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©2013 Anheuser-Busch, Budweiser® Beer, St. Louis, MO


June2013

Vol15 No6

Features Unbridled Beauty p17 The horse culture of Mackinac Island, Michigan, is truly a way of life. From a jaunt from home to the grocery store and UPS deliveries to a taxi ride to the airport or ferryboat, this very Victorian island in the Great Lakes is entirely dependent on horses. BY SANDRA FRIEND

Ready, Set, Read! p22 Before the days of television, computers, smartphones and tablets, people had to be creative when it came to finding sources of entertainment. They made music; they sang; and they read. BY BONNIE KRETCHIK

A Family Affair p24 Joseph M. O’Farrell III and John David O’Farrell have become the third generation of O’Farrells to be involved in the operation of Ocala Stud, the oldest active Thoroughbred farm in Florida. BY JOANN GUIDRY

Men Of Style p29 You may have encountered some of these gentlemen before. Whether seated behind the desk in their office or out on a job site, these individuals are among the best in their fields.

Photo by John Jernigan

p38

ON THE COVER

Smokin’ & Sizzlin’

Barbeques, barbecues, Bar-B-Qs. We’re unsure of the correct way to spell it, but one thing remains without a doubt: Ocalans absolutely love their BBQ. Sumptuous ribs brushed with sweet sauce over a hot pit; it’s the quintessential smell and taste of a summer we’ve all been waiting for. BY AMANDA FURRER Cover photo by John Jernigan. Food provided by Shane’s Rib Shack. Model: Casey Allen

ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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p60

June2013 Vol15 No6

Departments The Buzz p9 The real people, places and events that shape our community. BY KEVIN CHRISTIAN, CYNTHIA MCFARLAND AND ANTIONETTE ROLLINS

p10

FROMCITYHALL p10

Splash pad at Citizens’ Circle opens for summertime fun. CLASSACTS p12

Greenway reads like royalty and an astronaut visits Dunellon Middle.

p52

ONTHEJOB p14

Behind the scenes at Ocala Fire Rescue.

The Pulse p45 Ideas to keep you fit and healthy all year long. BY JOANN GUIDRY & KATIE MCPHERSON

p14

BEINGWELL p46

Living with Lyme disease.

p46

FEELINGWELL p50

What to know about plantar fasciitis. LOOKINGWELL p52

Muscle-building basics.

The Dish p59 Our best recipes, restaurant news and culinary quick bites.

p12

BY BONNIE KRETCHIK, CYNTHIA MCFARLAND AND MARY MCTAGGART

QUICKBITES p60

True Grits opens for business and McAlister’s Deli offers the tastes of summer. DININGGUIDE p61

Our area’s finest dining establishments.

p70

The Scene p69

p71

Your guide to what’s happening in and around Ocala. BY BONNIE KRETCHIK & ANTIONETTE ROLLINS

AQUICKQ&A p71

Ocala Style gets the details on Ocala’s first-ever Comic Con. SOCIALSCENE p78

Photos from our area’s most popular events.

6

JUN’13

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p66


urc e: T he M 1 edia Audit 201

MA

Still

1 MAGAZIN S#

COUNT ON Y’ RI

ALL LEVELS: AGES 3 & UP

E

So

June2013

Vol15 No6

ocalastyle.com

PUBLISHER

KATHY JOHNSON / kathy@ocalastyle.com OFFICE/PRODUCTION MANAGER CYNTHIA BROWN / cynthia@ocalastyle.com

EXECUTIVE EDITOR KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY karin@ocalastyle.com

MANAGING EDITOR MELISSA PETERSON melissa@ocalastyle.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JASON FUGATE jason@ocalastyle.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS CASEY ALLEN casey@ocalastyle.com

LIFESTYLE EDITOR BONNIE KRETCHIK

KRISTEN NETHEN

bonnie@ocalastyle.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS SHEILA HARTLEY

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT ANTIONETE ROLLINS antionette@ocalastyle.com

kristen@ocalastyle.com

sheila@ocalastyle.com

JOHN JERNIGAN jernigan@ocalastyle.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS KEVIN CHRISTIAN kevin@ocalastyle.com

MARY ANN DESANTIS maryann@ocalastyle.com

AMANDA FURRER amanda@ocalastyle.com

JOANN GUIDRY joann@ocalastyle.com

KRISTEN NETHEN

ron@ocalastyle.com

DIRECTOR OF SALES DEAN JOHNSON deanjohnson@ocalastyle.com

MACKENSIE GIBSON

lori@ocalastyle.com

EDITORIAL INTERNS KATIE MCPHERSON MARY MCTAGGART

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES SHARON MORGAN sharon@ocalastyle.com

SKIP LINDERMAN skip@ocalastyle.com

ACCOUNTING LISA CONNOLLY

CECILIA SARCO

billing@ocalastyle.com

ADELAIDE TASSA-RACHA

COLLECTIONS LYNSEY JOHNSON lynsey@ocalastyle.com

DISTRIBUTION DAVE ADAMS

OFFICE PHONE 352.732.0073

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Ocala Style Magazine, June 2013. Published monthly by Ocala Publications Inc., 1007 E. Fort King Street, Ocala, FL 34471. (352) 732-0073. All contents copyright 2012 by Ocala Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written CHAMBER & ECONOMIC permissionPARTNERSHIP from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to beMOVING returned.FORWARD Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature”MOVING denote aFORWARD paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements. OCALA / MARION COUNTY

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Up In Flames

Buzz

the

Fighting fire in the Brick City p14

City Of Ocala p10

Class Acts p12

Big-Time Book Deal p16

and more!

UP SURF’S

Photo © Tayhutch / Shutterstock.com

I

T’S SUMMER, AND THE HEAT IS BLAZING. HOWEVER, THERE’S NO NEED TO HIDE FROM THE SUN—CATCH SOME RAYS AND GET ACTIVE (AND MAYBE WIN SOME CASH) AT THE 2013 FLORIDA WAKE SURF COMPETITION, WHICH TAKES PLACE ON JUNE 21 AND JUNE 22. SURFERS OF ALL LEVELS CAN HEAD OVER TO LAKE WEIR IN OCKLAWAHA TO PARTICIPATE IN THE FIRST ANNUAL EVENT TO QUALIFY FOR THE 2013 WORLD WAKE SURFING COMPETITION. OVER $100,000 IN CASH PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED TO WINNERS. FRIENDS AND FAMILY WHO AREN’T IN A COMPETITIVE MOOD CAN STILL ENJOY THE CATERED DINNER, LIVE ENTERTAINMENT AND BEACH PARTY HAPPENING ON THE LAST DAY. SUN, FUN AND SURFING—YOU CAN’T LOSE AT THIS COMPETITION!

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FROMCITYHALL

One Ocala One America is an outgrowth of the National League of Cities campaign to promote racial justice. The campaign started in 1999 at the urging of Bob Knight, mayor of Wichita. Ocala chose to participate in a major way this year. With city council’s blessing, Councilwoman Mary Sue Rich formed a task force in order to put on this major community event. The task force decided Ocala’s week should focus on racial harmony and cultural understanding, and the name One Ocala One America was chosen as the theme. THE RACIAL HARMONY TASK FORCE is seeking community members who would like to help plan and organize the One Ocala One America week of events. For more information on how to become involved, please contact Stan Creel at (352) 629-8444.

A SPLASHIN’ GOOD TIME

The splash pad at CITIZENS’ CIRCLE is now open for summertime fun! The splash pad is located behind City Hall at 151 SE Osceola Avenue and is open seven days a week, from sunrise to sunset.

COOL SAVINGS

Summer is just around the corner, and that means hot weather. Not only will temperatures increase, but air-conditioning and energy consumption as well. Here are some helpful tips from OCALA UTILITY SERVICES on how to prepare! •

Keep the sun out. Weather strip and caulk around outside doors and windows to make your home as airtight as possible and minimize the loss of conditioned air. •

Use ceiling fans in conjunction with air-conditioning, and set the thermostat two to four degrees higher. Save approximately 6 to 8 percent per degree and still feel comfortable. Turn fans off in unoccupied rooms.

• Schedule a checkup for your air-conditioning system, including the ductwork, by a licensed contractor. •

SUMMERTIME FUN DOWNTOWN JUNE FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK Downtown Ocala FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 6-9PM

RED, WHITE AND BLUES Citizens’ Circle, Downtown Ocala

Replace or clean dirty air filters once a month. Dirty filters cause the air-conditioning system to run longer, decreasing efficiency and increasing costs. Set your thermostat to 80 degrees. Each degree below 80 will cost approximately 6 to 8 percent or more in cooling costs.

Ocala Utility Services users can monitor daily energy and water consumption with the new program MyUsage.com. For more information and energy-saving tips, visit ocalafl.org/us.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 6-9PM

Join us for a patriotic festival in honor of our country. The event includes live music, food and fun for the entire family. Be sure to wear your swimsuit and enjoy the splash pad.

DOWNTOWN SUMMER JAMS Citizens’ Circle, Downtown Ocala FRIDAY, JUNE 21, JULY 19, AUG. 16, SEPT. 20 AT 7:10PM

Back for a third season, local, young artists showcase their talent in this summer concert series.

10

JUN’13

ocalastyle.com

SEEKING

“PARKTACULAR”

AMBASSADORS

The CITY OF OCALA RECREATION AND PARKS department is seeking Citizens Rangers to assist staff in securing and promoting local parks. The rangers will help monitor activities, answer questions, assist park visitors and help with youth programs, special events and public relations. Contact Katherine Crile at (352) 368-5500.

Flag © STILLFX; Theometer © Alhovik; Park Ranger © Kletr; Art © Boyan Dimitrov; Concer© Melis / Shutterstock.com

ONE OCALA, ONE AMERICA


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CLASSACTS

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS AND DISTRICT NEWS THAT SHAPE MARION COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

BY KEVIN CHRISTIAN

DUNNELLON MIDDLE MAKES SPACE HISTORY Out of 2,076 entries from 52 countries, “EVERY GENERATION,” a video about future technology produced by these sixth-grade Dunnellon Middle School students in Beth Wood’s exploratory wheel class, captured the top spot in a recent NASA contest. Students were inspired by Joe Acaba (back row, center), a former DMS teacher-turned-astronaut who spent time aboard the International Space Station and stopped by to visit with students. The winning video is now part of NASA’s “50 Years of Solar System Exploration” celebration and is being considered for display on the ISS.

ROBOTICS BACK HOME The Forest Robotics team may not have captured the top spot in national competition, but they’re still all smiles from the incredible experience in St. Louis. The team was eliminated in the quarterfinals but finished 31st in their division. The ILLUMICATS relish the memory despite having to rebuild their robot, which was damaged in transit to the team’s second appearance at nationals.

MARTHA’S READERS PAIR UP MARTHA THE DOG, a

LANDING THE RIGHT CAREER There was no emergency when this sheriff ’s helicopter landed at

Hammett Bowen Jr. Elementary.

famous PBS character promoting literacy, made a guest appearance honoring “Reading Pals” at Eighth Street Elementary. The Martha Speaks program pairs older students with younger ones for regular one-on-one reading sessions, teaching vocabulary, pronunciation and literacy skills along the way. The final celebration also involved cookies, punch and printed certificates for each Reading Pal.

Instead, students got up-close and personal with the crime-fighting aircraft as part of the school’s annual career day. From aviation and dentistry to fire-fighting and dairy farming, kids talked, questioned, quizzed and made friends with community professionals offering their expertise and advice for future careers.

ART SPRINGS FORTH

GREENWAY’S ROYAL COURT Thanks to “Weekend Warriors,” hundreds of Greenway Elementary

students are now “knights” in the QUEEN’S ROYAL COURT. No medieval exercise, these kids earn knighthood by waging war with reading. Each weekend, they read in 15-minute blocks to win the war. Those battles add up to nearly 10,000 hours of after-school reading in just over four months. Principal Erin “Queenie” Quainton and other administrators wear royal court costumes, dole out royal crowns and even have a Roundtable Library for kids winning even more reading “battles.” The entire campaign is volunteer driven and includes other incentives encouraging students to read.

College Park Elementary’s SHANNON O’LEARY designed the winning cover art for a special publication from Marion County’s Storm Water Office. Her design features over 20 people enjoying local springs. Thousands of copies of the 12-page publication made it into the community, encouraging all of us to “Discover our Water Resources,” and County Commissioner Carl Zalak presented Shannon with prizes for her work at the school.

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BMW 5 Series

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THE MATCHUP THAT’S NO MATCHUP. When comparing the BMW 528i Sedan to rivals like the Mercedes E350, some stark differences quickly come to light. To start, the 528i is faster than the E350, and more fuel-efficient, with 34 mpg hwy vs. 30 with the Mercedes*. The 528i widens its lead with a comprehensive maintenance plan (that costs you nothing), and a lower MSRP than the E-Class. Looks like it’s time for a test drive of the 528i today.

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*Fuel-efficiency claims based on EPA estimates. The 528i achieves 23/34 city/highway mpg, the Mercedes-Benz E350 achieves 20/30 city/highway mpg. Actual mileage may vary. For comparison purposes only. Speed claim based on published 0–60 acceleration times and MSRP claims based on published information from manufacturer websites. **STK#M229499 - 2013 BMW 528i Sedan, MSRP $50,595. 36 month lease with $4000 due at signing including $0 security deposit with approved credit through BMW Financial Services. 10,000 miles per year allowed, 15¢ per mile thereafter. Lease excludes tax and includes tag, title, registration and dealer fee. Photo used for illustration only. Offer cannot be combined. See dealer for complete details. Offer expires 6/30/2013. 1 Whichever comes first. For full details on BMW Ultimate Service ® visit bmwusa.com/ultimateservice. ©2012 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

When you set out to improve upon greatness, you leave no stone unturned. Or in this case, ©2013 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Porsche recommends seat belt usage and observance of all traffic laws at all times. no component unimproved. Built from the ground up with 90% new or fundamentally revised materials, the next 911 redefines performance as we know it. Acceleration from 0 to 60 in an astounding 3.9 seconds* in the Carrera S. It’s even shed almost 100 pounds for added agility and improved efficiency. The next 911 is the sports car that turns all we know into everything you desire. The next Porsche 911. Forever the sports car.

See the next Porsche 911 at the auto show. New 2014 Porsche Cayman S $1099 Lease Per Month Auto Show Name Here Month date to Month date, 2012 Auto Show Location Here ocala.porschedealer.com Porsche recommends 36 month lease with $5000 due at signing including $0 security deposit with approved credit through Porsche Financial Services. 5,000 miles per year allowed, 20¢ per mile thereafter. Lease excludes tax and includes tag, title, registration and dealer fee. See dealer for complete details. Offer expires month end.

ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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Buzz

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ONTHEJOB

A DAY IN THE LIFE AT OCALA FIRE RESCUE Many residents are familiar with Ocala’s nickname, “Brick City,” but not how it originated

O

N THANKSGIVING DAY IN 1883, A FIRE STARTED ON THE ROOF OF BENJAMIN & COMPANY, A DOWNTOWN STORE STOCKED WITH FURNITURE AND MATTRESSES. AS THE BLAZE RAGED OUT OF CONTROL, A BUCKET BRIGADE QUICKLY FORMED USING WATER FROM WELLS ON THE COURTHOUSE SQUARE, BUT BUCKETS WERE NO MATCH FOR THE FLAMES EAGERLY DEVOURING THE MERCANTILE AND SURROUNDING WOODEN STRUCTURES. WHEN THE FIRE WAS FINALLY EXTINGUISHED, FIVE FULL BLOCKS OF DOWNTOWN OCALA LAY IN SMOLDERING ASH.

Following the disaster, downtown was rebuilt with brick instead of wood, hence the moniker “Brick City,” and Ocalans demanded a full-scale, paid fire department. In May 1885, the Fire Department of the City of Ocala was established, incorporating the volunteer firemen who previously protected the town. Fire rescue has come a long way from those days when men pulled the apparatus to the scene of a fire. Beginning in 1894, horses replaced manpower and transported fire apparatus until motorized equipment debuted in 1915. Much has changed in the last 100 years. Today, the only horsepower at Ocala Fire Rescue’s six stations is found under the gleaming hoods of the various trucks and rescue vehicles meticulously maintained by Ocala’s finest. What has not changed, however, is the dedication and determination of the firefighters. I recently visited Ocala Fire Rescue’s headquarters on NE 3rd Street, right across from Tuscawilla Pond, to find out what on-duty life is like. “Firehouse Magazine ranks this as the 25th busiest fire station in the country,” notes Assistant Chief Brian Stoothoff, who has worked for the department for over three decades. “The City of Ocala has six fire stations, and this is the largest one. We average

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ocalastyle.com

Photos by Cynthia McFarland

BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

more than 40 911 calls per day, and five trucks operate out of this station.” At any given time, there are eight to 12 firefighters on duty here, working 24-hour shifts. Although there’s no maximum age for firefighters, providing they can handle the physical requirements, the average age at this station is late 30s. Out of 131 personnel, 127 of those are firefighters, and women make up roughly 5 percent of the department. Ocala was one of Florida’s first departments to hire women, starting back Firefighter Eric Morton in 1985. Most people think of a firefighter as someone battling flames, but most calls—up to 85 percent of themare medical emergencies, which is why everyone in the department is either an EMT or a paramedic. The remaining calls are fires or some other type of emergency. Much of what goes on behind the scenes is about being prepared for those calls.


firehydrant ©Nerthuz/shutterstock.com

Cleaning and inspecting apparatus and facilities (and yes, that includes scrubbing toilets), checking fire hydrants, inspecting businesses… it may not sound exciting, but it’s all part of a firefighter’s daily duties. So are training exercises and physical fitness, which may include weight lifting and cardiovascular workouts, like racquetball and volleyball. “Firefighters must always be in a state of readiness,” says Stoothoff. “A certain type of personality is attracted to this job, someone who has a desire to help others. Their families have to be supportive, too, because firefighters spend much more time at work than most occupations. The work week for a firefighter is 52 hours.” Despite the stereotype, firefighters aren’t necessarily “adrenaline junkies.” “That might be true for some people but not for me. I actually had a career in engineering prior to this, and while it was fulfilling economically, it wasn’t fulfilling emotionally,” says Christopher Dyer, 37, a 13-year veteran of the department. “Community service is the reason I’m a firefighter.” “I always knew I wanted to do public service,” says Chase Howard, 20, who became a certified firefighter at 18. “My dad is a fireman, and my mom’s a nurse. They always came home and talked about the neat things they did; I knew I wanted a job like that, something that was rewarding and about helping people.” “A recent study showed that helping people is the No. 1 most rewarding thing for men in the 17 to 25 age range,” says Battalion Chief Shane Alexander. Serving the public is what firefighters do, but doing it as a team is what they most enjoy. “When I come to work, I might end up putting out a fire or going to an accident; that’s all unknown, but the known part is that I get to work with these guys,” says Jesse Blaire, 36, who’s been with the department for 11 years. “We spend as much time with each other as we do our families, and a lot of us also do things together off duty,” adds Alexander. Their career means a crisis like the Boston Marathon bombing can be part of any day. Dealing with those horrors is part of the job, but firefighters rarely talk about details with family members or friends, preferring to keep it between themselves. “These guys are like your second family, so it’s better to talk to them,” says Jesse. “You don’t process things until the next day or shift, and then you tend to talk about it with bravado; it’s our coping mechanism.” When I visited the station, the day’s cleaning duties were already complete. There was no pot of chili or spaghetti simmering on the stove. Contrary to another old stereotype, firefighters don’t always cook at the station, but they do eat plenty of crock pot meals. A television was on in a corner of the kitchen, but no one was watching it. Some of the crew had kindly agreed to talk with me, while the rest were either working out or on a call. When a call comes in—as it did when I was visiting—the firefighters are suiting up, in the truck and driving out within a minute or less. “No two calls are the same; there will be similarities, but they’re never the same, and we like that,” says Captain Larry Doerffel, 47, who’s been with the department for 25 years. “What’s normal and routine for us may be someone else’s worst day.”

