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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF ORANGE • OCCATHOLIC.COM

THE DEDICATION OF CHRIST CATHEDRAL COMMEMORATIVE EDITION • JULY 14, 2019


CONTENTS JULY 14, 2019

MESSAGE FROM HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS. . . . . . . 7 MESSAGE FROM BISHOP KEVIN W. VANN. . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 LANDMARK BEACON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 SCHULLER ERA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

ORANGE COUNTY CATHOLIC MISSION STATEMENT The Orange County Catholic Newspaper seeks to illuminate and animate the journey of faith for Catholics within the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange— building solidarity among the faithful and inviting a deeper understanding and involvement in the mission of Christ—through the timely sharing of news, commentary and feature content in an engaging, accessible and compelling format.

ORANGE COUNTY CATHOLIC The Official Newspaper of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange Diocese of Orange Pastoral Center, 13280 Chapman Ave., Garden Grove 92840 Publisher: The Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange Executive Editor: Tracey Kincaid, tkincaid@rcbo.org Editor: Kimberly Porrazzo, webeditor@occatholic.com Contributing writers: Deepa Bharath, Cathi Douglas, Greg Mellen, Douglas Morino, Larry Urish, Meg Waters Contributing photographers/artists: Bill Alkofer, Catholic News Service, Fred Matamoros, Greg O’Loughlin, Challenge Roddie, Chuck Bennett

ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Craig Hymovitz, chymovitz@scng.com Sales: Patty Brooks, pbrooks@scng.com

SCNG CUSTOM CONTENT Director of Custom Content: Caroline Wong

Managing Editor: Caitlin Adams

Creative Director: Tom Halligan

Art Director: Fernando M. Donado

ORANGE COUNTY CATHOLIC EDITORIAL COUNCIL The Very Rev. Christopher Smith (Chair), Msgr. Stephen Doktorcyzk, Msgr. Arthur Holquin, Msgr. Lawrence Baird, Tony Jennison, Susan Strader, Tim Strader Delivered weekly to parishes and homes throughout Orange County, Calif., Orange County Catholic is published by SCNG Custom Content, a division of Southern California News Group that offers content development and design expertise to businesses and nonprofit institutions. The Orange County Catholic editorial staff and editorial council are responsible for the content contained herein. Events and products advertised in Orange County Catholic do not carry the implicit endorsement of the Diocese of Orange or SCNG Custom Content.

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INSPIRED ARCHITECTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 CATHEDRAL CAMPUS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 THE RENOVATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 HOLY RELICS GIFTED TO CHRIST CATHEDRAL . . . . . . 55 OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE, PATRONESS OF THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 OUR LADY OF LA VANG SHRINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 SITTING BISHOPS OF THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE. . . . 71 MESSAGE FROM THE VERY REVEREND CHRISTOPHER SMITH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 A HOLY YEAR OF PREPARATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 VOLUNTEERS AND DONORS DRIVE CHRIST CATHEDRAL RENOVATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Cover photo: The crux gemmata, hanging above the altar in Christ Cathedral / Photo courtesy Challenge Roddie J U LY 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

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Snyder Langston congratulates the Diocese of Orange, Bishop Vann and the community of Roman Catholics on the development, construction and dedication of Christ Cathedral. We are grateful and humbled to have been on the team that built this cathedral of worship.

Irvine | El Segundo | Pasadena www.snyderlangston.com


Editor’s Note: The following message was sent to Bishop Kevin Vann on behalf of Pope Francis. It was sent by Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Vatican Secretary of State, and delivered by Apostolic Nuncio to the United States Archbishop Christophe Pierre.

TO THE MOST REVEREND KEVIN W. VANN, JCD, DD, BISHOP OF ORANGE IN CALIFORNIA

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S YOU CELEBRATE THE DEDICATION of Christ Cathedral, His Holiness Pope Francis sends warm greetings to you, your Auxiliary Bishops Timothy Freyer and Thomas Thanh Thai Nguyen, Bishop Emeritus Tod Brown, and all the priests, religious and lay faithful of the Diocese of Orange in California, as well as to all those gathered for this joyful event. He assures you of his spiritual closeness as he joins you in praising Almighty God for the abundant blessings which the Lord has bestowed upon the Diocese over the years. The Holy Father prays that the cathedral may serve as a tangible sign of our Lord Jesus Christ’s presence in your midst, and help to deepen your missionary witness to the broader community, and so lead all souls to an experience of his abiding mercy and divine life. In this way, you will be “like living stones...built into a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ” (l Pet 2:25). Commending all present to the loving intercession of Mary, Mother of the Church, Pope Francis renews his deep affection for all of you and imparts his Apostolic Blessing as a pledge of peace and joy in Jesus Christ.

HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS / PHOTO CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

CARDINAL PIETRO PAROLIN SECRETARY OF STATE

POPE FRANCIS’ COAT OF ARMS

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DEAR BROTHERS AND SISTERS IN CHRIST,

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AM HUMBLED AND INSPIRED to introduce you to our special commemorative issue of Orange County Catholic, published for the historic July 17, 2019 dedication of Christ Cathedral. I’m hopeful that you will join me in reading about the history of Crystal Cathedral and its remarkable transformation into Christ Cathedral, the new hub of Catholic worship in Orange County. Christ Cathedral reflects the faith and devotion of all the people of our Diocese and serves as a beacon of hope for those who visit in pilgrimage here, and who through God’s providence and guidance are drawn here by many circumstances! I’d like to thank everyone who has been a part of this incredible journey, including the architects and engineers who have developed the plans to transform the cathedral and grounds. Thanks, too, to the hundreds of electricians, tradesmen, and construction workers who made this transformation a reality. The ability and vision to come together and make this a reality is truly the working of the Lord. I am deeply grateful to the many Catholics, and all of other faith traditions, who passionately and freely gave their time and personal resources in support of our efforts. From the first planning meetings to our celebration event, you helped make history happen. We are thankful to the artists who created the sacred art that graces our cathedral and grounds, the children who prayed for the cathedral’s success in their Catholic school classrooms, and the parishioners throughout Orange County who kept our intentions in their hearts. Every one of us has something to celebrate during and beyond the dedication of Christ Cathedral. Thanks to all of you. And welcome, pilgrims of all faith traditions, to this place of worship that has such a special place in our hearts and history! Most of all, we thank God for this extraordinary opportunity. Those of us who followed the Rev. Robert H. Schuller’s “Hour of Power” and studied his philosophy of positive thinking, know well how significant the Crystal Cathedral has always been to Christians worldwide. I well remember how my grandparents would see him on television from this campus, as well as Archbishop Sheen, and how indeed the two of them were good friends! How fortunate and blessed the Catholic Church is to rededicate Christ Cathedral to the values, beliefs, and ethics that were integral to Rev. Schuller’s work, and to go forward to undertake the great transformation of this amazing building and beautiful grounds to a true center for Catholic worship in the Western United States and beyond! We welcome this marvelous opportunity to share our beautiful Catholic faith with all who visit here and share and live the story of a cathedral as a place of unity, beauty and worship to welcome and draw the Catholic community and others together: in a similar way as Bernini’s colonnades at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome welcome and draw the whole world together in their embrace! As I remember mentioning in one of my early videos for this endeavor to “find a place of welcome and respite in the city, and thus to find God!” As we have just finished the Paschal season with the great feast of Pentecost and the coming of the Holy Spirit, with great thankfulness and true elation, and in praise of the love of God in Christ Jesus, I am Sincerely yours in Christ,

THE MOST REVEREND KEVIN W. VANN, JCD, DD, BISHOP OF ORANGE

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1000 AM / 930 AM

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Congratulations Bishop Vann on the Dedication of Christ Cathedral! Relevant Radio® is proud to help spread the Good News in the Diocese of Orange.

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LANDMARK BEACON

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HRIST CATHEDRAL IS THE SEAT of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange and the spiritual home of Orange County’s 1.3 million Catholics. The cathedral will be the epicenter of Catholicism on the West Coast, serving not only as a place of worship, but faith formation, evangelization, charitable work, art and culture. Since its completion in 1980, the iconic Crystal Cathedral has been recognized as a historically significant architectural landmark and has undergone a 7-year renovation to transform it into a Catholic house of worship. Today Christ Cathedral and its surrounding 34-acre campus serve as a place where Catholics and believers of all faiths, throughout Southern California and across the globe, can gather to express their devotion. The Diocese of Orange is proud to be a steward of Dr. Robert Schuller’s vision that the cathedral serve as a beacon of faith and a platform to preach the power of unconditional love, hope and the idea that through belief in Jesus Christ anything is possible. Because of its history, significance and scale, Christ Cathedral will continue to be a popular destination for tourists from across the globe. Its iconic beauty—and its many arts and cultural events and offerings—will shine as a cultural beacon to believers of all faiths. Most important, it will serve for decades, even centuries, as a central place of worship for Southern California Catholics. The Diocese of Orange’s commitment to being a good steward of Christ Cathedral ensures its future relevance as a center of worship. As the Most Rev. Bishop Kevin Vann once described Christ Cathedral: “This gift of God which is given to us is not just for us, but it is for the ages.”

CHRIST CATHEDRAL WILL SERVE FOR DECADES, EVEN CENTURIES, AS A CENTRAL PLACE OF WORSHIP FOR SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA CATHOLICS. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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SCHULLER ERA

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EVEREND ROBERT H. SCHULLER was an American pastor, motivational speaker, televangelist, and author whose career spanned five decades. Rev. Schuller was also founder of the Crystal Cathedral Ministries and the television show “Hour of Power,” watched in over 165 countries by millions of people. Starting from humble beginnings, Rev. Schuller rose to be one of the most-watched televangelists in the world. Rev. Schuller’s close relationships with renowned architects Richard Neutra, Philip Johnson, Richard Meier, and Gin D. Wong, led to a collection of unique buildings on the 34-acre Christ Cathedral Campus (formerly the Crystal Cathedral campus). Rev. Schuller will long be remembered for his remarkable legacy.

EARLY YEARS Robert Harold Schuller was born on September 16, 1926 in Alton, Iowa. His father was a poor farmer with a sixth-grade education and his mother a hardworking farm wife. Rev. Schuller’s Dutch immigrant grandparents stressed the value of hard work. The family attended the First Reformed Church. In his autobiography, “My Journey: from an Iowa Farm to a Cathedral of Dreams,” Rev. Schuller writes that he was born “at the dead end of a dirt road with no name and no number.” The farm had no electricity or plumbing. But from the age of four, Schuller knew that he wanted to be a minister. Enrolled in Newkirk High School, Schuller found that he was poor at sports but did well in English and debate. He also loved to participate in school theatricals and musical performances. He graduated from high school in 1943 and went on to attend Hope College (a “Reform Church” school in Michigan). He excelled in English, speech and debate, and was introduced to psychology and Calvinist theology. One summer, as part of a religious singing quartet tour with three of his friends, Schuller traveled to California. The beauty of the mountains and the coast affected him deeply, and he had a premonition he would someday return. After receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree, he went on to Western Theological Seminary. While at Western, he continued his study of psychology and became a scholar of Calvinist theology, creating the first topical and scriptural index to Calvin’s writing. Schuller felt

REV. ROBERT H. SCHULLER AND WIFE ARVELLA. / PHOTO COURTESY THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

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that the Calvinists’ dark view of humanity was a product of Calvin’s followers, not Calvin himself. Schuller instead found “A theology of hope and joy, liberating humanity from shaming, blaming, cowering Christianity.” After receiving his degree, he was then ordained by the Reformed Church in America. Schuller eventually met and married musically talented Arvella DeHaan and pastored the Ivanhoe Reformed Church in Chicago for five years. The church had only 38 members when they arrived, so to build the congregation, Schuller went door to door in the neighborhood. The congregation grew to 500 in five years. During this time and because of Schuller’s expanding congregation, a new sanctuary was designed by Chicago architect Benjamin Franklin Olson. Olson was the first who encouraged Schuller to pursue architectural excellence, telling him that he should never let financial considerations force him “to compromise on the fine details of design” when building a church. “Art—not money—must have the last word,” said Olson. After five years in Chicago, Schuller headed to California and formed a new Church. In 1955 the Schullers drove to Orange County with their two children (Sheila and Robert Anthony), $500 in assets, and their worldly goods towed behind their car in a small trailer. Orange County had a population of 500,000 in 1955, Disneyland would open soon, and tract housing began to replace the orange groves and dairy land.

ORANGE DRIVE-IN THEATER After their arrival, the Schullers set about finding a building suitable for a church service. However, they were unable to find a hall or building to rent in Orange County, but they did discover the Orange Drive-in Theatre. No one had ever held a church service in such a place, but, Schuller realized, drive-in movie theaters were only used at night. He rented the drive-in for Sunday during the day. His unique call to the congregation was “Come as you are in the family car!” Standing atop the tarpapered roof of its snack bar, Schuller conducted his first open-air sermon to 100 people, all in their cars. Schuller believed this drive-in ministry, its ties to the outdoors, and his experience preaching outside atop the concession stand helped inspire him to later build the all-glass Crystal Cathedral. He often stated, “It was there that I fell in love with the sky!”

CHRIST CATHEDRAL TIMELINE

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His unique call to the congregation was “Come as you are in the family car!” Standing atop the tarpapered roof of its snack bar, Schuller conducted his first open-air sermon to 100 people, all in their cars. Schuller believed this drive-in ministry, its ties to the outdoors, and his experience preaching outside atop the concession stand helped inspire him to later build the all-glass Crystal Cathedral. He often stated, “It was there that I fell in love with the sky!”

1955 The Garden Grove Community Church is founded by Robert H. Schuller and his wife Arvella. An affiliate of the Reformed Church in America, the church first holds services in space rented from the Orange Drive-In Theatre.


An early advertisement from The Orange County Register announced the new ministry’s appeal: “The Orange Church meets in the Orange Drive-In Theater where even the handicapped, hard of hearing, aged and infirm can see and hear the entire service without leaving their family car.” Schuller’s wife Arvella provided music for each service from an electronic organ. The organ was portable and mounted on a trailer that the Schullers towed to and from their home to the service. Worshippers at the drive-in listened to the Schullers via portable speaker boxes mounted to their vehicles. Church guidebooks for services included instructions not only about when to sing, speak, and stay silent, but also for mounting the speakers onto car windows. As one congregant recalled about the experience: “Smoke and be in church at the same time, at a drive-in during the daytime. What a trip!” As the Garden Grove Community Church congregation continued to grow, Schuller searched for land to build what he envisioned would be a collection of buildings. He purchased a 10-acre plot in nearby Garden Grove. Schuller decided to combine the two services by building the CONTINUED ON PAGE 19 AN AERIAL VIEW OF THE CAMPUS BEFORE THE CATHEDRAL WAS CONSTRUCTED. / PHOTO COURTESY THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

1968

1970

The GGCC congregation completes the Tower of Hope to provide office and classroom space but continued growth leads to the need for a new facility.

“Hour of Power” is launched from the Richard Neutradesigned sanctuary now known as the Arboretum. Rev. Schuller was inspired by Archbishop Fulton Sheen’s legacy as a televangelist and communicator, as well as a 1969 Billy Graham Crusade in nearby Angel Stadium.

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REV. ROBERT SCHULLER PREACHES FROM ATOP A PLATFORM THAT ALLOWED HIM TO BE SEEN AND HEARD FROM THOSE SEATED INSIDE THE ARBORETUM AS WELL AS THOSE ATTENDING THE SERVICE WHILE WATCHING AND LISTENING FROM THEIR CARS. / PHOTO COURTESY THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

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1976

1977

William Robert Johnson is appointed as the first Bishop of the Diocese of Orange. Holy Family Parish in Orange is chosen to serve as the diocesan cathedral.

Ground is broken for the Crystal Cathedral mere feet away from the Tower of Hope and the sanctuary the Garden Grove Community Church has outgrown. Rev. Schuller envisions a unique facility with walls made of glass and commissions cutting-edge postmodern architect Philip Johnson.

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world’s first walk-in/drive-up church. He hired famous modernist architect Richard Neutra to design the Arboretum, a building that would combine the two congregations smoothly. Schuller also felt it was important to have a seamless transition between the natural world and the interior space, a main tenet of Neutra’s ‘biorealism’ philosophy. The parking lot would hold 500 cars that would all be oriented toward an indoor/outdoor platform. This platform would allow Schuller to preach to the indoor congregation and also those in their cars. The Arboretum’s unique indoor/outdoor design was completed in 1960 and the sanctuary was dedicated in 1961.

FROM CRYSTAL CATHEDRAL TO CHRIST CATHEDRAL Donations from loyal and grateful “Hour of Power” listeners and the continued growth of the congregation led Schuller to the decision to build the acclaimed Crystal Cathedral. Schuller picked famed architects Philip Johnson and John Burgee, whom he felt shared his aesthetic sensibilities. Schuller wanted to continue his established indoor/outdoor sanctuary, and also create a visually stunning building to augment the growing “Hour of Power” television show. Made entirely of mirrored glass and white-painted steel trusses, the Crystal Cathedral was fully paid for on the day that it opened by churchgoer and “Hour of Power” listener donations. However, when the economic climate brought a downturn in the Crystal Cathedral finances and creditors from the pageant shows sued for payment, Schuller’s Crystal Cathedral Ministries filed for bankruptcy in 2010. For a time it appeared that the campus and all its magnificent religious buildings, its gardens and cemetery, might be purchased by a secular organization. However, Schuller spoke to the bankruptcy judge personally when it came time to sell the campus, urging the judge to allow the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange to continue the Christian legacy of the campus. The judge allowed the sale in 2012. The Diocese purchased this architecturally significant campus, blessed and enthusiastically supported by Schuller. The transition of this Protestant campus to a Catholic Campus will be complete with its July 17, 2019 dedication, and the Diocese of Orange will have honored Schuller’s legacy as it continues to share Christ’s message of love to the world.

