Page 1

INTRODUCING MARION COUNTY’S VALEDICTORIANS P26

MAGAZINE August2014

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August2014

Vol16 No8

Features School’s In Session p22

Every August, students head back to class to meet new teachers, study new subjects and embark on new adventures. Here’s what’s new in the world of Marion County Public Schools. BY KEVIN CHRISTIAN

p26

ON THE COVER

Valedictorious

INTRODUCING MARION COUNTY’S VALEDICTORIANS P26

The students of Marion County’s class of 2014 have taken their commencement walks, framed their diplomas and begun building the next phases of their lives. Of course, some students went the extra mile in their four years of high school. These valedictorians are talking about how they made it to the top of the class.

MAGAZINE August2014

BUILDING A BETTER FUTURE VOLUNTEERS WANTED HOW YOUR TEEN CAN HELP

BRINGING IT BACK (TO SCHOOL)

Cover photo by John Jernigan

BY KATIE MCPHERSON

Building a Hopeful Future p34

It’s a beautiful thing when a plan comes together. When that plan keeps coming together, year after year, you know something special’s going on. BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

Valuable Volunteering p38

Ocala has a plethora of opportunities for various interests. Each organization does great things and has plenty of work to keep you busy. So find what’s closest to your home or closest to your heart, and volunteer your time.

Photos by John Jernigan

BY MADELINE CALISE

ocalastyle.com AUG’14

9


p18

August2014 Vol16 No8

Departments The Buzz p13 The real people, places and events that shape our community.

p14

BY ANDREA DAVIS, KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY, JIM GIBSON, JOANN GUIDRY AND CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

HORSIN’AROUND p14

Taming the wild at the Extreme Mustang Makeover.

p48

THERUNDOWN p18

Ideas for ending summer with a bang. ONEONONE p20

Ocala Style chats with George Tomyn about the upcoming school year.

The Pulse p41 Ideas to keep you fit and healthy all year long. BY ANDREA DAVIS & JOANN GUIDRY

LIVINGWELL p42

Don’t take this when you’re also taking that. FEELINGWELL p46

Putting a stitch in your stride.

p46 p50

EATNGWELL p48 A carbonated catastrophe.

The Dish p49 Our best recipes, restaurant news and culinary quick bites. BY ANDREA DAVIS, AMANDA FURRER, CYNTHIA MCFARLAND & KATIE MCPHERSON

QUICKBITES p51

Bonjoe Gourmet offers chips of all flavors and Street Bistro moves beyond catering. DININGGUIDE p53

p61

Our area’s finest dining establishments.

The Scene p59 Your guide to what’s happening in and around Ocala. BY BONNIE KRETCHIK & KATIE MCPHERSON

AQUICKQ&A p61

Operation: Stuff The Bus is in full swing and Ocala’s kids need your help. SOCIALSCENE p66

Photos from our area’s most popular events.

p60

10

AUG’14 ocalastyle.com


VE CH CUTI EX E

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August2014

Vol16 No8

ocalastyle.com

PUBLISHER

KATHY JOHNSON / kathy@ocalastyle.com OFFICE/PRODUCTION MANAGER CYNTHIA BROWN / cynthia@ocalastyle.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY karin@ocalastyle.com

MANAGING EDITOR MELISSA PETERSON melissa@ocalastyle.com

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT KATIE MCPHERSON katie@ocalastyle.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS KEVIN CHRISTIAN kevin@ocalastyle.com

AMANDA FURRER amanda@ocalastyle.com

JIM GIBSON jim@ocalastyle.com

JOANN GUIDRY

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JASON FUGATE

2436 E. SILVER SPRINGS BLVD, OCALA

352-732-4737

jason@ocalastyle.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS CASEY ALLEN CHRISTINA GEIGER GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERN KRISTY TAYLOR PHOTOGRAPHERS SHEILA HARTLEY sheila@ocalastyle.com

JOHN JERNIGAN jernigan@ocalastyle.com

DIRECTOR OF SALES DEAN JOHNSON deanjohnson@ocalastyle.com

LESLEY JONES

SALES MANAGER SHARON MORGAN

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CYNTHIA MCFARLAND cmcfarland@ocalastyle.com

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Ocala Style Magazine, July 2014. Published monthly by Ocala Publications Inc., 1007 E. Fort King Street, Ocala, FL 34471. (352) 732-0073. All contents copyright 2014 by Ocala Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written TRADEmust GOTHICaccompany BOLD permission from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature” denote a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements. OCALA / MARION COUNTY

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School Is In Session!

Taming The Wild p14

Mosquito © Kitsadakron_Photography / Shutterstock.com

Buzz

the

One on one with Superintendent George Tomyn p20

Art For All p16

Beat The End-Of-Summer Blues p18

MOSQUITO MAYHEM MAYHEM F

LORIDIANS NOW NEED TO BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR THREE MOSQUITO-BORNE ILLNESSES. WEST NILE VIRUS HAS BEEN REPORTED IN FLORIDA SINCE 2001, AND 69 CASES WERE VERIFIED IN 2012. Dengue fever was first

reported locally in 2013, with three cases verified in Martin and St. Lucie Counties that year. Chikungunya fever was first reported this June in Leon County. The two cases weren’t acquired locally, but indicate the disease is present in the state. So, don’t forget the repellent!

WEST NILE VIRUS

No symptoms (70 to 80 percent of persons infected). Some experience fever, headache, joint aches and pains, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue and/or weakness, encephalitis or meningitis, severe headache, high fever, stiff neck and seizures.

DENGUE FEVER

(BREAKBONE FEVER)

Mild infection: high fever, headache, intense joint and muscle pain, unexplained bleeding and/or pain behind the eyes

and more!

CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER

Fever, severe joint and muscle pain (usually in the arms and legs), joint swelling, headache and/ or rash (rarely fatal, but there is no known cure). The mosquitoes that carry this disease bite during the day, too.

Severe infection: high fever, intense joint and muscle pain, vomiting blood, tarry stools, abdominal pain, difficulty breathing, severe bruising, bleeding from nose or gums and possible death

ocalastyle.com AUG’14

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HORSIN’AROUND Photograph by John Jernigan

Buzz

the

A WILD MAKEOVER

BY JoANN GUIDRY

F

ORGET EXTREME HOME MAKEOVER. TAYLOR SMITH PREFERS HER MAKEOVERS TO BE FOUR-LEGGED AND A LITTLE ON THE WILD SIDE.

Taylor, a West Port High School student, will be competing with a wild mustang she trained in the Extreme Mustang Makeover on August 8-9 in Decatur, Alabama. The EMM, which includes events held annually throughout the country, was created by the Mustang Heritage Foundation to showcase the beauty, versatility and tractability of the American mustang. And, oh, there’s a catch: Taylor had only 90 days to accomplish that feat. And if the time frame wasn’t challenging enough, add in the fact that Taylor only became interested in horses a little over a year ago. “My mom rescued a Thoroughbred mare, and I started going with her to the farm where she was being trained,” says Taylor, 16. “I really liked being around the horses. The trainer, Tom Olive, gave me the chance to work for my first horse. And now I just love horses and riding.” That first horse was a paint quarter horse mare named Oreo, who Taylor competes on in barrel-racing events. Then came Molly, also a paint quarter horse mare, who has become Taylor’s trail riding horse. Olive, a veteran trainer who had competed in EMM, encouraged Taylor to take on the challenge of training a mustang. Taylor had to apply to the EMM and was one of only 25 youths from across the country chosen to compete. “I thought it would be fun and something different to try,” says Taylor. “I got my filly on April 28, and right away, we got along.” The horses provided for the EMM are wild mustangs rounded up out West by the Bureau of

14

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Land Management. Taylor paid a $25 adoption fee for the 2-year-old black filly she named Mestano’s Cross. In Spanish, mestano means wild, and the filly has a white blaze in the shape of a cross on her forehead. During the week, Taylor heads to Olive’s farm after school and spends two hours working with Mestano. On weekends, when she isn’t competing in a barrelracing event, Taylor is with Mestano. Competing in the youth (ages 8-17) division at EMM, Taylor will be judged in handling and conditioning, in-hand trail class and freestyle. No riding is required in the youth division. The top 10 contestants will share a $3,000 purse with the winner awarded $800. “For the freestyle, I’ve already taught Mestano to stretch out, climb up on a box and bow,” says Taylor, who is required to keep the

filly for a year before she can be sold. “She’s a quick learner. I think we’ll do well.” For Brigitte Smith, Taylor’s mother, she has seen the positive effects that training the mustang has had on her daughter. “Taylor has always been a very introverted person,” says Brigitte, a supervising operating room nurse at West Marion Community Hospital. “For her, the horses have been transformative. I never imagined that Taylor would be training a wild mustang. I am so proud of her.” Turns out that wild makeovers can go both ways.

Want To Know More? extrememustangmakeover.com


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ALLABOUTART

Girl © My Life Graphic / Shutterstock.com

Buzz

the

FOSTERING BY CYNTHIA McFARLAND

Unfortunately, funding for artistic pursuits isn’t always a priority. Leave it to aspiring young artists themselves to do something about it. Early in the fall of 2013, resourceful students at Belleview Middle School, frustrated by the lack of art classes, formed their own art club. When the Ocala Municipal Arts Commission heard about this, the members were proud of the kids, but they also knew something had to change. “The Commission recognized the lack of funding in local schools for arts programs and understands the important role that arts play in education. They developed the Art Depot project to collect visual art supplies and cash donations to benefit Marion County art educators who are in financial need,” says Melissa Townsend, community cultural arts manager for the City of Ocala. Art Depot, which is located downtown at Ocala’s Union Station, is a collaborative effort by the Ocala Municipal Arts Commission, Ocala Rotary Club and City of Ocala. “Seventy-two percent of business leaders say that creativity is the No. 1 skill they look for

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educators and homeschoolers can also participate in the Art Depot program but must make an appointment to pick up the supplies.

ART MAKES A DIFFERENCE!

Students who are active in the arts are:

4

TIMES more likely to be recognized for academic achievement

4

TIMES more likely to participate in a math or science fair

3

TIMES more likely to be elected to class office

2

TIMES more likely to graduate college

You Can Help! Make an online donation using PayPal at ocalaartdepot.org, or drop off supplies at any of the following locations: Appleton Museum of Art

Brick City Center for the Arts

4333 E Silver Springs Blvd. (352) 291-4455

23 SW Broadway St. (352) 369-1500

Artful Gifts

Design by Daniel Stained and Fuse Glass Studio

Circle Square Commons at On Top of the World 8405 SW 80th St., Ste 10 (352) 237-3747

2005 E Silver Springs Blvd. (352) 622-6004

Source: americansforthearts.org

C

REATIVITY IS PRICELESS, BUT THE SUPPLIES TO UNLEASH THAT CREATIVE SPIRIT AREN’T FREE.

when hiring,” says Townsend. “The arts not only help students develop critical-thinking skills but also organization and other important leadership skills. Those students are much more likely to have success in work and to become innovative leaders.” It might surprise residents of Marion County to realize that our students often do without such basic art necessities as paint, glue, easels and artist brushes. Art Depot intends to end the drought of supplies, and you can make a difference. “Our goal is to raise and distribute $25,000 worth of art supplies each year,” notes Townsend of the project, which was conceptualized last year and just launched this spring. “Our website went live in May, and we’ve already received over $1,500 in visual art supplies.” Not sure what to donate? A list of needed art supplies for both elementary and secondary students can be found at ocalaartdepot.org. Monetary donations are always welcome, as they are used to purchase specifically requested art supplies. Marion County art educators can view the available supplies and make requests for specific projects for area students. Upon approval, those supplies are granted free of charge. A courier service delivers the supplies to public school educators. Private school


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THERUNDOWN

GOING OUT WITH A

COOL OFF AROUND TOWN

Want to beat the heat without leaving town? Here are some last-minute summertime solutions. Attached to Silver Springs State Park, visitors of WILD WATERS can soak up the sun and stay cool in the wave pool, zip down water slides or play on the multi-level fun zone. silversprings.com/wild-waters.

BLAST

Cool off at the HAMPTON or JERVEY GANTT AQUATIC FUN CENTERS. Both have a waterfall, water slide and water spray features. The centers are open Monday-Saturday, 10am-4pm and Sunday 11am-4pm. ocalafl.org.

S

At the splash pad at CITIZENS’ CIRCLE kids can get soaked under the interactive fountain. All it takes is a simple step on a foot switch to start the water. You can splash around daily from sunup to sundown. ocalafl.org.

UMMER IS QUICKLY COMING TO AN END. SOON THE KIDS WILL BE BACK IN SCHOOL AND LIFE WILL FALL BACK INTO ITS NORMAL ROUTINE. STILL LOOKING FOR STUFF TO DO IN THOSE LAST PRECIOUS WEEKS OF SUMMER? HERE ARE SOME IDEAS THAT WE THINK ARE AWESOME.

GO ON AN ADVENTURE

There are springs all over the state of Florida. These parks typically offer swimming, hiking, picnicking and plenty of places to explore the great outdoors. Not sure where to go? Here are our recommendations. GINNIE SPRINGS has been open for activity since 1972. Known as one of the clearest springs and with water temperatures around 72°F year-round, Ginnie Springs is the perfect place to spend an afternoon. ginniespringsoutdoors.com. ICHETUCKNEE SPRINGS was deemed a national landmark in 1972 and offers plenty to do, such as swimming, tubing and hiking—you might even catch a glimpse of a few wild animals. floridastateparks.org/ ichetuckneesprings.

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RAINBOW SPRINGS is the fourth largest spring in Florida and is a great place for swimming and kayaking. There are also trails that lead to waterfalls, making for some great photo ops. floridastateparks.org/ rainbowsprings.

TAKE IN A CHEAP MOVIE

There’s still a few more chances to enjoy discounted summer prices at some of our local theaters.

MARION THEATRE will show Wreck it Ralph, August 4-7 and Rio August 11-14. Movies start at 10:30am and cost $2, which includes the movie, a drink and popcorn. Get there early though, as seating fills up fast and the movies are first come first serve. mariontheatre.org/ special-events.

REGAL HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 16 & IMAX is once again offering its Summer Movie Express, with the last movies in the series (Mr. Peabody and Sherman and Rio 2)) playing August 5 and 6. Both movies start at 10am and cost $1. regmovies.com/Movies/ Summer-Movie-Express.

SPEND QUALITY TIME AT HOME There’s nothing better than a little family time on the home front. Here are some classics you’ll want to enjoy before the summer ends. HAVE A WATER BALLOON FIGHT. Why not make it parents vs. kids and show the youngsters how it’s done?

MAKE A TENT OUT OF CARDBOARD BOXES AND SHEETS. Nothing makes sleeping more special than a blanket fort!

CAMP IN THE BACKYARD AND MAKE S’MORES. To make it extra special, make s’mores with your favorite candy bar like a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup or York Peppermint Patty. Yum!

Girl © Ramona Heim; Popcorn © mayakova; Canoe © stefan11; Marshmallow © Joe Belanger/ Shutterstock.com

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UPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS GEORGE TOMYN TOOK SOME TIME TO SPEAK WITH OCALA STYLE ABOUT HIS HISTORY IN EDUCATION, HIS HOPES FOR OUR STUDENTS AND WHY THE NEW FLORIDA STANDARDS MAY JUST BE A GOOD THING FOR MARION COUNTY STUDENTS.

It’s only fitting that George Tomyn’s current office is located in a building that once housed Ocala Primary School. After all, the Superintendent of School’s whole life has included education in one way or another. Even more interesting, though, is the fact that the 60-year-old’s current office is also his former first-grade classroom. “I say good morning to my first-grade teacher, Mrs. Hall, every morning when I come in for work,” smiles Tomyn. Born and raised in Ocala, Tomyn is the product of Marion County Public Schools. His parents, both local educators, taught him to respect and appreciate the importance of education. It’s a philosophy and a mindset that has stayed with him. After graduating from then CFCC in 1974, Tomyn made a short trek north to Valdosta State College (now Valdosta State University).

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“I met my wife, Barbara, there,” he says. “I received my degree in history and was awarded a teaching certificate.” A desire to be closer to his family and his roots brought George and Barbara back to Ocala, where he began his successful career in education. “I taught at Lake Weir High School for three years, was the assistant principal at Dunnellon High School for six years, then the assistant principal at Vanguard High School for nine years.” Tomyn’s first stint as principal came when he transferred to Sunrise Elementary School in Marion Oaks. After Sunrise, he went to Forest High School where he was principal from 1996-2005. “We built Forest High School between the years of 2001-2005,” Tomyn says. “If there is one single thing that stands out as a highlight of my career, it is moving 2,000 students, teachers and staff to their new school on a Friday before winter break; and we only lost a few boxes along the way.” Tomyn was elected and began his four-year term as superintendent of Marion County Public Schools in November 2012. When asked why he wanted to become superintendent, he replied, “I care very deeply for the Marion County Public School System. I am a product of the Marion County Public School System, and I have spent my entire career in this

IF THERE IS ONE SINGLE THING THAT STANDS OUT AS A HIGHLIGHT OF MY CAREER, IT IS MOVING 2,000 STUDENTS, TEACHERS AND STAFF TO THEIR NEW SCHOOL ON A FRIDAY BEFORE WINTER BREAK; AND WE ONLY LOST A FEW BOXES ALONG THE WAY. system. Being superintendent gives me the opportunity to give back to the organization that has meant so much to me.” Upon taking his seat as head of the school system, Tomyn was immediately faced with several challenges, the first being ongoing budget issues. Marion County is no stranger to economic hardships,

and that includes the public school system. “We also have some huge challenges with the new Florida Standards facing us in that almost all the assessments will be given on computers. The best place to test a student is a computer lab, not in a typical classroom. Unfortunately, the schools that do have that type


MY FAVORITE PART OF MY JOB IS VISITING OUR SCHOOLS. WE HAVE GREAT KIDS IN THIS COMMUNITY.

of setting are also using labs as an instructional room. It’s a big puzzle, but I am very blessed to have a supportive, cohesive team that wants to do what is best for our children and our teachers.” Tomyn acknowledges that the school board and his administration want to be able to provide an appropriate benefits package for MCPS’s employees, so that’s a priority. A program implemented last year using federal funds to provide breakfast and lunch for all MCPS students will continue through the 2014-15 school year as well. But perhaps the most recent and most notable change facing Tomyn is the changeover from the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) to the aforementioned Florida Standards Assessment (FSA). “The Common Core State Standards are a set of standards to help guide instruction,” he says. “Common Core State Standards is not a curriculum. Florida has taken those core standards and amended them, calling it the Florida Standards.” The Mathematics Florida Standards and Language Arts Florida Standards will both be fully implemented across all grade levels during the 2014-15 school year.

“We as educators, parents and teachers have been waiting to see how we are going to be assessing our students on the new standards,” Tomyn adds. “The new assessment was designed and written by educators from the American Institute of Research, a non-profit organization. It was used for the first time in Utah and will be much more challenging and analytical than the FCAT.” Tomyn does admit, though, that the Florida Standards are much more strenuous and challenging even than the next generation of Sunshine State Standards. Tomyn stresses that it is not a mere regurgitation of answers. Instead, students are going to be expected to think critically and analytically. During the 2013-14 school year, kids were being taught the Florida Standards while prepping to take the FCAT. Now, with the elimination of the FCAT, students and teachers can focus on the newly implemented Florida Standards. “With this new assessment, we will probably see what looks like a drop in pass rates,” says Tomyn, “but eventually they will adjust and they will go back up. Our job is to prepare the students for

whatever direction they choose to take after graduation. I believe this test is a step in the right direction and will be good for our kids. Like I said, it’s going to be tough. We have to work together to prepare our children.” Tomyn adds that the countries that do well on international tests have already implemented standards similar to the FS. By introducing those critical-thinking skills here, America’s students will be better prepared to compete in the global job market. Failing is not an option for Tomyn. Although the standards may be tough, he believes our kids are intelligent, ready and up for the challenge.

“The school system here in Marion County means the world to me,” he says. “It’s important to me that we do well. I like seeing the educational system in action… the teachers doing what they do best, interacting with their students. My favorite part of my job is visiting our schools. We have great kids in this community. We may be facing some challenges in our future, but we have the people in place to rise to and overcome those challenges.”

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in

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byevi n n K risti a Ch

Every August, students head back to class to meet new teachers, study new subjects and embark on new adventures. This year, students at nine schools will meet new principals thanks to several long-time leaders retiring this su mmer. Rest assured these nine leaders know our schools well because every single one graduated from a Marion County public high school!

Belleview-Santos Elementary: Fredna

Wilkerson brings her 34 years of district experience to this Southeast Marion County school. With the last four years as principal, Wilkerson’s educational background includes degrees from the University of South Florida and the University of Central Florida. Wilkerson graduated from North Marion High.

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College Park Elementary: Cassandra Boston Boston,, a North Marion High graduate, leads here with 33 years of district experience. Having taught at elementary and secondary grade levels, Boston’s educational degrees come from Florida State University and National-Louis University.

Dunnellon Elementary:

Gay Street takes her first principal appointment at this school. A former school secretary, Street worked her way up the ladder and holds degrees from the College of Central Florida, Florida Southern and Saint Leo University. Street graduated from North Marion High School.

Evergreen Elementary:

Staying with a “green” theme, