Issuu on Google+

MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE ACCOUNT ‐ MALAWI


CA Summary ÎContext for MCCs Engagement ÎWhat Constrains Economic Growth?  ‰Geography ‰Human Capital ‰Infrastructure – Roads, energy and water ‰Finance ‰Macro and Micro risks ‰Market failures

¾Summary of Major Constraints


Low and stagnant  agricultural yields,  overdependence on rain  fed farming and low  uptake of improved  farming  Degradation of water  resources; inadequate  promotion of hygiene and  sanitation

Malawi Growth and  Development  Strategy

Inadequate and unreliable  energy supply

Priority Reforms

By Sector

Public Investments

Favourable  macroeconomic  Conditions; inefficient  High costs of doing  business; Poor  Infrastructure; Poor  Public/private;  Cooperation ;  Weaknesses in Human  Resource Base; HIV/AIDS Prevalence; High levels of corruption

MPRSP,  MEGS

Priority Interventions

Challenges &  Constraints

• Control of Corruption •Regulatory Quality •Public Sector Reforms •Fiscal Policy •etc.

By Aid  Modality

• Agriculture and Food  Security • Irrigation and Water  Development •Transport Infrastructure  Development •Energy Generation and  Supply •Integrated Rural  Development •Prevention and  Management of Nutrition  Disorders, HIV and AIDS   Donor Support=45% of National  Budget

Long Term Poverty Reduction and Attainment  of MDGs 

Medium Term Achievement of Sustainable  Economic Growth and  Wealth Creation

Long Term Decrease Aid Dependency and  attainment of Vision 2020


Growth diagnostics What constrains private investments?

Low returns to economic activity

Low social return

Poor  geography

Low appropriability

Low human capital

Bad infrastructure

High cost of finance

Govt. failures

Micro risks

Macro risks

Corruption,  Financial,  taxes, monetary, fiscal  property rights instability

Bad Intl. finance

Market failures

Self‐ discovery

Fiscal  rigidity

Coordination externalities

Bad local finance

Low  savings

Poor  intermediation


CONSTRAINTS TO ECONOMIC GROWTH :  GEOGRAPHY

Malawi Constraints Analysis


Geography • Weather has impacted maize output

Maize

MMI (Rainfall index)

2007

2006

2005

30

2004

0

2003

50

2002

500

2001

70

2000

1000

1999

90

1998

1500

1997

110

1996

2000

1995

130

1994

2500

1993

150

1992

3000

1991

170

1990

3500

1989

Maize, Thousands tonnes

– Contributes to low maize output • Droughts are common (1992, 1994, 1997, 2002, 2005) – Farmers cannot afford irrigation and feel full impact of weather variability

Drought Source: Ministry of Agriculture, World Bank


Geography • Major impediment to economic growth – Rainfall is therefore a major driver of maize yields  and subsequently of economic growth 15% 10% 5% 0% -5% -10%

Trend + Population growth

Rainfall (MMI)

Residual

GDP/capita growth

2006

2004

2002

2000

1998

1996

1994

1992

1990

1988

1986

1984

1982

1980

1978

1976

1974

1972

1970

1968

1966

1964

-15%

Source: WDI, World Bank


Geography

ÎEven controlling for MMI, GDP/capita growth volatility is  high compared to other countries in the region Standard Deviation of GDP/capita growth, 1989-2006 Malawi Madagascar Mozambique Malawi (controlling for MMI) Rwanda (excl. 1994-95) Zambia Burundi Lesotho Botswana Namibia South Africa Tanzania Kenya Benin Uganda Swaziland Ghana 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Source: WDI


Geography Î Low maize output and land  pressure ÎBy African standards, Malawi is a  densely populated country. ÎOne of the lowest urbanization  levels in the world: 83% of  population live in rural areas. As result: ÎArable land per rural inhabitant  has declined substantially.  Issues  of land distribution must be  addressed ÎLand is overused, which  depresses yields further: soil  fertility declining at a rate of 60kg  of NPK per ha per year.  (Source: GoM and WB “Malawi PVA”)