Donations from loyal and grateful “Hour of Power” listeners and the continued growth of the congregation led Schuller to the decision to build the acclaimed Crystal Cathedral.

TOWER OF HOPE AND MINISTRIES

In 1968, in addition to purchasing an additional 10-acres on the north side of the property, Schuller worked with Neutra and Neutra’s son Dion to design a building to hold his congregation’s expanding ministries. The 13-story Tower of Hope was built and with its 90-foot-tall neon cross, was the tallest building in Orange County for more than a decade. The Tower was named after the New Hope Suicide Prevention Crisis Line, the first church-sponsored 24-hour suicide prevention telephone hotline, started by Arvella Schuller.

1980

1981

The Crystal Cathedral, built at a cost of $18 million, is completed. The church is touted as “the largest glass building in the world.” Upon moving from the old Neutra sanctuary to the new Johnson sanctuary, the congregation changes its name to the Crystal Cathedral.

The annual production “The Glory of Christmas,” a nativity pageant featuring hundreds of performers and technicians, dozens of animals, and orchestral musical sequences is launched. It dazzles attendees for 28 years in addition to the corresponding “The Glory of Easter.”

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Christ Catholic Cathedral A place for Christ Forever Redwitz, Inc. and GDR Group, Inc. congratulates the Diocese of Orange on the dedication of the Cathedral. Christ Catholic Cathedral will stand as a sign of the Diocese’s commitment to service the Catholic Community of Orange County.

(800) 576-1514 www.redwitz.com


INSPIRED ARCHITECTURE

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T MAY BE HARD TO BELIEVE TODAY, but when it was completed in 1980 the Crystal Cathedral had its critics. Yet the soaring steel-and-glass church also was described as “both an inspiring and an inspired structure,” as noted by Architectural Record. Designed by world-renowned architect Philip Johnson and his partner John Burgee as a religious theater of sorts, the Crystal Cathedral acted as both television studio and stage. Its glass enclosure was designed in response to Rev. Robert Schuller’s request that the church be open to the “sky and the surrounding world.” Johnson and Burgee created an angular, star-shaped plan, a modification of the typical Latin cross plan, with a shortened nave and widened transept, to bring each seat closer to the chancel. The single interior space is 200 feet wide by 400 feet long, with 120-foot ceilings. There is over 40,000 square feet of worship space, and 35,000 square feet in the lower level. The strong steel truss structure will withstand an 8.0 earthquake and winds of up to 100 miles per hour. Some of the more than 11,000 mirrored glass panes used to open to assist with ventilation. Architecturally ingenious, the church can seat a congregation of 2,100. The cathedral’s accompanying edifice, Crean Tower, was dedicated in 1990 and became one of Orange County’s tallest structures. Johnson designed the interior carillon with 52 bells, which is named Arvella Schuller, in honor of Schuller’s wife. When the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange purchased the 34-acre complex in 2012, its leaders recognized the potential for continued Christian worship, as well as the inherent value of the land and buildings.

THE TOWER BECAME THE FINAL BUILDING NEUTRA WOULD DESIGN FOR THE SCHULLER MINISTRIES. IN 1967 SCHULLER CALLED NEUTRA AGAIN TO DESIGN ANOTHER BUILDING TO HOUSE OFFICES AND SUNDAY SCHOOL ROOMS. SCHULLER AND NEUTRA ORIGINALLY ENVISIONED ANOTHER HORIZONTAL BUILDING, POSSIBLY TWOSTORIES HIGH. THEN, WHILE VACATIONING, SCHULLER TOOK NEUTRA’S PRELIMINARY SKETCH AND TURNED IT ON END. HE CALLED NEUTRA AND ASKED HIM TO “GO UP INSTEAD OF OUT!” THE RESULT IS A 13-STORY TOWER. BUILT IN 1968, THE TOWER OF HOPE WITH ITS NEON CROSS WAS THE TALLEST BUILDING IN ORANGE COUNTY UPON COMPLETION. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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RICHARD NEUTRA Richard Neutra’s philosophic approach to architecture, important to Schuller and the basis for much of the design that took place on the campus, was the natural world incorporation with the interior of a building. Neutra distilled his approach in a philosophy he called “biorealism,” which he described as “the inherent and inseparable relationship between man and nature.” Austrian born Richard Joseph Neutra (1892–1970) is considered one of the world’s most influential modernist architects. His structures on the Christ Cathedral campus—the Arboretum, the Large and Small Galleries, and the Tower of Hope—exemplify his focus and philosophy toward simple geometries of design. Neutra’s philosophy grew out of his feeling that “... our environment is often chaotic, irritating, inhibitive and disorienting. It is not generally designed at all, but amounts to a cacophonous, visually discordant accretion of accidental events, sometimes euphemized as ‘urban development’ and ‘economic progress.’” These buildings also show Neutra’s sensitivity toward blending the interior and exterior of a space such that it would place man in relationship with nature; that’s where he developed and where he feels most at home. Rev. Schuller developed a longtime professional and personal relationship with Neutra, and Neutra’s theories and ideas deeply affected many of Schuller’s design decisions. Neutra’s legacy of modernist architecture is a gift to many and his influence is visible throughout the Christ Cathedral campus today.

BECOMING CHRIST CATHEDRAL The conversion of the Crystal Cathedral into a place of Catholic worship is more than a major milestone in the history of the Diocese of Orange and Orange County. “I know of no precedent where a non-Catholic church has become a cathedral,” said Monsignor Arthur Holquin, pastor of the Mission Basilica in San Juan Capistrano, shortly after the acquisition of the campus. “Because of the historic nature of this move on the part of the diocese...whatever is done is going to be done with very, very careful planning and oversight. We are keenly aware that the eyes of the Catholic world are upon us.” The deepest and most significant aspects of the Roman Catholic Church’s rich liturgical heritage and traditions were embodied in renovation plans for the cathedral. A deliberative architectural selection process was led by the Architecture and Renovation Committee of the Christ Catholic Cathedral Corporation, the entity entrusted with the management of the expansive campus. The Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange, felt that Johnson Fain and Rios Clementi Hale Studios had the experience and ability to respect the building’s original design and also create a fitting home for Orange County’s 1.3 million Catholics. “These two firms see this important work as more than a renovation project, but as a reflection of God and his people on earth,” said Bishop Vann upon the selection. CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

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THE CHRIST CATHEDRAL CAMPUS IS HOME TO SEVERAL ARCHITECTURALLY ACCLAIMED STRUCTURES INCLUDING THE ARBORETUM, THE TOWER OF HOPE, THE CATHEDRAL CULTURAL CENTER, THE CREAN TOWER, AND OF COURSE CHRIST CATHEDRAL. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE


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“We will take this vessel and transform it to accommodate Catholic worship while doing honor to the existing building,” said Scott Johnson, lead partner in Johnson Fain. “The cathedral will inspire us, becoming a symbol of our commitment to diversity and our shared vision of spirituality. It is the challenge of a lifetime.”

NEUTRA ARBORETUM SANCTUARY

DESIGNED BY RICHARD NEUTRA IN 1958, THE FIRST STRUCTURES BUILT ON THE GROUNDS WERE THE LOW-LYING, SINGLE-STORY BUILDINGS WITH SLIDING GLASS WALLS THAT LOOKED OUT INTO GARDENS AND WATER LANDSCAPING. THESE BUILDINGS AND THEIR FLEXIBLE-SPACE ROOMS HOUSED THE CHURCH’S OFFICES AND FELLOWSHIP HALL DURING ITS EARLY YEARS. AFTER THE CONGREGATION MOVED INTO THE ARBORETUM, THE ROOMS SERVED AS THE CHURCH KITCHEN, OFFICES, AND AN ART GALLERY. THE ART GALLERY ONCE SHOWCASED THE IMPRESSIONISTIC ARTWORK OF GEORGE CHANN. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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The first renovation efforts were focused on the Arboretum. From the time the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange acquired the campus, all work emphasized efficiency and faithfulness to Neutra’s original design. During the project, LPA Principal Jim Wirick, American Institute of Architects (AIA) says, whereas some people might have asked “WWJD” (“What would Jesus do?”), the restoration team used “WWRD” as a guiding principle—“What would Richard do?” “We decided that we would set the bar very high with the Arboretum, so it would guide the balance of the work on the campus,” says Rob Neal, managing partner of Hager Pacific Properties and member of the Architecture and Renovations Committee for the Crystal Cathedral Campus, which refurbished all the other campus properties as well—including the 13-story Tower of Hope, designed by Neutra and his son, Dion Neutra. The Docomomo jury, chaired by James Polshek, FAIA, of Polshek Partnership Architects (now Ennead Architects), praised the project’s “holistic approach” to the restoration—encompassing structural, aesthetic, material, and theoretical considerations. They called it “an exceptional restoration example of maintaining the original design and layout while upgrading for seismic and mechanical systems, which resulted in a renovation Neutra himself would be proud of if he were able to see his building today.”

1986

1988

Norman McFarland is appointed as the second Bishop of the Diocese of Orange by Pope John Paul II upon the death of Bishop William Johnson.

Rev. Schuller is an unofficial adviser and counselor to presidents Gerald R. Ford, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush.


THE RICHARD NEUTRA-DESIGNED ARBORETUM DEPICTS THE ARCHITECT’S PHILOSOPHY OF “BIOREALISM,” WHICH HE DESCRIBED AS “THE INHERENT AND INSEPARABLE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MAN AND NATURE.” THE LIGHT-FILLED ARBORETUM SERVED AS AN INDOOR/OUTDOOR SANCTUARY SPACE FOR SCHULLER’S CONGREGATION, AND THE TELEVISION STUDIO FOR SCHULLER’S LIVE SERMON BROADCASTS, THE “HOUR OF POWER,” UNTIL 1980, WHEN THE CONGREGATION MOVED INTO THE CRYSTAL CATHEDRAL. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

1990

1998

Named in honor of donors John and Donna Crean, the Crean Bell Tower opens to great acclaim in the architectural world. Reaching 236 feet, its intricately designed stainless steel facets complement and amplify the Crystal Cathedral.

Tod David Brown is appointed third Bishop of Orange upon Bishop McFarland’s retirement at the age of 76.

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CATHEDRAL CAMPUS PASTORAL CENTER The doors opened to the Pastoral Center building in 1990, at a cost of $25 million and entirely debt free. It was designed by Gin Wong and Associates, also known for designing the Arco Tower and Midnight Mission in Los Angeles, as well as the futuristic Theme Building at LAX. The former Family Life Center served for many years as the Crystal Cathedral Academy. Featuring 132,000 square feet, the third and fourth floors now house the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange Pastoral Center, home to the offices of The Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange and the ministries of the diocese. These offices were originally located at Marywood in the city of Orange and moved to these facilities in 2013, shortly after the Diocese of Orange acquired the then-Crystal Cathedral campus. The first and second floors of the Pastoral Center are now home to the Christ Cathedral Academy, a state-of-the-art educational facility.

“

This will be a place of welcome for people of all faiths or no faith. We want it to be a shining example of what it means to do outreach to the poor or the marginalized. Here we will honor the human person. We will support the arts, music, dance, painting. We will make it a wonderful home.

�

- Father Christopher Smith, Rector and Episcopal Vicar, Christ Cathedral

PHOTOS COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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CHRIST CATHEDRAL ACADEMY Housed within the first and second floors of the Pastoral Center, St. Callistus Catholic School was relocated in 2013 to these new facilities and renamed Christ Cathedral Academy. This Catholic school accepts new students with classes for preschoolers through eighth grade. Offering innovative curricula from highly trained staff, Christ Cathedral Academy is a state-of-the art educational facility, featuring a full-sized gymnasium, dance studio, science lab, and more.

CATHEDRAL MEMORIAL GARDENS A peaceful, ecumenical cemetery, the Cathedral Memorial Gardens is located in the shadow of Christ Cathedral. The cemetery was dedicated in 1991 and offers many different burial options within tranquil grounds accented by flowing fountains, beautiful landscaping and majestic art installations. The Diocese of Orange is proud to offer Catholics, and those of all faiths and backgrounds, a beautiful, serene final resting place. Construction underway at the cemetery will expand the grounds by three quarters of an acre to provide additional interment space. Rev. Schuller and his wife, Arvella, are buried in the family plot area. The Cathedral Memorial Gardens is also the final resting place for some notable individuals including: n Marie Callender (Marie Callender’s Restaurants) n Thurl Ravenscoft (the voice of Tony the Tiger featured in Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes cereal commercials) n Roger Williams (popular pianist) n John and Donna Crean (Fleetwood Enterprises) CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

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Congratulations... to the Diocese of Orange on the Dedication of Christ Cathedral.

The movement of Orange County Cursillo is blessed to be a part of the heritage of the Diocese of Orange since Orange County Cursillo had it first weekend at Blessed Sacrament Parish in May 1977. Cursillo is established in over 60 countries. We are overjoyed to tell you that all three of our Bishops have made their Cursillo. Cursillo is a lay-led movement. The weekends focus on showing Christians how to become effective Christian leaders. Participants are encouraged to take what they have learned back out into the world. Our mission mirrors that of the Dioceses of Orange: We are diverse Catholics united in Christ, seeking to spread the Gospel and to follow the Gospel’s call to live out our faith and share our lives in service to others.

Make a Friend. Be a Friend. Bring that Friend to Christ. O God, who by the light of the Holy Spirit, instructs the hearts of the faithful, grant that by the same Holy Spirit we may be truly wise and ever rejoice in His consolations, through Christ Our Lord, Amen.

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CREAN TOWER AND MARY HOOD CHAPEL Named for John and Donna Crean whose contributions helped fund its construction, the Crean Tower was completed in 1990. Upon the tower’s completion, the Los Angeles Times declared that the (former) Crystal Cathedral “can now be truly classified as an Orange County landmark.” Designed by Philip Johnson, this stunning 236-foot stainless-steel mirrored spire stands over 18 stories tall and houses a magnificent 52-bell carillon. The Arvella Schuller Carillon was named in honor of her 35 years of service in bringing beautiful music to the church. This remarkable collection of bells ranges from six inches to nearly six feet and were forged by the Royal Eijsbouts Bell Foundry in the Netherlands. The entire carillon assembly weighs 42,000 pounds and was lifted into place on May 25, 1990, by two cranes working in tandem. The bells may be played manually from a room high inside the tower or remotely from a cell phone. Just below the tower is the Mary Hood prayer chapel, named for the wife of the late Clifford E. Hood, former president of the United States Steel Corporation, who made the chapel possible with a gift of $1 million dollars. The chapel is a circular structure set with 33 solid, multi-colored marble cylindrical columns, representing Jesus’ 33 years of life, and 12 white columns representing the 12 apostles. A bronze plaque on the floor seals a prayer capsule located beneath the altar that contains 33,000 unopened prayers received from around the globe, representing future generations. The chapel has no lock, as Rev. Schuller wished that it would be open to all for meditation.

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2000

2011

Mikhail Gorbachev, the former world leader of atheistic communism, came to the Crystal Cathedral Church services as the guest of his longtime friend, Rev. Schuller.

The Diocese of Orange launches its firstever capital campaign to transform the Crystal Cathedral and its grounds for Catholic worship.


CATHEDRAL CULTURAL CENTER Originally known as the Welcome Center, the Cathedral Cultural Center was completed in 2002. It was designed by world-renowned architect Richard Meier, also known for his commission of the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Jubilee Church in Rome, Italy. This five-floor, 53,056-square-foot building is the capstone of the iconic Christ Cathedral campus and is a post-modern expression of Richard Neutra’s original design concepts. It was built in an ovalinear design in order to geometrically complement the existing rectilinear architecture of the Arboretum and Tower of Hope and the triangular layout of the Crystal Cathedral. In 2013, the building was featured as Star Fleet Command in the film “Star Trek: Into Darkness” and the interior was used in several scenes throughout the movie. The lower level houses The Susan & Timothy Strader Family Atrium, an indoor/outdoor reception area and the state-of-the-art 298-seat Freed Performing Arts Theatre that features upgraded surround sound electronics and a movable orchestra pit. This theatre has welcomed movie premieres, theatrical presentations, concerts and other special events. The upper floors house world-class art and spiritual exhibits and offer many cultural events to the community. The current exhibit is Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel: The Exhibition. A bookstore and gift shop recently opened on the main level.