Firefighters Chase Howard & Christorpher Dyer

Photos by Cynthia McFarland

Firefighters Chase Howard & Christorpher Dyer

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Buzz

the

ONE-ON-ONE

A NOVEL DEBUT L

ush. Sexy. Dreamy. Evocative. To have one’s first novel reviewed in such glowing terms is a fiction writer’s dream. To have that same novel fought over by several major publishing houses is almost unthinkable. Yet that’s exactly what happened to Forest High School graduate ANTON DISCLAFANI, 31, author of the newly released The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls. “People don’t really believe me when I say that I wrote Yonahlossee. I didn’t know that it was going to sell or if it would have an audience,” says Anton. “The publishing industry is tough; there are many more good books that are written than are published.” Location sparked the seeds of the novel, even before Anton developed her characters. For years, her family vacationed in their Blue Ridge Mountain cabin, a mere stone’s throw from a girls’ riding camp in Blowing Rock, North Carolina, the real Yonahlossee, which closed in the 1980s. She also chose Marion County, specifically

Emathla—a tiny community near the crossroads of SR 326 and CR 225—for the book’s setting. “I didn’t want to be as specific as Ocala, a place many people would recognize,” she explains. “It’s really based on the landscape and physical details, and the house is based on the house where I grew up.” A beautifully woven, coming-of-age tale of family drama, scandalous love and life-altering relationships, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls immerses the reader into the tumultuous world of Thea Atwell. Set during the Great Depression, the novel deftly unveils the layered mysteries of why Thea was sent from a seemingly idyllic life on her family’s citrus farm to the girl’s school. It’s impossible not to like this complicated and passionate young heroine, as we experience her heartache, confusion, realizations and, ultimately, the self-discovery that forever changes her life’s course. “One of the great realities of adulthood is realizing how anonymous you are, that not everyone is thinking about you, but as a teenager, you are so self-involved,” says Anton, adding that willful, fearless Thea is completely her opposite. Anton completed the first draft of her manuscript in about two years and then sent it to her agent, Dorian Karchmar, who suggested a number of revisions, which took another two-and-a-half years. Karchmar’s savvy handling of the manuscript ended up attracting the interest of multiple publishers, leading to a highly

Photo by Nina Subin

BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

competitive auction to acquire publishing rights. Riverhead Books, a member of Penguin Group, won the debut novel, and foreign rights have been sold in 12 countries to date. The novel has been heralded as one of the “most anticipated books of 2013” by Publishers Weekly and The Wall Street Journal. “It’s not often that a debut like this comes along, one that is as moving and thoughtful as it is propulsive and compelling,” notes Sarah McGrath, executive editor of Riverhead Books. “I was hooked instantly by the smart voice, the 1930s setting and the mystery of Thea Atwell’s secrets. It wasn’t long before the powerful pull of the plot was matched by my emotional investment in this girl and my pure love for her story.” Anton’s schedule is now packed with book tours and appearances. “I happened upon my agent luckily. At the time, all the revision was frustrating, but of course, now I’m really grateful,” says Anton, who received the reported seven-figure contract in February 2012. “I didn’t know anything about publishing. I wrote the book

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but had nothing to do with the negotiation.” Born in Tennessee, Anton was 10 when her family moved to Ocala from Fort Lauderdale, something she wasn’t thrilled about until her parents “bribed” her with horses. Indeed, horses were what she loved most about the decade she spent in Marion County. She took dressage lessons at Everglade Arabians in Micanopy, riding a talented, if occasionally challenging, Arab gelding nicknamed “Harry.” After graduating from Forest High School in 1999, Anton attended Emory University in Atlanta, then earned her MFA at Washington University in St. Louis, where she met Mat Smith, now her husband, who is also a writer, currently finishing his first novel. “It’s not competitive. It’s a dynamic that really works for us, and yes, it is all books, all the time,” says Anton, who also teaches a creative writing class at Washington University. “It’s good for me to teach; I would get bored if I was only writing,” says Anton, whose next book is already in the works.

The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls goes on sale June 4 at local bookstores and online. antondisclafani.com


UNBRIDLED BEAUTY WRITTEN & PHOTOGRAPHED BY SANDRA FRIEND

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efore the sun rises, the docks are bustling. Percherons snort and stomp, waiting for the wagons to fill as dock workers scurry up and down the ramp. Cartons of frozen food come fresh off the freezer truck on the ferryboat’s deck to be stacked in wooden wagons. Loading complete, the drays move out, a steady clip-clop of the horses hooves echoing down the streets toward Mission Point, the Grand Hotel and points in between. Teams and drivers deliver their most perishable loads of the day before the streets once again fill with today’s visitors to America’s only island that moves at a horse’s pace—Mackinac Island.


T

HE HORSE CULTURE OF MACKINAC ISLAND, MICHIGAN, is truly a way of life.

From a jaunt from home to the grocery store and UPS deliveries to a taxi ride to the airport or ferryboat, this very Victorian island in the Great Lakes is entirely dependent on horses. “We’re not the Amish,” says Brad Chambers with a laugh. “That’s the biggest misunderstanding about Mackinac.” Brad is a fifth-generation islander from a long line of carriage drivers. His family operates the dray service and oversees Mackinac Island Carriage Tours, a cooperative dating back to the 1920s that manages most of the working horses on the island. Mackinac’s distinctive horse-drawn lifestyle dates back to a proclamation by the Mackinac Island Village Council in 1898 that banned horseless carriages from city streets. Concerns ran deep that these newfangled machines would wreak havoc on their

peaceful island, which sits just off the Straits of Mackinac, separating the Upper Peninsula of Michigan from the rest of the state. In 1900, summer cottager Earl C. Anthony brought his new Locomobile over on the ferryboat, thumbing his nose at the ban. Sure enough, the engine startled the horses, several carriages wrecked and horses were injured. After this incident, the Mackinac Island State Park Commission banned cars from the state park, which covers 80 percent of the island. Since 1901, the only engine-driven wheeled vehicles permitted on the island are a small fleet of emergency vehicles, tucked away discreetly except when in use; golf carts limited to golf course use; and the rare special-permit use of construction vehicles for major efforts like rebuilding the airport runway. Building a house? Your concrete blocks and wood arrive by dray. From the moment you step off the ferryboat on the downtown docks—or arrive

by private plane at the airport—you’ll see horses and carriages taking care of business. Not just taxicabs and tours but delivery services, garbage trucks, lawn services, family transportation, even workers headed to their jobs. One exception: The post office does not deliver. It’s up to you to pick up your mail. On Mackinac Island, your transportation choices are simple: walk, ride a bike, ride a horse or drive a carriage. “It’s pretty neat,” says Leanne Brodeur, a Mackinac Island native and founder of the Mackinac Horsemen’s Association. “I grew up here and had ponies since I could shovel manure and saddle them up myself.” Leanne oversees the Mackinac Community Equestrian Center, which serves both as a boarding stable for residents’ horses and runs the 4-H program for the island. This is a stable that horses were involved in building. “Pretty much everything here was hauled in by dray,” Leanne says. “They

“WE’RE A SUMMER HOTEL. WE’RE ELEGANT, BUT WE DON’T WANT TO TAKE OURSELVES TOO SERIOUSLY. IT’S A THEATRICAL EXPERIENCE.” -BOB TAGATZ

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allowed us to truck in some of the stuff that was just too big and heavy, like the steel sheeting.” The Mackinac Horsemen’s Association holds one big fundraiser each summer, the Festival of the Horse. Running for several days in August, it enables visitors to peek into Victorian-era cottager stables, see formal carriages on parade and watch Musical Freestyle performances with Friesians. Presentations showcase the variety of breeds on the island, and lecturers share the unique aspects of island horse culture. During the rest of the summer season, visitors are welcome to visit the community stables. “None of the other barns allow anybody in,” says Leanne, “so we’re looking forward to showing it off.”

sheer size—you can’t miss it as you arrive by ferryboat—and its flair for keeping the island’s Victorian image and horse culture alive. “The biggest challenge we have is to represent all of the periods of the hotel’s history, put it together in this wild, eclectic mix and make it work,” says Grand Hotel Historian Bob Tagatz. “We’re a summer hotel. We’re elegant, but we don’t want to take ourselves too seriously. It’s a theatrical experience.” One of less than a dozen Gilded Age hotels remaining in the United States, the Grand Hotel flourished thanks to three generations of ownership by the same family, the Mussers. “It is the only institution I have ever been associated with where the president, the chairman

A GRAND STAGE

A

CROSSROADS ON THE WATERS of the Great Lakes

for centuries for Native American tribes, French fur traders and British soldiers, Mackinac Island is one of many islands where Lake Huron and Lake Michigan meet. The Ojibwa called the island Michilimackinac, the Great Turtle, for its prominent shape as seen from a canoe. French voyageur Jean Nicolet discovered the island and its indigenous people on his 1634 expedition, and by 1671, Mackinac Island was the most important fur trading post on the American frontier. Controlled by the British during the American Revolution and the War of 1812, the island resumed its status as a fur-trading mecca under the auspices of John Jacob Astor during the 1820s. Moving on to commercial fishing and shipping after the fur trade tapped out, the establishment of Mackinac Island National Park (now a state park and National Historic Site) after the Civil War shifted the island’s focus to tourism. Pre-dating the fuss about automobiles, the Grand Hotel opened its doors in 1887 after a 93-day whirlwind of construction. Built by a consortium of shipping interests, the Grand Hotel was meant to attract the newfound leisure class of the children of the titans of America’s industrial revolution. The late 1800s ushered in Victorian “cottages” built by the very wealthy along the island’s main avenues and high bluffs as well as quaint hotels and inns lining the streets of downtown. The Grand Hotel stands out thanks to its

and the vice president grew up as kids in the building,” says Bob. “They grew up with their guests. So I always say we were created for our guests, but we’re also created by our guests.” “At the Grand Hotel we have the fun part of the horse culture,” says Ben Mosley, a year-round Mackinac Island resident and the stable master of the Grand Hotel. “A stay at the Grand Hotel is kind of a choreographed show, with our horses the opening and closing acts of the show.” The show begins with the arrival of a 1901 Fisher Omnibus at the Arnold Ferry Line docks, a courtesy shuttle for incoming guests. “We use the Percheron horses to pull the Omnibuses. I prefer grays because they look better in photographs,” says Ben. “Our carriages, horses and drivers stand out downtown, and we do that on purpose. We use a harness that isn’t even traditional for that carriage; it’s a harness for showing Draft horses

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in an arena. Our drivers are slightly overdressed for the carriage that they’re driving… a formal livery. As a general rule, when the drivers put that livery on, their persona changes. It’s all part of the showmanship.” Once you arrive at the hotel, you’re treated to the gentle ‘clip-clop’ of horses along the avenue out front as part of the ambiance, as carriages continually arrive and depart. Carriages are used to transport golfers across The Jewel from the 1901-era Grand Nine—home of the Jockey Club Restaurant—to the Woods Nine, a more modern course. Some guests treat themselves to private carriage rides. “Everything we have is rolling stock,” says Ben, “and we try to use every carriage every year so we can keep saying that. It's surprising how well balanced and smooth they are to ride.” The hotel’s collection includes several of William Vanderbilt’s carriages, one of which is a late 1800s Bachelor Brougham, and a Brewster Vis-à-vis built in 1904 for U.S. Senator George Hazelton, part owner in the Union-Pacific Railroad. After more than a century inside the hotel itself, starting off in the basement and moving to separate quarters uphill, the Grand Hotel’s stables are now offsite in a prominent location at the top of Surrey Hill. Built in partnership with Mackinac Island Carriage Tours, the stables are home to both a new Antique Carriage Museum and the working horses of the Grand Hotel.

TEAM EFFORT

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EAR THE ARNOLD DOCKS, a team of Percherons

stands waiting as a “surrey with the fringe on top” loads up with eager tourists. Thousands of visitors disembark from the ferries every summer day, and one of their top choices for exploring the island is a two-hour tour with Mackinac Island Carriage Tours. Providing an overview of the historic downtown as well as a ride along the deeply shaded roads of the state park, it’s the best way to get your bearings on what’s where. Mackinac Island offers many temptations, from its dozens of competing fudge shops on Main Street to historic Fort Mackinac atop the bluffs and numerous unusual geologic formations, including Sugar Loaf and Arch Rock.

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To serve the summer throngs, there are more than 500 working horses, outnumbering the year-round residents. Most are stabled at Surrey Hill. Ben stopped our carriage near their stables. “Now you're in the middle of a whole bunch of stables, and the flies should just be swarming,” he said, “but this is as bad as it gets.” Which wasn’t bad at all. Dr. Al Sibinic runs the fly eradication program. “He educated people,” says Ben, “and uses fly predators, a hybrid bug, that they put out every five or six days. They also have people maintaining their compost piles better.” Throughout the island, you’ll see men with large shovels and wheeled carts making sure that the roads stay clean. “Any commercial vehicle that has a license on it, they’re responsible for a given area of the street to maintain,” says Ben. “The city and state pick up the rest of it.” All of the waste, including food and paper scraps from the hotels, ends up at a one-of-a-kind composting facility well away from the tourist and residential areas. “Believe it or not, it draws a few tourists,” says Ben. Belgian Draft and Percherons handle the heavy commercial loads and account for the majority of the island’s horses. High-stepping Hackney horses pull the dressiest of private carriages. Welsh Cobs and Friesians are local favorites for personal carriages and riding.

It’s not unusual to spot a Norwegian Fjord pony or even a Thoroughbred in someone’s yard. On a carriage ride through the Annex, the summer cottage community in the woods above the West Bluff, you’ll notice stables and carriage homes adjoining the houses, sometimes even eclipsing them in size. There aren’t as many obvious in Harrisonville, where most year-round working residents live. “You really don’t have time to care for a horse,” says Ben. “Everyone has to make hay while the sun shines.” Instead, bicycles are their main means of transportation. At the end of the season, most working horses are shipped off-island to farms in the Upper Peninsula. Full-time residents switch to snowmobiles during the winter months. Although most visitors opt for bicycle rentals to circle the island—an 8.2 mile loop at lake level—there are those for whom a horse is a must. Jack’s Livery Stable offers drive-your-own carriages, with gentle horses that know the established routes. Both Jack’s and Cindy’s Riding Stable offer guided trail rides on the island’s nearly 77 miles of trails. “The people who take the drive-it yourself carriages, that’s got to be hard because you’re going from 75 miles an hour down I-75 to a horse’s pace,” says Leanne. “But if you can just relax, enjoy it and go with it,” you’ve discovered the magic of Mackinac Island.

IF YOU GO

M

ackinac Island is located in the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Huron and Lake Michigan, where Upper Michigan and Lower Michigan meet. Several ferry lines depart Mackinaw City on a regular schedule between May and October and less

ARNOLD TRANSIT CO. / arnoldline.com CINDY’S RIDING STABLE / cindysridingstable.com GRAND HOTEL / grandhotel.com JACK’S LIVERY STABLE / jacksliverystable.com

MACKINAC ISLAND / mackinac.com MACKINAC ISLAND CARRIAGE TOURS / mict.com

frequently in the off-season. Ice socks in the island in the dead of winter, closing down transportation options. Mackinaw City is 20 hours north of Ocala off I-75 exit 338 in Michigan, just south of the Mackinac Island Bridge.

MACKINAC ISLAND FESTIVAL OF THE HORSE /

mackinacislandfestivalofthehorse.org

MACKINAC ISLAND HORSEMAN’S ASSOCIATION /

mackinachorses.org

MACKINAC STATE HISTORIC PARKS /

mackinacparks.com

MISSION POINT / missionpoint.com

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WRITTEN BY

SET READ!

BONNIE KRETCHIK

Flash forward to today and we not only have televisions in our homes, but we’ve got them on our multiple mobile devices and even in our cars. Our brains are very rarely unplugged. This summer, make it your goal to get hooked on reading. Over 30 million Americans can’t read beyond a fifth-grade level. Research shows that those who read more have better jobs, are more productive, live healthier lives and are better able to educate their own children. IT ALL BEGINS WITH THE LITTLE ONES

When do we become “readers?” Roseanne Russo, branch services division manager of the Marion County Public Library, points out that we don’t merely “spring forth as readers.” Rather, our environment plays a key role in whether we reach for the portable DVD player or summertime best seller, and it all begins before we can even form our first words. “When you look at the develop development of the brain, between the ages of 0 and 2 is when the most formaforma tion takes place,” says Diane Johnson, children’s services division manager

of the Marion County Public Library. She notes that the more language children are exposed to during these crucial years, the better vocabulary development they will experience, leading to an improved chance of academic success over the years. LETTING THEM READ ON THEIR OWN

When kids enter school and can begin to read on their own, a whole new world of exploration and imagination opens up. “Early childhood reading is hugely important,” says Roseanne, explaining that the library system is highly dedicated to reading during these formative years, incorporating such programs as the Ready to Read Van, Pre-School Club, Super Saturdays, Dig into Reading and many more. At a young age, children are excited about reading, and this is a key time to instill the habits that they will utilize throughout their school years. In fact, research shows that on a national level, while reading scores for high school kids have declined, they have shown improvement among 9 year olds.

HOT AIR BALLOONS © RINGO RINGO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM ; GIRL READING © SERHIY KOBYAKOV/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

READY

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efore the days of tele-vision, computers, smartphones and tablets, people had to be creative when it came to finding sources of entertainment. They made music; they sang; and they read.


TACKLING THE TWEENS AND TEENS

10 BOOKS EVERY CHILD SHOULD HEAR BEFORE KINDERGARTEN »

Each Peach Pear Plum

»

Where’s My Teddy?

»

Happy Birthday Moon

»

Bear in a Square

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The Story of Babar

»

Jump Frog Jump

»

How I Became a Pirate

»

Love You Forever

»

Little Red Hen

»

Curious George

SIZZLING SUMMER SELECTIONS FOR ELEMENTARY STUDENTS

»

Summer According to Humphrey, by Betty G. Birney

»

The Lemonade War, by Jacqueline Davies

»

Runaway Ralph, by Beverly Cleary

»

Because of Winn-Dixie, by Kate DiCamillo

TOP SUMMER PICKS FOR TWEENS

»

The Lightening Thief, by Rick Riordan

»

The Ghost’s Grave, by Peg Kehret

»

Holes, by Louis Sachar

»

A Long Way From Chicago, by Richard Peck

Once middle and high school begins and the onslaught of clubs, homework, sports and social time bombards students left and right, it’s hard to inspire students to read anything more than what is absolutely required. In fact, less than one-third of 13 year olds read daily. “It can be difficult to get the tweens and teens to continue reading, but it’s so important for imagination and vocabulary development,” explains Karen Jensen, the library’s community liaison. According to the National Endowment for the Arts, nearly two-thirds of employers rank reading comprehension as “very important” for high school graduates, yet 38 percent rank most high school graduates as “deficient” in reading skills.

YOUNG ADULT SUMMER MUST-READS »

City of Ashes (Series), by Cassandra Claire

»

Age of Miracles, by Karen Thompson Walker

»

The Moon and More, by Sarah Dessen

»

Lunar Chronicles, by Marissa Meyer

READING THROUGH THE DECADES

“Our lives change, we get new jobs, we raise kids, our kids move out, we retire,” says Roseanne, explaining that interest in reading is cyclical. When time allows, you may fly through a book in a matter of days, while at other times, you may not even remember the title of the last book you read. But just because high SAT scores are no longer a concern doesn’t mean reading can’t positively affect your life. Research shows that readers are more likely to engage in positive civic and individual activities that will enrich their lives, such as volunteering, exercising and attending cultural events.

SUMMER BEACH READS »

The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II, by Denise Kiernan

»

The Sharper Your Knife, The Less You Cry, by Kathleen Flinn

»

WWW: Wake, by Robert J. Sawyer

»

N0S4A2, by Joe Hill

THE YA CRAZE

The “Young Adult” genre has become widely popular (even among adult readers!) over the past decade with such series as Harry Potter and The Hunger Games. The library system accommodates these readers with Y.A.L.L.A., or the Young Adult Leading Library Awareness. Here, young readers can connect with their peers and select the books they want to read. The library also hosts multiple tween- and teen-friendly programs, including the upcoming county-wide geocaching extravaganza. READING FOR A NEW GENERATION

Interested in going “e”? The Marion County Library now holds over 600 titles you can check out digitally with the click of a button. There are also over 20,000 titles available for download, a full selection of digital magazines, music and more. SUMMERTIME READING

The Marion County Public Library hosts a variety of free programs throughout the summer for readers (and future readers) of all ages. Age-specific story times, reading-related hands-on activities, reading groups and much more are available at each branch. For a complete list, visit library.marioncountyfl.org. Sources: nea.gov, proliteracy.org

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A

Family

AFFAIR Joseph M. O’Farrell III and John David O’Farrell have become the third generation of O’Farrells to be involved in the operation of Ocala Stud, the oldest active Thoroughbred farm in Florida. By JoAnn Guidry Photography by Jim & John Jernigan

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ll ’Farre hael O c i M , Joe & David

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aybe you can’t go home again. But for brothers Joe and David O’Farrell, you can definitely go back to the family farm. Joe and David’s grandfather, Joe O’Farrell Sr., was part of a nine-member syndicate that established Ocala Stud in 1956. Their father, J. Michael O’Farrell Jr., took over running the now solely familyowned operation in 1971 when he was but 22. Today, Joe, 35, is the farm’s financial manager and David, 33, is the operation’s farm manager. But surprisingly, Thoroughbreds were not the focus of the brothers’ lives growing up. “With my dad, family time was family time,” says Joe. “When Dad left the farm at the end of the day, he left the Thoroughbred business at the farm.” To which David adds, “My brother and I were both into sports from a very early age, so our parents stayed busy taking us to practices and games. Dad never pushed us to become involved in the farm business.” And for Mike O’Farrell, that was the plan all along. “I grew up in the Thoroughbred business with my father, and I always knew I wanted to be involved in the industry,” says Mike, 65, who serves as president and managing partner of the operation owned by himself, sisters Susan Greiner, Anna O’Farrell-Brown and brother-in-law James Lewis. “But my wife Judy and I thought it was best to allow our sons to see that there were other opportunities out there. I didn’t want to force them into the Thoroughbred business. I wanted them to want to be in the Thoroughbred business.” First Joe then David went off to Erskine College in Due West, South Carolina; both graduated with business degrees. When Joe graduated in 1999, he secured an accountant position with a bank and remained in South Carolina. David, whose interest in the Thoroughbred business began to grow while in college, graduated in May 2003. By July, he was back home and working at Ocala Stud. “While I was in college, I started to track Ocala Stud-bred horses at the races on cable racing shows and the Internet,” says David. “And to my surprise, I became more and more interested in Thoroughbred racing. I told my dad that as soon as I graduated, I wanted to come back and work on the farm.” For Joe, it was the thrill of an Ocala Stud-bred and -sold horse doing well at the racetrack that led him back to the farm. While the O’Farrell