Arable land, ha/rural inhabitant, 2005 Zambia Mozambique Rwanda Uganda Tanzania South Africa Botswana Kenya Malawi Burundi 0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

Source: WDI, author’s calculations


Geography ÎMalawi landlocked ‐ so are many other countries! ÎDistance to nearest port <900km and transport costs should  be around 20% according to the regression line ÎDistance explains only a third of high transport costs All landlocked  countries

Sub Saharan  Africa 0.6

0.6

Malawi

0.5

Transport costs / exports

Transport costs / exports

Malawi

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 R² = 0.185

0.0 0

1000 Distance  to port  (km)

2000

0.5 0.4

?

0.3 0.2 0.1

R² = 0.277

0.0 0

1000 Distance  to port  (km)

2000


Geography ÎGeography only explains part of the story ÎMalawi is landlocked and rainfall is an important driver  of growth ÎLand is scarce which and lends itself to overuse resulting  in loss of soil fertility ÎBut neither of these factors can explain the high variability of GDP, nor does Malawi being a landlocked country explain the  high cost of international transport


CONSTRAINTS TO ECONOMIC GROWTH :  INFRASTRUCTURE

Malawi Constraints Analysis


Transport : Roads ÎDo bad or congested roads constrain growth? ÎNo. Malawi’s road density is good by regional standards though  still below that of a number of countries in the region Road density (km of road per 100 sq km of land area)

Road usage South Africa

Rwanda

Kenya

Uganda

Uganda

South Africa

Tanzania

Zimbabwe

Mozambique

Malawi

Rwanda

Zambia

Zambia

Kenya

Zimbabwe

Tanzania

Malawi

Botswana Mozambique

0 0 20 40 All roads Paved roads

60

50

100

150

Vehicles/km of paved road People/km of paved road

200


Roads ÎQuality of roads improving Î... although over 30% of unpaved roads are still in poor condition Æ hinders access for agricultural buyers, microfinance institutions,  tourism, etc Paved roads 2007 2006 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

60%

80%

100%

60% Poor

80%

100% Source: MEPD AER 2008

Unpaved roads 2007 2006 0%

20%

40% All roads

2007 2006 0%

20%

40% Good

Fair


Access to ports & railway ÎDoes access to ports through the railway constrain economic  growth? ÎLet’s look at the state of the infrastructure. ÎThere has been a long delay in rehabilitating the 77 km stretch to  Cuamba on the Mozambique side, severely impacting transit times. ÎNo rail infrastructure to Beira ‐ currently accessible only by road – more expensive than needed. ÎRail infrastructure in Malawi is poor – in need of major rehabilitation.  “Delays in repairing the Blantyre‐Lilongwe rail line (was cut in 2003)  compared badly to the swift repair of the road link.”

ÎState of rail infrastructure is poor.


Transport Costs State of rail infrastructure reduces  transportation options and drives costs  up:

Fuel imports by route (million litres)

300 250

Î Shipping by rail through Nacala cheap, but  unreliable

200

Î TERA (2005) estimates:

150

„

Lilongwe‐Beira: 948 km. 3 days transit by road

„

Lilongwe‐Nacala: 989 km. 10 days transit by rail  (77km to Cuamba @15km/h)

100

„

Nacala: weeks

$4000

12 

„

Beira: weeks

$4800 

12 

„

Dar‐es‐Salaam: $6000

6‐8 weeks

Î Govt. recognizes: “[...] logistical and  capacity problems with the Nacala  rail line” results in most gasoline being  imported through other routes.  (Source: MEPD AER 2008)

Nacala

Beira

Dar-es-Salaam

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

0

2000

Î Large retail business: “If a delivery is time‐ critical, I route it through Dar.” Cost and duration of import from India:

50

Mbeya+Gweru

Source: MEPD AER 2008


Transport costs • As a result of high transport costs Malawi not well‐integrated into the world economy

Transport costs / value of exports Malawi Rwanda Chad Mali Uganda

– Large wedge between domestic and international prices – Inefficiencies in the logistics  chain