TOWER OF HOPE Designed by Richard Neutra and his son Dion, the 13-story Tower of Hope first opened in 1968. Named after New Hope Ministries, this building housed the very first 24-hour suicide prevention hotline (714-NEWHOPE), which today continues under the auspices of Catholic Charities of Orange County. The Tower of Hope has undergone a $7.8-million renovation and seismic upgrade and houses the offices of the Christ Cathedral Parish (formerly St. Callistus Parish). EWTN Global Catholic Network has its West Coast television news and broadcast facility located here and the diocese houses its radio production facility, airing content over Relevant Radio across Orange County. The ninth floor of the tower houses executive office suites for other worldwide Catholic ministries, including the Magis Institute, Dynamic Catholic, and other leading organizations. Topped by a 90-foot neon-lit cross, the Tower of Hope was the tallest building in Orange County at its opening and held this distinction for over 10 years. On the top floor is the 130-seat ecumenical Chapel in the Sky, with breathtaking panoramic views of Orange County.

2012 On November 17, a federal judge approves selling the Crystal Cathedral to the Diocese of Orange for $57.5 million. The sale is finalized on February 3, 2012 after Rev. Schuller convinces church board members to keep the building as a house of worship. “It is time for all believers not to focus on differences, but on respect and appreciation for our common goals,” Schuller said in a statement. “Today is not an ending; rather, it is a divine continuance of a beautiful, sacred campus that was dedicated to the greater glory of God.” After the papers were signed, he told future rector Father Christopher Smith that he wished the campus to be “a place for Christ forever.”

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ARBORETUM The newly renovated Arboretum has served as home to the Christ Cathedral Parish until their move into Christ Cathedral. It offers Sunday Masses in four languages (English, Spanish, Vietnamese and Chinese) attended by more than 10,000 people each week. Because of the age and delicate state of the Arboretum, diocesan crews took it down to steel and dirt and conducted extensive renovations, including

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creation of an innovative and energy-efficient underground air conditioning system. Also completed were seismic strengthening, glass replacement, landscaping and other aesthetic renovations. Since every element was specifically designed by the original architect, the diocese studied archival records to ensure that every dimension and pane of glass matched original specifications. Completed in just six months, the Arboretum’s amazing renovation has won several awards.


CHRIST CATHEDRAL A symbol of the unity of believers and their Church, cathedrals have been central to Catholic worship for thousands of years. A cathedral is the diocese’s “mother church” and the core of liturgical life. Standing 120 feet tall (12 stories), this 78,397-square-foot edifice is constructed entirely of glass and steel. With more than 11,000 panes of mirrored glass and seating for 2,100, the cathedral structure is known the world over for its inspiring beauty and breathtaking scale. Johnson Fain and Rios Clementi Hale Studios, respectively, redesigned the cathedral interior and re-sculpted the campus. The monumental task of converting an all-glass church into a space that is intrinsically Catholic and facilitates contemplative and solemn liturgical prayer, required inspired action that combined thoughtful accommodation for sacred ministry, while simultaneously honoring the property’s legacy. The renovated cathedral is the new home for the Christ Cathedral Parish (formerly St. Callistus Parish), an active Catholic church with over 10,000 diverse parishioners. “The cathedral will be an international center of faith and evangelization,” said Bishop Kevin Vann, “a vessel for the love of God, a beacon of faith, a home for neighbor and traveler, and a sanctuary for the human spirit.”

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Congratulations Felicidades

Chúc Mừng

축하해

to the Diocese of Orange and Bishop Kevin W. Vann on the magnificent transformation of Christ Cathedral into a world-class house of Catholic worship from Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, Auxiliary Bishop Jorge Rodriguez and all the faithful of the Archdiocese of Denver.

ar archden.org chden.org

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Our prayers are with you all as you continue your journey, spreading the Gospel of our Lord, Jesus Christ.


C o n g r a t u l a t io n s ! The family of God in Los Angeles extends warmest prayers and best w i s h e s t o t h e f am il y o f G o d i n Orange on the joyous occasion of the opening of their new Christ Catherdral. Star t your day with Always For ward. Receive news on LA and all over the globe from Angelus News. Sign up at AngelusNews.com

M ost R eveRend W ilton d. G ReGoRy A Rchbishop

of

W AshinGton

together with the Auxiliary Bishops of Washington

Most ReveRend MARio doRsonville Most ReveRend Roy cAMpbell Most ReveRend MichAel fisheR and the

l Ay f Aithful of the A Rchdiocese of W AshinGton congratulates the

d iocese

of

o RAnGe

on the dedication of its

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Bishop Thomas John Paprocki and the Clergy,

Religious and Laity of the

Diocese of Springfield in Illinois

Congratulate the people of the Diocese of Orange on the dedication of their beautiful

Christ Cathedral A special congratulations to Bishop Kevin Vann orginally from the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois. You make us proud.

We share your joy at the dedication of the beautiful

Christ Cathedral “For Christ Forever” St. Mary’s Cathedral in Peoria, Illinois, is now the resting place of Venerable Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen – known worldwide for his pioneering television and radio programs, engaging preaching, books and missionary efforts. We invite prayers for the Cause for Canonization of our famous native son. Visit celebratesheen.com.

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Congratulations from Most Rev. Daniel R. Jenky, C.S.C. and the faithful of the Diocese of Peoria


THE RENOVATION

B

ISHOP VANN BLESSED the construction project before crews started work on the initial phase of the restoration of the cathedral; the cleaning, repairing and replacing of the glass panes that make up the exterior of Christ Cathedral.

RESTORATION OF THE GLASS PANES Christ Cathedral is reportedly the largest glass-pane structure in the world, with more than 11,000 panes of tempered glass making up its exterior. The iconic cathedral houses the Hazel Wright Memorial Organ, one of the largest musical instruments in the world. If “large” is a theme, then it follows that cleaning and replacing the thousands of glass panes is a huge task—one that required a blessing. Before construction crews began to carefully disassemble, clean and replace the glass panels, the entire project, crew and equipment were blessed by Bishop Kevin Vann in an evening ceremony that marked the first major step in the renovation of the cathedral. Ryan Lilyengren, then-director of communications for the Diocese of Orange, said, “The Bishop was here blessing the tradespeople, the workmen, and a few panes of glass and some of the structures that will be used in this process. The people will be renovating, changing out the glass, recaulking and resealing all the glass.” He added, “This is really the first major step in the construction project of the cathedral transformation.” He noted that before any further work could begin, the building first had to be sealed and weather-proofed properly. The bishop, the vicar general and the financial supporters of the renovation were on hand for the Dec. 15, 2017 ceremony because as Catholics, Lilyengren said, we strive to make certain that all our endeavors are grounded in faith. CONTINUED ON PAGE 41

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ERECTING THE SCAFFOLDING An intricate maze of scaffolding was installed inside the cathedral to allow workers to clean the inside of the more than 11,000 glass windowpanes. It was also used to allow construction crewmembers to paint the nine-story space frame, and to install fire sprinklers, lighting and the quatrefoils. The elaborate scaffolding was in place in late July 2017 and was used through the summer of 2018. The structure consisted of 11 million parts and weighed approximately 1 million pounds. It was constructed much like an Erector Set and at its peak reached 120 feet high. The scaffolding, which included four “stair towers” and hoisting platforms used to raise supplies to workers in the highest levels, was said to be the second-largest scaffolding installation next to that installed during the renovation of the Statue of Liberty. When it was no longer needed, it took more than three months to disassemble.

ONE MILLION POUNDS OF SCAFFOLDING WAS INSTALLED INSIDE THE CATHEDRAL TO CLEAN AND PAINT THE SPACE FRAME AND TO INSTALL THE QUATREFOILS. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

THE ERECTOR SET-LIKE SCAFFOLDING IS SAID TO BE THE SECOND-LARGEST INSTALLATION OF ITS KIND, SECOND ONLY TO THE STATUE OF LIBERTY AS IT WAS RESTORED. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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INSTALLATION OF THE QUATREFOILS Interior restoration of the cathedral included the installation along the cathedral’s interior of thousands of aluminum powder-coated quatrefoils, which will deflect UV rays and heat from the glass. This system will allow the building to be air conditioned at a reasonable cost and improve acoustics without compromising the beauty and appeal of the glass structure. The quatrefoils have been installed along the cathedral’s ceiling and upper walls. More than 11,000 quatrefoils will make up the unique climate and sound-enhancing system. The triangles on each panel remain open to varying degrees (between 15 and 45) to let in light based on how the sun passes over the cathedral, the Very Rev. Christopher Smith, rector and episcopal vicar at Christ Cathedral, said. “Not only do they help with the acoustics and interior temperature but they’re also aesthetically beautiful.” The completion of the quatrefoil installation was a milestone moment in the process of the restoration. At a celebratory prayer service and dinner on Saturday, Oct. 13, 2018, attendees were awed by the timely appearance of a rainbow. The clouds parted after the rains and the sun broke through, setting the stage for a spectacular dusk for the more than 500 guests assembled outside Christ Cathedral.

DURING THE EVENING CELEBRATION OF THE COMPLETION OF THE QUATREFOIL INSTALLATION, A RAINBOW APPEARED OVER THE CATHEDRAL CAMPUS. BISHOP VANN IS SEEN POINTING IT OUT TO THE MORE THAN 500 PEOPLE GATHERED FOR A PRAYER SERVICE AND CELEBRATION. / PHOTO COURTESY BILL ALKOFER

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THE QUATREFOILS WERE INSTALLED ON THE CATHEDRAL’S CEILING AND UPPER WALLS. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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CHRIST CATHEDRAL GLOWS FROM THE INSIDE AS THE LIGHTS REFLECT FROM THE QUATREFOILS. / PHOTO COURTESY BILL ALKOFER

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SOURCING OF THE STONE AND TILE Bishop Vann was actively involved in the selection of the hard surfaces installed in the cathedral. He toured Grassi Family Stone/Marble Works, which supplied the stone for the flooring. White stone, imported from quarries near Verona, Italy, was installed across the cathedral’s floor and walls. The stonework was done by Carnevale and Lohr, the firm that recently installed the marble at Hearst Castle’s famed Neptune Pool. Carnevale and Lohr also did the stonework at the original Crystal Cathedral and the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles. All the cathedral’s stone was fabricated in Italy and shipped to the U.S. in 14 shipping containers. Stone was sourced from Italy, Germany, Tunisia and Turkey. The unique angular cuts and installation of the stone on the walls is very intricate and designed to enhance the acoustics in the cathedral. There are plates on the back of each piece of stone that allowed it to be cemented at the correct angles on the wall to assist in the reverberation of the Hazel Wright Organ. The stone on the flooring spans the interior of the worship area and continues through to the Blessed Sacrament Chapel and the Baptistry. It also is featured on the predella and outside of the festal doors. In early April 2017, Bishop Kevin Vann visited Italy, where he toured a stone and marble factory in Carrara to review the fabricating of marble for Christ Cathedral. Carrara is a town along the Carrione River in Tuscany, famous for the white and blue-grey marble quarried there. “This marble is beautiful and rare and will also be behind the cathedra and presider chairs,” Bishop Vann said.

THE BAPTISTRY IS MADE FROM THE SAME MARBLE AS THE ALTAR. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

THE BISHOP’S CHAIR, OR CATHEDRA, IS ONE OF THE ELEMENTS THAT IS REQUIRED FOR THE DESIGNATION AS A CATHOLIC CATHEDRAL. IT IS EVIDENCE THAT THE CATHEDRAL IS THE “SEAT OF THE BISHOP.” / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

2012 On Sept. 21 Pope Benedict XVI accepts Bishop Brown’s request for retirement, which the Code of Canon Law requires him to submit, replacing him with Kevin William Vann, the then-bishop of Fort Worth, Texas, who hails from Springfield, Ill.

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ASSEMBLY OF THE ALTAR, AMBO AND CATHEDRA

THE AMBO, FROM WHICH THE WORD OF GOD IS PROCLAIMED, IS CUT FROM THE SAME STONE AS THE ALTAR. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

To prepare for the delivery of the altar, cathedra and ambo, construction crews first poured concrete for the predella, a raised platform at the center of Christ Cathedral that is elevated approximately 21” above the primary worship level to enhance sightlines to the altar, ambo and cathedra. Access to the altar is via three broad steps ascending from the east and west sides of the sanctuary. The 13,940-pound altar, is made from Carrara marble carved from the mountains of Verona, Italy. Bishop Vann personally visited the quarry to meet the artisans and select the materials. It took many months of polishing and cutting to get the exact fit. Each item was assembled in Italy, disassembled for shipping and then reassembled and installed upon arrival at Christ Cathedral. The priests of the Diocese of Orange, who collectively donated nearly $900,000, commemorated the altar to Christ Cathedral. “It’s only fitting that the presbyterate gift and commemorate the altar, one of the most important parts of the cathedral,” said Tony Jennison, vice president of Philanthropy for the Orange Catholic Foundation. The ambo, the place from which the Word is proclaimed, was cut from the same stone as the altar. “It was one big, massive piece, and then they cut all the different pieces from that one big piece,” said Snyder Langston’s Construction Superintendent Greg McClure, who supervised the installation.

BISHOP VANN PERSONALLY SUPERVISED THE SELECTION OF THE MARBLE USED FOR THE ALTAR. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

2012 The Arboretum undergoes extensive renovation, thanks to the efforts of LPA Inc, Davis Partners/Hager Pacific Properties, the Cannon Building, and Lamprecht archiTEXTural. The restoration efforts win multiple prestigious design awards. The Arboretum serves as the temporary home to the more than 10,000 members of the Christ Cathedral Parish, with Sunday Masses taking place in multiple languages.

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RAISING OF THE CRUX GEMMATA The crux gemmata, suspended over the marble altar in Christ Cathedral, is the design of Brother William Woeger, FSC, liturgical consultant for the renovation project, and was fabricated by two talented teams. The corpus was created by the Ferdinand Stuflesser Studio in Ortisei, Italy. The corpus is made of a bleached- or white-cedar wood that was carved in the image of Christ. Crafted in Omaha, Nebraska from blackened steel and transported to Orange County in four separate pieces, the cross itself weighs 1,000 pounds, rises 18 feet above the cathedral’s altar and hangs from the baldachin. It is a cross typical of early medieval art, affixed with gems and the crowned corpus of Christ. Fabricator David Fitzpatrick put the finishing touches on the crux gemmata inside the cathedral before it was hoisted above the altar. “It’s a very big day today—it’s a great day,” Fitzpatrick said. “To be able to be here and see it be put up in place, and then years later be able to come back and say, ‘It’s still here,’ and enjoy it is an awesome feeling.” The raising of the crux gemmata signaled another symbolic milestone as Christ Cathedral transformed into a Catholic house of worship.

BISHOP KEVIN VANN CAPTURES THE MOMENT THE CRUX GEMMATA IS HOISTED INTO PLACE, MARKING A MILESTONE IN THE PROGRESS OF THE RENOVATION. / PHOTO COURTESY CHALLENGE RODDIE

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THE CRUX GEMMATA, WEIGHING 1,000 POUNDS, RISES 18 FEET ABOVE THE ALTAR. / PHOTO COURTESY CHALLENGE RODDIE


SACRED ART The sacred art found inside Christ Cathedral was created by six internationally recognized artists. It is designed to welcome worshippers into the presence of the Lord, to introduce the communion of saints and the glory of Our Lady, the Blessed Mother, as well as to accompany all on our journey of faith, inspired by the Holy Spirit. Pablo Eduardo, a Bolivian-born sculptor known for marrying his Spanish-American heritage with his training and intimate knowledge of his craft, designed four Manifestations of the Divinity of Christ, the 14 Stations of the Cross, and the festal doors. “Our inspiration is Christ-centered,” Eduardo says. “I am a Catholic. The more art I make for the Church, the more devout I become. For me, the figure of Christ represents the iconographic steps we take in our lives – He falls three times, gets up, and accepts His fate. All these things I’ve tried to depict differently, with a bit more modern iconography.” Eduardo’s sculptures, rendered in bronze, are recognized for capturing a snapshot of artistic metamorphosis while celebrating rhythm, emotion, texture and tension. He is known for developing close relationships with his clients. “I met with Bishop Vann and Father Christopher Smith (episcopal vicar to Christ Cathedral) and I think of them the whole time; I’m trying to capture their spirit, to speak in a way they understand. “We pray and we ask God to give us the ability to do something worthy of the responsibility they’ve entrusted to me,” Eduardo said. Brother William Woeger, a member of the Christ Cathedral Sacred Art Commission, served as a consultant on the art commissions and is one of the artists, responsible for creating the crux gemmata (crucifix over the altar), altar candles, Paschal candle, sanctuary lamps, reliquary (container for relics at the altar), and dedication candles. Other artists commissioned to create sacred art for Christ Cathedral include: the Ferdinand Stuflesser Studio in Ortisei, Italy, which made the corpus for the crux gemmata; the Valerio Lendarduzzi Studio in Fontanafredda, Italy, which created the Our Lady of Guadalupe mosaic, and the coats of arms mosaics in the narthex (an architectural element consisting of the entrance or lobby area, located at the west end of the nave, opposite the church’s main altar); Mia Tavontatti, an award-winning artist and painter, who created the baptistry mosaic; and ceramicist Brother Martin Erspamer, a monk of Saint Meinrad Archabbey, who created the tapestry of the Pantocrator, or Christ seated in glory as the Lord of Creation. Bro. Woeger said that some of the cathedral’s sacred art is inspired by the Egino Weinert tabernacle, completed in West Germany in the 1970s, which was acquired from the Weinert family in 2015 and will be the centerpiece of the Blessed Sacrament Chapel. Tabernacles are used to hold the Eucharist and provide a place where congregants often pray.

