the street opposite to furniture the school Figure 10: Poor vegetation and shade distribution Figure 30: The first site visit to the school, ( to the in the schoolyard left) Arch. Omar Wanas, ( to the right ) Miss Azza Figure 11: Unhygienic sanitation units the school principal Figure 12: Small white board installed in Figure 31: Touring the city classrooms Figure 32: General impressions from phase three Figure 13: General mapping of issues in School Figure 33: Proceedings of the third site visit to the El Masyaf showing the inter-connexion between school with the technical team physical elements and socio-eco. aspects Figure 34: Final design documents prepared for Figure 14: An overlap between the Mapped the workshop behaviour patterns in the schoolyard throughout Figure 35: Paper work preparation for the the school day and the Cast shade within the space )workshop (timetables, task division and contracts demonstrates the contradiction between both Figure 36: The child’s role in a Co-design Figure 15: Poor distribution of vegetation and process, Durin, 2002 greenery in the School outdoor spaces Figure 37: The workshop with the teaching staff Figure 16: SUN AND WIND: Hazards due to of Gamasa School strong winds and excess solar radiation Figure 38: The Russian doll was mot expressive Figure 17: Excess solar radiation in Classrooms symbol of the several interlinked workshops Figure 18: Flag pole corrosion due to local climate Figure 39: The fabric shade over the theatre, Figure 19: Broken window pane Hazard due to ©UNHCR/Ravy

Figure 40: Aerial view of the entrance zone in the schoolyard, ©UNHCR/Ravy Figure 41: Aerial view of the schoolyard after construction, ©UNHCR/Ravy Figure 42: ground view of the schoolyard after construction Figure 43: Aerial view of the shaded outdoor theatre/ outdoor classroom Figure 44: Aerial photo of the connecting zone between the football fields and the quit play zone Figure 45: Photos of the school tour, ©UNHCR/ Ravy Figure 46: Photos of the public discussion for the inclusion of the Syrian students in the new school year, ©UNHCR/Ravy Figure 47: Few Samples of visibility Items designed for the Opening Event Figure 48: Samples of Postcards designed for the Opening Event Figure 49: Students celebrating the new schoolyard, ©UNHCR/Ravy Figure 50: Primary student observing the opening ceremony, ©UNHCR/Ravy Figure 51: Primary students enjoying the Syrian cuisine buffet , ©UNHCR/Ravy Figure 52: The Syrian buffet prepared specially for the event Figure 53: Primary students enjoying the shade, ©UNHCR/Ravy Figure 54: The multiuse play installations in the schoolyard Figure 55: The grass court and the entrance zone of the schoolyard Figure 56: General impressions from the opening event Figure 57: The fun continues in the schoolyard way

after the opening ceremony Figure 58: Impressions from the first day of school reported to Oecumene studio by Amr Mohamed a preparatory student in the school and a member of the science club Tables Table 1: Interviews conducted between the 21.08 to 25.08.2014 Table 2: The level of participation of each actor in the project

‫يجمعنا‬


101 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

102 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

References

Core References:

paper4.pdf.

- Kishigami H. Bankok U., 1988, Design Ideas for Pre-school centres and Play spaces, Unicef, Paris, France. - The centre for architecture and Research in New Jersy, 2007, Schoolyard Planning and Design in New Jersy. - Moore H., 1979, Designing spaces for children, the Centre for Cultural resources, New York. - Jolley J., 2000, Tyre Fun Playgrounds. - Wilon P. 2009, The Playwork Primer, Alliance for Childhood. - Consumer product safety commission in the united states, 2001,Public Playgrounds Safety Handbook. - Ceppi G., Zini M. 2004, Children, Spaces, Relations. - Dudek M., 2005,Children’s spaces, Architecture press

- Iltus S. , Hart R., 1991, PARTICIPATORY PLANNING AND DESIGN OF RECREATIONAL SPACES WITH CHILDREN, Accessed online at: http://homes.ieu.edu.tr/~dhasirci/Hasirci-ARTICLES/IAED-ARCH%20202/Iltus%20and%20HartParticipatory_Planning_&_Design_Recreational_ Spaces.pdf.