Burundi Niger Burkina Faso CAF Zambia Botswana Zimbabwe Lesotho Swaziland 0%

20%

40%

60%


Transport costs • Wedge between domestic and international  prices can be explained by : – Few options for reliable international transport – Imbalance in the value, timing and quantity, of  imports and exports • Tobacco, cotton, sugar, tea and coffee – low price per  kg ‐ high shipping cost per value of kg  • Exports and imports occur at different times and  sometimes result in empty back haulage (tobacco,  fertiliser) • Imports 2x the value of exports


Transport Costs Only exports that are not time‐ and logistics‐critical survive Î Tobacco, tea, sugar, cotton well‐adapted to survive  Î Flower exports a failure, due to poor logistics (air transportation)

Î Problems with transport logistics contribute to limited response to AGOA Selected textiles exports

1500 1250 1000 750 500 250

20

Million constant 2000 US$

1750

16 12 8 4

Malaiwi's export failures

Cotton Fabrics

Unknitted Apparel

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

0

1994

0

1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Thousands Constant 2000 US$

Exports of flowers and live trees

Knitted Apparel

Source: GoM National Accounts


Transport Costs  Import substitution dominates manufacturing sector ÎNon‐agriculture manufacturing dominated by import‐ substituting industries that are insulated from  international competition by high transportation costs: „ Only 14% of manufactured output is exported (MEPD AER 2008)


Transport Costs • Due to the state of transport infrastructure,  options are limited and costs are high. • Only exports that are not time and logistics  critical survive • As a result Malawi has a stagnant export  basket  • Conclusion : Transport infrastructure is a  constraint.


CONSTRAINTS TO ECONOMIC GROWTH :  Impact of transport costs, land pressure  and rainfall on food security and  agricultural diversification

Malawi Constraints Analysis


Effects of geography and poor  infrastructure on food security

• Yields are stagnant

– Low penetration of hybrid varieties of maize Maize yield, tonnes/ha – Pressure on land reduces soil fertility South Africa – Underuse of fertilizer, irrigation and  Ethiopia other inputs  including the hand‐held hoe  Namibia Zambia translate into low yields Kenya

Maize yield kg/ha, 5-yr moving average

Tanzania

5000

Uganda Malawi

4000

Burundi

3000

Mozambique Rwanda

2000

Lesotho

1000

Zimbabwe Swaziland

Malawi

South Africa

World

2005

2003

2001

1999

1997

1995

1993

1991

1989

1987

1985

1983

1981

1979

1977

1975

1973

1971

1969

1967

1965

1963

0

World Africa 0 2006

1

2

3

Average 2000-06

4

Source: FAOSTAT


Effects on Food Security

Good h arvest

Output of traditional exports affected by droughts

Dr o ug ht

P X  <  P

Maize exports if ct=0 W

Welfare if ct=0

Consumption Output

Consumption = Output Welfare if ct=0 W

P

W

P

Subsistence

Other goods

Food security = low maize productivity +agricultural exports +high cost of trade Î Forex receipts from tobacco fall when needed most Î Imports are expensive because of high cost of trade (ct) Î Little maize exports when the country has good harvest because of high cost of  trade (ct)  Î Results in large price swings which in turn creates a disincentive to diversify Î Low maize productivity pushes farmers into corner solution during drought years

W

M   P P >

Maize

Maize Little maize exports  with high ct


Summary on food security and agricultural  diversification • Due to the high cost of transportation combined with  geographical factors as well as little use of inputs the farmers find themselves in a corner situation • There is low demand during times of good harvests and there  are large surges of demand in times of poor harvests leading  to high price volatilities • Small landholdings result in overuse and precipitates loss of  soil fertility. Cash crop production is also limited • Price volatility creates a disincentive to diversify‐ the farmer  cannot guarantee household access to maize without a  significant cash crop production


Power ÎDoes quality and quantity of supply constrain growth? ÎESCOM loaded at full capacity ÎReintroduction of Tedzani will remove immediate pressure, but not  for long. ÎPeak demand reaching capacity = power outages 340 320