The cathedral’s artworks will include, among many others: n A crux gemmata, made of a bleached- or white-cedar image of Christ, suspended over the altar n Four bronze bas relief works that depict the manifestation of the Lord’s divinity in the Scripture: the Adoration of the Christ Child by the Magi, the Wedding Feast of Cana, the Transfiguration of the Lord on Mt. Tabor, and the Baptism of the Lord by John the Baptist n 14 Stations of the Cross, also created in bronze bas relief to be in continuity with the four manifestations n 12 dedication lights suspended from the cathedral’s interior walls, each representing the 12 Apostles In addition, stunning works in mosaic—a medium used in early Greek, Roman and Christian art—will adorn the cathedral. “Two floor mosaics will be located in the Narthex (the cathedral’s entry area),” Tony Jennison, vice president of philanthropy said. “They’ll depict two coats of arms: one for Pope Francis and one for Bishop Vann.” The Diocese’s patroness will also appear in mosaic. “The Our Lady of Guadalupe piece will be located on the cathedral’s south interior wall,” Jennison says.

THE TAPESTRY OF THE PANTOCRATOR, OR CHRIST SEATED IN GLORY AS THE LORD OF CREATION. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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OAK PEWS ARE BOLTED INTO PLACE When the cathedral was originally built by Rev. Schuller, the Marshall Company was the vendor that made and installed the original seating. The Idaho-based company was once again charged with manufacturing and installing the pews in Christ Cathedral. The pews are designed to seat 2,100 people. There are approximately 1,591 feet of pews on the main floor—a total of 135 pews on the worship level—and another 1,800 feet of pews among all three balconies, for a total of approximately 3,200 total linear feet. The pews are made of red oak, stained to a dark walnut. According to the company, the raw material (from Idaho) arrived at the plant and then was milled and “ripped.” The pews were built to exact specifications to maximize seating, while considering sightlines. They were sanded, sent to the finish room, into the trucks and delivered to the job site. The pew kneelers in the main floor have pistons on them to keep them from hitting the floor when lowered; they slowly go down and settle quietly without making any noise. They must be raised manually. The kneelers up in the balconies are automatic and they’ll raise back up when not in use. In February of this year, Fr. Christopher Smith, rector at Christ Cathedral, got his first glance at the pews. “This is my first time here in the future Christ Cathedral with the pews in, and it’s really starting to look like a church,” he said with a smile. “It’s wonderful to see these beautiful pews. We’ve been dreaming about them for years, and the beautiful dark color contrasts nicely with the lighter hues. They’re empty now, but in not too long of a time they will be filled with people and they will be beautiful pews when they’re filled with people.”

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With gratitude to the Christ Cathedral Guild members who have generously commemorated an item in Christ Cathedral or on the Christ Cathedral campus as of June 1, 2019 Deeann & Al Baldwin & Family • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration

Dr & Mrs Robert Hamra & Family • Adoration of Christ by the Magi

Tim & Steph Busch • Tabernacle

Richard & Regina Hunsaker • Diocesan & Bishop Coat of Arms

Bill & Helen Close - In Honor of Our Lady of the Angels Cathedral in Los Angeles •Our Lady of Guadalupe Shrine

S Michael & Lynn Joseph - The Joseph Family Foundation • Wedding Feast at Cana

John & Lucy Curci Family • Cathedral Festal Doors • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration Ben & Carmela Du •Blessed Sacrament Chapel Dennis & Lynne Jilot • Crux Gemmata Yvonne & Damien Jordan •The Victory of the Lamb Frank & Susan Kavanaugh - Kavanaugh Family • Station XI - Jesus Is Nailed to the Cross • Arboretum Fountain Walk Peter & Mary Muth Foundation • Meditation Courtyard

Donald Alves & Family In Memory of Patricia Alves • Offertory Table

John A & Lyn B McKinney • Station VI - Veronica Wipes the Face of Jesus • Station XIII - Jesus Is Taken Down From the Cross

The Terrance K & Elizabeth L Barry Foundation • Blessed Sacrament Lamp

Trish & John O’Donnell • Cathedral Nativity Set Joe & Karen Perricone - In Memory of Bishop William Johnson • Bishop Vann Coat of Arms, Narthex Michelle Rohe •Hazel Wright Organ Restoration Timothy & Jennifer Buckley • Holy Oil Ambry

The Roberto Foundation • Christ The King Tapestry Barbara & Douglas Stephen • Baptistry • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration

Jeff & Susan Hamar • Station VIII - Jesus Meets the Women of Jerusalem

Susan & Timothy Strader & Family • Cultural Center Atrium

Roger & Tracy Kirwan, In Memory of Gail Logozzo Kirwan • Pew

In Honor of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Orange • Unity and Reconciliation Chapel Presbyterate of the Diocese of Orange • Altar

Wayne & Lisa Stelmar In Memory of Thad & Florence Stelmar • Station II - Jesus Carries His Cross

Gerda Khouw • Worship Level Sacristy

Mr & Mrs Michael E Flynn • Station V - Simon of Cyrene Helps Carry the Cross

ErmaJean & Thomas Tracy Family Foundation • Cathedral and Sedilla

Valerie Rafferty - In Memory of Richard Q Rafferty • Station XIV - Jesus Is Placed In The Tomb

A Gift from Roger, Tracy, Nicole & Sean Kirwan • Cathedral Dedication Candle Gift from Susan Mears in Memory of James Mears • Paschal Candle Stand Deborah & Patrick Powers • Station IX - Jesus Falls For the Third Time

Ronald & Carol Berg - Berg Family Trust • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration Ricardo & Michelle Brutocao • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration Dr Thomas & Dr Cynthia Coad • Choral Director’s Podium Jacqueline Lehn DuPont & Marc W Carlson • Station IV - Jesus Meets His Mother Gabriel & Maria Ferrucci • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration Ralph & Oonagh Linzmeier • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration John & Denise McGraw • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration Stephen & Cathy Muzzy • Steinway Piano of Christ Cathedral Jean & William O’Connell Family • Station XII: Jesus Dies on the Cross Kenneth & Valetta Tait • Baptistry Candle The Ahmanson Foundation • Hazel Wright Organ Restoration


THE FESTAL DOORS, ALSO CALLED THE BISHOP’S DOORS, TELL THE STORIES OF THE BIBLE. / PHOTOS COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

FESTAL DOORS ARE HUNG Catholic cathedrals do not earn their distinction as a cathedral because of their size or architecture. A cathedral is designated as such because it is the seat of the bishop of that particular diocese. It contains the bishop’s chair, called the cathedra. Another distinction marking a cathedral are the bishop’s doors, also called the festal doors. Christ Cathedral’s festal doors were created by artist and sculptor Pablo Eduardo. He also created several other sacred art pieces for the cathedral including the Stations of the Cross. The blackened steel doors, weighing 7,000 pounds, feature a bronze inlay that Eduardo says captures some of the most significant stories in the Bible. “The first part is ‘emptiness,’” Eduardo explains. “Then the ‘hands of God,’ and they create the cosmos. Then ‘Adam and Eve’ and the Garden of Eden.” Eduardo continues: “Then there’s the serpent. Eve eating the apple. There’s the ‘Cain and Abel’ story, and then the ‘Sacrifice of Isaac.’” The linear art is, according to Eduardo, like a movie trailer. “You see different images. You focus on things that come out and then you focus on another thing.” “I’m really, really honored to have the opportunity to do this,” he said. “When I was a very, very young artist I always liked this kind of sacred art. I would look at churches and I would say, ‘Wow!’” “We’ve done works in other churches before, but to do this for Christ Cathedral, being the architectural gem that it is in the center for Orange County, it’s one of the biggest honors so far in my life.”

We’ve done works in other churches before, but to do this for Christ Cathedral, being the architectural gem that it is in the center for Orange County, it’s one of the biggest honors so far in my life.

- Pablo Eduardo, sculptor and artist who created the artwork for the festal doors

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Quatrefoils

Approximately 11,000 quatrefoils line the glass of Christ Cathedral. Made of aluminum, the triangle-shaped panels are perforated to allow for sunlight, while also deflecting ultraviolet rays and heat from the glass. The quatrefoils have a polycarbonate backing and fiber to improve acoustics for the Hazel Wright Organ, as well as the choirs when they sing.

Inside Christ Cathedral Christ Cathedral is the spiritual home of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange and Orange County’s 1.3 million Catholics. The cathedral will become a place of pilgrimage for people of all faiths and a beacon of Christianity on the West Coast, serving as a place of not only worship, but faith formation, evangelization, charitable work, art and culture. Since its completion in 1980, the iconic structure has been recognized as a historically significant architectural landmark and has undergone a five-year renovation to transform into a Catholic cathedral. Today, Christ Cathedral and its surrounding 34-acre campus serve as a place where Catholics and believers of all traditions throughout Southern California and across the globe can gather to express their faith. The Diocese of Orange is proud to be a steward of Dr. Robert Schuller’s vision that the cathedral serve as a beacon of faith and a platform to preach the power of unconditional love, hope and the idea that through belief in Jesus Christ, anything is possible. The Diocese of Orange’s commitment to being a good steward of Christ Cathedral ensures its future relevance as a center of worship. As the Most Rev. Bishop Kevin Vann once described Christ Cathedral: “This gift from God is not just for us but also for the ages to come.”

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Cathedra

The bishop’s chair, or cathedra, forms the central element of the bench on the north wall of the sanctuary. It can accommodate the deacon assistants to the bishop at stational liturgies as well as a place for the nonepiscopal presider at a daily or Sunday liturgy. Above the cathedra will be the bishop’s coat of arms fabricated in inlaid stone incorporating both the diocesan heraldic insignia and that of the current bishop.

Baptistry

Located in the west side of the cathedral near the Memorial Gardens, the baptistry is shaped like an octagon, for the 7 days of creation and the 8th for the “new creation”. The cross-shaped baptismal font is made of stone matching that of the cathedra, altar and ambo. The floor of the baptismal font features black Chi-Rho, the christogram of Greek letters for Christ mosaic tile by Orange County artist Mia Tavonatti.

Festal Doors

The artwork on the cathedral’s Festal Doors was created by sculptor Pablo Eduardo. The ornamental bronze band crosses blacked steel doors at the festal entrance into the cathedral. The artwork depicts the creation of Adam and Eve, God walking with Adam in the garden. The halfway mark will be the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. The other half of the story is the fall: Adam and Eve eating the fruit, being aware of their nakedness, and banishment from the garden.

Altar and Relics

Commemorated by priests of the Diocese of the cathedral’s 14,000-pound stone altar c the interred physical remains of saints in it Among the holy relics interred beneath th bone from the hand of Vietnamese Catho Andrew Dũng-Lạc, who was beheaded in his faith. The altar also contains holy relics f Korean martyrs (St. Andrew Kim Taegon, ma Mexican martyrs (St. Atilano Cruz Alvarado an Justino Orona Madrigal), and North American marty John de Brébeuf, S.J., Saint Charles Garnier, S.J., Saint Lalemant, S.J), as well as St. Junípero Serra, Pope Saint Paul II and St. Rafael Guizar Valencia.


Hazel Wright Organ

One of the largest pipe organs in the world, the famed Hazel Wright Organ was inaugurated in 1982 at Crystal Cathedral — the precursor to Christ Cathedral. In early 2014, the organ was dismantled as part of Christ Cathedral’s renovation and shipped for restoration to Fratelli Ruffatti workshop in Padua, Italy. In early 2016, the Hazel Wright Organ was shipped back to California where it was temporarily stored in an Irvine warehouse before being reinstalled in Christ Cathedral. The organ currently comprises 270 ranks over fourteen divisions, and has more than 16,000 pipes. The console has five manuals.

Pantocrator

Ambo

To the right of the sanctuary area and suspended from the architectural space frame is the monumental 16’ x 30’ tapestry of Christ seated in Glory as Lord of Creation (Pantocrator). The tapestry was created by Brother Martin Erspamer, OSB, and woven in Belgium. Four images, one in each corner, represent the four evangelists. The two fingers represent Jesus being divine and human.

The ambo, or place for the proclamation of the Word of God, is set back from the altar to accommodate clear visual sight lines for the entire assembly, both from the floor of the cathedral proper as well as from the balconies. The ambo is cut from the same stone as the altar. Similar to a pulpit with steps, it is prominently placed within the cathedral for reading scripture and homilies. Next to the ambo will be the stand for the Paschal candle, stylistically reminiscent of the ancient Roman Basilicas.

Crux Gemmata

Blessed Sacrament Chapel

Made from blackened steel and affixed with polished semi-precious gems. The cross contains a bleached wood corpus of Christ, which was hand carved in Italy. The 1,000-pound Crux Gemmata, reminiscent of a Medieval precious cross, hangs from a metallic baldachin about 18ft. above worship level floor.

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Our Lady of Guadalupe

Our Lady of Guadalupe is the patroness of the Diocese of Orange, as well as the patroness of the Americas. Traditionally, churches have an image of their patron/patroness in a prominent place in the main body of the church. The mosaic by Valerio Lenarduzzi Studio in Fontanafredda, Italy, hangs in axial symmetry to the altar and cathedra on the south interior wall of the cathedral.

Coat of Arms

There are two coat of arms mosaics near the entrance of the cathedral in the Narthex, one for Pope Francis as the sitting Pope at the time of the cathedral dedication, and another for Bishop Vann as the sitting Bishop of Orange.

Located in the east end of the cathedral, entrance into the Blessed Sacrament Chapel will at times be possible outside of the regular opening hours of the cathedral. Circular in shape, the chapel’s centerpiece is the tabernacle, where the consecrated Eucharist is kept for the sick and the dying as well as prayer and adoration. The tabernacle was created by the celebrated German liturgical artist Egino Weinert and features four painted panels depicting a scene from Jesus Christ’s life and is visible from most areas on the cathedral’s worship level. It sits on a five-sided bronze pedestal that features engravings giving a visual narrative of the life of Christ from his birth to his resurrection.

Undercroft

In addition to providing support spaces for cathedral liturgies and other functions, this area beneath the sanctuary includes a large vesting room for the more than two hundred diocesan priests, sacristies, a choir practice room, restrooms, and bride-family rooms, a media broadcasting center and a number of other critical rooms. After a future phase of construction, the undercroft is foreseen to include the St. Callistus Chapel, named after the former home of the Christ Cathedral Parish, as well as cremation nitches and bishops crypts that will be located beneath the worship level.

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THE HAZEL WRIGHT ORGAN BY DEEPA BHARATH

“Hazel” has waited a long time for this. About five years ago, after the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange purchased the Crystal Cathedral in 2012, the church’s 16,000-pipe organ named after its benefactor, Hazel Wright, was taken apart piece by piece from its long-time home, the glass sanctuary envisioned and erected by famed televangelist the Rev. Robert H. Schuller. After a trip to Italy and four years in a temperature-controlled storage unit, Hazel is now back where she belongs. Since late January, Piero Ruffatti, the man who built the Hazel Wright organ for the Schullers in 1981, has returned to the same sanctuary, supervising the installation of the legendary instrument which he says will have a place in his heart and in his family’s legacy forever.

SPIRITUAL STRENGTH AND INSPIRATION It’s going to take about a year to resuscitate Hazel at a cost to the diocese of $2.9 million, all of it raised by the Orange Catholic Foundation. The overall cost of the cathedral renovation now stands at $77 million, including the considerable expense of bringing one of the world’s most famous organs back to life. Bishop Kevin Vann admits the costs are staggering. He says it’s natural for the public to question why a church should spend tens of millions on a glittering building and a humongous organ when that money could go to help solve issues such as hunger and homelessness. Bishop Vann says there are several organizations within the Catholic Church, such as Catholic Charities of Orange County, which serves as the diocese’s social service agency dedicated to helping the needy. According to Catholic Charities of Orange County’s 2017 tax filings, it had an annual budget of about $3 million. The bishop says he hopes the sanctuary and its music will help inspire the faithful in Orange County and beyond to do good deeds. “I hope the people, when they come here and hear the sound of this magnificent instrument, will be spiritually inspired to go forth and spring into action to help others and make this world a better place,” he said. Reviving the building and the organ is also about continuing the legacy of Schuller and the Crystal Cathedral, Bishop Vann said. “That has always been important to us,” he said.

HISTORY AND LEGACY Music was an integral part of the Crystal Cathedral’s ministry including its weekly “Hour of Power” television broadcasts, which in their heyday had more than 100 million viewers worldwide. These millions watched organist Frederick Swann and other skilled musicians perform on the Hazel Wright organ over the years.