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family was on vacation at Saratoga Springs, New York, in 2003, Chapel Royal won the Sanford Stakes (G2) at Saratoga Race Course. By Ocala Stud stallion Montbrook out of the Cutlass mare Cut Class Leanne, Chapel Royal had been bred and then sold by Ocala Stud for $1.2 million at the 2003 Ocala Breeders’ Sales Company’s February juvenile sale at Calder Race Course. “I got really caught up in the excitement of Chapel Royal,” says Joe. “I started thinking that working for the farm might be more fulfilling than working at a bank.” By 2004, both David and Joe were working at Ocala Stud. “From day one, I told both David and Joe that there would be no free rides for them at Ocala Stud,” says Mike, who is currently the chairman of the OBS board of directors; he has also served multiple terms on the Florida Thoroughbred Breeders’ and Owners’ Association board of directors. “Just because their last name was O’Farrell didn’t mean they weren’t going to have to work. But they didn’t shy away from that, and now both are very involved in every aspect of the farm.” David took the more hands-on approach, working his way through the broodmare, stallion, training and sales divisions on his way to becoming assistant farm manager. When longtime Ocala Stud farm manager Bob Noble retired in July 2012, David moved into that position. “I think it was inevitable that David was going to become the farm manager,” says Mike. “He worked his way up and earned the respect of both our employees and clients. David brings a great energy and love of the business to the mix.” It was an easy transition for David, who also handles the farms’ stallion bookings during breeding season. He also works closely with the farm’s division heads. “My job is to make sure that everything runs as smoothly as possible every day,” says David. “We’re a commercial breeder, so we have to focus on breeding good horses that sell well in the juvenile market. It’s what Ocala Stud has been doing for 57 years. We do break and train horses for the racetrack for our clients, but every year, we sell the whole crop of Ocala Stud-bred horses.” For Joe, there was definitely a learning curve in switching gears from the banking business to the Thoroughbred business. A numbers man at heart, Joe’s financial manager duties range the gamut from human resources to horses. “Ocala Stud is a big operation with 100 employees during peak breeding, training and sales seasons,” says Joe, who is also currently serving as a director on the FTBOA board. “When that’s over, we still have

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around 65 year-round employees. Then throw in 90 broodmares, between the farm mares and those of clients, their offspring, a dozen stallions, close to 200 sales and training horses and our clients. Like I said, it’s a big operation.” As for his position on the FTBOA board of directors, Joe says, “I am very honored to have been first nominated and then elected. The Thoroughbred industry is a much more complicated business than people realize. We have to deal with many on-going issues, particularly legislative ones, that impact the Thoroughbred industry and people’s livelihoods.” The O’Farrells also notched a third-generation milestone when Florida-bred Chary won the 2009 Calder Oaks. Chary was bred by the partnership of Joe, David and Ocala Stud; she was sold by Ocala Stud for $130,000 at the 2008 OBS February juvenile sale. “Chary’s stakes win was very exciting for us,” says David. “To breed our first stakes winner with our dad was very special.” The Ocala Stud operation consists of three separate parcels of land. The main 188-acre farm on the original Shady Road (SW 27th Avenue) site serves as the business office, training center and stallion station. The white and forest green Ocala Stud sign that sits at the stonewall entrance of the farm is a popular photo opportunity for tourists and locals. The 120-acre Shady Lane broodmare division is about a half-mile south of the original farm. The 240-acre Ocala Stud Annex, where the O’Farrell brothers grew up, 12 miles northeast of the main farm on Highway 441 North, is the weanling/yearling division. Since Joe O’Farrell Sr. staged the first-ever 2-year-olds-in-training sale on February 25, 1957, at Hialeah Park in Miami, Ocala Stud has bred Florida-breds for the Florida juvenile market. It’s a business plan that has served the operation well. The horses it has bred and sold contribute to Ocala Stud consistently being a leading Florida breeder for more than five decades. Ocala Stud has been named Florida Breeder of the Year by the FTBOA for the past three years. In 2010, the farm recorded Florida-bred earnings of more than $2.5 million while being represented by seven Florida-

bred stakes winners. Those outstanding accomplishments were topped in 2011 with more than $4.1 million in Florida-bred earnings and six stakes winners. Included in that latter number was Florida-bred graded stakes winner Musical Romance, who Ocala Stud bred and then sold for $22,000 at the 2009 OBS April juvenile sale. Racing for Pinnacle Racing Stable and William Kaplan, she earned more than $1 million on the season, won the 2011 Breeders’ Cup Fillies & Mare Sprint (G1), collected an Eclipse Award as North American champion female sprinter and was named the Florida-Bred Horse of the Year. Musical Romance became the fourth Ocala Stud-bred horse to be named a national champion, joining My Dear Girl (1959 champion 2-year-old filly); Roman Brother (1965 champion handicap horse and Horse of the Year); and Office Queen (1970 champion 3-year-old filly). In 2012, Ocala Stud was the leading Florida breeder by Florida-bred earnings with more than $3.1 million. Ocala Stud was represented by five Florida-bred stakes winners, including graded stakes winners Musical Romance, Turbulent Descent and Unlimited Budget. Musical Romance was named the 2012 Florida-bred champion older female and champion female sprinter. She won three stakes on the season, including the Princess Rooney Handicap (G1), before being retired with more than $1.6 million in career earnings. At the FasigTipton Kentucky November mixed sale, she was sold for $1.6 million to Japan-based Northern Farm. “We have been so fortunate to have enjoyed the success of the last three years,” says David. “The Thoroughbred business is very tough. There are a lot of highs and lows, so when you’re doing well, you really appreciate it. We have such a great staff, and everyone contributes every day to our success. It’s definitely a team effort.” Mike agrees. “Our success depends on a lot of people and a little bit of good luck, too,” he says. “For me, it’s been very energizing to have Joe and David become involved in the farm’s operation. While I’m not planning on retiring anytime soon, I’m very grateful that another generation of O’Farrells is carrying on the family tradition.” And a fourth generation of the O’Farrell family is well underway. Joe and his wife, Alicia, are parents to Joseph Michael O’Farrell IV, who

We have such a great staff, and everyone contributes every day to our success. It’s definitely a team effort.”

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“We enjoy what we do for a living, and we have great families.”

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goes by Michael and will be 5 this August. David and his wife Allison’s family includes Maggie (4), Annie (2) and 8-month-old John David Jr. The O’Farrell brothers are raising their children much as they were brought up—family time is very important. “The farm business probably takes up 90 percent of my time,” says Joe, who likes to bring Michael with him to the farm on Saturdays. “But when I’m home, I focus on the family. We like to travel to visit friends. And we have a family lake house on Lake Santa Fe, and that’s a great place to get away from everything. Michael and I like to sit on the dock there and do a little fishing.” Getting totally away from the horses isn’t as easy for David, as his family lives at the Ocala Stud Annex where he grew up. “We’re still around the horses, but it is different than being at work on the farm. We’re outside people, so living on the farm gives us the opportunity to just walk out our back door to play,”says David. “The girls really like going out to see the horses and pet them. I wouldn’t be surprised if there is talk soon of getting a pony.” For now, Maggie and Annie have two dogs, cocker spaniel Hattie and Boston terrier Ozzie. Michael has a French bulldog named Louis. The O’Farrell brothers’ families are close, spending time together at the lake house. And much like they were, Joe and David’s children are also into sports. Maggie and Michael have already played two seasons of youth soccer, while Annie will become involved this year. “Joe and I consider ourselves very fortunate,” says David. “We enjoy what we do for a living, and we have great families. Coming back to the farm and becoming involved in the Thoroughbred business was the best thing we did. We wouldn’t want to be doing anything else.”


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OU MAY HAVE ENCOUNTERED SOME OF THESE GENTLEMEN BEFORE. WHETHER SEATED BEHIND THE DESK IN THEIR OFFICE OR OUT ON A JOB SITE, THESE INDIVIDUALS ARE THE BEST IN THEIR FIELDS. THEIR PRIMARY GOAL IS TO MEET THE DEMANDS OF THEIR CUSTOMERS. THEY MIGHT WORK LONG HOURS AND LATE NIGHTS YET ALWAYS APPEAR SUAVE AND SOPHISTICATED, AND THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND PRECISION PLACE THEM IN A FIELD ALL THEIR OWN. THE GENTLEMEN ON THE UPCOMING PAGES ARE SOME OF THE BEST OCALA HAS TO OFFER. THESE ARE OUR MEN OF STYLE…

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JERRY F.GAUSE What are some of the awards Gause & Son Jewelers has won through the years? I am proud of the National Jeweler’s Hall of Fame induction. I always thought it would be for baseball, but it was for being a jeweler. The honor is given to outstanding jewelers in the USA. Also, our firm won the Morris B. Zale Award for outstanding consumer marketing, and last year, we were a runner-up for Florida Retailer of the Year. Without my family and professional staff, this would not have been possible.

How does Gause & Son Jewelers give back to the community? We are a big supporter of many charities, including Hospice of Marion County, the College of Central Florida, the ALS Association, HITS,

GAUSE & SON JEWELERS

352.732.8844 / 14 SE BROADWAY., DOWNTOWN OCALA

OF STELYERLE JEW

OWNER, GAUSE & SON JEWELERS

Salvation Army, Interfaith and more. We also donate gifts to the Boys & Girls Club of Marion County and many other local organizations.

You’ve been a downtown staple for quite some time. Do you see downtown Ocala changing? The walking traffic is picking up with more shopping, eateries and hopefully, in my lifetime, a unique hotel close by! We have had our flagship store visible on the downtown square for 64 years, and we are proud to offer a fine and unique shopping experience to all our clients and new customers.


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MORGANBARFIELD,ESQ. BARFIELD BARFIELD,ESQ. T

HE CORLESS BARFIELD TRIAL GROUP HAS VAST EXPERIENCE WITH LEGAL ISSUES CONCERNING HOMEOWNER’S INSURANCE CLAIMS. FROM HURRICANES AND LIGHTNING TO PERSONAL INJURY AND EVEN SINKHOLE CLAIMS, THE CORLESS BARFIELD TRIAL GROUP CAN AND DOES HANDLE IT ALL. WHEN AN ISSUE ARISES AND YOU NEED A LAWYER, MAKE SURE IT’S ONE WITH THE EXPERIENCE AND DEDICATION NEEDED TO HANDLE YOUR CASE PROPERLY AND EFFICIENTLY. What type of law does your firm practice?

We can handle any type of insurance claim, whether it’s relating to a claim on your house or a claim for injuries due to an accident. We have handled almost every type of homeowners’ claim, including hurricanes, storm damage, water losses, even theft or lightning claims, but our specialty is handling sinkhole claims. We have handled thousands over the years. We also have vast experience in handling personal injury claims and are currently expanding our practice to take on more of those types of cases.

What should I look for to determine whether I have a sinkhole? Generally, you will see cracks. They can be

PARTNER, CORLESS BARFIELD TRIAL GROUP, LLC

found on exterior walls, interior walls, ceilings or floor tiles. Certain types of cracks, like stairstep cracks, are generally associated with movement of the foundation of the home. You may also notice doors or windows not opening or sticking and depressions in the yard.

How can your firm help with a sinkhole claim?

We see sinkhole claims come in a variety of forms. The majority are either cases where the insurance company has tested and determined that a sinkhole is not what is causing the damage or when they did find a sinkhole but the repairs they want to cover are insufficient. We also deal these days with a lot of claims being denied because of no “structural damage.” These claims are often denied because they are using the wrong law and should be looked into.

What tricks should I look out for with my insurance company when I file an insurance claim on my house? Whenever you file a claim, your insurance company will almost always require you to provide a recorded statement. They may even require you to appear for an examination under oath with attorneys asking you questions about the claim. It is during these times you must remember they are trying to find a way to deny your claim, not help you. The most important things they will look for are the timing of the damage, whether another insurance company could also be responsible or whether the homeowner failed to do something they should have, like proper maintenance or keeping complete records.

I see your billboards advertising personal injury claims around town. What type of claims do you handle in this field? We can handle any type of claim that involves injuries due to the negligence of another person or company, such as auto accidents, slip and falls, dog bites or wrongful death.

CORLESS BARFIELD TRIAL GROUP, LLC

813.258.4998 / 4350 W. CYPRESS ST., SUITE 910, TAMPA / CORLESSBARFIELD.COM 30

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JAMES P.HILTY HILTY SR. & JIMHILTY HILTY JR. What should people know about you? We’re a full-service brokerage firm dedicated to helping serious, long-term investors meet their goals. We follow key steps to understand our client’s goals. Whether it’s saving for retirement, living in retirement, paying for education or preparing for the unexpected, we have the experience, knowledge and tools to help plan. Educating

clients about the investments they own and why they own them is an important part of our process.

What makes your firm unique? Our model of one financial advisor and one branch office administrator per office allows us to know our clients well and consequently provide appropriate recommendations with personal service as they work toward their goals and meet life’s financial challenges. We welcome accounts of all sizes and never charge to answer questions or review your investments.

FINAN S ADVISOR

FINANCIAL ADVISORS EDWARD JONES Do you have any general advice for today’s investors? It’s crucial to put a plan in place as early as possible and stick to it. Even if you’re starting small, regularly investing in quality investments will put the power of compounding to work for you, which is one component of successful investing. Make sure you are properly diversified, readjust your portfolio when needed and avoid the negative news that surrounds us daily. Seek the advice of a qualified financial advisor to create a roadmap to reach your destination.

EDWARD JONES

SR: 352.351.9482 /2157 / E FT. KING ST., OCALA / JR: 352.629.2165 / 11 NE IST AVE., OCALA / EDWARDJONES.COM ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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BOBSUMPTER & EDHENDRIX What sets your business apart from other RV service and repair businesses?

When we started the business, our goal was to provide quality workmanship at a fair price and in a timely manner. We have accomplished all three. We are considered one of the best service centers in the state and are very proud of that. All of us at B&E RV work hard to satisfy our customers’ needs. Courtesy, clean and thorough is what our customers can expect.

How does being a local center benefit your customers?

Having the ability to service the RV here at our shop or go wherever the customer is located

OWNERS/PARTNERS, B&E RV SERVICE & REPAIR

says a lot for how we feel about our service. Convenient, reliable and timely repairs help our customers enjoy time with their RV instead of waiting around for repairs to be made.

What is one piece of advice you would give to owners about maintaining their RVs?

We see all types of problems come through our shop and in the field. One of the most common is roof seals. It is so important that customers check and reseal their roofs as needed or schedule us to do it for them. The damage caused by roof leaks is costly and, in most cases, preventable. Another very important area to maintain is the batteries. Be sure they have water and stay charged.

B&E RV SERVICE & REPAIR

352.401.7930 / 3660 NE 45TH PL., OCALA / BANDERVSERVICEREPAIR.COM

TRAVISJOHNSON What type of business is Floriturf, Inc.? We produce, sell and install several varieties of sod. Floriturf, Inc is the parent company of Ft. McCoy Farms and was founded in Osceola County in 1995. I grew up in the sod industry. My father has been in the sod business for over 30 years and I hope to instill the same love of farming to my children. It’s very rewarding to grow a small sprig of grass and watch it transform into a beautiful lawn.

What makes Floriturf, Inc different from other sod companies?

Floriturf, Inc is the only turfgrass grower in Marion County. It’s been tried and proven to withstand our colder temperatures and sandy soil. Floriturf, Inc works directly with customers to provide information about the different types of sod so they can select

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SO

OWNER, FLORITURF, INC

the sod that will work with their particular lawn and lifestyle. We are also available to provide tips and information regarding the care and maintenance of their lawn for years to come.

What kind of services do you provide? We sell several types of sod at our retail office by the piece or by the pallet. We produce St. Augustine, centipede, bahia, Empire Zoysia and Ultimate Zoysia. We offer delivery and installation to residential and commercial customers. Whether you are a contractor, landscaper or homeowner we can offer you a quality product at a reasonable price.

352.369.8873 / 4201 NW BLITCHTON RD., OCALA / OCALASOD.COM 32

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JOSHHART

OWNER, BURNYZZ SPEED SHOP

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AUTO ION CUSTOMIZAT

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OSH HART KNOWS HE IS DOING THE JOB HE WAS BORN TO DO. AS OWNERS OF BURNYZZ SPEED SHOP, JOSH AND HIS WIFE, BRITTANIE, HAVE HELPED INDIVIDUALS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD REALIZE THEIR DREAMS OF OWNING THE AUTOMOBILE OF A LIFETIME. THE FULLSERVICE, STATE-OF-THE-ART SHOP CAN SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS, AND JOSH HAS ACCESS TO OVER $3 MILLION IN INVENTORY AT ALL TIMES. ALONG WITH RUNNING A HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL SHOP AND SALES OPERATION, THE BURNYZZ RACE TEAM IS ALSO A TOP COMPETITOR IN DRAG RACING EVENTS ACROSS THE NATION. Who are your potential clients?

My potential clients are anyone who owns a car and loves classic cars, the feel of horsepower, the intensity of speed and the overall culture of American horsepower.

What qualities help make Burnyzz Speed Shop extraordinary?

We are an extraordinary business because of our worldwide connections. We have a vast knowledge of the market and industry and $3.2 million inventory of classics and super cars. Our service team has outstanding mechanical capabilities, and our inhouse services are superior to those of other service shops in the area. We also have a dyno meter, which allows our technicians to evaluate the performance of specialty vehicles at top speed.

Can you tell us a little about your experience in this field? I’ve been a successful entrepreneur since 1999. I started with nothing, and cars were just a hobby until I wanted a car that no one else could build. So I decided to build it myself. After that, I decided to build a business that had a team of specialists who shared my passion for this occupation. Together we total a combined experience of 75 years.

What are some of the upcoming events you have planned? Our BURNYZZ race team will be competing at select NHRA national events and Lucas oil divisional events all over the East Coast. We have a 1933 Ford Super Gas Roadster driven by Remo DiGenova, general manager of Burnyzz, and a top dragster driven by myself. We will be at the Texas Standing Mile event in October with my 2005 Ford GT twin turbo with 1200hp plus nitrous driven by myself as well, where I will try to break my own personal fastest speed of 250mph. We encourage everyone to come out and see what BURNYZZ is capable of.

How do you make the dreams of your customers come true?

We fulfill the dreams of our customers by taking their vision of a one-of-a-kind automobile and making it a reality. If you dream it, we can build it. We also take the time to teach them the trade.

BURNYZZ SPEED SHOP

352.307.1968 / 1 ASPEN RD, OCALA / BURNYZZ.COM ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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CUSTOM TR

MARTYLORICK,JR. LORICK LORICK,JR. MARTYLORICK,SR. LORICK LORICK,SR. F

AMILY-OWNED BUSINESS TRIPLE CROWN TRAILERS HAS BEEN SERVING OCALA WITH ITS EXPANSIVE VARIETY OF TRAILERS FOR NEARLY 30 YEARS. FROM LAWN TO CAR TRAILERS, OWNERS MARTY LORICK SR. AND MARTY LORICK JR. TALK ABOUT THE SELECTION THAT TRIPLE CROWN TRAILERS OFFERS AND THE COMPANY’S REPUTATION FOR QUALITY, DURABILITY AND DEPENDABILITY.

What is the history of Triple Crown Trailers? Triple Crown Trailers was established as a family business in 1983. The company is still family owned and operated today. We moved to our current location in 2003, which allowed us to put more focus on our retail trailer sales, parts and repairs. This expanded our business from being simply a wholesale trailer distributer to having a full-retail sales location. We have recently branched into the fabrication business. We are building a wide array of products from aluminum landscape bodies for trucks to items for the fire truck industry.

OWNER, TRIPLE CROWN TRAILERS

RETIRED OWNER, TRIPLE CROWN TRAILERS

How large is Triple Crown Trailers’ dealership network? Our dealership network stretches from Florida all the way up the coast to Maine and as far west as Mississippi. We also ship to Canada and the Caribbean. About a year ago, we started supplying our trailers to a large retail chain store.

What is the advantage of buying from Triple Crown Trailers? We are celebrating 30 years this year and pride ourselves on the fact that we have established a reputation for quality, durability and dependability. We service what we sell. We also do repairs on all trailers, not just ours, including boat and stock trailers. We have a large, 1,500-square-foot parts showroom. Our showroom has everything from couplers and jacks to tires and wheels—and everything in between. If someone wanted to build their own trailer, our showroom is stocked with everything they would need!

What are some types of trailers the company provides to clients? We build everything from utility trailers for homeowners and landscapers to equipment and dump trailers for commercial use. We also carry several lines of enclosed trailers.

Does Triple Crown Trailers offer customizable trailers? We have built some incredible custom trailers over the years. From a rock-climbing wall trailer, a catering trailer with built-in smoker to emergency relief trailers—we have built them all! We work with our customers from start to finish to ensure they are getting exactly what they want and to make sure their needs are met.

TRIPLE CROWN TRAILERS

352.368.7885 / 4251 S. PINE AVE., OCALA / TRIPLECROWNTRAILERS.COM


RANDHOLLON What’s special about Brick City Pest Control?