Installed capacity

300

Point where peak demand Exceeds installed capacity

MW

280 260

Peak demand

240 220

Available capacity

200 180 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Installed capacity

Available capacity

Peak Demand

Source: MEPD AER 2006 & 2008


Power Power outages and large scale projects Î ESCOM couldn’t guarantee QoS to uranium mines Æ Paladin imported  diesel generators:  „ much more expensive energy  „ increased diesel imports create additional pressure on international  transport. Î Heavy sands extraction never materialized because of the same inability  to guarantee QoS  Î BAT quoted power outages as one of the reason for their departure from  Malawi: „ Each power outage = 50,000 cigarettes thrown away Î Dairy industry can’t provide consistent quality of milk (outages preclude  maintaining constant temperature) Î Plastics: power outage = expensive cleaning of equipment.


Power • Power shortages – outages = losses – Median losses from power outages: 20% without a  generator vs 5% with generator Median sales losses due to power outages

% of firms with generator

Malawi

Kenya

Tanzania

Tanzania

Madagascar

Malawi

Kenya

Zambia

Zambia

Uganda

Uganda

Madagascar

South Africa

South Africa

SSA

SSA

Low income

Low income 0%

2%

4%

6%

8% 10%

0%

20%

40%

60%

Source: Malawi ICA 2006

80%


Power • State of power infrastructure poor, impacting  returns to investment and constraining new  investments in the country. • It has prevented the country’s diversification  into non‐traditional exports (e.g. Titanium and  on farm processing) • It has led to the shrinking of manufacturing  output • Yes, power is a constraint to growth.


WATER AND IRRIGATION

Malawi Constraints Analysis


Water and Irrigation • Frequent Droughts and Floods – Droughts are endemic to Malawi and have had devastating  effects on crop and livestock production. Floods occur in the  south, particularly in the lower shire areas of Lake Malawi, Lake  Malombe and Lake Chilwa. Floods also occur in the lower  reaches of the Songwe River in the Northern Region.  – The main problems of flooding are damage of agricultural lands  and crop damage. Droughts, floods and rainfall variability also  assert risk‐averse behaviour by farmers and other investors in  agricultural industries and services, slowing the diversification  of economic activities.


Water and Irrigation • Degradation of upper catchments – De‐vegetation, erosion and sedimentation are  Malawi’s most serious environmental threat,  affecting energy generation and water supply to   homes industries. – The most significant dams are the hydropower  dams on the Shire River, which are badly affected  by sedimentation. Sedimentation is particularly  acute in the Nkula pondage which supplies a  power plant and Blantyre Water Board (BWB).


Water and irrigation • Coverage of water supply and sanitation – Almost 50 percent of all illnesses in Malawi are water‐related,  such as cholera and typhoid, a problem exacerbated by the rapid  spread of HIV/AIDS – The chemical contamination of stream water in urban and peri – urban areas is becoming a common problem due to the  improper disposal of industrial waste.  – Europhication of water bodies and the growth of the water  weeds including water hyacinth threaten fish resources. – Today 74.2% Malawians have access to improved water supply  and the country is on course to attaining the water MDG – As for urban areas of Lilongwe and Blantyre there is significant challenge in maintaining the ageing water system as the urban  population increases. Water shortages are very common  especially in Blantyre and seriously affects business operations


Water and irrigation • Despite abundance of water resources irrigation  development has been limited • Only 27% of the irrigation potential has been exploited


Conclusion:Water and irrigation are a  constraint • Malawi is on course to attaining the water MDG by 2015 • The country experiences serious droughts which results in  agricultural land and crop damage • Reinforce farmers’ aversion to risk‐taking including  diversification  • Malawi suffers from degradation of upper catchments  thereby affecting other economic activities including  power generation and Pumping capacity of Blantyre  Water Board • Lilongwe and Blantyre Water Boards have the problem of  ageing water systems • Malawi is not exploiting its irrigation potential 