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THE HAZEL WRIGHT ORGAN, BEFORE BEING DISASSEMBLED AND SHIPPED TO ITALY FOR RESTORATION. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

Ruffatti, now 75, remembers meeting Arvella Schuller in the New York City office of Crystal Cathedral architect Philip Johnson, around 1980. The pastor’s wife, a skilled organist and musician herself, was the force behind the church’s music ministry. “Arvella wanted a special organ, something that was magnificent,” Ruffatti said. “She wanted big sounds, grandeur.” The Schullers got what they wanted, and more. Under the supervision of master organist Virgil Fox, the Ruffattis grafted a 100-rank Aeolian-Skinner organ purchased from the Philharmonic Hall in New York City with a 97-rank Ruffatti organ built in 1977 for the sanctuary now known as the Arboretum on campus, which at the time housed Schuller’s Garden Grove Community Church. The Hazel Wright organ was born. Its benefactor, a long-time viewer of Schuller’s “Hour of Power,” donated $2 million for the organ’s construction and upkeep. The organ the Ruffattis built featured 270 ranks, or sets, of pipes from four inches to 32 feet long, five keyboards, and the largest draw-knob console in the world to control the sound. It could play a range from the highest pitch to the lowest, and could produce all sounds — from the softest to the most majestic.

MEMORIES AND NOSTALGIA Swann, who played the Hazel Wright organ almost every Sunday for 17 years at the Crystal Cathedral, from 1982 to 1998, said he can’t wait to hear those majestic sounds once more. Swann, 87, now lives in Palm Desert.


In May 2013, he played a “farewell concert” for Hazel’s fans. In January 2020, he says, he’ll return to Garden Grove to hear the sounds of his favorite organ again. Over the years, Swann has received thousands of comments about what the organ meant to those who came to the cathedral. “As organists, we appreciate the beauty we can create through music,” he said. “It’s almost like a beautiful piece of architecture. For many, the music brings them closer to God. It’s meaningful and beautiful at so many levels.” Swann has had unforgettable moments with Hazel. Like the time he played First Lady Barbara Bush’s favorite hymn during a service. Or when he performed with Metropolitan Opera singer Beverly Sills. He’s even performed with animals during the Crystal Cathedral’s annual “Glory of Christmas” shows, and once played with a 350-pound tiger on top of the console. So, this is an organ with a rich history and an aura of celebrity. Hazel even has her own Facebook page with more than 1,700 followers. THE HAZEL WRIGHT ORGAN AS IT NOW LOOKS, HAVING BEEN RESTORED AND REASSEMBLED IN CHRIST CATHEDRAL. IT IS SAID TO BE THE FIFTH-LARGEST ORGAN IN THE WORLD. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

GOLD TRUMPETS ARE POSITIONED THROUGHOUT THE CATHEDRAL. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

RETURN TO FORMER GLORY In addition to the cost, it has taken a lot of work to restore and nurse this instrument back to its former glory, said Dr. John Romeri, the diocese’s director of Music Ministry. Heat, humidity, rain, smog and lack of proper maintenance during the Crystal Cathedral’s bankrupt final years took their toll on this majestic instrument, he said. “The pipes became infested with termites and insects,” Romeri said. “The once-beautiful trumpets—about 400 of them—had become corroded. Some of the pipes had melted and collapsed in the heat.” Once the organ is fully installed and ready a year from now, the public will hear its real sound, better than before, because the sanctuary will now be temperature-controlled. When Swann played the organ, he said, he and the instrument were under the mercy of the elements. If it was hot or sunny, he wouldn’t be able to use parts of the organ just as when it was rainy, windy or when the temperature dropped below 40 degrees, because it would be out of tune. Now, thanks to a temperature-controlled environment, Swann said, all parts of the organ can be used, all the time. While the dedication of Christ Cathedral is July 17, the organ must still be “voiced” and will be ready in early 2020. C Reprinted with permission from The Orange County Register.

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Sheppard Mullin congratulates and proudly supports the Diocese of Orange and Bishop Vann on the dedication of Christ Cathedral

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HOLY RELICS GIFTED TO CHRIST CATHEDRAL BY DOUGLAS MORINO

T

HEIR WORDS ECHO across generations. Their legacies inspire millions. Catholic saints lived with discipline and dedication, working to ensure their actions and words aligned with God’s will. They are heroes of the Catholic faith, serving as examples of how to live a holy life. Physical objects connected to Catholic saints—bones, blood and clothing—are considered sacred relics and venerated by the faithful. Christ Cathedral’s stone altar will be home to the relics of martyrs and saints who reflect the diversity of the Diocese of Orange. “The relics of the saints which will be enclosed beneath the altar in Christ Cathedral connect us directly with the witness and life of the early martyrs of the Church whose remains were placed in the Roman Catacombs,” said Most Rev. Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange. “The relics connected with the altar teach us of the Communion of Saints, our worship and prayer, and the witness we all need to give daily to Christ in our world.” The relics are from saints and martyrs from across history, and across the globe, who lived and died for their faith. “Christ Cathedral is a beacon of Christ’s light,” said Msgr. Stephen Doktorczyk, vicar general of the Diocese of Orange, who helped bring the relics of the North American Martyrs to the Diocese. “Having relics available for veneration brings to the present an ancient tradition that traces its roots back to the time of Elisha, 850 years before Christ.” The tradition of placing relics in the altars of Catholic churches and cathedrals is solemn and sacred. “We look to these holy men and women as examples of how to live our faith and they can inspire us to live holy lives, as they do for so many people today,” said Lesa Truxaw, director of the Office for Worship for the Diocese of Orange. Relics are classified in three categories. A first-class relic is a part of the saint’s body, such as a bone. A second-class relic is a piece of the saint’s clothing or something used by the saint, while a third-class relic is an object that has been touched by the saint or by a first-class relic.

THE RELIQUARY IS PLACED UNDER THE CATHEDRAL’S 14,000-POUND ALTAR. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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The relics of Christ Cathedral are first class, and come from as far away as Vietnam and South Korea. They have been authenticated by a competent authority, including leaders at the dioceses and religious orders from where they came. At Christ Cathedral, each of the relics will be placed in a cedar box that will go inside the altar’s bronze reliquary, which is embellished with precious stones. The reliquary is enclosed and fixed into place in the base of the altar. Before they were interred in the cathedral’s 14,000-pound altar, the relics were brought on a pilgrimage to parishes in the Diocese. Solemn evening prayer will be celebrated followed by an extended vigil to venerate the relics the night before the cathedral’s dedication. The relics from Vietnamese, Korean, North American and Mexican martyrs and saints symbolize the diversity of the Catholic community in Orange County. By venerating the relics and the lives of saints, Catholics in Orange County can grow closer to their faith, and each other. “When we began to look for relics for Christ Cathedral we knew we wanted a representation of who we are as a Diocese,” Truxaw said. “We can learn a lot about our faith through other cultures. We can come to understand the importance of our faith through those who see life through a different lens.”

ST. POPE JOHN PAUL II Among the most influential figures of the 20th century, Karol Józef Wojtyła was ordained a priest in 1946 and elected pope by Papal conclave on October 16, 1978, becoming the first non-Italian Catholic pope in more than 400 years. He adopted the name Pope John Paul II in honor of his predecessor, Pope John Paul I, who died 33 days after being elected pope. Considered among the Catholic Church’s most transformative figures, Pope John Paul II visited 129 countries during his pontificate, spreading a message of faith, peace and love. He was an advocate for human rights and inspired tens of millions to find the Lord’s call. St. Pope John Paul II was canonized on April 27, 2014 by Pope Francis.

ST. JUNÍPERO SERRA Few figures in western Catholicism are more known than Junípero Serra, the Franciscan friar who traveled across Mexico and Alta California in the 18th century on a legendary mission to share his Catholic faith. The Diocese of Orange’s origins—along with the roots of Catholicism in Orange County, California and the United States—can be traced to Serra. The Spanish-born Serra founded the first missions in the California mission system, including Mission San Juan Capistrano in 1776. “St. Serra brought faith to our state and specifically here in our county,” Truxaw said. St. Serra was canonized by Pope Francis in 2015, and his relic interred at Christ Cathedral is a bone fragment that was donated to the Diocese.

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ST. ANDREW DŨNG-LẠC

St. Andrew Dũng-Lạc was a Vietnamese priest in the 19th century who was persecuted and killed for his spiritual beliefs. He was among 117 Catholics martyred in Vietnam between 1820 and 1862. The relic—a bone from the saint’s hand—was gifted to the Diocese of Orange by Pierre Cardinal Nguyên Văn Nhon of the Archdiocese of Hanoi. The remains of St. Andrew Dũng-Lạc, including his skull, are on display behind glass at St. Joseph’s Cathedral in Hanoi. Rev. John Francis Vu, Catholic chaplain at the University of California, Irvine, travelled to Hanoi in November to accept the relic from Cardinal Nguyen. Cardinal Nguyen handed Rev. Vu the relic at the cardinal’s private residence near the cathedral. Early the next morning, Cardinal Nguyen received word that Pope Francis accepted the resignation the cardinal had submitted 5 ½ years earlier, and that his retirement would be effective at noon Rome time that very day. Gifting the relic to the Diocese of Orange would be Cardinal Nguyen’s final official act before retirement. Orange County is home to the largest Vietnamese population outside of Vietnam and the Archdiocese of Hanoi is the sister diocese of the Diocese of Orange. “This relic symbolizes the strong bond between our Catholic community in Orange County, and the Catholic community in Vietnam,” Bishop Vann said. St. Andrew Dũng-Lạc was canonized in June 1988 by Pope John Paul II.

ST. ANDREW KIM TAEGON The first native-born Korean priest, St. Andrew Kim Taegon is among the most prominent saints in east Asia. He was among thousands of Korean Catholics who were persecuted and killed in the 19th century for following their faith. He was killed in 1846, at the age of 25, on the banks of the Han River near Seoul. St. Andrew Kim Taegon was canonized by Pope John Paul II in May 1984, along with 102 Korean martyrs. A delegation from the Archdiocese of Seoul travelled to Orange County in December, delivering the relic of St. Andrew Kim Taegon to Auxiliary Bishop Tim Freyer, who accepted it on behalf of Bishop Vann and the Diocese of Orange. A member of the four-person delegation stayed with the relic at all times while en route. The relic is a bone from the upper cervical vertebrae. St. Andrew Kim Taegon is an influential figure for Korean Catholics, and his portrait is often prominently displayed in churches serving Korean-American communities. “Having a relic of St. Andrew inside the cathedral serves as a rallying point for the Korean Catholic community, not only those from the Diocese of Orange, but from all of Southern California,” said Rev. Eugene Lee, who served as a liaison between the Diocese of Orange and the Archdiocese of Seoul to bring a relic to Christ Cathedral.


NORTH AMERICAN MARTYRS

ST. ATILANO CRUZ ALVARADO

St. John de Brébeuf, St. Charles Garnier and St. Gabriel Lalemant were French Jesuit priests who lived and worked among the Native American tribes in Canada and upstate New York in the 17th century. They were killed during conflict between the warring tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy. They were canonized as martyrs by Pope Pius XI in 1930. Along with 5 other Jesuit missionaries killed in Canada and upstate New York between 1642 and 1649, they are known collectively as the North American Martyrs. Their relics were obtained by Msgr. Stephen Doktorczyk, vicar general for the Diocese of Orange, who corresponded with officials from the Jesuits USA Northeast Province, based in New York City. “The diocese is grateful for the kindness and cooperation of the USA Northeast Province of the Society of Jesus, including Father John J. Cecero, S.J., Provincial, in responding positively to the Diocese’s request for relics,” Doktorczyk said.

Born on October 5, 1901 in the tiny village of Ahuetita de Abajo in Jalisco, Mexico, Atilano herded cattle until his native parents sent him to the town of Teocaltiche for schooling. He began his seminary studies there, continued in Guadalajara, and was ordained at the height of the religious persecution when it was a felony to be a priest. Thereafter he was sent to replace St. Toribio Romo, another martyr, in the parish of Cuquío, Jalisco, but hidden on the ranch of Ponciano Jiménez called Las Cruces. Eleven months after his ordination, 50 soldiers arrived in the dead of night on July 1, 1928 with civilian authorities. When Atilano heard them killing his superior, Justino Orona, he knelt in prayer to await them. His naked body, deposited by the soldiers in the city square, was retrieved and buried by the faithful at the parish church of Cuquío, where it is venerated today. He was canonized on May 21, 2000 by Pope John Paul II. C

ST. RAFAEL GUÍZAR Y VALENCIA St. Rafael Guízar y Valencia was a Mexican Catholic bishop who lived in the late 19th and early 20th century. He was known for caring for the sick and was wounded during the Mexican Revolution. During the revolution, he continued his work as a priest despite facing intense persecution and was forced to flee to Cuba. After the revolution he returned to Mexico, and continued his ministry to the poor and infirmed until his death in 1938. St. Rafael Guízar y Valencia was canonized in October 2015 by Pope Benedict XVI. The relic was gifted to the Diocese and Bishop Vann by Rev. Al Baca.

ST. JUSTINO ORONA MADRIGAL Born in April 1877 in Jalisco, Mexico, Justino was the son of an extremely poor family. He completed his initial studies at Zapotlán before entering Guadalajara’s seminary. After his ordination, he served as a parish priest at Poncitlán, Encarnación, Jalisco, and Cuquío. Despite an atmosphere of anticlericalism and religious indifference, he was an exemplary priest. While he was pastor of Cuquío, he founded the Congregation of Claretian Brothers of the Sacred Heart to care for orphans and poor children. When the persecution intensified, he and his associate, (St.) Atilano Cruz, decided to remain with their flock despite the danger, but hid themselves on the nearby ranch of Las Cruces with Justino’s brother José María and Toribio Ayala. Federal forces arrived there at dawn on July 1, 1928 with the mayor of Cuquío. Justino opened the door, shouted “Viva Cristo Rey!” and was shot. St. Justino Orona Madrigal was canonized on May 21, 2000 by Pope John Paul II.

SAINT POPE JOHN PAUL II (PICTURED LEFT WITH SAINT MOTHER TERESA) AND (PICTURED RIGHT) A STATUE OF SAINT JUNIPERO SERRA / CNS PHOTO/ NANCY WIECHEC

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7-17-2019

May Christ Cathedral be a beacon of love, faith and hope for all.

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OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE, PATRONESS OF THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE BY GREG MELLEN

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ERS IS AS ICONIC AN IMAGE as there is in local Catholicism: Hands steepled, a modest, downward gaze, clad in a pink robe and blue mantle covered with stars, bathed in light. Occasionally she is crowned. She is the Virgin Mary as she appeared to a peasant nearly 600 years ago, Our Lady of Guadalupe. Her image has been seen and represented countless times over the centuries, in paintings, carvings and textiles. Museum exhibitions have been dedicated to her and her religious, historic and cultural importance. Her image can be seen in everything from priceless works of art to all manner of tchotchke. Millions of parishioners traverse the globe to commune and seek healing and comfort. To the Diocese of Orange, Our Lady of Guadalupe is about much more than the iconic image. Her message resonates today as much as ever. “As the patroness of the Americas and of the Diocese of Orange, places of immense cultural, ethnic, religious and economic diversity, she stands as an affirmation of our dignity as human persons and the responsibility we have to in turn, respect and honor one another,” said Father Christopher Smith, rector and episcopal vicar of Christ Cathedral. In 1895, Pope Leo XIII crowned her with a canonical coronation and Pope Pius II named her “Patroness of the Americas” in 1946, a title that was reiterated by Pope John Paul II in 1999. When the Diocese of Orange was created in 1976, Our Lady of Guadalupe was named its patroness. Her roots run deep throughout the diocese and the region. “Devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe was brought to what is now Orange County by the priests who established Mission San Juan Capistrano in the 18th century,” Fr. Smith said. “Naming Our Lady of Guadalupe as the patroness of the newly established Diocese of Orange provided a powerful link to the beginnings of the Catholic Church in the county.” Her importance will be underscored at Christ Cathedral as it will be home to one of the most impressive mosaics of Our Lady of Guadalupe

PHOTO COURTESY GREG O’LOUGHLIN

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anywhere. The 10-by-7-foot commissioned tile mosaic on the entry wall features more than 55,000 tiles of gold and opaque glass. Created by internationally renowned artist Valerio Lenarduzzi and his studio, it will include a 22-by-20-inch crown, made of gold leaf, and available to adorn Our Lady’s head for devotionals and on feast days. The diocese has three Our Lady of Guadalupe-named parishes and a school named in her honor in La Habra that has provided Catholic education for more than 50 years. Each year, congregants across the Southland celebrate the days surrounding the December 12 feast day of Our Lady of Guadalupe with colorful processions and vigils, homemade shrines and religious observances and Masses. In 2016-17, Orange County played host to the first exhibition in the United States devoted to images of the Blessed Virgin of Guadalupe in Mexican colonial art, organized by the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana. The appearance of Our Lady of Guadalupe is well known in the Latin community, less so outside. It commemorates the encounters between Mary and Cuauhtlatoatzin native Juan Diego in Mexico in 1531, in which she asked that a church be built in her honor. After Diego twice brought her message to the archbishop and was rebuffed, the Virgin Mary had Diego gather flowers in his cloak, or tilma. When the peasant returned to the bishop, a cascade of roses fell from his jacket and a mysterious image of Our Lady was revealed in the garment. It is that image that has been reproduced across the ages and is among the more recognizable in Latin and Church culture. The cloak remains on display and in good condition at the basilica bearing her name in Mexico, considered the most important Catholic site in the Americas, and visited by millions each year. Or, as Fr. Smith put it, “This connection and devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe continues to be an important part of 21st century Catholicism in the Diocese of Orange.” C THE INTRICATE MOSAIC OF OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE WAS CAREFULLY RAISED INTO PLACE INSIDE THE CATHEDRAL ON JUNE 14, 2019. / PHOTO COURTESY KIMBERLY PORRAZZO

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2012

2012

Fr. Christopher Smith is announced in March as the cathedral’s episcopal vicar and rector.