Cited References: - Loebach J., 2009, The Magical Park of Aviacion “Lessons from a participatory design project with the children of Aviacion, Peru” , Acess online at : http://ipaworld.org/main/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/Mag11-PeruArticle-Full.pdf. - Kaplan M. Promoting Community Education and Action through Intergenerational Programming, Accessed online at: http://www.colorado.edu/journals/cye/11_1/11_1article6.pdf. - Mechelen L. Abeele V. Zaman B. Laenen A. Co-design revisited: exploring problematic co-design dynamics in kids, Accessed online at: http:// www.chici.org/teens2013/papers/chi2013-w22-

- Vaajakallio K., Lee J., Mattelmäki T., 2009, “It has to be a group work!” - Co-design with Children,Accessed online at : http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1551843. - Woolner P. , 2009, Building Schools for the Future through a participatory design process: exploring the issues and investigating ways forward, Accessed online at http://www.ncl.ac.uk/cflat/ news/documents/WoolnerBSFberapaper.pdf. - Durin A., 2001, The role of children in the design of new technology, Behaviour and information technology, Accessed online at : http://www. tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01449290110 108659?journalCode=tbit20#.VCgZfGeSzHQ.

‫يجمعنا‬


103 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014

Annexes

List of Annexes 1-The Schoolyard For All - Hoosh Yegam›ana The Volunteers 2-The Schoolyard For All - Hoosh Yegam›ana The Team 3-The Guide Booklet 4-The Design Brief 5-The Design developed by the Volunteers 6-Feedback on Design

104 A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL - 2014


The SchoolYard For All Hoosh Yegam’ana The Volunteers -

-


The SchoolYard For All Hoosh Yegam’ana The TEAM -

-

Roisin Wanas:

Project Graphic Officer Roisin Wanas (*1985) graduated in 2008 from Faculty of Fine Arts , Décor Department with a major in Cinema & Theatre Design, Helwan university. Her love for architecture led her to start work directly in 2008 as a Visual Artist for MODULE DESIGNERS Architecture Studio and remained there for two years working in various art fields from graphic presentation to creating hand made artwork for the various spaces designed within the studio. Moving on in 2011 she became part of DURAVIT’s Design Office team in Cairo where she helped produce Duravit’s various Editorial and printed work as well as designing complete photoshoot sets. Since 2014, she has been experimenting in different areas, like moving her work within Duravit to the exhibit department and taking part in styling sessions both in Cairo and Germany, and above all is trying to focus on her work as an independent artist in Cairo! E-mail: roisinwanas@gmail.com

‫ مصمم الجرافيك بالمشروع‬: ‫روشين ونس‬.‫م‬


The SchoolYard For All Hoosh Yegam’ana The Design Developed by the Volunteers -

0.50 m 1.50 m

1.50 m0.50 m

5.39 m

1.68 m

ISSUE

Back Yard

PROJECT NO.

MK, LZ

A

DRAWN BY

A

PROJECT

Section A-A

Housh Yegama3na

1.20 m

09.04.14

-

A.04 Safe proof the egde using tires or slanting the edge to 45 degree Max height= 2 tires/ 50 cm Wooden beams connected between tires. Min 35x35 cm

1

PROJECT NO.

Heba Attia, M. Abbas

library zone

Housh Yegama3na

DRAWN BY

plan, section 1-1 perspective

ISSUE

PROJECT

4-9-2014

Link Zone

PROJECT NO.

ER, MM

PROJECT

DRAWN BY

Zone for playing "Ola/Khota"

ISSUE

Fixed Wooden Chair to be used as a table when needed due to presence of the seats

04/09/2014 Housh yegama3na

Protective surface 30 cm of Fine Sand

Design Elements

Min. height= 1 tire/25 cm

A.2


© 2014

Oecumenestudio schoolyardforall  

Description A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL – COEXISTENCE THROUGH DESIGN is a participatory design and construct project aiming to benefit the local Sy...

Oecumenestudio schoolyardforall  

Description A SCHOOLYARD FOR ALL – COEXISTENCE THROUGH DESIGN is a participatory design and construct project aiming to benefit the local Sy...

Advertisement