HUMAN CAPITAL

Malawi Constraints Analysis


Primary Education • Completion rates for the first four  years of primary school are 44.2%  (lowest of comparator countries). • Primary education is accompanied by  higher cash‐crop income Tobacco income against years of primary education

Source: IHS 2005, authors calculations


Tertiary Education Tertiary enrollment is lowest of comparators (0.4%  gross enrollment) • Annual expenditure for urban university graduates is  4x secondary school leavers • Malawians make great efforts to study in overseas  universities Ö High returns to tertiary education •

Annual expenditure for each education level

Source: IHS 2005, authors calculations


Skills • ICA: shortage of skills is quoted  as 8th by businesses • But absence of skills prevents  existence of high‐skill  businesses • High number of foreign  workers in key management/  technical posts in firms and  NGOs • High proportion of businesses  owned or managed by  foreigners in formal sector.

Macroeconomic instability Access to financing Cost of financing Electricity Tax rates Crime, theft and disorder Transportation Skills and Education of Available … Corruption Tax administration Access to Land Other Anti-competitive or informal practices Political stability Regulatory Policy Uncertainty Telecommunications Customs and Trade Regulations Business Licensing and Operating … Legal framework / Conflict resolution Labor Regulations Environmental regulations 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%


Is Human Capital a constraint? •

Yes: Low primary school completion rates Highly contracted tertiary education High returns to primary education in cash cropping High returns to tertiary education in urban employment Shortage of highly skilled workers There is a mismatch between school and tertiary institutions curricula and what is  required by most businesses – Technical training institutions not properly functioning – – – – – –

Government/ donors are gradually improving primary and secondary education – School building – New curriculum – Expansion of Teacher Training colleges

Transformation of education is crucial but slow and expensive


Finance Is access to capital a constraint? Î Yes: „ „ „ „

High interest rates High spreads High overheads (little pressure to cut costs) Small financial depth (but 1980s‐90s reduction in private credit due to reduction in  investment opportunities, not vice‐versa) „ Banking highly profitable (ROA and ROE) „ Access is an issue „ Venture capital not available

Î All point to poor financial intermediation „ But high overheads are at least partly explained by small market size

Î But things are gradually changing: „ Recent financial innovations: FMB’s Makwacha cards, increased ATM networks „ Spreads decreasing (albeit not due to competition‐induced cost‐cutting) „ At least one bank considers raising deposit rates


Macroeconomic risks Summary Î Fiscal stance much improved,  but credibility of recent  advances has yet to be  established.  Î Inflation is under control Î Overvalued exchange rate  hurts exporters and is  maintained in a fashion that  also penalizes importers

Macroeconomic instability Access to financing Cost of financing Electricity Tax rates Crime, theft and disorder Transportation Skills and Education of Available … Corruption Tax administration Access to Land Other Anti-competitive or informal practices Political stability Regulatory Policy Uncertainty Telecommunications Customs and Trade Regulations Business Licensing and Operating … Legal framework / Conflict resolution Labor Regulations Environmental regulations 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

Source: ICA


Micro risks: conclusion ÎOverall business climate has tremendously improved in  recent years. Nevertheless Malawi doing less than its  neighbors to provide a favorable business climate to  investors ÎGiven non‐administrative barriers to trade and coupled  with the high administrative burden on exporters it is  extremely unhelpful in promoting an export‐oriented  economy


SELF‐DISCOVERY

Malawi Growth Diagnostics


Export sophistication Î Export basket still highly concentrated Î ... although there is some improvement once tobacco is factored out

Hirschman‐Hirfindahl index of export concentration 7000

Botswana

6000

Malawi

5000

Mozambique

4000

Rwanda

3000

Zambia

2000

Ghana

1000

Namibia

1990 1991 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

0

Uganda Kenya

HHI Index 0

1000

2000 2006

3000 2002

4000 1997

5000

6000

HHI Index w/o tobacco

7000

Source: UN Comtrade, author’s calculations


Export sophistication • Malawi’s placement 32000

EXPY 2003, $

16000 8000 4000 2000 1000 500

1000

2000

4000

8000

16000

32000

64000

GDP/capita 2003, PPP$

Source: Hausmann & Rodrik (2005)