On June 9, the diocese announces that the transformed cathedral will be known as Christ Cathedral.


A LARGE TILE MOSAIC OF OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE, THE PATRONESS OF THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE AND CALIFORNIA, IS LOCATED AT THE CATHEDRAL’S SOUTH INTERIOR WALL. THE MOSAIC STANDS 10 FEET BY 7 FEET AND IS MADE UP OF MORE THAN A 55,000 TILES OF GOLD AND OPAQUE GLASS. A 22-BY-20-INCH CROWN, MADE OF GOLD LEAF RATHER THAN MOSAIC, WAS ALSO DESIGNED TO ADORN OUR LADY’S HEAD AT DEVOTIONALS AND FOR FEAST DAYS. THE COMMISSIONED ART, DEPICTING THE TRADITIONAL IMAGE OF OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE, WAS CREATED BY INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED ART MOSAIC ARTIST VALERIO LENARDUZZI AND HIS STUDIO, LENARDUZZI MOSAICS OF ITALY. / PHOTO COURTESY GREG O’LOUGHLIN

2013 St. Callistus Parish on June 29 moves in a procession up Lewis Street to its new home at the Christ Cathedral campus. “This will be a place of welcome for people of all faiths or no faith,” says Father Christopher Smith, cathedral rector. “We want it to be a shining example of what it means to do outreach to the poor or the marginalized. Here we will honor the human person. We will support the arts, music, dance, painting. We will make it a wonderful home.” The date marks the first Mass ever celebrated on the campus.

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C o n g ra t u la t i o n s On The dedication of Christ Cathedral

Bishop Mitchell Rozanski and the catholic coMMunity of the diocese of spRingfield, Massachusetts congRatulate

Most Reverend Robert J. McManus, S.T.D. and the clergy, religious and lay faithful of the Diocese of Worcester

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Bishop kevin vann and the diocese of oRange on the Beautiful RestoRation of the chRist cathedRal May this holy space continually inspire and enrich the lives of all who enter.


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OUR LADY OF LA VANG SHRINE BY GREG MELLEN

F

OR 18 DAYS IN A TINY 28-foot by 6-foot boat, 26 Vietnamese refugees cling to life. It is 1979 and they are part of the vast tide of humanity fleeing repression in their homeland. They have already weathered a fierce storm in their tiny craft. They are starving, surviving only on meager rations of rainwater. And faith. As much as the boat, faith is what keeps them afloat. Each day, twice a day, the Nguyen family prays and recites the rosary. On the final day, they spot land. Despite their exhaustion, the refugees row all day and finally reach shore in the Philippines. “My question is, where did we find the energy?” asks Diocese of Orange Auxiliary Bishop Thanh Thai Nguyen. Answering his own question, he says, “Only (through) God, with the intercession of the Blessed Mother.” To the Vietnamese faithful, Mary is a pillar represented as Our Lady of La Vang, a Marian apparition that first came over 200 years ago to pray and offer comfort and intercession. To the Bishop, that perilous trip and Mother Mary laid his path to the priesthood and life in the United States. In July 2016 a team of Orange County Catholic Vietnamese volunteers made an impassioned proposal to Bishop Kevin Vann for his approval to create a shrine for Our Lady of La Vang. Two weeks later, Dr. Elysabeth Nguyen, La Vang Shrine Committee project manager, was in Vietnam. Having prayed at the Our Lady of La Vang shrine, she received approval to move forward with the project. “If I didn’t believe before, I do now,” she said of intercession by the Blessed Mother. “She really listens.” Two tales, 37 years apart, that are testaments to the Vietnamese faithful of the love and support of Our Lady of La Vang. And now Orange County Catholics will soon have a shrine of their own at which they can pray and meditate at Christ Cathedral—the Our Lady of La Vang shrine. During the groundbreaking for the site Bishop Vann said the shrine is important on two levels; to recognize the importance of the Vietnamese congregation in Orange County, home to the world’s largest

A RENDERING OF THE FUTURE OUR LADY OF LA VANG SHRINE ON THE CAMPUS OF CHRIST CATHEDRAL. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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Vietnamese immigrant population, and as a “testament to their faith.” Bishop Vann, who came to the Diocese of Orange in 2012, said he was aware there had been a desire for a shrine before he arrived. In July 2016 he met with Vietnamese volunteers about their vision. “I said, ‘Let’s move this along,’” Bishop Vann recalled. After the bishop green-lighted the effort, it came together quickly. The shrine and plaza are expected to be in place soon after the dedication of Christ Cathedral. For generations, Our Lady of La Vang has held special relevance to Vietnamese Catholics. She first appeared in the late 18th century to persecuted villagers who had fled to the jungle. Many were starving and diseased when the apparition of Mary, in a traditional ao dai garment, appeared in the tree canopy. She carried in her arms an infant child and was accompanied by two angels. The villagers were comforted and told how to boil leaves from the trees for medicine. In 1802 the message got out about the apparition and Catholics flocked to the area to pray. A chapel was built in Hai Phu in 1820. After it burned down, another was erected with a shrine that remains there today. Since the first appearance, Vietnamese Catholics and non-Catholics alike have turned to Our Lady of La Vang in times of need. Many share tales similar to Bishop Nguyen’s of comfort and intercession. In the United States, Vietnamese Catholics have helped start 19 parishes and shrines to Our Lady of La Vang, including one in Santa Ana. Although the Vatican has yet to recognize the event as a Marian apparition, its importance has been noted, most recently by Pope John Paul II. The shrine on the Christ Cathedral campus was designed by two architects Aaron Torrence and Tr n Qu c Trung, with help from a team of designers. It will feature a 12-foot-tall statue of Mary in traditional Vietnamese garments, cradling the infant child. They will stand beneath an up swirl of Alpha-shaped ribbon of stainless steel panels under a glass-paned roof. There will also be a plaza, four Rosary gardens, with one that has the shape of the Greek letter Omega, and room for future statuary honoring Mary. C

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A RED BRICK FROM THE BELL TOWER OF THE ORIGINAL OUR LADY OF LA VANG CHURCH IN VIETNAM, CONSTRUCTED IN 1901, WAS PART OF AN EXHIBIT IN THE CULTURAL CENTER AT CHRIST CATHEDRAL. / PHOTO COURTESY DOUGLAS MORINO

2014

2014

On Pentecost Sunday, June 8, the parish is officially named Christ Cathedral Parish.

The world’s most famous organ, the Hazel Wright Organ, is removed in February and its major parts are shipped to Padua, Italy for restoration.


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San Antonio de Padua CATHOLIC CHURCH

5800 East Santa Ana Canyon Road, Anaheim, CA 92807 Tele: (714) 974-1416 ⬧ Fax: 714-974-9630 Website: sanantoniochurch.org

HALF PAGE VERTICAL AD - ARTWORK T/K ADVERTISER: SAN ANTONIO DE PADUA NORMAL BUILD SIZE: 4.89 IN. X 9.65 IN. FIT TO THIS SPACE: Rev. John Neneman, 4.75 IN. X 9.5 IN. Pastor

Rev. Ven Amidar, Parochial Vicar Deacon Doug Cook

Welcome Christ Cathedral We welcome the dedication of Christ Cathedral to the Catholic community with heartfelt appreciation for years of renovating and transforming the site. Congratulations on realizing this vision and thank you for creating this place of worship for the dear neighbor in our midst.

Deacon Paul Amorino Deacon Russ Millspaugh

714-633-8121 • csjorange.org

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Congratulations Bishop Vann and the Diocese of Orange May Christ Cathedral be a place of joyful witness to the Risen Lord Jesus for the people of Southern California

Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted Bishop Eduardo A. Nevares The Faithful of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix

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SITTING BISHOPS OF THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE THE MOST REV. KEVIN W. VANN, JCD, DD, BISHOP OF ORANGE

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ISHOP KEVIN W. VANN WAS BORN on May 10, 1951 in Springfield, Ill. He is the oldest of the six children born to William M. Vann Jr. and Theresa Jones Vann. Bishop Vann is a graduate of Springfield’s St. Agnes Grade and Griffin High schools. He attended Springfield College and earned a Bachelor of Science in medical technology from Millikin University, located in Decatur, Ill. After working for three years as a medical technologist, he entered the seminary in 1976, spending a year at the Immaculate Conception Diocesan Seminary in Springfield and four years at Kenrick Seminary in St. Louis, MO., majoring in theology. After his ordination on May 30, 1981, he was assigned to graduate studies in Canon Law at the Angelicum in Rome, with residence at the graduate house of the North American College, the Casa Santa Maria dell’ Umilta. Upon returning to the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois, then-Father Vann was involved in the work of the Diocesan Tribunal and the Tribunal of Second Instance in Chicago. He served as pastor of parishes ranging in size from 35 to 1,300 families, two of which had large schools. He taught Canon Law at Kenrick Seminary. Before he was named bishop, he was pastor of Blessed Sacrament Parish in Springfield, Vicar for Priests, and the Diocesan contact for Hispanic Ministry. Bishop Vann was ordained and installed as the third bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth on Wednesday, July 13, 2005, at Texas Christian University’s Daniel-Meyer Coliseum. In Texas, he collaborated closely with other bishops through the Texas Catholic Conference and Region X, which includes dioceses of states of Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas. He is the former Texas Bishops’ Liaison to the Texas Mission Council and Texas Catholic hospitals. And, through the U.S. Conference of Bishops, he works with bishops across the United States as well as globally. Bishop Vann was a leader in the Texas Conference of Bishops, providing leadership for various initiatives at the national level, including service on an ad hoc committee which assisted the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) to guide the incorporation of Anglican groups into the Catholic Church of the United States. On September 21, 2012, His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI announced the appointment of Bishop Kevin W. Vann as the fourth Bishop of Orange. Bishop Vann has led the Diocese of Orange—the 10th largest diocese in the country—in its multicultural mission to meet the social, economic and spiritual needs of the region’s increasingly diverse Catholic population. He continues to lead the historic effort to transform the former Crystal Cathedral from a world-renowned center of Protestant worship into the West Coast’s most visible center of Catholicism.

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THE MOST REV. TIMOTHY FREYER, DD, AUXILIARY BISHOP OF ORANGE

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ISHOP FREYER’S ROOTS are in Southern California. He was born in L.A. and grew up in Huntington Beach, a short drive from Christ Cathedral in Garden Grove, where he serves as Auxiliary Bishop. After graduating from Huntington Beach High School he entered the St. John’s Seminary College in Camarillo, CA where he earned his bachelor’s degree, followed by four years at St. John’s Seminary where, as a graduate student, he studied theology. Bishop Freyer was ordained a priest on June 10, 1989 and his first assignment was as associate pastor at St. Hedwig Church in Los Alamitos, within the Diocese of Orange. He served in that role for five years before being assigned to Our Lady of Fatima Church in San Clemente. Five years later, he moved to St. Catherine of Siena Church in Laguna Beach where he remained for two years. In 2001, Bishop Freyer was appointed pastor of St. Mary’s Church in Fullerton, and then in 2003 was reassigned as pastor for St. Boniface Church in Anaheim. He was named Episcopal Vicar for Priests in 2012, with responsibility for the care and ongoing formation of the priests of the Diocese of Orange. Additionally, he was named the first bishop’s liaison to the Jovenes para Cristo (Young Adults for Christ) movement from 1998-2004, helping them to write their statutes and revise their plan of formation as well as assisting them as they opened chapters in California, Texas and Oregon. Bishop Tim served as one of the founding board members of the Anaheim Family Justice Center (now called the Orange County Family Justice Center) that assists victims of domestic violence. He served two terms as a member of the board of trustees for St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton and continues to serve on the Community Benefits Committee that oversees the medical center’s carefor-the-poor programs. He is currently a police chaplain for the Anaheim Police Department. Bishop Freyer is the only child of Jerry and Patricia Freyer. His father died in 1977 and his mother currently resides in Huntington Beach.

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THE MOST REV. THANH THAI NGUYEN, DD, AUXILIARY BISHOP OF ORANGE

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ISHOP THANH THAI NGUYEN WAS BORN IN Nha Trang, Vietnam in 1953 and is the second oldest of eight boys and three girls. He spent most of his elementary education in Catholic schools and in 1966 he entered St. Joseph Seminary, a small diocesan institute in Vietnam. His seminary formation was interrupted when the communist government took over the country in 1975. Bishop Nguyen and other seminarians were forced into hard labor in the rice fields to be allowed to continue their studies. In 1979 after suffering religious persecution, Bishop Nguyen, along with 26 members of his extended family, boarded a small motorboat and slipped out of Cam Ranh Bay—headed for the Philippines and safety. The family was soon engulfed by a tropical storm and spent 18 days at sea, several with no food or water. The family prayed the Rosary together each morning and evening. All 26 of them, through the Grace of God, arrived safely in the Philippines. After 10 months in a refugee camp the family left Manila in June of 1980 for their new life in Beaumont, Texas. Upon arriving in the United States, Bishop Nguyen’s vocational calling continued to draw him toward God. He worked at Catholic Charities in Hartford, Conn. before returning to his academics at Merrimack College in North Andover, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree. After two years of study he graduated Cum Laude and immediately began his novitiate year in Washington D.C. and took his first vows with the La Salette Order in 1987. Bishop Nguyen graduated from the Weston Jesuit School of Theology, Cambridge, Massachusetts in May 1990 and was ordained on May 11, 1991. Bishop Nguyen was later incardinated into the Diocese of St. Augustine, Fla. where he served at St. Joseph parish from 2013 until his appointment as Auxiliary Bishop of Orange. Bishop Nguyen is well known by parishioners for his love of music and skill in playing the guitar. He is also an avid tennis player. Bishop Nguyen was appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Orange on Oct. 6, 2017.

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THE MOST REV. TOD D. BROWN, DD, BISHOP EMERITUS, DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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ISHOP TOD DAVID BROWN WAS BORN in San Francisco on November 15, 1936, the first of two children born to George and Edna Anne Brown. His brother Daniel Brown lives in Orinda, California with his wife Jeanne. He also has two nieces, one nephew and six grand nephews. Bishop Brown received his early education at various schools in Northern California. His seminary education and formation were at Ryan Seminary in Fresno, St. John’s Seminary in Camarillo and the North American College in Rome, Italy. He holds a B.A. from St. John’s Seminary, a STB from the Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome, and has Master degrees in biblical theology and education from the University of San Francisco. He was ordained to the priesthood on May 1, 1963 for the Diocese of Monterey in California. In the Diocese of Monterey he had various assignments, including parochial vicar, pastor, chairman of the Divine Worship Commission, chairman and member of the Presbyterial Council and Priests Pension Committee, and member of the Diocesan Board of Education. In addition, he served as Chancellor, Moderator of the Curia and the Vicar General. On December 27, 1988, Pope John Paul II appointed him Bishop of Boise, Idaho. He was ordained and installed as Bishop of that See on April 3, 1989. On September 3, 1998, Bishop Brown was installed as the third Bishop of Orange, succeeding Bishop Norman McFarland, who had served the Diocese of Orange until his retirement. Bishop Brown has served in the USCCB as a member of the Mission Committee, the Liturgical Committee, and as Chairman on the Committee of Laity. He is also Chairman of the Ecumenical and Inter-religious Dialogue Committee and continues to serve as a consultant of that committee. Bishop Brown led the Diocese of Orange effort to purchase the former Crystal Cathedral in 2012.

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DEAR VISITORS AND PEOPLE OF THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE,

T

HANK YOU FOR JOINING US for the historic Dedication of Christ Cathedral. As a seventh-generation descendant of the early California rancho families, I am grateful to have had a part in preserving the long legacy of holiness that is Christ Cathedral. My roots run deep in the Southern California soil and I am so pleased as a Californian and Orange County native to have the privilege of carrying on the legacy of such a beautiful, sacred place. Soon after I was named Rector of Christ Cathedral, I had the rare and special opportunity to meet the Rev. Robert H. Schuller and to hear him declare his gratitude that, thanks to the Catholic Church’s purchase of the Crystal Cathedral, it will remain “a place for Christ Forever.” Ever since that first meeting, “For Christ Forever” has been the motto and inspiration for those of us tasked with the efforts required during the past seven years to transform this iconic house of worship and its serene grounds into Christ Cathedral, now a West Coast center of Catholic worship and the seat of the Bishop of Orange. So many people have poured hundreds of thousands of hours into the transformation of Christ Cathedral, along with the ongoing prayers and fervent intentions of numerous faithful Catholics and non-Catholics alike, here in Southern California and, indeed, across the world. We take our mission of evangelization seriously and will go forth from this thrilling dedication day, intoning “For Christ Forever” as fervent missionaries proclaiming our love for Jesus and for our Catholic faith. We are so happy you are here to share in the history of this incredibly special place, its present-day transformation into Christ Cathedral and its future as a beacon of faith for all! Together in faith,

VERY REV. CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH, RECTOR AND EPISCOPAL VICAR

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St. Bonaventure Catholic School and Parish gives glory to God for the gift of Christ Cathedral!