First of all, we’re local. Having local knowledge brings a lot to the table on both a technicalability and a service-ability front. We know the area, and we know our customers. Secondly, we’re flexible. With customers ranging from single-family homes and commercial/ industrial environments to professional offices, it’s necessary to design pest control service packages tailored to the individual needs of each customer. We don’t take a cookie-cutter approach to pest control or termite protection. Lastly, we’re responsive. We’re successful because our level of service responsiveness is unparalleled. It’s simple. Do what you say you’re going to do. Show up when you say you’re

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OF SCOTNYTRLOEL PEST

OWNER, BRICK CITY PEST CONTROL

going to show up. We enjoy the dividends of great customer service in the form of customer referrals; it’s our greatest source of new business.

call you’ve ever been on?

Well, I won’t go into specifics, but I’ll tell you it involved spiders, lots of spiders.  

We have to ask about your ad with the roaches. Are they real?

Yes, they are. They’re Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches on loan from the University of Florida Entomology Department. Just prior to the shoot, they spent some time on ice to slow them down since we needed manageable models. After the shoot, Karen, my wife, made sure (demanded) each roach be accounted for and returned immediately to the University of Florida.

OK, now for the real question. What’s the toughest

BRICK CITY PEST CONTROL

352.732.4244 / 500 EAST FORT KING ST., OCALA / BRICKCITYPEST.COM

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OMARVILLEDA & OMARVILLEDA,JR. What makes Central Florida Kitchen and Bath Surfaces different from other custom countertop companies?

pans and tub decks. In our 10 years of existence, we have improved our methods of fabrication and installation and are able to match our TerraStone product to fit any décor.

Our area of expertise is hard-surface countertops, but we aren’t just a custom granite fabricator. We also custom fabricate quartz countertops and manufacture our own solid-surface material, TerraStone. With TerraStone, we can custom fabricate countertops, sinks, shower walls, shower

What should a customer look for when choosing a company to remodel their countertops? Look for service before, during and after the sale. We are proud to say that we have educated thousands of customers about the differences and benefits of these hard-surface materials. With our education, customers

M OF STKIYTCLHEEN CUSTOM ATH &B

OWNERS CENTRAL FLORIDA KITCHEN & BATH SURFACES, INC. are able to make a decision easily, comfortably and quickly. Customer satisfaction is our ultimate goal.

Can your products fit into my budget? Although we are very competitive in price, there really is no comparison when you consider the benefits and care that go along with our services. Our granite, quartz and solid-surface fabrication and installations are priced to give the customer a product that will last as long as the home they live in. Affordable? Definitely. Can homeowners afford not to use us? That’s a chance we don’t recommend.

CENTRAL FLORIDA KITCHEN & BATH SURFACES, INC. 352.307.2333 / 9740 SE 58TH AVE., BELLEVIEW / CENTRALFLORIDAKBS.COM ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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ERICFASCI SCOTTGENCARELLI CODYLOUGHLIN

RV

OWNER OWNER OWNER

AMERICA CHOICE RV

Who is America Choice RV? We’re Ocala’s RV dealership for sales, service and parts with a family atmosphere. We offer the most competitive pricing in the industry, a huge service and repair center, parts supercenter, financing, extended warranties and insurance repairs. We also have a 106-site campground called the Wild Frontier with a 10,000-square-foot clubhouse available for events like weddings and parties.

What makes America Choice RV stand out among other businesses in Ocala? We’re most proud to provide a place to earn a good living to over 80 Ocala-area residents. We’re actively involved in the community for events like Light up Ocala and the Ocala Christmas Parade. We focus on the latest cutting-edge national

marketing strategies, bringing business to Ocala from other states while serving our local clientele. Our website has been recognized as one of the industry’s best.

What plans do you have for the future? We’re working to satisfy every customer and continue to build a family atmosphere. Our goal is to become a household name when you think of RVs! We’re dedicated to leveraging technology to bring business to Ocala, better serve our customers and expand our local contribution. We’ve even partnered with a new large movie studio, The Dream Vision Company, to help produce a feature film spotlighting the horse community titled One Horse Movie. Look for the international press release in June!

AMERICA CHOICE RV

352.368.2451 / 1.800.RVSALES / 3040 NW GAINESVILLE RD., OCALA / AMERICACHOICERV.COM

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KEVING.BROOKS BROOKS What are some good tips for keeping good dental hygiene?

It’s so important to practice good dental hygiene. Brushing and flossing are key to keeping a healthy mouth as well as using a fluoridated toothpaste. And of course, get regular checkups to prevent a small problem from evolving into a big one.

What are a few procedures that can imporve my smile?

Teeth easily become stained from things like coffee, smoking and certain foods. To whiten them, we utilize a tray system that can whiten your teeth several shades in as little as a few days. We can also recreate your existing smile by applying a set of veneers. These are very thin ceramic shells that

KEVIN G. BROOKS, DMD JUN’13

ocalastyle.com

DMD, COSMETIC AND FAMILY DENTISTRY

cover your existing teeth. They are bonded into place and feel like your natural teeth but are able to hide chips, cracks, spaces, stains and many other issues.

What sets Dr.Brooks apart from other dentists?

We treat our patients like family. We offer a warm and relaxing atmosphere in a state-of-the-art facility, and our friendly team helps put patients at ease. Aside from performing our many services, we are also working with sleep doctors to create oral appliances for individuals suffering from sleep apnea who can’t or don’t want to wear the much larger and bulkier CPAP mask.

352.347.2333 / 125 MARION OAKS BLVD.,OCALA / DRKEVINBROOKS.COM 36

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DR.JEFFPITTS DR.TRAVISWILEMON DR.BILLSTANKOSKY CHIROPRACTOR

P

EOPLE OFTEN WAIT TOO LONG BEFORE THEIR FIRST VISIT TO A CHIROPRACTOR. ALTHOUGH CHIROPRACTIC ADJUSTMENTS ARE USED TO TREAT ACHES AND PAINS, THEY CAN ALSO HELP AN INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVE HEALTH IN OTHER AREAS OF THE BODY. THE DOCTORS AT PITTS CHIROPRACTIC OFFER A VARIETY OF NATURAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES DESIGNED TO BRING PATIENTS TO OPTIMUM HEALTH.

How did you get involved in the chiropractic field? DR. STANKOSKY: When I was in middle school, my mom brought

me to a chiropractor after sustaining an injury to my neck. Years later in college, I went to a chiropractor and he planted an interest in chiropractic that would sprout five years later.

DR. WILEMON: I was introduced to chiropractic medicine during my years playing college football. I was amazed how great I felt and how it helped my performance.

DR. PITTS: As a child, I saw a chiropractor for preventative spinal

care. I came to understand what chiropractic medicine could do for one’s health. I was a junior in high school when I realized going to chiropractic college was the natural thing to do.

What are some ways you can benefit from chiropractic adjustments? DR. WILEMON: Adjustments aren’t just for back pain. Chiropractic medicine

CHIROPRACTOR CHIROPRACTOR

PITTS CHIROPRACTIC You perform several services, including massage and exercise rehab. Can they be used in conjunction with chiropractic care? DR. STANKOSKY: Yes, our office provides a variety of natural health

care services. It is important to remove stress and tension from the soft tissues that surround the spine. Massage therapy and exercise rehab help to both get a person well and keep them that way.

What is the “cracking” noise you hear with some adjustments? DR. STANKOSKY: Some people worry about the cracking noise heard

during a manual-type adjustment to the spine. There is no reason to worry. As the chiropractor moves the spinal bones back into alignment, sometimes nitrogen gas that is built up in the joint between the bones is released. It can sound scary but is completely harmless.

helps keep the body in alignment so it can function at optimum level.

DR. PITTS: Keeping good spinal health is essential in maintaining overall health. Just as you would see an MD or dentist for a checkup, it makes sense to see a chiropractor for wellness checkups. A properly functioning nervous system helps control and coordinate the functions of the body. What are some other signs that I would look for if I don’t already receive wellness checkups? DR. STANKOSKY: Spinal misalignment shows up in two ways: internal

symptoms like pain, burning or tingling and external signs like poor posture or one shoulder or hip sitting higher than the other

DR. PITTS: Other signs include lack of concentration, fatigue, getting sick often, general stiffness or soreness.

PITTS CHIROPRACTIC

352.732.0200 / 801 NE 25TH AVE., OCALA / PITTSCHIRO.COM

TRAVIS BILL

JEFF


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SONNY’S R EAL PIT BAR-B -Q

4102 E SILVER SPRI NGS BLVD. / OCALA 1845 SW COLLEGE RD . / OCALA 5239 SE ABSHIER BL VD. / BELLEVIEW 1128 CANAL ST. / THE VILLAGES 1794 SW CR 484 / OCALA SONNYSBBQ.COM

236-1012 629-2663 347-5400 430-1461 245-5595

We couldn’t leave out Sonny’s. The

franchise can’t be beat as the go-to, chain restaurant, as proven by dozens of readers who declared they were hooked on the place when we asked them where they go to get their BBQ. Located only in southern states, northerners may intone “Just who is this Sonny?” when southerners lament about missing the smokin’ chicken wings, pulled beef brisket and garlic bread that comes with every meal—perfect to dip into the last traces of sizzlin’ sweet bar-B-Q sauce. And their Dixon burger! Their chargrilled chicken! You know the rest, so we’ll stop while we’re warm.

But here’s a little trivia for you: Did you know the favorite chain was founded by Floridian Floyd “Sonny” Tillman in Gainesville in 1968? For Ocala and surrounding cities, Sonny’s is truly a part of Central Florida heritage.

Ribs © Dallas Events Inc; Guest Check © Felixco / Shutterstock.com

NT O R EF se fine

N BAR-B-Q CHAMPIO SERVICES 427-1543 S BLVD. / OCALA

When we asked our readers about their favorite BBQ joint, Sonny’s (see above) was the reigning victor. But the non-franchise, neighborhood eatery that came in as a close second has a name that proves its special status in Ocalans’ hearts. Champion, a commercial kitchen on wheels, got its start in

40

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2008. Pit Master Chris Crandon opened Champion after retiring from 27 years in law enforcement with the Marion County Sheriff ’s Office. “I recognized a need in Marion County for good quality food available to working men and women at an affordable price,” says Chris. Given the lunchtime constraints placed on the average working person, he also saw the need for food to be made available in a timely fashion. Customers can’t get enough of Champion’s slowsmoked beef brisket, which you can get as a sandwich combo with a drink and a delectable side. You can’t go wrong with the collard greens and coleslaw, but we have our heart set on the homemade casserole with pecan topping when it’s time to order.

Photos by John Jernigan

NG 3960 W SILVER SPRI


Y… R T re ALSO here a other

T ON THE COVER!

SHANE’S RIB

SHACK

#105 / OCALA 2601 SW 19TH AVE. RD., SHANESRIBSHACK.COM

304-5255

This fast-growing and popular BBQ chain

got its start in McDonough, Georgia, in 2002. The restaurant prides itself on consistency and has won many guests over with their savory meat glazed with their top-secret sauce. With local franchise owner Kristen Keene at the helm in Ocala's location, diners are sure to be pleased. “When Shane’s father came up with this delicious sauce for the restaurant, it just blew the doors off!” says Director of Operations Nick Brannigan.

Just who is PeGee? Chef and Owner Cheryl

Peterson-Gaines says their eatery’s name is a combination of her maiden name and her husband’s nickname, GQ. Some new diners may think PeGee is pronounced “Peggy” instead of “P-G,” but call it what they will, nothing will change their mind about how much they adore PeGee’s cooking.

PEGEE’ COOKINSGHOMESTYLE & BARBE QUE 1680 NW 77TH ST. / OCALA

861-7343

Big Dad’s Secret Sauce is heavenly on a rack of ribs; the meat so tender it falls right off the bone. Although pork and chicken nachos are one of the top orders, customers also love the traditional Southern sides of mac’n’cheese and fried okra, which Nick says are as popular as french fries. The Brunswick stew is a meal to consider even on the hottest days if you want your BBQ pork in a hearty bowl. Another Southern tradition that has customers misty eyed is the mention of Shane’s cobbler, a plate of warm peaches in a sweet crisp that your spoon—and mouth—will love. “What I like about Ocala is that they’re hearty eaters,” says Nick, who has been in the restaurant business for 30 years and worked in BBQ for 10. “Our menu is small, but it’s simplicity at its finest.”

After working for 29 years in the prison system for the state of Florida, Cheryl went into catering and opened PeGee’s in 2010. People love the signature ribs and pulled pork and fry basket for a meal. The food, which is homemade, has earned PeGee’s legions of fans. People love the eatery so much, Cheryl says, that she’s been trying to figure out how to deliver her cooking to a deprived customer in the Dominican Republic using dry ice. “I have customers who travel from Jacksonville and Tampa just to get my barbeque,” says Cheryl. Foodies try to figure out how she makes the unique flavors in her green beans, baked beans and potato salad, all of which are quick to go by the day’s end. Get a slice of the lemon pound cake and sweet potato pie—they’re the first to sell out. Cheryl hopes to transform the mobile eatery into a dine-in restaurant in the near future.

Spotlight on:

STINE’S BAR-B-Q PIT 9433 SE Maricamp Rd., Ocala (352) 680-9755

This eight-year-old BBQ

eatery is open until they sellout, which happens quite early so make it snappy! Owner Stine Fulton is a semi-retired UPS worker who decided to open Stine’s to “keep me busy in my backyard.” The food is homemade from family recipes and is smokin’ good. Customers love the southern-style potato, baked beans and mac’n’cheese sides. But banana pudding and lemon pie are usually the first menu items to disappear. “Once they’re gone, they’re gone,” says Fulton. BOAT’S DELI QUE 4111 NW 100 St., Ocala (352) 622-2294 ROOSEVELT’S BARBEQUE Corner of CR200A & 326, Ocala (352) 280-6094

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Photos by John Jernigan

Photo by John Jernigan

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Into the Woods

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BACKWOODS SMOKEHOUSE 888 CR 310, Interlachen / (386) 684-4795 backwoodssmokehouse.com

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OAKWOOD SMOKEHOUS E 860 US 441 / LADY LAKE OAKWOODSMOKEHOUSE.COM

& GRILL

751-5640

Take a ride through the Ocala National Forest and you’ll drive up to a little cabin that serves a bounty of barbecued delights. The smokehouse offers daily specials, such as free banana pudding with your meal on Wednesdays and all-you-can-eat ribs, chicken and pork on Thursdays. All meat is cut fresh and slow-smoked with blackjack oak. If you’re feeling overwhelmed with all this meat, add some greenery to your plate with a gigantic salad. Also available are Backwoods’ “famous Brunswick stew,” which has its own palatable charm alongside Shane’s Rib Shack’s version of the southern dish, and Caribbean jerk chicken soup. Is your inner carnivore still hungry for more? You may find your match with “The Porker,” a triple layer pork sandwich.

Adam’s Delight Established in 1998,

Photo by John Jernigan

this smokehouse has a quaint country charm with all types of restaurant fare that everyone can enjoy. Indulge in corn fritters, wedge-cut sweet potato fries with cinnamon butter or fried mac’n’cheese bites. Co-founders Will Henderson and Bailey Cardwell wanted to open a restaurant of their own before finally opening C and H Smokehouse, which they ran for five years. They eventually branched out as OakWood and now have restaurants in four locations. Chef Sammy has cooked with OakWood since the beginning, and many of the elder guests have watched Will’s children grow up. His oldest patron is the ripe age of 104. “We’re not a chain,” says Will. “We’re just good local folks. People like the culture of our restaurant.” OakWood’s tasty baby back ribs have been credited for their sensational taste. The ribs have been awarded “Best Entrée” at the Taste of Tavares competition for three consecutive years. Get the baby backs with a “sidewinder” Sam’s slaw, lima beans or roasted corn salad.

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FOLLOW THE PROMPTS AND SEE WHERE YOU’LL END UP.

1. You are… Ravenous! >> It’s always sunny at SONNY’S. Hungry but I can wait. >> Go to No. 2.

ADAM’S RIB CO. 2111 NW 13th St., Gainesville / (352) 373-8882 adamsribco.com

You’re in good company at Adam’s Rib Co. The gator on the logo is a nod to the Florida Gators, who dominated football the year the restaurant opened in 2005. Adam’s serves three meals a day, with breakfast served until 10:45am weekdays and 11:45am weekends. Pancakes, French toast, omelets and biscuits are all for the picking, but lunch and dinner are where it’s at! Begin your meal with spicy-hot jalapeno cheddar poppers or breaded pickle chips dipped in ranch dressing. It’s no mistake Adam’s calls their appetizers “gator bait.” If you want it all when it comes to dinner, order Adam’s Delight: a half slab of juicy ribs, two sides—we recommend the BBQ baked beans or french fries—garlic toast and banana pudding.

2. You’d rather…

3. You’re a very…

4. You’re in the mood for…

Dine-in. >> Go to No. 3.

“Sunny” person. >> Refer to 1a.

Take-out. >> Go to No. 4.

“Secretive” person. >> Go to No. 5.

Slow-smoked beef brisket. >> You’ll find a winner eating at CHAMPION. Pulled pork >> PEGEE’S is the place to go.


Q e inspired B B or ar make RD

BRUNSWICK STEW Smoked chicken and its other grilled counterparts may get all the attention, but a steamy bowl of Brunswick stew is also a BBQ staple and is a great option for leftovers. Here’s a recipe from The Nifty Cupcake’s Annie Patz, a gal in Jacksonville who puts her culinary school skills to work blogging about sweet treats and savory dishes.

I

Marvelous Meat and Macaroni

BLACKENED CHICKEN MAC AND CHEESE The slogan on the blog Girl Carnivore reads, “Because boys aren’t the only ones who like to play with their meat.” Kita Roberts has a passion for cooking over dancing flames with wood smoker in hand and seasonings and rubs at the ready. But this carnivore is also head over heels in love with melted cheese. Here, Kita combines BBQ favorites into a sublime dish that makes meat and macaroni a match made in heaven. SERVES 4 ¼ pounds bacon, cut into ¼-inch cubes

2

tablespoons butter

2

tablespoons flour

2

tablespoons butter, melted

½ cup heavy cream

1⁄₃

cup blackening seasoning

½ cup milk

1

pound chicken, sliced thin and trimmed

8

1

pound pasta

ounces sharp cheddar

½ cup frozen peas Scallions, sliced thin

Cook bacon in skillet until crispy. Drain on paper towel. Heat griddle or skillet over high heat until smoking. (Flat cast iron griddle and outdoor grill recommended as cooking will get smoky!) Coat chicken in melted butter; then cover with seasoning. When griddle surface is smoking, turn on fan with ventilation and add chicken. Cook 5-7 minutes, turning chicken as needed until all sides are blackened and chicken is cooked through. Remove from griddle, and cover. In a large pot, cook pasta according to instructions. Drain, and set aside. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons butter and whisk in flour. Cook 1 minute. Slowly whisk in cream and milk. Add cheese, and stir until melted through. Toss cheese sauce over pasta. Add peas and bacon. Place heaping portions of mac’n’cheese on plate. Top with chicken and scallions. For more recipes by Kita, visit girlcarnivore.com.

Photo by Kita Roberts

ou thern BB cipes. n a r e aft wn sou ggers’ re your ong these blo owi by foll

SERVES 4-5 1 tablespoon olive oil

1

cup corn, fresh, canned or frozen

8

ounces sausage links, cut into ½-inch pieces

2

tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

2

teaspoons prepared mustard

1

yellow onion, finely chopped

2

teaspoon light brown sugar

1

celery, minced

½ teaspoon ground allspice

1

large white potato, diced

½ teaspoon Tabasco sauce

2

garlic cloves, minced

1½ teaspoons grated fresh ginger 15 ounces fresh diced tomatoes 1

½ teaspoon liquid smoke

3½ cups vegetable stock OR water cup lima beans, fresh, canned or frozen

Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add “sausage” links, and cook until browned, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove sausage from pot, and set aside. Reheat oil in saucepan; add onion, celery, potato, garlic and ginger. Add 1/4 cup of stock or water, cover and cook until softened, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove lid, add remaining stock or water and stir in tomatoes, corn, lima beans, Worcestershire sauce or tamari, mustard, sugar, allspice, Tabasco and salt and pepper to taste, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and simmer, uncovered, until vegetables are tender, about 45-50 minutes, stirring occasionally. During last 10 minutes of cooking time, add reserved “sausage,” vegetarian burger crumbles and liquid smoke. See more by Annie at the-nifty-cupcake.blogspot.com.

“It’s Ridiculously Easy”

EASY CROCK POT BBQ PULLED PORK Jen Nikolaus’s boys—meaning her husband and four sons!—approved of this pulled pork recipe. “My boys were in heaven!” writes Jen on her blog Yummy Healthy Easy. Served on a soft bun, this BBQ pulled pork is simply satisfying and mouthwatering good! SERVES 4 TO 6 1 onion, thinly sliced 1

(3 to 4-lb) boneless pork loin Seasoned salt (Jen uses Lawdry’s) Pepper

5. You feel… So hungry at this point, you’d order appetizers, an entrée and peach cobbler. >> Feed your hunger at SHANE’S. OK enough to explore outside Ocala. >> Go to No. 6.

6. You tend to… 7. You see a gator you… See the forest for the trees. >> Head into BACKWOODS for some chow.

Don your orange and blue. >> Time to tailgate at ADAM’S RIB CO.!

See the forest… time to scoot. >> Go to the No. 7.

“No gator is gonna eat my baby back ribs!” >> Feast on OAKWOOD’s award-winning entrées.