Exports v GDP ÎA stagnant EXPY, stagnant GDP Î Export sophistication is stagnating although tobacco hides some recent progress Î Zambia and Mozambique: rapid structural transformation, higher growth

EXPY and GDP/capita growth Mozambique

4500

Malawi's EXPY dynamics

4000

Zambia

3500

Malawi

3000

Kenya

2500

Uganda 0%

20%

40%

60%

GDP/capita growth, 2002 to 2006 EXPY growth, 2002 to 2006

1990 1991 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

2000

EXPY

EXPY excluding tobacco

Source: UN Comtrade database, authors calculations


Back to Food Security • Addressing food security is key in unlocking Malawi’s  potential to diversify and transform its productive  and export base – A failed harvest removes the principal source of  consumption for rural households – Increased demand on the formal market during lean years  greatly raises food prices making it harder to substitute  lost subsistence production – Capacity to replace lost production through imports is  limited by forex earnings


Food Security Three components to food security Æ three long term solutions + one short‐ term fix: 1. Increase and stabilize yields to the point where output doesn’t fall below  subsistence levels even during bad years. 2. Increase and diversify Malawi’s exports. 3. Lower barriers to trade (transportation costs in particular). 4. Insure yourself against droughts on international financial markets (e.g.  call option for maize). Government focused on (1) at the expense of (2) and overlooking (3). (4) is a  short‐term and expensive fix that does not address the root causes of the  problem.


Food Security Different solutions, different tools 1.

Increase and stabilize food production: „ „ „ „ „ „ „

2.

Irrigation Fertilizer Feeder roads Appreciated currency (to lower cost of fertilizer program) Move into less volatile crops (cassava) Subsidized rural credit Avoiding creating market distortions

Increase and diversify Malawi’s export industries: „ Energy, urban water (Blantyre) „ Depreciated currency (incentivize tradable sector) „ Favorable business climate (severance pay)

3.

Integrate Malawi into world economy: „ Increase throughput and reliability of Nacala and Beira corridors „ Simplify import/export procedures „ Export diversification will help automatically


Different solutions Competing Priorities? ÎExchange rate: appreciated (1) vs. depreciated (2) ÎInfrastructure: irrigation (1) vs. energy (2) ÎTransportation: feeder roads (1) vs. international  corridors (3) What should Malawi prioritize from the point of view of  long‐term growth? ¾ In addressing these factors it is important to consider the  following:


70 60

Agriculture/GDP, %

50 40 30 20 10 0 2500 12500 GDP/capita 2004, PPP$

30

500

800

25

600

20

35

300

30

200

25 20

10

0

15

2003

100

2001

15

1999

0

40

400

1997

200

50 45

1995

400

62500

Vietnam

1993

1000

600

1991

1200

35

1989

China

1987

1400

500

1985

100

1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003

Î Malawi still needs to take  advantage of the current  commodity boom, however for  accelerated growth , agriculture  offers little prospects after the  boom; for instance Î It is rare to see a rich and  agricultural country Î Long term growth ‐ move into  goods with higher value added or  have high growth potential. Î World maize yields increased 2.5  times in 40 years. Î China’s GDP/capital quintupled in  20. Î Vietnam only took 15 years to  increase GDP/capita 2.5 times. Î How? Structural transformation  away from agriculture.

Solutions

GDP/capita PPP$

GDP/capita PPP$

Agriculture/GDP, % (right axis)

Agriculture/GDP, % (right axis)


MCA  Constraints Analysis

Summary of Findings

15 March 2009

53 53

Conclusion Binding constraints: Finance, International Corridors and Feeder Roads, Power, Human Capital,  and distortions in agricultural value chains. Secondary constraints: overvalued exchange rate,  administrative barriers to trade, and regular changes to trade rules   


Stakeholder Consultations

• Q&A Session The Project Coordinator Millennium Challenge Account – Malawi Ministry of Finance LILONGWE


Millenium study in Malawi