Accepting Applications TK - Grade 8 www.stbonaventureschool.org 714-846-2472

It’s always a great day to be a SAINT! Loyola Institute for or Spirituality congratulates c Bishop Vann ann and the Diocese of o Orange on the dedication tion of o Christ Cathedral.

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A HOLY YEAR OF PREPARATION

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ISHOP KEVIN VANN ANNOUNCED in a decree on June 28, 2018, the feast of Saints Peter and Paul, a Holy Year of Preparation for Christ Cathedral. A Mass was celebrated in the Arboretum on the campus of Christ Cathedral.

Following is the official decree: DECREE

PROCLAIMING A HOLY YEAR OF PREPARATION OF CHRIST CATHEDRAL “A place for Christ forever … The dedication of Christ Cathedral” I, Bishop Kevin William Vann, fourth Bishop of Orange in California, by the grace of God and the Apostolic See: Whereas, after years of planning, prayer and Faith, and due to the hard work, diligence and dedication of many, we find ourselves, by the Providence of God, rapidly approaching the completion of the renovation of Christ Cathedral (formerly called the “Crystal Cathedral”); Whereas, with profound gratitude to God—as the one who “builds His House”—to the planners and workers who continue to labor that the building project is on schedule, I have set the date when I will dedicate Christ Cathedral as 17 July 2019; Whereas, I recognize the essential involvement of many people of good will in the Diocese of Orange to make this campus a center for evangelization so that as many people as possible may be helped to know, love and praise God in this life so that we might spend eternity with him in the next; Whereas, no one should be denied an opportunity to participate in this historic endeavor in a tangible way; Whereas, I desire that all people of good will enter into a spirit of prayer 1) to continue to pray for the workers who do not cease to give of themselves in order to bring this project to completion; 2) for others

THE MOST REV. KEVIN VANN, BISHOP OF ORANGE, IS FLANKED BY THE VERY REV. CHRISTOPHER SMITH, RECTOR OF CHRIST CATHEDRAL PARISH, AS THEY CELEBRATE BISHOP VANN’S DECREE OF THE HOLY YEAR OF PREPARATION. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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involved in the completion of the cathedral renovation, that they may make informed and wise choices; 3) that the project may stay within budget; 4) that more generous benefactors present themselves; and 5) that this entire campus may be welcoming, bringing the visitor to an encounter with Christ or at least planting the seeds for an eventual encounter with the Risen Lord; Whereas, I would be most pleased if the faithful were on fire for Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and that his Holy Name be always on our lips as we prepare this place for Christ forever; Whereas, I exhort the faithful to avail themselves of the many opportunities made available at various parishes in the Diocese of Orange to spend time in Eucharistic adoration, keeping in mind that Our Lord Jesus Christ is eager to hear from his sons and daughters and that praying before the Blessed Sacrament in the monstrance or in the tabernacle fosters closeness with Jesus Christ; Whereas, I invite the faithful to pray to our Blessed Mother Mary, Our Lady of Guadalupe, our Diocesan Patroness, that she might drape her mantle around her sons and daughters in Christ, just as she comforted Saint Juan Diego. Whereas, I ask the faithful not to overlook or undervalue the pious, but nowadays set aside and often forgotten practice, of the offering up of one’s sufferings for the souls in purgatory or for grown children who, for whatever reason(s), no longer practice the true faith nor avail themselves regularly of the sacrament of reconciliation so as to help prepare their hearts most fully for the spiritual blessings of the new cathedral;

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Whereas, the undertaking of pious works, including attending Holy Mass on weekdays as well as the offering up of their prayers, sacrifices and sufferings for the success of the Cathedral’s evangelization efforts are most efficacious; Whereas, one may qualify to gain a plenary indulgence who visits the Blessed Sacrament for adoration and spends at least thirty minutes in adoration or who prays the rosary devoutly in a church or oratory or in a family or who reads or listens to sacred scripture with due reverence to the divine word for at least thirty minutes as well as those who exercise of the Way of the Cross. DECREE That, in accord with canons 35 and 48 of the Code of Canon Law, a Holy Year of Preparation for the Opening of Christ Cathedral is to begin today, the Solemnity of the Apostles Saints Peter and Paul and will continue through the Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus on 28 June 2019. Given in Garden Grove, from the halls of the Pastoral Center on this 29th day of June in the year of Our Lord 2018, the liturgical solemnity of the Princes of the Apostles, Saints Peter and Paul and the sixth year of my episcopacy of the Diocese of Orange in California. Most Reverend Kevin William Vann, J.C.D., D.D. Bishop of Orange in California Doctor Pia Francesca de Solenni, S.Th.D. Chancellor

2014

2015

Arvella Schuller dies on Feb. 11, 2014 in Orange, CA.

Dr. Robert Schuller dies on April 2, 2015 at a nursing facility in Artesia, California, at age 88, of esophageal cancer. Memorial services for both Rev. Schuller and his wife Arvella are held on the Christ Cathedral campus; both are buried in the memorial gardens.


Christ Anointed One of God, bless our endeavors to transform this place of Christian worship into a Cathedral for our Diocese of Orange. May it become a beacon of faith to all people, a center for worship, formation, and communion, to raise our hearts and minds to you. Send your Spirit to guide us so that we may be built into your likeness and bring about your kingdom of love and justice. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

BISHOP VANN REQUESTED THAT THE STAFF WORKING ON THE CAMPUS OF CHRIST CATHEDRAL PRAY THIS PRAYER THROUGHOUT THE YEAR OF PREPARATION.

THIS PRAYER CARD WAS USED IN ALL PARISHES IN THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE THROUGHOUT THE YEAR OF PREPARATION.

2017

2017

The diocese retains the architectural firm Johnson Fain to focus on the cathedral itself, while Rios Clementi Hale Studios is retained to transform the cathedral’s 34-acre surrounding campus.

F&M Bank of Long Beach is engaged as banker of choice for the Diocese of Orange in keeping with the bank’s historic association with the Crystal Cathedral and the Rev. Robert Schuller.

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GOD GAVE US MUSIC... THAT WE MIGHT PRAY WITHOUT WORDS. - Unknown

In loving memory of Jadtec owner, John Dieball. An amazing human being who loved life, God, his family, and...music; especially Dixieland Jazz and the renowned Christ Cathedral Hazel Wright Organ!

JADTEC

SECURITY 714 282 0828 ACO4202

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VOLUNTEERS AND DONORS DRIVE CHRIST CATHEDRAL RENOVATION BY LARRY URISH

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HE CHRIST CATHEDRAL RENOVATION project wouldn’t have been possible without help from volunteers who are literally giving “life time donations.” They serve on several Diocesan committees, some long-standing and others created specifically for the renovation. “The Diocese appreciates our volunteers’ time, treasure and talent,” says Tony Jennison, the Orange Catholic Foundation’s vice president of philanthropy. “It’s gratifying to see how they’re making an impact on their faith in such an altruistic way.” This impact has obviously worked both ways, adds Jennison. “The key question: Can we leverage the knowledge of those who have been so successful in their own businesses and organizations?” The answer has been a resounding yes. Each committee also includes Diocesan clergy and lay professionals. “While the Diocese ultimately makes the final decisions, our volunteers provide critical advice,” Jennison says. “Bishop Vann has done a wonderful job empowering the committees to do what they do best in their specialties.”

CHRIST CATHOLIC CATHEDRAL CORPORATION Chaired by Bishop Vann, the Christ Catholic Cathedral Corporation provides the most general “wide-angle view,” since it’s in charge of the overall campus renovation. In addition, the CCCC works closely with the Orange Catholic Foundation, the charitable organization that supports the Diocese of Orange. “Six of the seven campus buildings have been renovated with funds raised from donors who participated in the For Christ Forever and Christ Cathedral campaigns,” Jennison says. “The seventh, the cathedral, will soon be fully completed.”

THE CATHEDRAL CONSTRUCTION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE GOT A REAL BOOST WHEN RICHARD HEIM, DIVISION PRESIDENT AND CEO OF CLARK CONSTRUCTION’S WESTERN REGION, AGREED TO ACT AS ITS CHAIR. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

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Board Members: n Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange, Chair n Monsignor Stephen Doktorczyk n Very Reverend Christopher Smith, Episcopal Vicar n Art Birtcher n Brian Finck n Reverend Fred Bailey

CHRIST CATHEDRAL FACILITIES CORPORATION The Christ Cathedral Facilities Corporation owns the Christ Cathedral land and buildings and oversees the improvements to all buildings, Jennison says. Chaired by Rand Sperry, CEO of Sperry Commercial Global Affiliates and Sperry Equities, it was established in 2012 and safeguards the cathedral property and improvements.

n Maureen Flanagan n Monsignor Lawrence Baird

Board Members:

n Richard Heim

n Rand Sperry, Chair

n Tim Strader

n Carol McDermott

n Reverend Vincent Pham

n Jerome Thode

CHRIST CATHEDRAL MASTER PLANNING COMMITTEE The vision of the Christ Cathedral Master Planning Committee is equally broad in scope. However, its vision is directed toward the future of the campus. The committee’s chair is Tim Psomas, former chair of the board for Psomas, one of the top consulting engineering firms in the nation. Committee Members: n Tim Psomas, Chair n Very Reverend Christopher Smith, Episcopal Vicar n Deacon Michael Stock

n Ed Benoe n David Duran n Michael Joseph n Ben Du

CATHEDRAL CONSTRUCTION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE The Cathedral Construction Oversight Committee got a real boost when Richard Heim, division president and CEO of Clark Construction’s Western Region, agreed to act as its chair. Composed of experts in construction, real estate development, engineering, finance and fundraising, this committee advises Bishop Vann about everything related to the renovation process itself.

n Elizabeth Jensen Committee Members:

n Joe Novoa n Kymmberly Binnquist

n Richard Heim, Chair

n Marcia Vojtech

n Eric Flynn

n Mike Joseph

n Rand Sperry

n Tim Strader

n Randy Redwitz n Christopher Trujillo n Tim Psomas n Kent Peterson n Elizabeth Jensen n Deacon Michael Stock n Tony Jennison

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n Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange n Very Reverend Christopher Smith, Episcopal Vicar n Most Reverend Timothy Freyer, Auxiliary Bishop of Orange n Steve Oakley n Joe Novoa n Kymmberly Binnquist n Jeff Bolton

CHRIST CATHEDRAL DEDICATION CELEBRATION GALA COMMITTEE Chaired by The Very Rev. Christopher Smith, episcopal vicar and rector of Christ Cathedral, the Dedication Celebration Committee planned and will execute Christ Cathedral’s dedication on July 17, 2019. The committee was also behind several events scheduled before and after the dedication, including the Dedication Evening of Celebration fundraiser and a Solemn Evening Prayer and Vigil with Relics, among many others. Committee Members: n Marc Carlson, Co-Chair n Jacqueline DuPont Carlson, Co-Chair n Susan Strader, Co-Chair n Tim Strader, Co-Chair n Cindy Bobruk + n Ann Conway n Michelle Dao n Jamie Heim n Tony Jennison n John McEntee n Monica McEntee n Adam Michaelson n Linh Nguyen n Alaina Stamos n Nancy Valeri n Margie Wright n Linda Young


CHRIST CATHEDRAL SACRED ARTS COMMISSION

n Ric Brutocao

n Jim Reed

n John Curci

n Sean Connolly

The Very Rev. Christopher Smith also chairs the Diocese’s Sacred Arts Commission. “It directed the commissioning and execution of the cathedral’s sacred art, and will oversee future art-related issues that come up,” Jennison says. This includes how to best deal with a donated work: what is right for the cathedral, where the work will be displayed and so forth.”

n Lucy Dunn

n Kelly Lind

n Most Reverend Timothy Freyer, Auxiliary Bishop of Orange

n Deacon Michael Stock

Committee Members: n Very Reverend Christopher Smith, Episcopal Vicar, Chair n Brother William Woeger n Monsignor Arthur Holquin n Monsignor Michael Heher n Alex Pijuan n Lesa Truxaw n Tony Jennison

CHRIST CATHEDRAL CAMPAIGN TASK FORCE The Christ Cathedral Campaign Task Force works closely with the Diocese and the Orange Catholic Foundation to raise the funds needed to complete Christ Cathedral’s renovation. Several hundreds of thousands of dollars are needed to complete the first phase of the cathedral construction and remain free of any construction debt, assuming the donors fulfill their pledges. The committee is co-chaired by Tim and Susan Strader, who have spearheaded projects for a variety of worthy causes throughout Orange County and our Diocese.

n Monsignor Arthur Holquin n Tony Jennison n Dean McCormick n Stephen Muzzy n Reverend Steve Sallot n Very Reverend Christopher Smith, Episcopal Vicar

DIOCESAN FINANCE COUNCIL The Diocesan Finance Council is responsible for advising the Bishop on the management of Diocese finances, which includes the approval of all material spending. Chaired by Annette Walker, president of City of Hope Orange County, the council is also charged with the review and approval of the annual budget for the Pastoral Center of the Diocese. Committee Members: n Annette Walker, Chair n Thomas Greeley n Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange

n Stephen Muzzy, Chair n Rand Sperry n Fernando Jimenez n Don Hunsberger

n Monsignor John Urell

n Monsignor Stephen Doktorczyk n Monsignor Lawrence Baird n Reverend Steve Sallot

n Tim Strader, Co-Chair

n Dr. Pia de Solenni

n Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange

n Elizabeth Jensen

n Cindy Bobruk +

Committee Members:

n Most Reverend Thanh Thai Nguyen, Auxiliary Bishop of Orange

n Sister Mary Bernadette McNulty, CSJ

n Monsignor Lawrence Baird

The Orange Catholic Foundation, whose board of directors is chaired by volunteer Stephen Muzzy, is comprised of lay and clergy leaders. The foundation is an autonomous charitable corporation that raises, manages, grows and grants funds according to donor intent to support the mission of the Catholic Church throughout the Diocese of Orange. “Individually and collectively, the advice and counsel provide the spark for meaningful initiatives that have a long-lasting impact on our community,” Jennison says. “It’s considered an honor to be asked by the Diocese to volunteer on these key committees,” added Jennison. And the Diocese is honored to have them.

n Jacqueline DuPont Carlson

n Susan Strader, Co-Chair

n Alan Arnold

ORANGE CATHOLIC FOUNDATION

n Most Reverend Timothy Freyer, Auxiliary Bishop of Orange

n Reverend Antonio Lopez-Flores Committee Members:

n Thomas Burnham

n Thomas Croal n Gabriel Ferrucci n Maureen Flanagan n Dr. Donald Miller

n Andrew Talley n David Boynton n Jacqueline Brady n Suzanne Cameron n Sister Katherine (Kit) Gray, CSJ n Ryan Kerrigan n Michael Offenheiser n Reverend Jim Ries n Reverend Steve Sallot n Douglas Stephen n Susan Strader n Suzanne Nunn (Non-Voting Director) +

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Christ Cathedral Dedication Planning Committee: n Very Reverend Christopher Smith, Episcopal Vicar, Chair n Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange n Most Reverend Timothy Freyer, Auxiliary Bishop of Orange n Armando Cervantes n Sean Connolly n Norah Dopudja n Sister Katherine (Kit) Gray, CSJ n Monsignor Arthur Holquin n Tony Jennison n Tracey Kincaid n Trudy Mazzarella n Hector Pantoja n Dr. John Romeri n Deacon Michael Stock n Lesa Truxaw n Nancy Valeri n Marcia Vojtech

CATHEDRAL FOUNDERS CIRCLE In 2016, Bishop Kevin Vann created the Christ Cathedral Founders Circle to honor the volunteers and staff who were instrumental in the acquisition and first years of the transformation of our 34-acre Christ Cathedral campus to a vibrant place of worship, reflection, education and service for the more than 10,000 people each weekend who experience the presence of God. The group has worked to build on the heritage and history of Dr. Robert and Mrs. Arvella Schuller and their call to “keep the Cathedral campus a light in Orange County that will never go out and a light that reminds humanity how much God loves us.� n Dennis Allison n Alan Arnold n Monsignor Lawrence Baird n Monsignor Kerry Beaulieu n Tracy Bejotte n Edward Benoe

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IM AND SUSAN STRADER, pictured here in front of a model of the interior of Christ Cathedral, gave countless hours of their time as they led the fundraising to complete the sanctuary in Christ Cathedral. The duo are doers. The Newport Beach couple has been at the center of many projects and initiatives that have positively impacted residents and visitors to Orange County and beyond. Their work will continue to benefit generations to come. Philanthropy and voluntarism have been a way of life for the Straders, who have been involved in projects that benefit the arts, education, health care and the Catholic Church. Tim Strader has taken the lead on a number of philanthropic and community projects, including serving on the boards of the UCI Foundation, Irvine Health Foundation, and the Orange County Performing Arts Center (now Segerstrom Center for the Arts). The Straders helped found the Center; Tim has been on the board since 1979 and was president when it opened in 1986. He was the lawyer who formed the city of Irvine in 1971. He and his wife, Susan, are founders of Santa Margarita Catholic High School in Rancho Santa Margarita. In 1989 they brought to Orange County the Legatus organization. The group for Catholic executives now has four chapters within the county. Recruited by Bishop Kevin Vann, together they led the campaign committee that helped raise the funds needed to complete the sanctuary at Christ Cathedral, enabling generation after generation of Catholics to celebrate Catholic Mass inside the renovated cathedral.


n Most Reverend Tod D Brown, Bishop Emeritus n Tim Busch n Reverend Craig Butters n Jeffrey Cadieux n Bill Close n John Curci n Norah Dopudja n David Doran n Mark Dubeau n Lucy Dunn n Gabriel Ferrucci n Priscila Forbes n Jennifer Garey n Bob Gilroy n Bud Grandsaert

n Berni Neal n Reverend Tuyen Van Nguyen n Josh Nguyen n Joe Novoa

n Bishop Thomas Thanh Thai Nguyen, Episcopal Delegate

n Hector Olivera n Lee Pacheco

n Dr. Huan Duy Le, Co-Chair

n Tim Psomas n Mark Purcell

n Elysabeth Nguyen, Ph.D, Project Manager

n Robert Redwitz

n Luong Quang Vu

n Phil Ries

n Tac Van Pham

n Reverend Steve Sallot

n Tri Ma Gia

n Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange n Most Reverend Timothy Freyer, Auxiliary Bishop of Orange n Most Reverend Thanh Thai Nguyen, Auxiliary Bishop of Orange n Monsignor Stephen Doktorczyk n Dr. Pia de Solenni n Reverend Juan Navarro

n John Sawyer

n Deacon Michael Stock

n Brian Sawyers

n Elizabeth Jensen

n Maria (Mickie) Schinderle

n Thomas Burnham

n Lee Sherman

n Katie Dawson

n Maria Grant n Monsignor Michael Heher

n Rand Sperry

n Richard Heim

n Carl St. Clair

n Fred Helms

n Steve Stambaugh

n Guy Henderson

n Doug Stephen

n Monsignor Arthur Holquin

n Susan Stoneburner

n James Hunter

n Susan Strader

n Julie Incorvina

n Tim Strader

n Randy Jackson

n Fred Swann

n Paul Jacobson

n Robert Tall

n Tony Jennison

n Andrew Talley

n Dennis Jilot

n James Tecca

n Kory Kramer

n Bob Thiergartner

n Dr. Patricia Lamb

n Gemma Thomsen

n Michelle Lencioni

n Lesa Truxaw

n Tom Leonard

n Donna Upton

n Ryan Lilyengren

n Monsignor John Urell

n Mike Ludin n His Eminence Cardinal Roger Mahony

n Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Bishop of Orange

n Carol McDermott

n Mary Westbrook

n John Miller

n Brother William Woeger, FSC

n Rob Neal

Diocesan Leadership Council:

n Reverend Tuyen Van Nguyen, Co-Chair

n Very Reverend Christopher Smith, Episcopal Vicar

n Stephen Muzzy

Our Lady of La Vang Shrine Committee:

n Yolanda Wright

My ey� will n� be open and My ears a�en�� to

�ay� �om this place. 2 Chr�icl� 7:15

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet congratulate the Diocese of Orange on the dedication of Christ Cathedral.

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St. John the Baptist Church and School extends deep and heartfelt congratulations . . . To the Diocese of Orange,

And to our Shepherd, Bishop Kevin Vann, On the dedication of the magnificent Christ Cathedral! Laus Deo!

1015 Baker Street, Costa Mesa, CA 92626

Dedication of

Christ Cathedral ROSARY ACADEMY A

Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church

Revealing the light of Christ

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...a Eucharistic community living the Good News daily. O C C AT H O L I C

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Catholic education women

Empowering the next generation of

1340 N. Acacia Avenue Fullerton, CA 92831 www.rosaryacademy.org

. leaders.


THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE

T

HE ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF ORANGE has played a profound role in shaping the cultural and community landscape of Orange County. The multicultural mission and the far-reaching influence of the Diocese of Orange, currently the 10th largest diocese in the nation with more than 1.3 million Catholics, and nearly 20,000 students enrolled in its extensive educational system, continues to influence and shape the many communities of Southern California. Across the United States four times more people identify themselves as Roman Catholic than any other religion according to the PEW Form on Religion and Public Life (2011). In Southern California the historic roots of Orange County and the Catholic Church intertwine and run deep. The importance of the Catholic Church in shaping the growth of Orange County is self-evident. It was 243 years between the establishment of the first Spanish mission and the creation of the Diocese of Orange. As Orange County has blossomed, changed, and developed a unique identity, so has the county’s largest religious organization. The Diocese of Orange was established by Pope Paul VI with 44 parishes and more than 300,000 Catholics in 1976. William Johnson, an auxiliary bishop in Los Angeles, was appointed as its first bishop. In accepting his appointment, he said, “The very name, ‘Orange,’ suggests a golden treasure and the new diocese is all that in its physical characteristics, its people and its traditions. The area is small enough to be unified as a true community and large enough to encompass a substantial number of generous-hearted people.” In 1986, the Most Rev. Norman McFarland was appointed the second Bishop of Orange. A very spiritual and intellectual man, he was also gifted with a keen financial aptitude that served the Diocese well. History will show that his strategic planning was key in placing the Diocese of Orange in the strong financial position, some 25 years later, to acquire the iconic Crystal Cathedral and to transform it into a Catholic cathedral located in the very accessible central Orange County. The Most Reverend Tod D. Brown was appointed the third Bishop of Orange by Pope John Paul II on June 30, 1998. Bishop Brown shepherded the Catholic community in Orange County through turmoil

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and success for 14 years. Bishop Brown was instrumental in reaching a groundbreaking settlement with victims of clergy sexual abuse and instituted unprecedented reforms including the Covenant with the Faithful in 2004. Through the innovative vision and tireless mission of Bishop Brown to build a much-needed cathedral for Orange, the Diocese of Orange acquired the Crystal Cathedral campus which would be transformed into a Catholic cathedral as a center of worship, mission and culture for the more than 1.3 million Catholics in the Diocese and for Christians all over the world. The fourth Bishop of Orange, the Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, was installed December 2012 in a very special time of growth, renewed commitment to the mission of salvation, evangelization and transformation. Over the past 43 years Orange County has developed into one of the most diverse communities in the world—integrating Asian, Hispanic and Caucasian ethnicities, while respecting their unique cultures. The multicultural mission of the Diocese of Orange is its hallmark and has paved the way toward a greater respect and knowing appreciation of each other’s heritage and traditions by the members of the many different communities. Since the diocese was founded, it has filled a variety of social, economic, and spiritual needs throughout Orange County, the United States and the world. Orange County parishes, Catholic philanthropists and the bishops use their global reach to spread the healing mission of the Church. The acquisition of the Crystal Cathedral, a historic center of protestant worship, provided the diocese with a physical and spiritual center for a very diverse and dispersed

Catholic community and elevated its stature as the most-visible center of Catholicism on the West Coast. In Orange County, like anywhere, life and the Church will change. Faith remains a deeply personal experience, yet all Catholics celebrate that faith together. The Catholic Church has served as a steady unifying spiritual force over the last two centuries and will continue to care for a diverse community. The Diocese of Orange has evolved as Orange County has, equitably responding to controversy and success. The Diocese remains strong and spiritually rich. The Diocese is poised to continue its spiritual as well as physical growth in the coming decades. The Diocese is now organized into 62 parishes and centers led both spiritually and organizationally by its fourth Bishop, Kevin Vann, and served by the men and women who staff the Pastoral Center. Home to the ministries, offices, and administrative departments of the Diocese, the meaningful service of those within the Pastoral Center empowers all aspects of the Catholic experience in Orange County. As the symbolic center of Catholicism in Orange County, Christ Cathedral is a beacon of faith within and beyond our Diocese, a gathering place for all on their journeys of faith. Catholic life on the campus at large is vibrant and thriving.

MISSION “We are diverse Catholics united in Christ. We follow the Gospel’s call, live out our faith and share our lives in service to others.”

VALUES As members of a Christ-centered community, we gather the hopes, inspirations and struggles of all Orange County Catholics together: n To worship by listening actively to the Word, praying for the needs of all, actively participating in the liturgy and receiving God’s grace in the Sacraments. n To evangelize by the way we share our lives and treat each other, by the Gospel that we share and by the strength we find in our community of faith. n To respect and cherish our diversity, discovering the way our many cultures reveal the greatness of Christ’s presence. n To serve others as faithful servants, sharing our gifts with respect, compassionate care, justice and generosity, with those among us who are vulnerable and underserved.

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n Brothers: 9 n Seminarians: 34 n Sisters: 290

INSTITUTIONS: n Elementary Schools (Diocesan, Parish and Private): 34 n High Schools (Diocesan, Parish and Private): 7 n Total students: 17,301 n Teachers: 1,640 n Hospitals: 3 • Total assisted: 1.8 million n Health care centers: 5 • Total assisted: 40,423 n Homes for the aged: 1 • Total assisted: 60 n Social Services Centers: 11 • Total assisted: 4 million THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE IS HOME TO 34 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS AND 7 HIGH SCHOOLS (DIOCESAN, PARISH AND PRIVATE) THAT EDUCATE NEARLY 20,000 STUDENTS. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

Source: The Official Catholic Directory 2018

LEADERSHIP: n Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, JCD, DD, Bishop n Most Rev. Timothy Freyer, DD, Auxiliary Bishop n Most Rev. Thanh Thai Nguyen, DD, Auxiliary Bishop n Most Reverend Tod D. Brown, DD, Bishop Emeritus n Msgr. Stephen Doktorczyk, Vicar General n Dr. Pia de Solenni, Chancellor n Deacon Michael Stock, Episcopal Director of Operations & General Counsel

THE DIOCESE OF ORANGE: n Established: 1976 n Total O.C. Population: 3,190,000 n Catholic Population: 1,302,000 n Square miles: 791 n Auxiliary Bishops: 2 n Parishes/Centers: 62 n Deaneries: 7 n Priests: 272 n Deacons: 140

Bishop Thomas A. Daly and the Catholic Faithful of the Diocese of Spokane Congratulate Bishop Kevin W. Vann and The Diocese of Orange on the Dedication of Christ Cathedral We prayerfully ask the intercession of Our Lady of Guadalupe for the Diocese of Orange as they dedicate their new cathedral.

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DEANERIES DEANERY 1 Dean: Rev. Eugene Lee Sub-Dean: Rev. Khoi Phan n Blessed Sacrament n Christ Cathedral Parish n St. Columban n St. Hedwig n St. Irenaeus n St. Polycarp n Korean Martyrs Center DEANERY 2 Dean: Rev. Eamon O’Gorman Sub-Dean: Rev. Francis Ng n Holy Family Cathedral n La Purisima n San Antonio de Padua n Santa Clara de Asis n St. Angela Merici n St. Joseph, Placentia n St. Martin de Porres n St. Norbert n Pope John Paul II Polish Center DEANERY 3 Dean: Rev. Edward Poettgen Sub-Dean: Rev. Paw Lwin n Our Lady of Guadalupe, La Habra n St. Anthony Claret n St. Boniface n St. Juliana Falconieri n St. Justin Martyr

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MOST REV. KEVIN VANN, BISHOP OF ORANGE, EMBARKED ON A HISTORIC TRIP TO MEXICO, MAKING A PILGRIMAGE TO THE COUNTRY’S SPIRITUAL CENTER AND HELPING DELIVER WHEELCHAIRS TO CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS. / PHOTO COURTESY DIOCESE OF ORANGE

n St. Mary, Fullerton n St. Philip Benizi n St. Pius V n St. Thomas Korean Center

n St. Joseph, Santa Ana n Vietnamese Catholic Center DEANERY 5 Dean: Rev. Michael Hanifin

DEANERY 4 Dean: Rev. Joseph Luan Nguyen Sub-Dean: Rev. Gregory Marquez n Christ Our Savior n Immaculate Heart of Mary n Our Lady of Guadalupe, Delhi n Our Lady of Guadalupe, Santa Ana n Our Lady of La Vang n Our Lady of the Pillar n St. Anne, Santa Ana n St. Barbara

Sub-Dean: Rev. Timothy Nguyen n Holy Family, Seal Beach n Holy Spirit n St. Anne, Seal Beach n St. Bonaventure n St. Joachim n St. John the Baptist n St. Mary’s by the Sea n St. Vincent de Paul n Sts. Simon & Jude

2017

2018

The first part of the cathedral’s $77-million transformation in summer begins with seismic retrofitting, installation of air conditioning, fountain repairs and other improvements.

Bishop Kevin Vann on June 29 declares a “Holy Year of Preparation” ahead of the summer 2019 cathedral dedication.


DEANERY 6 Dean: Rev. Angelos Sebastian Sub-Dean: Rev. Kiet Ta n Our Lady of Mt. Carmel n Our Lady Queen of Angels n San Francisco Solano n Santiago de Compostela n St. Cecilia n St. Elizabeth Ann Seton n St. John Neumann n St. Kilian n St. Nicholas n St. Thomas More n Our Lady of Peace Korean Center n St. John Vianney Chapel DEANERY 7 Dean: Rev. Patrick Rudolph Sub-Dean: Rev. Tony Park n Corpus Christi n Holy Trinity n Mission Basilica, San Juan Capistrano n Our Lady of Fatima n St. Catherine of Siena n St. Edward the Confessor n St. Timothy RELIGIOUS Dean: Rev. Chrysostom Baer, O. Praem. Sub-Dean: Rev. John-Francis Vu, S.J.

2018

2019

Bishop Kevin Vann travels to the quarries and fabricators in Italy where he selects the marble and stone for the interior of Christ Cathedral.

Christ Cathedral is dedicated as the seat of the Diocese of Orange on July 17.

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Santa Margarita Catholic High School congratulates Bishop Vann and the Diocese of Orange on the dedication of Christ Cathedral! May this cathedral serve as a sacred place to gather, worship and witness the love of Christ.

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AUDIO | VIDEO | LIGHTING | CONTROL | DESIGN | INSTALL

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Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels - Los Angeles AMT Systems partnered with the Diocese and designers to provide exceptional Audio/Video integration and has provided ongoing service and event support.

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amtsystemsinc.com (661) 251-4206 J U LY 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

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Congratulations to the Diocese of Orange Christ Cathedral Dedication July 17, 2019

CONGRATULATIONS

from the FACULTY, STAFF, & SEMINARIANS of ST. PATRICK’S SEMINARY & UNIVERSITY to The Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, JCD, DD and the Diocese of Orange on the dedication of

CHRIST CATHEDRAL 320 Middlefield Rd Menlo Park, CA 94025 650-325-5621

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www.stpsu.edu /stpatrickssem


S�� J���� M����� ������ ��� S����� ������� ����������� ��� ��������� �� C����� C�������� �� ��� ������� �� O����� We were established as a new parish in 1958, became a part of the new Diocese of Orange in 1976, and now we celebrate our new Cathedral in 2019. We con�nue to ma�e history and grow together as Catholics in Orange County. St. Justin Martyr Pastors: Rev. Msgr. Hugh O’Connor 1958-1990 Rev. Joseph Nettekoven 1990-2008 Rev. Joseph Robillard 2008-present

SAINT JUSTIN MARTYR CATHOLIC CHURCH 2050 West Ball Road ● Anaheim, CA 92804 ● www.saint��s�n.o�� ● 714‐774‐2595

Congratulations Bishop Vann and the entire Diocese of Orange from your St. Thomas More Parish Family in Irvine! J U LY 1 4 , 2 0 1 9

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The 136,894 Catholics in the Roman Catholic

Congratulations bishop Kevin Vann and the

Diocese of Orange

May the Cathedral radiate the peace of Christ Risen + Bishop Michael Mulvey, STL, DD and the Diocese of Corpus Christi

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Diocese of Lubbock, Texas, their priests, deacons, w women religious, and

Most ReveRend RobeRt CoeRveR Bishop of Lubbock

pray God’s richest blessings for pra

bish hop Kevin vann and the Catholics of the

Diocese of Orange on the dedication of

Christ Cathedral. May God continue to bless you!


Congratulations to the Diocese of Orange on the occasion of the dedication of the

Christ Cathedral Bishop Oscar A. Solis and the faithful of the Diocese of Salt Lake City

Congratulations!

on the dedication of Christ Cathedral! Many prayers and blessings sent to you from... Bishop Walker Nickless and the Diocese of Sioux City

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Congratulations to Bishop Vann and the Diocese of Orange on the restoration and dedication of the Christ Cathedral

Archbishop Gustavo García-Siller, MSpS; Auxiliary Bishop Michael Boulette; and the faithful of the Archdiocese of San Antonio congratulate Bishop Kevin Vann and the people of the Diocese of Orange on the dedication of Christ Cathedral, “A Place for Christ Forever,” following an extensive renovation.

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Irvine Cottages Congratulates and salutes Bishop Kevin Vann, along with Orange Catholic Foundation and the Diocese of Orange, for its dedication to our church and our Lord. We also remember Cindy Bobruk for her love and dedication to those less fortunate than herself. We pray for her family daily. Love, Irvine Cottages,

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Profile for occatholic

OC Catholic 7-14-19  

The special commemorative edition of OC Catholic that chronicles the history, the transformation, and the dedication of Christ Cathedral.

OC Catholic 7-14-19  

The special commemorative edition of OC Catholic that chronicles the history, the transformation, and the dedication of Christ Cathedral.