Salt and pepper, to taste 12 ounces frozen vegetarian veggie crumbles OR textured vegetable protein

1

can (12 ounces) diet soda OR regular

½ bottle (1 cup) barbecue sauce (Jen loves Sweet Baby Ray’s)

Spray slow cooker lightly with cooking spray. Put sliced onions on bottom. Rinse pork loin, and pat lightly with paper towels. Coat with a layer of salt and some pepper. Place on top of onions. In a medium-sized bowl, mix barbecue sauce and soda. Pour the fizzy concoction on top of seasoned pork loin in crock pot. Cover crock pot, and cook on low for 7-8 hours. When meat is tender enough, carefully take pork out of slow cooker and place on plate. Shred meat up using two forks. Place meat back inside crock pot; stir to combine. Let cook for 30 minutes. Serve on buns. For more easy—and yummy—ideas visit yummyhealthyeasy.com.

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Photo by Jen Nikolaus

YAke staying ineal, you cangrub K C BAf you feel litstanding mQ-inspired

Photo by Annie Patz

Something to Stew About


S P E C I A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

F E A T U R E

Back pain?

Not ready for surgery?

See Dr. Zhou

a n d

A s s o c i a t e S

Back pain? Joint pain? Want to get rid of it? See Dr. Zhou and his associates! Finding new treatments and hope for chronic pain patients is a life-long interest of Dr. Zhou. In addition to many books and articles on pain management published over the last decade, Dr. Zhou of the Florida Pain and Rehabilitation Center (FLPNR) published two new research articles in the March issue of an international professional journal: Techniques in Orthopedics. In the first article, Dr. Zhou reported his own new technique to safely and accurately inject mediations (steroids) into the cervical epidural space to treat neck pain. In the second article, Dr. Zhou and Dr. Vu demonstrated new techniques on how to decrease radiation exposure during the spine injection procedures, protecting the patients as well as the performing physicians. Dr. Zhou and his associates at FLPNR always put quality and patient safety first. Over the last eight years, more than 34,000 interventional pain relief treatments (including spine injections) have been successfully offered to their patients without any major complications.

OUTSTANDING CREDENTIALS OF

YiLi Zhou, MD, PhD. Harvard Trained Pain Specialist Author of numerous articles and book chapters for pain management Distinguished Physician Award by Florida Medical Association 2004, 2006 Physician Recognition Award by American Medical Association 2003 Former Director of Jackson Memorial Hospital Pain Clinic, University of Miami TRIPLE BOARD CERTIFIED BY: American Board of Pain Medicine American Board of Interventional Pain Physician American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Many of Dr. Zhou’s patients feel very lucky to have such a top-notch scholar and practitioner in North Central Florida. Dr. Zhou’s philosophy of treating pain is not to put his patients on high doses of narcotics for the rest of their lives. His philosophy is to “find the cause and get rid of the pain.” Back pain can often be relieved at FLPNR with only one or two treatments. A previous patient suffering from severe headaches without knowing the real cause for many years was diagnosed and successfully treated by Dr. Zhou in the first visit. A patient crying with severe leg pain after cardiac catheterization found a cure at FLPNR. These are just few examples. Many of Dr. Zhou’s patients find there really is no need to return because they are pain free. However, they refer many of their closest family and friends to his practice. In addition to being a successful academician and clinician, Dr. Zhou also focuses on building a great team of experts. Dr. Warycha is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist. His area of expertise is nerve function study, and he excels at using ultrasound-guided joint injections. “This technique is more accurate and allows me to treat the exact pain site instead of the general area,” he says. Dr. Vu is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist and pain specialist. Together with other team members, Dr. Vu offers a comprehensive approach to treating pain using minimally invasive non-surgical treatment. Just listen to what one of his patients has to say: “I am very pleased with the treatment and the results of the treatment I received in Dr. Zhou’s office. I can rest easier knowing there is a doctor who cares and can help me with the treatment. It is worth it to travel hundreds miles to see him. I will happily refer anyone I know that is having a problem with pain to Dr. Zhou’s office.” Consult with this outstanding team today, and learn how you can begin leading a pain-free life without surgery!

YOU DESERVE THE BEST! FLPNR never used any compounding steroid from the New England Compounding Pharmacy, which has been related to the recent outbreak of meningitis and stroke.

Left to Right: Sara Webber PA, Asha Vishnagara PA, Hoang Vu DO, YiLi Zhou MD PhD, Bohdan Warycha MD, Chayapathy Jollu MD and Heather McClendon PA


Pedal Pain

Tick Troubles p46

Pepper © Maks Narodenko / Shutterstock.com

Pulse

the

How to kick plantar fasciitis p50

HeadsHeader Up p48 pXX Moves Header For Muscles pXX Header p52 Savory pXX Header Savings pXX p54

and more!

PEPPERS WITH POTENTIAL

T

Source: foxnews.com

HE UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON IN SEATTLE RECENTLY PUBLISHED A STUDY SUGGESTING THAT PEPPERS MAY HELP WARD OFF PARKINSON’S DISEASE DUE TO A SURPRISING INGREDIENT. PEPPERS BELONG TO THE SAME PLANT FAMILY AS TOBACCO AND, AS A RESULT, CONTAIN TINY TRACES OF THE INFAMOUS CHEMICAL NICOTINE. RESEARCH SHOWS THAT WHILE NICOTINE CAN WRECK HAVOC ON YOUR BODY, IT CAN ALSO PROTECT BRAIN CELLS FROM BEING DAMAGED BY PARKINSON’S. THE STUDY FOUND THAT PEOPLE WHO ATE PEPPERS FIVE TO SIX TIMES WEEKLY CUT THEIR PARKINSON’S RISK IN HALF VERSUS THOSE WHO ATE THEM ONCE WEEKLY. SCIENTISTS CANNOT SAY DEFINITIVELY THAT PEPPERS PREVENT PARKINSON’S, BUT THEY DO BELIEVE THERE IS A CONNECTION BETWEEN THE TWO AND WILL CONTINUE EXPERIMENTING WITH THE SUPER VEGGIES. ONE THING IS FOR SURE, IT CAN’T HURT TO PUT MORE PEPPERS ON YOUR PLATE. VISIT THE PARKINSON’S DISEASE FOUNDATION WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION AT PDF.ORG.

ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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TIME IS “TICKING”

THE LOWDOWN ON

LYME DISEASE T

RANSMITTED TO HUMANS ONLY THROUGH THE BITE OF AN INFECTED BLACKLEGGED TICK, ALSO KNOWN AS A DEER TICK, LYME DISEASE IS CAUSED BY BACTERIUM BORRELIA BURGDORFERI. THE TICK MUST BE ATTACHED TO A HUMAN FOR 24 HOURS TO TRANSMIT LYME DISEASE. THE GOOD NEWS FOR US HERE IN FLORIDA IS THAT ALTHOUGH WE DO HAVE BLACKLEGGED TICKS, THEY PREFER TO FEED ON OUR LARGE POPULATION OF LIZARDS RATHER THAN HUMANS. ACCORDING TO FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH STATISTICS, OUR STATE AVERAGES 55 CONFIRMED CASES OF LYME DISEASE EACH YEAR, AND 70 PERCENT OF THOSE CASES WERE CONTRACTED OUTSIDE THE STATE.

Time is of the essence, so the sooner you seek treatment at the first signs of tick-bite symptoms, the better. Diagnosis is based on symptoms and blood work in some cases. Treatment includes oral antibiotics such as doxycycline, amoxicillin or cefuroxime axetil. In more severe cases, intravenous antibiotics such as ceftriaxone and penicillin are used.

FLORIDA’S STATE TICK The lone star tick is the most common human-biting tick in Florida, and it does not transmit Lyme disease. But the lone star tick can transmit human ehrlichiosis, tularemia and southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI). Symptoms include fever, fatigue, headaches and muscle aches. STARI also presents with a rash similar to Lyme disease. But unlike Lyme disease, there is no arthritis or neurological symptoms. Both ehrlichiosis and STARI are typically treated with doxycycline, an oral antibiotic, for a usually quick and complete recovery.

STAGES & SYMPTOMS EARLY LOCALIZED (3-30 days post-tick bite): Fatigue,

fever, chills, muscle/joint aches, swollen lymph nodes, headache. Erythema migrans (EM) rash, aka the “bull’s-eye” rash, occurs in 70-80 percent of those infected at the site of the tick bite, usually about seven days after being bit. The rash is usually warm to touch, but rarely painful or itchy. It gradually spreads and can grow to 12 inches in diameter.

EARLY DISSEMINATED (days/weeks post-tick bite): Additional “bull’s-eye” rash appears on other areas of the body. There can be a loss of muscle tone on one or both sides of the face as well. Inflammation in the spinal cord can lead to severe headaches and neck stiffness. Arthritic joint pain and swelling, especially in the knee, is common, as well as shooting pains. LATE DISSEMINATED (months/years post-tick bite): There

can be intermittent bouts of arthritis, particularly in the knees, as well as chronic neurological symptoms such as numbness or tingling in the hands or feet. Short-term memory problems often occur.

NEED SUPPORT? OCALA LYME GROUP 46

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ocalastyle.com

Tick © Dariusz Majgier; Tweezers © ffolas / Shutterstock.com

BEINGWELL

THE POWER OF PREVENTION »

»

When outdoors, » especially in wooded areas with tall grass, use insect repellant that » contains 15-20 percent DEET and wear long pants and socks.. Treat clothes, boots and tents with permethrin-containing products; pre-treated clothes and gear are also available.

Bathe/shower within two hours of coming indoors. Use a full-length or hand-held mirror to do a full-body check on yourself, spouse and children. Focus on underarms, in and around ears, behind knees, inside belly button, between legs, around waist and in hair. Check your dogs, too!

REMOVING A

T ICK USE tweezers to

grasp tick as close to skin’s surface as possible.

PULL upward with steady, even pressure. DON’T jerk or twist, as this can cause tick’s

mouth parts to break off and remain in skin. If this happens, remove mouth parts with tweezers; if this isn’t possible, leave it alone and let skin heal.

AFTER removing tick, thoroughly clean bite area with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub or soap and water.

DON’T paint tick with nail polish, cover with

petroleum jelly or use heat to hopefully make tick detach from skin!

/ lymesupport101@aol.com / Monthly meeting June 22 at Ocala/Marion County Library headquarters

Sources: cdc.gov, floridahealth.com, edis.ifas.ufl.edu, doh.state.flu.us

Pulse

the


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ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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WHEN IT’S MORE THAN JUST A BUMP ON THE HEAD

SION S U C N O C T HE NDR UM: CONU

A

CONCUSSION IS CONSIDERED A TYPE OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) THAT IS CAUSED BY A BLOW, BUMP OR JOLT TO THE HEAD IN WHICH THE BRAIN MOVES QUICKLY BACK AND FORTH,, I.E. WHIPLASH. ACCORDING TO THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, THERE ARE 1.7 MILLION TBIS EVERY YEAR, AND CONCUSSIONS MAKE UP 75 PERCENT OF ALL TBIS. IN THE UNITED STATES, THERE ARE AN ESTIMATED 300,000 SPORTS-RELATED CONCUSSIONS ANNUALLY.

CDC CONCUSSION

FYI

“Most people think you have to lose consciousness to suffer a concussion,” says Dr. Richard Petrik, the medical director of Ocala Health Emergency Services. “And that a CAT scan is necessary to determine if you have a concussion. You can have a concussion without having lost consciousness. But if you did lose consciousness, then a CAT scan is a necessary diagnostic tool.” Petrik adds, “It is very important to be symptom-free before returning to normal activities and to know that almost everyone who suffers a concussion recovers completely.”

Football is the most common sport with concussion risk factors for males, with a 75 percent chance of occurrence. Headache (85%) & dizziness (70-80%) are the most commonly reported symptoms immediately following concussions.

71 percent of all sports/recreation-related head injury ER visits are attributed to males

47 percent of athletes do not report feeling any symptoms after a concussive blow

20mph:

25mph:

70mph:

Impact speed of a pro boxer’s punch

Impact speed of a football player tackling a stationary player

Impact speed of soccer ball being headed by a player

4 CATEGORIES OF CONCUSSIONS:

DETERMINING A DIAGNOSIS

COGNITIVE: Not

PHYSICAL: Headache,

EMOTIONAL:

SLEEP:

thinking clearly, feeling slowed down, difficulty concentrating, not being able to remember new information. Memory loss can occur immediately after injury with mental fatigue two to three days later.

fuzzy/blurry vision, nausea/vomiting, dizziness/vertigo, light/noise sensitivity, balance problems, feeling tired/ listless. Headaches, mild to severe, can present within 30 minutes; dizziness/vertigo within minutes; light/noise sensitivity immediately after injury and for days afterward.

Easily upset/ angered, sad, nervous/ anxious, irritable, more emotional than usual. All of these usually present several days following injury.

Sleeping more/less than usual, difficulty falling asleep in days after injury.

Doctor asks about injury and symptoms.

Doctor performs physical exam to check balance, coordination, reflexes and strength.

Doctor may order CT, MRI or PET scan to check for brain bruising/bleeding.

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Woman © bikeriderlondon / Shutterstock.com

LIVINGWELL

CONCUSSION TREATMENT Rest. Avoid alcohol/ illegal drugs. Do not take medications unless doctor approved. Avoid physically/mentally demanding activities. Use prescription/overthe-counter meds as doctor directed. For swelling/bump on head, use ice pack 10-20 minutes several times a day. Wait until doctor says it’s OK to resume normal activities. If symptoms return, see your doctor immediately. Always wear the appropriate helmet when playing contact sports or riding a bicycle, motorcycle, scooter, ATV, snowmobile, etc. Always wear seat belt in car or, if available, in any other type of motor vehicle.

Sources: cdc.gov, webmd.com, concussiontreatment.com, aan.com

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FEELINGWELL

PL A N TTAIRS FA S CII

T

FOOT

HE PLANTAR FASCIA IS THE LONG LIGAMENT THAT RUNS JUST BELOW THE SKIN ALONG THE LENGTH OF THE BOTTOM OF OUR FEET. IT CONNECTS THE HEEL BONE TO OUR TOES, CREATES THE ARCH OF THE FOOT AND ACTS AS A SHOCK ABSORBER. INFLAMMATION OF THE PLANTAR FASCIA IS CALLED PLANTAR FASCIITIS, ONE OF THE MOST COMMON AND PAINFUL FOOT AILMENTS. THE CONDITION CAN HAPPEN IN ONE FOOT OR BOTH. PLANTAR FASCIITIS OCCURS IN BOTH MEN AND WOMEN BUT IS MOST SEEN IN MEN 40 AND OLDER, ESPECIALLY IN RUNNERS.

“I see plantar fasciitis a lot in my practice,” says Physical Therapist Dr. Miguel Quintana of Ocala-based ALPHA REHAB AND SPINE STRENGTHENING. “The most common causes are increasing physical activity, like walking or running, too much at one time and improper shoes. People think it will go away on its own, but it will only get worse. So it’s very important to seek out treatment to return to an active lifestyle.” Quintana’s go-to treatment is connective tissue release, which he describes as “a broad rub on the plantar fascia to break up and release the damaged tissue.” He adds that “most of my clients get relief in four to six weeks.” Quintana also recommends getting good supportive shoes and custom-made orthotics to lessen the risk of reoccurrence.

CAUSES Flat feet, which usually leads to excessive pronation (rolling inward) when walking/running High arches Tight Achilles tendon, which connects calf muscle to heel and can lead to tight calf muscles as well

Aching/burning sensation/tenderness on bottom of feet

Sudden weight gain/obesity Long-distance running/ downhill running/running on uneven/hard surfaces Occupations that require standing on feet for hours, such as hair stylists, sales clerks, etc.

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» Replace athletic shoes, especially running shoes, every 500

miles or three to four months.

» Begin any physical activity gradually. » Wear supportive everyday shoes.

Swelling/redness of foot Pain worse first thing in morning with first steps, after standing still or sitting for a long time, when climbing stairs or after intense activity

» Don’t go barefoot. » Maintain a

healthy weight.

EASE THE PAIN See a podiatrist/orthopedic doctor/physical therapist. Use over-the-counter pain relievers like Tylenol, Advil or Motrin. Ice foot twice a day for 10-15 minutes during most painful days. Wear a night splint. Try over-the-counter or custom-made orthotics. Back off high-impact sports like running, and try low-impact ones like swimming or bicycling. Try a boot cast. Consider steroid shots into heel or foot surgery.

THE OUCH FACTOR Pain/stiffness in bottom of heel; can be sharp or dull

Shoes with poor arch support/soft soles/high heels

PREVENTION IS KEY

Foot © LeventeGyori; Woman © Rob Byron; Shoes © Penny Hillcrest / Shutterstock.com

A PAIN IN THE…

S T R E E E E T C H ! TOE STRETCHES

CALF STRETCHES

» Sit in a chair, extending your

» Stand facing a wall; place hands flat on wall

leg so the back of your heel is resting on the floor.

» Reach down and pull your

big toe up and back toward your ankle and away from the floor.

» Hold for 15-30 seconds. » Repeat two to four times a

session several times a day.

at eye level.

» Put one leg back a step behind the other leg. » Keeping heel of back leg flat on floor, bend

knee of forward leg until you feel a stretch in back leg calf.

» Hold stretch for 15-30 seconds; repeat two

to four times.

» Switch legs, and repeat. » Do three to four times a day, five days a week.

Sources: orthoinfo.assos.org, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, webmd.com

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LOOKINGWELL

GOT MUSCLES MUSCLES? C D COMPOIUSNES E X ERC

OMPOUND WEIGHT-LIFTING EXERCISES, WHICH ENGAGE MULTIPLE JOINTS AND MUSCLE GROUPS, ARE THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY TO BUILD MUSCLE MASS AND STRENGTH. THE SQUAT, DEADLIFT, CLEAN AND PRESS, LUNGE, CHIN-UP AND BENCH PRESS ARE SOME OF THE MOST POPULAR COMPOUND EXERCISES.

“Especially for a beginner, compound exercises are the best way to achieve the muscle mass and strength everyone is looking for,” says Will Brooks, a certified personal trainer with Ocala-based BRICK CITY HEALTH & FITNESS. “Add in a functional movement component that engages the core muscles for stabilization and you have the perfect all-around workout.”

Brooks recommends first getting medical clearance before beginning any physical activity and also working with a certified personal trainer to set up an appropriate program. He notes that the latter is “especially important when you hit that plateau and are no longer making any gains. A personal trainer can help you redesign your program to continue to move forward.”

A typical beginner’s compound exercise program, according to Brooks, would incorporate two to three exercises with three to four sets of 10-12 reps, using a weight that makes the last three to five reps feel the most challenging but not to the point where you would break form. Aim for working out two to three times a week.

FULL BARBELL SQUAT

DUMBBELL BENCH PRESS

CHIN-UP

Works chest, shoulders and triceps

» Grab chinning bar with palms

» Sit on edge of flat exercise

» Cross feet at ankles and lift feet

Works quads, hamstrings, calves, glutes, lower back and core » Using a squat rack, put safety catch pins low enough to perform a full squat but high enough to prevent total collapse of weight onto your body if you miss the lift.

» Using closed-hand grip, place hands evenly on bar to retain balance.

» Duck under bar and avoid

bench with one dumbbell resting on each knee.

» Lie down, bringing dumbbells outside your shoulders.

» Press dumbbells overhead until arms are extended. » Bend elbows to slowly lower weights until upper arms are slightly below parallel to the floor.

» Return to starting position, and repeat.

Illustrations by Casey Allen

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Works biceps and back facing toward you, hands slightly past shoulder-width apart. off the floor, pointing chest toward ceiling.

» Pull yourself up until chin clears the bar.

» If possible, touch upper chest to bar. » Return to starting position, and repeat.

legs, not your back.

» Take one small step back, followed by a second small step back with other foot; align feet a little wider than shoulder-width apart.

» Begin descent by moving hips backward, then lower to the floor until lower legs are nearly vertical in relation to the floor.

» Begin lift by first pushing upward on bar with hands, extending chest and head.

» Accelerate the bar through the lift until reaching point where it has to be stopped.

» Take two to three steps back and place bar back into rack, and repeat.

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SNATCH-GRIP DEADLIFT

PUSH PRESS

Works glutes, hamstrings and back

Works quads, deltoids and triceps

» With barbell on floor, stand facing it with feet

» Step into squat rack with barbell set at collar-

should-width apart.

» With hands two-times shoulder-width apart, bend over and grab bar.

» Drop hips as low as possible while keeping torso as upright as possible.

» Keep arms straight as you stand up. » Return bar to floor, and repeat.

bone height.

» Grab barbell with hands just past shoulder-width apart.

» Unrack bar, step back, plant feet, bend knees and drop into

quarter squat.

» Explosively straighten legs as you drive up barbell.

» Return to starting position, and repeat.

Sources: menshealth.com, sportsmedicine.about.com, onfitnessmag.com

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» Lift bar off hooks using your


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ZEN, M.D. ., I O R L E A H MIC HMET OZ, M.D & ME

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nother health myth bites the dust! You don’t need to spend a fortune to eat good-for-you food. In fact, a new report reveals that buying healthy food saves money. That’s worth celebrating (you could hear our whoops and cheers for miles when this important info made the news), because plenty of wrong-headed reports have led North Americans to believe that healthy diets are wallet-busters. What we love most about this game-changing study is that it happened in the real world—and got real-world results. Researchers from the Miriam Hospital and the Rhode Island Community Food Bank asked 83 people, all trying to make ends meet on very small incomes, if they’d like to learn how to cook and eat a plant-based

Mediterranean diet. Yup, it’s the same kind of low-meat, veggiepacked plan that we endorse in YOU: On a Diet and YOU: The Owner’s Manual for a healthier weight, less belly fat and a lower risk for heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes and cancer. Volunteers took some healthyeating classes, then shopped and cooked as they pleased. Eight months later, researchers collected their grocery receipts and asked them to step on a scale. The results? The average weekly grocery bill was cut in half, saving families about $160 per month. Half of the participants lost weight. And food insecurity—a hunger and health worry for a growing number of people—shrank, too. With more food in the pantry, reliance on the local food bank dropped. That’s a win-win-win!

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SHOP FOR THESE SUPERFOOD BARGAINS. These are like the “dollar menu” at a fast-food joint, only healthy and at the grocery store. Our favorites include: • Canned salmon (that’s wild salmon) runs about 50 cents a serving. • Black rice, with more antioxidants and fiber than blueberries, at 49 cents per serving. • Adzuki beans, with 17 grams of fiber per cup, at 57 cents per serving. • Dark meat chicken, packed with protein, B vitamins and minerals like iron and zinc, at 75 cents per serving (skip the skin, of course). Other healthy foods for less than $1 per serving include oatmeal, whole-grain pasta, canned and dried beans, kiwi fruit, oranges, bananas, real peanut butter, carrots, popcorn, plain frozen vegetables, eggs and canned tuna.

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Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of The Dr. Oz Show, and Mike Roizen, M.D. is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute. To live your healthiest, visit sharecare.com. (c) 2013 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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JUNE 2013 ISSUE www.ocalaice.com

Connections matter One reason my family and I love Marion County is because of its small-town charm coupled with the vitality and diversity of a larger city. Here, we truly get the best of both worlds. We can enjoy a multitude of outdoor activities, professions, diverse cuisine, and our neighbors originate from different points across the nation and the globe. In fact, we all have a special story about how we came here or, as natives, why we have stayed. But what exactly has made our community thrive over the years? I believe it has been about connections. What I discover when meeting new patients, friends, or colleagues is that if we listen closely enough, we all have something in common. We may know the same people or have shared similar experiences. But at the very least, we can find some way to empathize with each other. These connections are the foundation of our community and what has made us strong. Feeling connected has a huge impact on our mental and physical well-being, too. If you think of the body as a community of organs and bones, it is easy to understand how connections matter. Take the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries, for example. These two arteries are in the pelvic area, which is constantly in motion. Our workouts and diet will affect our movement and the health of these arteries, demanding a delicate balance of nutrition, exercise, and attention when pain occurs. What my “family” at ICE and I wish for you is connections that count. Let us take the time and interest in connecting with each other, our community and our health and, as a result, enjoy fulfilling lives. Yours,

Asad U. Qamar, MD FACC, FCCP, FSGC, FACP, FSCAI Cardiologist

Superficial femoral and popliteal artery The relationship between the arteries in the pelvis and thigh is a delicate and complicated one. One might say that disease in these arteries is the Achilles heel of physicians today. So what makes the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries the most commonly diseased arteries in the body? Location, location, location. As its name indicates, the superficial femoral artery (SFA) travels alongside the femur supplying the thigh muscles with nutrientand oxygen-rich blood. The SFA connects to the popliteal artery at the end of the femur behind the knee, putting these two arteries in the part of the body that is almost constantly in motion.

When you bike, walk, or even dip in and out of your car, the SFA and popliteal are constantly extending, contracting, compressing, and flexing, making it a delicate system to care for. More than 50 percent of all peripheral artery disease (PAD) cases involve the SFA and popliteal artery. PAD is a condition in which sticky plaque made up of cholesterol, calcium, and fibrous tissue causes the arteries in our extremities to harden, preventing blood from travelling freely. Meanwhile, the slow-flow of blood in the thigh region creates a scenario that makes it prone to a unique set of vascular diseases. Pain from this condition is most likely to be felt in the knee

or calf, and it may radiate into the foot. Disease in this area is most common in elderly patients, smokers, and those with diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases. Those with a family history of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), high blood pressure, and high cholesterol levels are at high risk for developing issues, as well as people who are obese and people who are physically inactive. But don’t leave it up to yourself to determine whether your knee or thigh pain is “superficial” or a deeper-rooted issue. Consult a local cardiovascular specialist, like those at ICE, and get answers.


FA S T FA C T S

The popliteal artery can be affected by a variety of pathologic conditions, the most common of which is atherosclerosis. Affected patients are usually older, presenting with other risk factors for atherosclerosis, less acute symptoms, and disease at multiple levels. Source: http://intl-radiographics.rsna.org/content/24/2/467. fullerectiledysfunctionyourchoices/ur029205.pdf

CASE STUDY

Caring for Carol I love meandering around flea markets and hanging clothes on my clothesline, taking in the fresh air. I also worked 80 hours a week at two jobs — I am not accustomed to staying still! But the pain caused by my femoral artery blockage has changed everything. I use a manual wheelchair in the house and when I go shopping, I have to take frequent breaks or have someone come and push my wheelchair. I have diabetic neuropathy. I have had a heart attack, stroke, and femoral bypass all since 2000 and thought that was behind me until recently. I started getting symptoms again — the

cramping in the calves. It took a visit to the doctor to have an ingrown toenail cut to find the problem, and I was told to see Dr. Qamar. It hasn’t been easy, but Dr. Qamar keeps finding ways to help me. I guess you’d say he is tenacious! For example, he doesn’t stop until he finds a solution to the blockage, and his team helped me realize the importance of a healthy diet. I cut out the southern fried pork chops and try to be a positive influence on my siblings and grandchildren.

— Carol Pittman

Myrlene’s inherited attitude

Amanda’s gift of demeanor

What matters most to me as a phlebology sonographer at ICE is that all my patients feel like VIPs. I know how many kids and grandchildren they have, and I connect with them during their visit. This is important because I want to do more than just perform a job; I want to make patients feel comfortable, valued, and understood and listening inevitably leads to learning. One patient, Steven Dandreano, taught me a valuable lesson about attitude. We talked at length about homelessness and his passion for providing people with clothing and medications. Meanwhile, I learned that he has been dealing with many personal health issues, but he never complains. His attitude is remarkable, and he is a role model in that way.

Clearly, many medical procedures are not fun. But I do my best to create a calm and relaxing atmosphere for my patients. While my job is to manage the often-hectic patient schedules for the radiofrequency ablations, I take the time, greet my patients when they come in. I can tell right away if they need some reassurance, so when I assist Myrlene with the procedures, I take on other roles. I am a hand-holder, a back-rubber, and will get a wet cloth if I see my patient are distressed — just as I would for my mother, father, or grandparents. Also, I am determined to stay upbeat and positive like my favorite patient Betty Jo Jacobs. No matter how hectic things get in the office, she is friendly and calm. Her demeanor rubs off on me!

— Myrlene Lucien-Heriveaux

— Amanda Gavin Patient Coordinator in the Vein Clinic

Registered Vascular Tech in the Vein Clinic

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SNACK ON Y SOMETHING SUPER

OU MAY HAVE HEARD THE TERM “SUPERFOODS” IN THE NEWS RECENTLY. NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH “SUPER-SIZED” FOODS, THESE MIGHTY MORSELS ARE PACKED WITH VITAMINS, MINERALS, ANTIOXIDANTS AND TONS OF OTHER GOOD-FOR-YOU STUFF. BUT DON’T THINK EATING SUPERFOODS MEANS A DIET CONSISTING OF TWIGS AND BERRIES OR SHOPPING AT UBER-EXPENSIVE SPECIALTY STORES. THERE ARE PLENTY OF SUPERFOODS AVAILABLE IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD GROCERY STORE AND CAN BE AS SIMPLE OR EXOTIC AS YOU’RE WILLING TO TRY.

PLAYING IT SAFE

DARE TO BE DIFFERENT GOING GUNG HO!

WALNUTS: Along with other nuts, walnuts pack an impressive punch of monounsaturated fats and are a heart-healthy source of omega-3s.

ACAI BERRIES: It may look like a grape, but these berries are bursting with anthocyanins, the pigments found in red wine, making them an antioxidant powerhouse. Buy them freeze dried and add to cereals, oatmeal or eat them as a snack.

LEAFY GREENS: Ditch the iceberg lettuce and shoot for darker, leafier greens. The high chlorophyll content is responsible for producing hemoglobin in the human bloodstream, which is important for cell function and production.

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PUMPKIN SEEDS: These

super seeds are high in protein, B-complex vitamins and vitamin E and are an excellent source of essential minerals. Sprinkle them over salads and desserts or toast them and enjoy as a snack.

BEETS: These red tubers are real jewels when it comes to antioxidant stores. The red (or orange or yellow) roots are a rich source of B-complex vitamins and essential minerals, such as iron, manganese, copper and magnesium. And don’t discard the greens! These tender leaves are packed with vitamin A, essential for good eye health, and many other cancer-preventing carotenoids and flavonoids. Pickle or roast the beet roots, and add the greens to salads or sauté to use in soups or pasta dishes.

POMEGRANATE: Don’t let

the hundreds of tiny seeds in this super fruit dissuade you. Pomegranate juice has almost three times the antioxidant power of green tea or red wine. As little as 1/4 cup of this flavorful juice has been shown to improve cardiovascular health by reducing the oxidation of LDL cholesterol. Drink the juice alone, or add it to dressings and sauces, and add the seeds to salads or cereals.

QUINOA: Pronounced

McAlister’s Deli always has tempting salads on the menu, but now’s the time to enjoy their Pecanberry Salad, which is new and available only for a limited time. It features a bed of mixed greens, topped with grilled chicken, fresh strawberries © Nitr / Shutterstock.com and blueberries. A sprinkling of sweet, crunchy candied pecans and fat-free raspberry vinaigrette dressing finish it off. Tastes like summer! You can get the Pecanberry Salad on its own or as part of their “Choose 2” option and pair it with soup, a half sandwich or half spud. Perfect with a tall glass of McAlister’s Famous Sweet Tea™.

QUICK BITES

“keen-wa,” this ancient grain is a naturally high source of protein, fiber, iron, zinc and selenium. It cooks similar to rice but is a real winner in terms of nutrition. Try incorporating it into rice dishes or add some veggies and lemon juice for a cold salad.

GINGER ROOT: Ginger has been used since ancient times for its anti-inflammatory, painkilling, nerve-soothing and anti-bacterial properties. Boiled, pickled or crystallized ginger can be purchased at health food or Asian grocery stores and can be incorporated into a number of recipes.

QUICK BITES

3930 SW 42nd St., Ste 110 Ocala (352) 690-7783 mcalistersdeli.com

Sources: nutrition-and-you.com, webmd.com

SOY: Research shows that diets rich in soy products can lower cholesterol levels. Incorporate pure forms like soymilk, tofu or edamame into your diet.

Pomegrante © Nattika; Dried Fruit © marilyn barbone / Shutterstock.com

the

True Grits had its grand opening on May 3 and serves hearty home cooking and grits done in a variety of ways. In addition to Straight Up Bottomless (“an endless bowl of creamy, © Jaimie Duplass / Shutterstock.com buttery stone-ground grits”), you can order grits with shrimp, steak and bleu cheese, spinach and feta cheese, and more. For lunch, try Cogburn Continued on page 62


DININGGUIDE

Tony’s Sushi & Steakhouse 3405 SW College Road, Ocala / (352) 237-3151 / tonysushi.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p / Fri & Sat 11a-11p / Sun Noon-10p With abundant menu choices and over 100 off-menu rolls, you certainly won’t run out of options at Tony’s Sushi. If you can’t decide, the wait staff is excellent at suggesting items you’re sure to enjoy. Every roll and sushi dish is made to order from the freshest ingredients. In the steakhouse area, highly trained chefs make for a memorable meal as they cook on the tableside grills, preparing chicken, steak or seafood just the way you like it. Entrées include soup or salad and rice. Family-friendly, casual atmosphere, along with a full bar, including imported Japanese sake and beer selections. Like us

Book your party at Tony’s today. Gift cards available.

on Facebook!

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Tango Argentinian Steakhouse 2015 SW 17th St Ocala, FL / (352) 236-5656 Mon-Tue 12-9p / Wed-Thu 12-10p / Fri-Sat 11a-12p / Sun Closed You are invited to experience outstanding Argentinian cuisine with the blending of Mediterranean influences. Ocala’s newest steakhouse brings a whole new meaning to the concept of fine dining. A wide range of Argentinian meats are cooked to perfection on an open grill to bring out the best flavors. Dishes like the Entrana and the Churrasco are Argentinian favorites, and all entrées are served with our fresh Chimichurri and your choice of one of our signature sides. And finish off the evening with a delicious flan or order of churros from the dessert menu. Lunches start at only $7, and the VIP room is perfect for parties. Come check us out!

We have a full bar, including Argentinian wines, specialty drinks, beer and more. On Tuesdays, enjoy $10 off a bottle of wine. Happy hour runs 2-6pm daily.

El Toreo 3790 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 694-1401 / 7 Days 11a-10p SR 200, Ocala / (352) 291-2121 / 7 Days 11a-11p Happy Hour Daily 4-7p New lunch specials include Taco Salad on Monday, $3.95; Speedy Gonzalez on Tuesdays, $3.95; Quesadillas on Wednesday, $5.45; Chimichangas on Thursdays, $4.95; and Burrito Supreme on Fridays, $3.95. New dinner options include Fajita Mondays, $7.95; Chimichanga Tuesdays, $6.95; Alambre Wednesdays, $6.95; Tacos de Bistec Thursdays, $6.95; and Enchilada Fridays, $6.95. Don’t miss Margarita Mondays with $1.95 margaritas. On Tuesdays, kids 12 and under can get 99¢ children’s meals (takeout not included). Wednesday you can get 99¢ margaritas and $1.95 for domestic and imported beers. Saturday is 2-for-1 margaritas all day.

Join us every day for happy hour from 4-7p and get 2-for-1 wells or drafts. Whether it’s delicious food, great drinks or a festive atmosphere, there are more reasons than ever to visit either El Toreo location today.

THE BEST MEXICAN FOOD

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Drunken Chicken, a half-chicken, beer brined and honey BBQ glazed (comes with two sides and choice of bread) or order The Tatanka, an 8-ounce bison burger. Breakfast served from 6-11am, lunch from 11am-3pm Monday-Saturday and until 2pm Sundays.

PROMOTIONAL

Southern Comfort Consistently named as one of the best places to eat in Florida, The Ivy House earns “favorite” status, thanks to its memorable home cooking, friendly service and welcoming atmosphere. Now that the original Williston restaurant has been joined by a long-awaited second location in downtown Ocala, The Ivy House has gained even more fans.

331 NW 20th St., Ocala (352) 867-7772 true-grits.com

QUICK BITES

S

ince 1993, patrons have relied on The Ivy House to dish up the kind of satisfying meals they once enjoyed for Sunday suppers at Grandma’s place. Founded in 1993 by Marjorie Hale (known by family and friends as “Mimi”), The Ivy House is owned by Mimi and her daughters, Ann, Myra, Evelyn and Waica, all of whom are active in the day-to-day operations. Ready to bring a different twist to the Ocala restaurant, Mimi hired Chef Rick Alabaugh, resulting in a perfect combination of Southern meets classic. “Our mission is not ‘country’ food; it’s Southern,” says Chef Alabaugh, who has worked for some of the country’s finest hotels and restaurants. “Our focus is on fresh, seasonal food, just cooked in a Southern way. I was raised in West Virginia, and my mother was a great cook. After becoming a chef, I learned the finer art of food, too.” Bringing Chef Alabaugh into the mix opened the door for even more menu options and a different approach to Southern–style food. For example, fried green tomatoes are a traditional appetizer, but if you don’t want fried, you can chose the Caprese appetizer, which features sliced tomatoes and fresh mozzarella. Mimi’s ever-popular Baked Krispy Chicken has long been a customer favorite, and her decadent creamy mac and cheese, elevates this entrée to the epitome of “comfort” food.

With at least three nightly specials in Ocala, Chef Alabaugh loves to get creative. Recent specials included a tender filet with jumbo lump crab meat and Gorgonzola, served with grilled asparagus and garlic mashed potatoes, or for seafood lovers, a classical Italian dish showcasing grilled shrimp and chicken sun-dried tomato Alfredo with an asiago cream sauce. Whatever you do, save room for dessert. Whether you’re craving Mimi’s old-fashioned buttermilk walnut pie or a more modern take, such as key lime pie with macadamia graham crust or a praline shell filled with homemade praline ice cream and chocolate sauce, you’ll walk away content. The Ivy House Restaurant ivyhousefl.com 106 N Main St, Williston (352) 528-5410

Gilbert’s Deli & Grill has become the go-to spot for working folks in the northwest part of the county to grab breakfast and lunch. Breakfast options include hot egg sandwiches, sausage biscuits and biscuits and gravy. Hearty 100 percent Angus burgers are popular for lunch, as are the Philly cheese steak sub, © Rojo Images / Shutterstock.com two- and three-piece chicken dinner with two sides. There are also wings, sandwiches, chef salads and cold subs. Daily lunch specials include BBQ pulled pork sandwiches, sloppy Joes, Salisbury steak, beef and macaroni, meatloaf, etc. Open 6:30am-2pm Monday-Friday. Call for Saturday hours. Inside Gilbert’s Hardware & General Store Corner of SR 326 and Highway 225-A, Ocala (352) 622-4744

917 E Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala (352) 622-5550 Continued on page 64

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DININGGUIDE

Wayne’s Brick City Café 10 NE 1st Street, Ocala / (352) 629-4700 Mon-Fri 6:30a-2p / Delivery Downtown Area 9a-1:30p

Wayne’s Brick City Café is a local favorite. Find out why! The specialty salads, including chicken, pasta and taco salad are out of this world, and guests can create their own salad plate, served with your choice of salad combinations. Also on the menu are a tasty variety of burgers and dogs and a great selection of sandwiches. For the early birds, breakfast is served from 6:30-11am. A great start to any day with menu items ranging from omelets and eggs benedict to French toast and sausage gravy and biscuits. Dine indoors or out in the secluded courtyard area. Brick City Café is known for its friendly service and cozy environment.

Call ahead for takeout, and delivery is available to the downtown area.

Pavarotti’s Pizza & Restaurant 8075 SW HWY 200, Canopy Oak Center, Ocala / (352) 291-9424 Mon-Thu 11a-9p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun 11a-8p Pavarotti’s Pizza and Restaurant in Dunnellon is known for their famous old-fashioned pizzas, hand tossed and baked on a stone deck oven as well as their array of classic Italian entrées, fresh salads and subs and hearty pasta dinners. Their newest location in the Canopy Oak Center means Ocala residents can now enjoy Pavarotti’s famous fare. Veal or chicken is served Parmigiana, Marsala or Picatta style, and the seafood dishes are served fresh over linguini. Pizza lovers can’t get enough of the homemade pies, and don’t forget about the subs, stromboli and calzones!

Be sure to check out the new bar area and expanded dining room. Pavarotti’s also caters.

PAVAROTTI’S Pizza & Restaurant

Asian Pop 2611 SW 19th Ave. Rd. Suite 400, Ocala / (352) 237-2666 / asianpopfl.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p / Fri 11a-11p / Sat 1-11p / Sun 3-9p The newest Asian restaurant to open in Ocala is Asian Pop. Sample the many flavors of Asia either dining in or by ordering online for a quick pick up. For lunch, the bento boxes are the way to go. Each comes with daily fruit, a spring roll, cream cheese Rangoon, miso soup, salad and rice. For dinner, try one of the chef ’s specials such as the Walnut Shrimp or Mongolian Beef. There are also plenty of tempting appetizers, soups, salads, rice and noodle dishes and much more. And no Asian dinner would be complete without tempura ice cream for dessert!

Reservations for private parties and business dining available. Most credit cards accepted. Beer and wine available. Grand Opening Special - 20% off entire check.

ASIAN ASIAN CUISINE

POP

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THE DISH ON DISHWASHERS

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OME WOULD ARGUE THAT THE ALMIGHTY DISHWASHER IS THE MOST IMPORTANT KITCHEN APPLIANCE OUT THERE. HOURS OF SOAKING AND SCRAPING DIRTY DISHES ARE A THING OF THE PAST WITH THE HANDYDANDY MACHINE THAT TRANSFORMS THE CRUSTIEST OF PLATES INTO SPARKLING PLATTERS AWAITING THEIR NEXT USE. BUT BEFORE YOU SELECT YOUR CYCLE, FOLLOW THESE TIPS TO ENSURE YOUR DISHES COME OUT GOOD AS NEW EVERY TIME. Isn’t the point of utilizing a dishwasher so that you don’t have to hand wash your dishes? Today’s efficient appliances don’t require you to completely rinse the dishes before loading. In fact, for the detergents to really work, they need to come in contact with food particles. But, it is a good idea to scrape off leftover food, especially if those greasy plates will be sitting in there for a day or so.

in the front should face backward. This insures the center spray reaches all of them.

HANDLE YOUR HANDLES CORRECTLY Alternate the handles of spoons and forks so that some are up and some are down. If they rest against each other, the spray stream can’t optimally clean between. As for knives, handles should always be pointed upward.

KEEP TRACK OF THE TRAP

If you’re just not the type to scrape every morsel from that pizza plate or you’ve left your spaghetti bowl on the counter overnight and the sauce is pretty much shellacked on, then you may want to clean out your dishwasher’s trap more often. Located underneath the bottom rack (where you might find a lost spoon or two as well) is a filter. Every few weeks, remove the filter and clean out any excess debris.

BOWL BLUNDERS

Small bowls should be loaded on the top rack. Those in the back should face forward, while those

COMMONLY NOT DISHWASHER SAFE: • Wooden items • Pots and pans • Gold-trimmed dishes

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• Crystal or handblown glass • Aluminum thermoses

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TURN UP THE TEMPERATURE

To ensure that your first fill cycle is using hot instead of warm or even cold water, run the water in your sink for a few minutes until the hot water starts to come through. This is especially important during the winter when it takes even longer for the water to heat up. (Tip: Make sure the water heater is set between 120˚F and 125˚F. Any higher and the water will flash dry and not roll off the dishes.) Although you may be tempted to wait until you have a full or really full load before you run the cycle, don’t. Overcrowding or layering dishes will only result in having to re-wash the load again and hand wash the dishes that didn’t really fit in the first place.

IS IT SAFE?

Remember, not all items are dishwasher safe, meaning they can’t hold up to the hot temperatures inside. Always check the labels before you load them in (some are only dishwasher safe if placed on the top rack.)

Tango Argentinian Steakhouse officially opened in March in the completely renovated building that was formerly Texas Roadhouse on 17th Street. Best described as “urban fine dining in a relaxed atmosphere,” Tango is open six days a week for lunch and dinner and focuses on authentic Argentinean cuisine with a blending of Mediterranean influences. An open charcoal grill adds optimal © Fanfo / Shutterstock.com flavor to the various Argentinian meats, while homemade Chimichurri sauce enhances the flavor of each entrée. Enjoy a full bar and great variety of appetizers. Closed Sunday. Find them on Facebook.

QUICK BITES

KEEP IT CLEAN

Dishwasher starting to smell a little, well, off? Run a cycle with a cup of white vinegar in the bottom. It will clean out any old food particles and keep it smelling as fresh as a daisy!

QUICK BITES

2015 SW 17th St., Ocala (352) 236-5656 tangosteakhouse.com

LOAD EM’ UP RIGHT

Sources: instituteofkitchenscience.com, thekitchn.com

TO RINSE OR NOT TO RINSE?

Dishwasher © OmiStudio; Stacked Cups © Kellis / Shutterstock.com

Continued from page 62

The Getaway Deli opened in April in the shopping center between Big Lots and the old Albertson’s and specializes in sandwiches with international flavors. Check out the “Croque © MSPhotographic / Shutterstock.com Monsieur,” Black Forest ham smothered in Béchamel sauce, shredded Gruyere cheese, served on a croissant, or the Liberty Bell, their hearty version of Continued on page 66


DININGGUIDE

The Getaway Deli 2637 E. Silver Springs Blvd. / (352) 789-6474 / F:(352) 789-6475 Open Tues-Sun 7a-5p

In the mood for a taste of Germany? How about a nibble of something French? Maybe both? Then, The Getaway Deli is the place to go for breakfast and lunch. Taste sandwiches from around the world, including the American “Liberty Bell,” grilled chicken, sautéed onions and peppers smothered with rich provolone cheese; the French “Croque Monsieur,” ham, gruyere cheese and béchamel sauce on a toasted croissant; or the Old World-themed “Three Tenors,” ham, salami and pepperoni on a hoagie with mozzarella. Crisp salads and classic soups are also available along a variety of sides.

Come Taste The World...As We See It. Catering available, and free delivery with $15 minimum order.

Getaway Deli

Braised Onion 754 NE 25th Ave, Ocala / (352) 620-9255 Tue-Thu 11a-9p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun 11a-8p Betty and Raoul Lemieux, Nicole Lassiter, and Marge and Loring Felix welcome you to Braised Onion, where you can experience a fun, colorful meal in a casual atmosphere as your taste buds dance away with the many exciting flavors of our “comfort food with attitude.” Stop by every Wednesday at 6pm for happy hour featuring two-for-one call and premium drinks all evening! While you’re there, stay for Martini & Jazz Night with smooth jazz by Rudy Turner. Taste of Ocala winners for: Best of Taste, People’s Choice and Best Presentation Awards. Chef Felix was winner of the Culinary Combat Iron Chef Award 2012-2013.

Enjoy great drinks with Bob & Jason at the bar who will be mixing for you! LIVE JAZZ NIGHTS Wed & Fri 6-9pm

Eagle’s Nest Café Grand Lake RV and Golf Resort / 18545 NW 45th Av, Rd, Citra / (352) 591-2768 Mon-Thu 8a-7p / Fri-Sat 8a-8p / Sun 8a-5p

When you step into the Eagles Nest Café, you will instantly understand why it’s said that they have the “Best View in Town!” Whether you eat lakeside or to go, you won’t be disappointed. Eagles Nest Café offers a variety of selections to suit anyone’s taste. For breakfast, create your own omelet or pick from one of their famous breakfast platters. At lunch, enjoy a chicken caesar salad, a fresh California turkey sandwich or a hot and juicy Rueben. And that’s just the beginning! Try our $10 or less dinner entrées such as the lemon pepper mahi mahi or meatloaf with mashed potatoes. The Eagles Nest Café offers a relaxing and hospitable atmosphere that’s guaranteed to bring you back time and time again!

The Eagles Nest Café is located just east of Ocala Jai-Alai. The golf course is open to the public and for just $25 you can play a round of golf (including a golf cart) and enjoy breakfast or lunch. What a deal!

Café

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the Philly with either sliced steak or sliced grilled chicken, sautéed onions and peppers, topped with provolone on a Hoagie roll. “Everything is wholesome and fresh,” says owner Nathanial Thibodeaux (“Mr. Tibbs”), whose homemade fruit salad wins rave reviews. Serving lunch and dinner 7 days a week from 11am-9pm. 2637 E Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala (352) 789-6474 thegetawaydeli.com

WHAT’S IN THAT? W

COCONUT MILK, COCONUT OIL, COCONUT…WATER? Not to be confused with coconut milks or oils, coconut water is the sweet and nutty-tasting clear liquid tapped from the center of green coconuts.

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Coconut water’s unique, sweet taste comes with a minimal caloric price to pay. One cup will only cost you 46 calories, while one can of cola will clock in at 140.

MIGHTY MINERALS POTASSIUM POWERHOUSE There’s a reason why athletes are always eating bananas! It’s because they are packed with potassium, an important hydration-promoting electrolyte. Pop open a can of coconut water and you can get twice the amount of potassium found in a banana in just a few sips.

SLIM DOWN THE SUGAR Sports drinks, juices and sodas are sweet for a reason, they are full of added sugars. Coconut water’s sweet taste comes from natural sugars and adds up to only 6g in a 1-cup serving. Compare that with 24g in 1 cup of orange juice, 39g in one can of cola or 24g in 1 cup of iced tea.

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CALORIE CONTROL

You may not get any extra calories or sugar with good ol’ H2O, but you won’t get much of anything else either. Coconut water comes complete with a natural source of calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium and zinc.

A BOOST OF THE B’S Essential vitamins need to be consumed, as the body can’t produce them itself. Down a cup of coconut water for a good source of B-complex vitamins riboflavin, niacin, thiamin and folate.

ENERGIZING ENZYMES Coconut water contains a wide range of naturally occurring bioactive enzymes that aid in both metabolism and digestion.

JUST THE FACTS One cup of coconut water will give you:

46 CALORIES 0.5G FAT 252MG SODIUM 8.9G CARBOHYDRATES 2.6G FIBER 6.3G SUGAR 1.7G PROTEIN

D.Y.K.?

Coconut milk is produced by steeping grated coconut in hot water and then straining. Coconut cream is produced by either cooking down coconut milk until it thickens or by steeping grated coconut in hot milk instead of water.

Source: foodreference.com, nutrition-and-you.com, sugarstacks.com, caloriecount.com

WITH F F O L O O C COCONU T

ITH THE SIZZLING SUMMER SUN SETTLING IN, YOU PROBABLY HAVE A WHOLE SLEW OF WATER BOTTLES, SPORTS DRINK BOTTLES, JUICE AND SODA BOTTLES STOCK-PILED IN EVERY NOOK AND CRANNY OF YOUR HOUSE AND CAR. BUT WHEN WATER JUST WON’T CUT IT, AND YOU’RE TRYING TO STAY AWAY FROM ADDED SUGARS AND SWEETENERS, REACH INSTEAD FOR THE ALL-NATURAL BEVERAGE THAT HAS MORE AND MORE PEOPLE ASKING “WHAT’S IN THAT?”

Green Coconut © antpkr; Coconuts © Volosina / Shutterstock.com

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DININGGUIDE

Ipanema Brazilian Steak House 2023 South Pine Avenue, Ocala / (352) 622-1741 / ipanemaocala.com Lunch Fri 11a-2:30p / Dinner Tues-Thu 5-9p, Fri & Sat 5-10p, Sun 4-9p Brunch Sun 12-3p / Happy Hour Tue-Fri 5-7p / Closed Mon A Churrascaria (Portuguese for barbecue) is a dining experience where roaming Gauchos slice and serve fire-roasted meats from skewers in a continual fashion. Ipanema Brazilian Steak House boasts 12 of the finest cuts of meat complemented by an opulent salad and vegetable bar, delectable desserts, and delicious wines, beers and cocktails. Brazilian native and Executive Chef Ortencia DeAlmeida invites you to embrace the flavors of her homeland and experience the magnetism of Ipanema for yourself. Become a fan of Ipanema on Facebook at facebook.com/ipanemasteakhouse.

Nothing says Father’s Day like endless filet mignon and lamb chops! Join us on Sunday June 16th from 12pm to 8pm where dads will receive our signature turtle caramel cheesecake on the house!

Cuvée Wine & Bistro 2237 SW 19th Ave Rd, Ste. 102, Ocala / (352) 351-1816 / cuveewineocala.com Mon-Thu 5p-10p / Fri & Sat 5p-11p / Happy Hour 5p-7p Experience the ultimate in fine dining with fabulous wine and culinary classics at Cuvée Wine & Bistro. Relax with a glass of wine or indulge in an elegant dinner, and let us transport you to an intimate world with impeccable service and exquisite cuisine. Embrace the age-old relationship between food and wine by sampling over 104 wines on our interactive wine system. An unforgettable experience awaits you...Come see what’s new at Cuvee with our chef ’s Scan here with your smartphone to access new summer creations cuveewineocala.com starting June 1st.

Whether a beginner or a connoisseur, our knowledgeable and friendly staff will be ready to assist you. Private rooms and off-premise catering available. Happy Hour 5-7pm/Monday night Surf & Turf special/ Thursday $5 Martinis

Shane’s Rib Shack 2602 Southwest 19th Ave Road #105, Ocala / (352) 304-5255 shanesribshack.com/ocalaeasystreet Open Mon-Sat / 11a-9p / Sunday 11a-8p Shane’s Rib Shack brings together a passion for BBQ, high quality, fresh ingredients and daily preparation. Come in and taste the result! Try our full line of traditional BBQ pork, ribs, chicken and sides, including Shane’s famous smoked wings, full meal salads, sandwiches, homemade peach cobbler and more. Our BBQ is always made fresh daily onsite, slow smoked, chopped by hand and served with Big Dad’s secret sauce. Shane’s tailors every catering to your request and handles all the details. Consider Shane’s party platters, box lunches or full-catered meals for any occasion. From elaborate feasts to finger food, Shane’s will have you covered.

The next time you throw a party, let Shane’s Catering do the cooking. Check out the extensive gluten-free menu. Visit them on Facebook at facebook.com/ ShanesRibShackOcala.

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Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant 2463 SW 27th Avenue, Ocala / (352) 237-3900 / kotobukiocala.com Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30a-2p Dinner: Tue-Thu 4:30-9:30p / Fri & Sat 4:30-10:30p / Mon & Sun 4:30-9:30p Happy Hour daily 4:30-6:30p Check out our full sushi bar. Celebrating 26 years!

For an authentic Japanese meal in an award-winning restaurant that has been serving Ocala since 1986, try Kotobuki. Enjoy traditional Japanese favorites like tempura, teriyaki and broiled seafood and vegetables. For a memorable experience, gather around the hot grill and watch as your chef prepares steak, chicken and seafood favorites right before your eyes.

The Ivy House Restaurant 917 E. Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala / (352) 622-5550 Sun 11a-2p / Tue 11a-2p / Wed & Thu 11a-8p / Fri & Sat 11a-8:30p / Closed Mon 106 NW Main St, Williston / (352) 528-5410 Sun-Wed 11a-2p / Thurs-Sat 11a-8p / ivyhousefl.com For more information on catering, please contact Waica Huggins or Evelyn Nussel at wmhivyhouse@yahoo.com. No reservations are required, but a courtesy call for parties of more than 10 is appreciated.

“Come on home, it’s supper time!” is our motto. We want you to feel you have come to our house to eat. The family-owned Ivy House Restaurant now has two locations, Williston and Ocala. The downtown Ocala location has added several specialty items created by award-winning Chef Rick Alabaugh. The restaurant has been named by Florida Trend as one of the “Top 500 Best Places to Eat in the State” for several years. Specials include Southern Fried Lobster, delicious Hand-Cut Steaks and our famous Baked Krispy Chicken. Trying our delicious homemade desserts like the Key Lime Pie and Chocolate Midnight Cake is a must when dining here.

Tilted Kilt 3155 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 351-5458 / tiltedkilt.com Mon-Thu 11a-11p/ Fri-Sat 11a-Midnight / Sun 11a-10p

Scan the code to view our complete menu and calendar of events. Or go to our website: ocala.tiltedkilt.com

Looking for some fun with a great meal? Besides our great service, hospitality and delicious food, you’ll feel at home watching your favorite HD sporting events on the big screen TVs or enjoying live music on the patio. From poker to cruise-ins, there’s always something happening at the Tilted Kilt. Big or small, celebrate your next party or special occasion with us. Our menu features an array of options, from snacks to full meals, plus a complete bar, all served by beautiful lasses in kilts. You’ll want to make us your hometown pub. The Tilted Kilt – where a cold beer never looked so good! Get the free mobile app at

http:/ / gettag.mobi

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Caped Crusaders Unite:

Comic Con comes to Ocala p71

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Kayak Crazy p72

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THEY’VE GOT THE BEAT

I

T’S TIME TO KICK BACK AND LET THE MUSIC MOVE YOU. BACK FOR THE THIRD SEASON, THE DOWNTOWN SUMMER JAM SERIES OF CONCERTS RETURNS, SHOWCASING THE TALENTS OF THE AREA’S HOTTEST YOUNG ACTS. FOR FOUR SELECT FRIDAY NIGHTS THIS SUMMER, COOL OFF AT THE CITIZENS’ CIRCLE, WHERE EACH CONCERT WILL FEATURE PERFORMERS OF ALL GENRES. CROON TO SOME COUNTRY OR FEEL THE RHYTHM OF HOPPIN’ HIP-HOP BEATS—THE LINEUP CHANGES EACH WEEK. CONCERTS BEGIN AT 7PM, AND BEST OF ALL, THEY ARE ALL FREE!

Guitar © Ilyashenko Oleksiy / Shutterstock.com

2013 CONCERT SCHEDULE » » » »

June 21 July 19 August 16 September 20

WANT TO GO? For more information, visit ocalafl.org or contact Stan Creel at (352) 629-8444.

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the

Have you ever experienced the urge to gawk at gorgeous cars while chomping down on delicious 2 food? Of course you have, and now you can, because GENERATION FOOD TRUCK, THE OCALA MOPAR GROUP AND O’REILLY AUTO PARTS are bringing The 1st Ever Ocala Cruisin’ 4 Food Explosion Food Truck Rally & Car Show to town. Get your fill of classic cars and food truck fare from 4-9pm. The inaugural car show takes place at Bruster’s Ice Cream on Silver Springs Blvd., and everyone is invited. generationfoodtruck.com or Jun

(813) 562-9599.

FUN RUN

Jun

15

stopdropandrunracing.com or (352) 635-8131.

JUN’13

SUMMER SHOWERS

Jun

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21

Do your part to ensure that lovable little newborns in Marion County start their lives with the necessities by participating in the UNITED WAY’s Community Baby Shower. As part of the sixth annual National Day of Action, the United Way of Marion County encourages both workplaces and individuals to assist at-risk mothers and babies by hosting a baby shower item drive now through June 12 to collect items such as diapers, wipes and blankets. You can also donate baby items or money and volunteer at the Sort-a-thon on June 21 starting at 9am. uwmc.org or (352) 732-9696.

DAWN TO DUSK YOGA

Stop what you’re doing and run—for a great cause! The third annual Michelle Standridge Memorial Cancer Benefit Stop, Drop and Run 5K will be held on the Turkey Trot course. Be sure to thank the YMCA and the MARION COUNTY FIREFIGHTER’S BENEVOLENCE FUND for hosting this event, which also includes a children’s 1K and a team challenge that awards not only the fastest teams but also the team with the most unique name. Register online until June 7 for your chance to enter the run that benefits community residents and firefighters battling cancer and other medical hardships.

70

FORECAST:

Get limbered up for a full day of yoga. On June 21, POWER YOGA OCALA joins thousands of other 21 organizations around the country as they take part in a number of day-long events to support Alzheimer’s research. “The Longest Day” brings individuals and teams together for a full day of activities. Power Yoga Ocala will be offering classes on a donation basis from sunup to sundown, including Yoga 101, Hot Yoga, senior and kid yoga and more. Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s Association. alz.org or poweryogaocala.com or Jun

(352) 361-3619.

Food Truck © Jeff Whyte; Runner © Maridav; Baby © Ruth Black; Yoga© Nuzza / Shutterstock.com

APPETIZING AUTOS


A QUICK

Arm wrestler © CWA Studios

Q& A

WRESTLE WITH A PURPOSE Join hall of fame wrestler 26 Dory Funk as he and his professional wrestling friends tussle in the name of charity. Come witness multiple matches, including one for the women’s championship featuring Hollywood Heather and Jessica “Powerhouse” Hill. The showdown takes place at the Hilton Ocala, and all proceeds will benefit Marion County’s homeless and displaced through the HELPING HANDS FOUNDATION. Tickets, which are $20 in advance and $10 for children under 12, can be purchased at Pasteur’s Sports Shop, Dinkins Realty, Millers Boating Center and Hilton Ocala. dory-funk.com or Jun

(352) 895-4658.

CONVENTION HEROES W

DONALD GUALANDRI & CHRISTOPHER MAJOR

INT E RV I E W B Y ANTIONETTE ROLLINS

HAT STARTED AS A SMALL CONVENTION IN SAN DIEGO TO CELEBRATE COMICS OVER 40 YEARS AGO HAS MATURED INTO AN INTERNATIONAL SENSATION. CHANCES ARE THAT YOU HAVE HEARD OF COMIC CON, CONVENTIONS WHERE COMIC FANS GATHER TOGETHER, SOME EVEN DRESSSING UP AS THEIR FAVORITE CHARACTERS. IF YOU’VE EVER WANTED TO ATTEND COMIC CON BUT COULDN’T MAKE IT TO CALIFORNIA, YOU’RE IN FOR A TREAT. ORGANIZERS DONALD GUALANDRI AND CHRISTOPHER MAJOR SHARE THE STORY OF HOW THEY BROUGHT COMIC CON TO OCALA AND WHAT RESIDENTS CAN EXPECT AT THIS YEAR’S EVENT.

THELOCALSCENE CLASSES AT THE MANOR (ONGOING) The Artist Hub of Ocala will host a variety of classes throughout the month. Visit the website for specific classes, times and dates. Pre-registration is required. thecherishedbride.com or (352) 390-6801. UPCOMING EXHIBITS AT THE APPLETON MUSEUM (ONGOING) Edge to Edge: Vintage Panoramic Photography in Florida will feature original vintage panoramic prints and postcards and will open June 15. Art of the Robot will feature 45 works created by 16 robot artists and will open June 22. Victorian International showcases examples of 19th century English and American art. The exhibit will be on display through June 19.

What is Comic Con? Comic Con is a convention where a bunch of people can meet up to see vendors, events and merchandise that revolve around comics, films and indie artists.

When did Ocala Comic Con start? This is the first year that we’re doing Comic Con in Ocala, but we don’t plan on this being a one-time event. Each year will be bigger and better.

What made you decide to start a Comic Con in Ocala? We’ve always enjoyed going to Comic Con, so we thought it would be a fun idea to do it here because Ocala is in the center of a lot of major cities. We would like to continue it so that people can have something to do in Ocala more often.

WANT TO GO?

Jun

29-30

What are some of the events taking place at this year’s convention? There is going to be a meet and greet with voice artists, a puppet show with a comedian and a costume contest. We’re also going to have about 75 vendor tables.

Who are some of the celebrity guests attending this year? Some guests include voice actors Quinton Flynn and John Swasey, who appeared in the movie Dazed and Confused. There will also be some artists from Marvel, including Sergio Cariello and Clay Mann. Ocala Comic Con will have somebody for everybody—the guests are very versatile.

OCALA COMIC CON

Hilton Ocala Convention Hall / ocalacomiccon.com

Continued on page 72

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Scene TICKETMASTER (800) 745-3000 / TICKETMASTER.COM ALL DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE, SO PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM VENUE LISTINGS.

WHO

WHERE

WHEN

Fall Out Boy

House of Blues, Orlando

06/04

The Postal Service

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

06/05

ZZ Ward

The Ritz Ybor, Tampa

06/05

Fleetwood Mac

Tampa Bay Times Forum

06/07

LL Cool J

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

06/07

Abbamania: A Tribute to ABBA

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

06/08

Happy Together Tour

The Peabody, Daytona Beach

06/09

Say Anything

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

06/11

Billy Idol

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

06/12

Jason Bonham

Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

06/18

Billy Idol

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

06/18

98 Degrees/NKOTB

Amway Center, Orlando

06/21

Earth Wind and Fire

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

06/21

Brad Paisley

Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

06/22

Juanes

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

06/28

Pitbull and Ke$ha

Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

06/28

Corey Smith

House of Blues, Orlando

07/05

Mac Miller

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

07/06

Lil’ Wayne

Live Nation Amphitheatre at the Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

07/13

Dave Matthews Band

Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

07/17

Marilyn Manson

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

07/18

Vans Warped Tour

Vinoy Park, St. Petersburg

07/26

Black Sabbath

Live Nation Amphitheatre at the Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

7/29

American Idol

Amway Center, Orlando

08/01

Jonas Brothers

Live Nation Amphitheatre at the Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

08/03

Justin Bieber

Tampa Bay Times Forum

08/08

THELOCALSCENE / Continued from page 71 New World Treasures: Artifacts from Hernando De Soto’s Florida Expedition features artifacts discovered in Marion County and will be on display through December31.appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. SWEET ADELINE’S CHORUS REHEARSALS (ONGOING) Women interested in singing with the Sweet Adeline’s Chorus are invited to attend a Monday rehearsal from 1-3:30pm.

Rehearsals are held at the First Baptist Church of Belleview. (352) 624-2887. LIBRARY PROGRAMS (ONGOING) There will be a variety of fun and educational events this month at the library for children of all ages. Contact your branch directly for a list of program details. library.marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8551.

KAYAKING

(Ongoing) The Marion County Parks and Recreation Department will host a variety of kayaking classes and outings over the coming months. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560. FIRST SATURDAY CHILDREN’S ART PROGRAM (JUNE 1) The Appleton Museum will host a children’s art education series from 1-3pm. Children will partake in a hands-on art project with instruction. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS (ONGOING) Ocala Health and Rehabilitation is requesting volunteers to assist with various activities, including bingo, arts and crafts, cooking classes and more. (352) 732-2449. YOGA (JUNE 1) A free yoga class will take place in Sholom Park at 9am. (352) 854-7950. FRANK POLACK MEMORIAL RIDE TO BENEFIT HOSPICE (JUNE 1) A memorial bicycle ride will be held to benefit Hospice of Marion County. There will be 80-, 62- and 30-mile routes, stocked rest stops, swag wagons and more. The ride begins at 8am from the Hospice parking lot. hospiceofmarion.com or (352) 854-5218. MURDER MYSTERY DINNER (JUNE 1) The historic Seven Sisters Inn will host a murder mystery dinner. The dinner features appetizers, drinks and a four-course meal. Tickets are $60, and the dinner and show runs

6-9pm. sevensistersinn.org or (352) 433-0700. ANIMAL LAW SEMINAR (JUNE 1) Have A Heart For Companion Animals will sponsor a free seminar at the main library from 1-3pm. Jennifer Dietz, an animal lawyer will discuss various topics. (352) 687-1776. OCALA MOPAR GROUP CRUISE-IN (JUNE 2) The Ocala Mopar group will host a cruise-in at O’Reilly Auto Parts from 5-8pm. The cruise-in is open to late-model and classic mopars and Dodge Ram trucks of all kinds. There will be prizes and an ice cream truck on-site. (352) 236-0366. OCALA FIRST PRE-SCHOOL SUMMER SESSIONS (JUNE 3) Ocala First Preschool will host three summer sessions with different themes for each session. Sessions will run June 10-28, July 1-19 and July 22-August 9. Enrollment applications must be completed by June 3. (352) 620-0003. BMW GOLF CUP (JUNE 8) An annual golf tournament to benefit the Ocala Symphony Orchestra will take place at the Golden Ocala Golf and Equestrian Club. The tournament begins at 7am. Registration is $100. ocalasymphony.com or (352) 671-3933. START SMART WORKSHOP (JUNE 10) A workshop for aspiring entrepreneurs looking to start their own business will take place in the SBDC in Colours Plaza from 9am-12pm. Topics include selecting an idea, testing the market, acquiring capital and more. Registration is $40 in advance or $50 at the door. www.sbdc.unf.edu or (352) 622-8763. DANCE PARTY (JUNE 12, 21) Dancin’ Around Studio will host a dance party at 7pm. Admission is Continued on page 74

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Kayaking ©BlueOrangeStudio / Shutterstock.com

CONCERTS

JUN’13

the


Welcome to

Carlton Arms of Ocala Redefining the Apartment Community

HELP DAD ORGANIZE HIS GARAGE THIS FATHER’S DAY Mention this ad for $100 OFF any purchase over $1,000 or a FREE accessories package ($150 value) Join Marion County’s premier apartment community. CARLTON ARMS OF OCALA offers our residents affordable country club living with outstanding services and value. Visit us today to select your apartment as your next home to live, work and play. CARLTON ARMS OF OCALA is located on 127 lush acres of wooded lakefront property. With beautifully landscaped grounds, peaceful woods and a freshwater lake, this community of 860 apartments offers country club living at affordable rental rates. • FREE Basic Cable TV Package • FREE Water Utility • FREE Poolside WiFi • FREE Valet Trash Removal • FREE Pest Control • Large Private Patios/Balconies • Rapid Response Maintenance • 2 Private Party Clubhouses • 2 Sparkling Pools • Fitness Center w/ Steam Showers • Lighted Tennis & Basketball • Fresh Water Fishing • Car Care Center

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866.927.6819 Locally Owned & Managed by

The Dusty Rose Room

is our upscale resale boutique

Vintage luxury labels for less, such as Chanel, Gucci, St. John, Tory Burch, Christian Dior, Judith Leiber, Michael Kors and so much more!

The Gardenia Room Huge selection of fashionable, trendy, even namebrand clothes for women. Why buy retail? Shop resale! A large majority of our items are gently used and in great condition. Don’t be surprised if you find items that have never been worn!

The Magnolia Room

Apparel just for men

Huge selection of T-shirts, jeans, knitwear, golf wear, shoes, suits, accessories and much, much more!

The Garden Room Over 4,000 sq. ft. of fabulous items for everyone! Household items, indoor and outdoor furniture, kitchenware, lamps, appliances, pictures, rugs, outdoor items, knick knacks and much more!

Food Drive Day

Collection 1st Sunday of the month

Humane Society of Marion County 3rd Sunday of the month

352.245.0809 7655 SE 126th Place, Suites 2 & 3 / Belleview, FL (0.2 Miles North of Market of Marion on 441) www.thegardenworshipcenter.com

CarltonArmsofOcala.com

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Donations: Please know that we are always in need of donations and are very appreciative of your generosity. Your donations allow us to continue our outreach program as well as provide affordable household items and clothing to the community. To schedule a pick-up on your large items, please call (352) 245-0809. We are happy to provide you with a receipt for your tax-deductable donation.

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Scene WHO

WHERE

WHEN

Guys and Dolls

Ocala Civic Theatre

06/01-09

Avenue Q

The Hippodrome, Gainesville

06/01-23

Cesar Millan

Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, Jacksonville

06/01

Johnny Counterfit

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

06/01

Alice in Wonderland

Phillips Center, Gainesville

06/01

The Dancers Pointe

Bob Carr Perf. Arts Centre, Orlando

06/08

George Trullinger

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

06/08

The Dancers Pointe

Bob Carr Perf. Arts Centre, Orlando

06/08

Kevin James

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

06/09

Margaret Cho

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

06/09

Scooby-Doo Live!

Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts, Jacksonville

06/09

Red

Insomniac Theatre, Ocala

06/14-30

Missoula Children’s Theatre: Pinocchio

Ocala Civic Theatre

06/21

Daniel Tosh

Bob Carr Center for Perf. Arts, Orlando

06/25

Forever Doo Wop

Ocala Civic Theatre

06/25

Daniel Tosh

David A. Straz Center for Perf. Arts, Tampa

06/27

Starfish Circus

Ocala Civic Theatre

06/28

Margaret Cho

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

06/29

Do You Trust Your Best Friend?

Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, Orlando

06/29

Legends of Doo Wop

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

06/29

Jun

9,11

MYSTERY MACHINE MUSICAL Famous pooch Scooby-Doo and his gang have solved enough mysteries on the telly, so they’re brining their talents to Jacksonville’s Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts and the Peabody Auditorium in Daytona Beach. Pack the kids in the Mystery Machine and take them to see Mystery, Inc. as they dance, sing and try to figure out who’s haunting the theater. scoobydoolive.com.

THELOCALSCENE / Continued from page 72 free for students and $10 for guests. Refreshments will be served, but BYOB. danceocala.com or (352) 690-6637. SPIRIT OF THE MARATHON II (JUNE 12) The documentary Spirit of the Marathon will show at the Regal Hollywood 16 theatre at 7pm. The documentary will also feature deleted scenes and outtakes. (352) 861-2699. TRIPS N’ TOURS (JUNE 12, 18) The Appleton Museum’s Trips N’ Tours program will visit the Morean Arts Center in St. Petersburg. Participants will tour Chihuly’s Sealife Stoppers collection. Price is $65 for members and $75 for non-members. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4456. DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP (JUNE 13) A support group for adults with type II diabetes will be held at the Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist Church. Nutrition, exercise and medication will be discussed. The meeting will run from 2-3:30pm. (352) 629-3782. WINE AND CHEESE FOR CHARITY (JUNE 14) The Seven Sisters Inn will host a wine and cheese cocktail hour to benefit a different charity each month. This month, the event will benefit the Arnette House. The event runs from 5-7pm and a $10-$20 donation is requested. sevensistersinn.org or (352) 433-0700. HORSE SHOW (JUNE 14-16) A hunter/jumper and dressage show will be held at Longwood Farm. Competition begins at 8am daily. Admission is free. horseshowsinthepark.com or (321) 693-5551.

HARVEY AWARDS (JUNE 15) The annual Harvey Awards will take place at the Ocala Civic Theatre to recognize the actors, designers and volunteers who make the season possible. The event will be catered by Mojo Grill and begins at 6pm with a cocktail hour, hors d’oeuvres, raffle, silent auction and more. The awards ceremony and dinner begins at 7pm. Tickets are $20 and must be purchased by June 7. ocalacivictheatre.com or (352) 236-2274. KIDS YOGA (JUNE 18-JULY 26) Power Yoga Ocala will host a six-week summer program for kids ages 6-13. Classes will focus on yoga postures, breath work, teamwork and relaxation. poweryogaocala.com or (352) 361-3619. SCRAPBOOK FOR BREAST CANCER (JUNE 21) Bring your scrapbook or any craft to the Marion County Extension Auditorium from 6pm until the last person leaves. Admission is $5. (352) 732-5982. DOG DAYS OF SUMMER AND CATS TOO! (JUNE 21) The Humane Society of Marion County presents an old-fashioned cookout to benefit their program. There will be food, music, dancing and more. The event will be held at the Ocala Golf Club at 5:30pm. Tickets are $25. humanesocietyofmarioncounty.com or (352) 873-PETS. TAKE STOCK IN PETS PUTTING TOURNAMENT (JUNE 21) The fifth annual Take Stock in Pets Putting Tournament will take place at the Ocala Golf Club at 5:30pm. The tournament proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Marion County. Registration is $25. humanesocietyofmarioncounty.com or (352) 873-PETS. Continued on page 76

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JUN’13

ocalastyle.com

Scooby Doo © Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com

PERFORMING ARTS

JUN’13

the


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FARM!

SUMMER FUN! July 4th Patriotic Animal Parade/Reptile Program

• Summer Day Camp On Wednesdays Starting July 10 Through August 14

UNCLE DONALD’S FARM 352-753-2882 • 2713 Griffin Ave. Lady Lake

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THELOCALSCENE / Continued from page 74 CHARITY PICNIC (JUNE 28) Highland Memorial Park will host a charity picnic to benefit Hospice of Marion County. The picnic will run from 11:30am1pm, and a $10 donation is requested. hospiceofmarion.com or (352) 671-6466. CINDERELLA PERFORMANCE (JUNE 29) The Balcony Dance Studio presents Cinderella. Seventy performers will tell the classic story through different dance styles. The performance will be held at West Port High School at 6pm. Doors open at 5:40pm. Admission is free. (352) 817-9372.

NEW LOCATION

11352 N. Williams ST. (HWY 41) Suite 302, Rainbow Square Plaza Dunnellon, FL 34432

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SPORTS MIAMI MARLINS

Foursomes Play to Save Buy 3 Get One Free

Must Present Coupon at Check-in Expires June 30, 2013

MLB

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TAN

Jun. 7 Jun. 8 Jun. 9 Jun. 10 Jun. 11 Jun. 12 Jun. 13 Jun. 14

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76

Jun. 1 Jun. 2 Jun. 10 Jun. 11 Jun. 12 Jun. 14 Jun. 15 Jun. 16 Jun. 25 Jun. 26 Jun. 28 Jun. 29 Jun. 30

Mets Mets Brewers Brewers Brewers Cardinals Cardinals Cardinals Twins Twins Padres Padres Padres

4:10p 1:10p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p 4:10p 1:10p 7:10p 12:40p 7:10p 7:10p 1:10p

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PARADE OF ANIMALS (JULY 4) Uncle Donald’s Farm will host a parade of animals. The farm will be open from 10am-3pm with the parade beginning at 12:30. There will also be pony and hay rides. uncledonaldsfarm.com or (352) 753-2882.

To have an event considered for Ocala Style Magazine’s The Scene Send a short description (and a color photo, if possible) 60 days in advance to: email: calendar@ocalastyle.com fax: (352) 732-0226 mail: Ocala Style Magazine The Scene, 1007 E. Fort King St., Ocala, FL 34471

Vernon Martin Salon & Day Spa

JUN’13

Come Visit A Real

Orioles Orioles Orioles Red Sox Red Sox Red Sox Royals Royals

7:10p 4:10p 1:40p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p

PLAN AHEAD FOR THE NEXT BIG GAME. HOME SCHEDULES

Jun. 15 Jun. 16 Jun. 24 Jun. 25 Jun. 26 Jun. 28 Jun. 29 Jun. 30

Royals Royals Blue Jays Blue Jays Blue Jays Tigers Tigers Tigers

ATLANTA BRAVES Jun. 1 Jun. 2 Jun. 3 Jun. 4 Jun. 5 Jun. 14 Jun. 15 Jun. 16 Jun. 17 Jun. 18 Jun. 19 Jun. 20 Jun. 28 Jun. 28 Jun. 28

Nationals Nationals Pirates Pirates Pirates Giants Giants Giants Mets Mets Mets Mets D-Backs D-Backs D-Backs

ORLANDO PREDATORS

JACKSONVILLE SHARKS

Jun. 1 Jun.15 Jun. 22

Jun. 1 Jun. 22 Jun. 29

Chicago Rush 7:00p Cleveland Gladiators 7:00p Pittsburgh Power 7:00p

TAMPA BAY STORM Jun. 8 Jun. 22

Orlando Predators 7:30p Chicago Rush 7:30p

4:10p 1:40p 7:10p 7:10p 12:10p 7:10p 7:15p 1:40p

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Photo courtesy

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Scene

the

THESOCIALSCENE

OkOk Karaoke Club Gathering CARLTON ARMS CLUBHOUSE

Dr. Khanna and Dr. Bedi

The OkOk Karaoke Club joined together at the Carlton Arms Clubhouse this past January for an evening of fun. The club was founded by Ram Vasudevan five years ago and meets once a month.

Max Perry and John Loughran

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA MILLER

Parvina Cacodcar

Dr. Murthy, Jaya Gurnani and Seena Mittal

Dr. Koka and Dr. Sheth Nita Vasudevan and Ajay Mittal Nick Sharma and Mr. Patel

Pramila Mitra Dr. Chandra and Dr. Kesari

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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JUN’13

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Veena Gulati Mr. & Mrs. Patel


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2013 TITAN 2060 SW College Rd, Ocala, FL

Local 352.622.4111 or Toll Free 800.342.3008

www.pearsonnissanofocala.com ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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Scene

the

THESOCIALSCENE

YMCA Donation Ceremony Brian & Vicki Ehlers

HILTON OCALA

On March 13, the Marion County YMCA received a generous donation of $1million from Ocala business and community leader Frank DeLuca, of DeLuca Toyota. As a token of appreciation, the Marion County Y and the Central Florida Y association’s leadership renamed the local Y the Frank DeLuca YMCA Family Center in his honor. DeLuca’s gift will be applied toward a $4.5 million renovation to the center located in Ocala.

Greg Graham, Dan McCall and Albert Peek

Mel & Ashlee Seek

PHOTOS BY KRISTEN NETHEN

Jim & Jeanne Henningsen and Danielle Marcino

Sheila & Earl Arnette Kayla Williams and Dawn Bowman Beth McCall and Lisa Lombardo

Frank DeLuca

Colleen Manahan

L-A Craven and Nick Robinson

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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Suzie & Steve Wingo and Barbara Fitos Rick Tatman and Bo Briggs


Keep Dad Safe & Happy Be Prepared for Hurricane Season

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ocalastyle.com JUN’13

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Golden Apple Gala HILTON OCALA

The Golden Apple Gala honors outstanding teachers throughout the county. The Golden Apple award is given to an exceptional teacher who makes strides in providing students with dynamic education and furthering their potential. This year’s Teacher of the Year was Tim Jones of Howard Middle School, who was awarded a 2013 Volkswagen Jetta from BMW/VW/Porsche of Ocala. PHOTOS BY KRISTEN NETHEN

Judi Zanetti and Kevin Christian Stephanie Devilling, Melissa Bumbach and Allison Briggs

Summer, Dana & Raymond Andrews

John & Cammie McLeod and Teddie & Jerry Gause

Maryanne Orloff, Staci Moore and Leslie Bruce Kenny & Julia Thompkins

Jeremy & Kristy Craig

George & Barbara Tomyn

Karen & Lou Morrison

Tim & Nicole Jones

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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Leslie Simpson, Dr. Charles Simpson, Rosemary Mesa and Meghan Magamoll Herb, Judith, Andrea & Mikael Dominquez and Herb Garcia


WE SUPPORT OUR TROOPS

Weekday Mornings 5:30-10:00 AM

Photo by Agape Photography

NEED CONCRETE?

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STAMPED CONCRETE CONCRETE ADDITIONS DRIVEWAYS WAREHOUSES

Before

Other Services: Landscaping, Concrete Curbing, Decorative Walls & Paver Restorations

PRECISION

Curbs & Landscape, inc.

352.427.7918 precisioncurbs.net

Lic #CT7618 ocalastyle.com JUN’13

83


“It’s time for a truck! Come by today. You’ll be treated as an honored guest in our home!”

LET’S GO PLACES.

—Frank DeLuca, President/Owner

MODEL #8228

HAVE A HEAVY LOAD? BRING IT. UP TO 10,400LB TOWING CAPACITY

GET UP TO $6,000 IN BONUS SAVINGS!* TRY BEFORE YOU BUY!

TOYOTA MAKES THE CAR… DELUCA MAKES THE DIFFERENCE! 1719 SW COLLEGE ROAD IN OCALA www.delucatoyota.com

(352) 533-2198

* PICTURES ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. ALL OFFERS ON SELECT NEW VEHICLES. NO TWO OFFERS CAN BE COMBINED. WITH APPROVED CREDIT. DEALER RETAINS ALL FACTORY REBATES OR CASH BACK.


Get a hot rate for a cool addition.

%

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APR1 fixed Up to 6 years

(other rates and terms also available)

Home equity Loan from CamPuS ● Up to 90% financing available ● No closing costs for home equity loans $10,000 to $50,0002

● Use the equity in your home for a new pool, home improvements, education expenses or even a vacation

Apply online at campuscu.com for fast approval, or call 873-4939 today!

www.campuscu.com

Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Marion, Lake and Sumter counties!3

OFFER NOT AVAILABLE ON EXISTING CAMPUS LOANS. OFFER IS FOR NEW LOANS ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. 1. Subject to credit and property approval. Your rate may be higher based on your creditworthiness and property valuation. Higher rates apply to non-owner-occupied properties. Offer excludes mobile homes. Property insurance is required; flood and/or title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. Example: a $50,000 loan at 4.871% for 6 years would require 72 monthly payments of $799.22 and a final payment of $266.70; total finance charge of $7,710.37, for a total of payments of $57,543.37 and a total amount financed of $49,833. APR = Annual Percentage Rate. APR is 4.99% 2. No closing costs for fixed-rate home equity loans $10,000 to $50,000. $350 off closings costs for loans over $50,000. Normal closing costs range from $125 to $1,000. Appraisal fees not included and may be required prior to closing. 3 Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new membership fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. G’ville - E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Summerfield 17950 US Hwy. 44 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. Tallahassee 1511 Killearn Center Blvd.


T E D

AID M ER T

A N I N.

IO

1 1915 CR 103, THE VILL AGES

352 753 5511 T HE V IL L A GE S T SPA .COM FACEBOOK.COM /

V IL L A GE S T SPA

LICENSED BY THE FLORIDA COMMISSION FOR INDEPENDENT EDUCATION, LIC. #3387

FINANCIAL AVAILABLE

TO THOSE WHO QUALIFY

Ocala Style Jun'13  

Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.

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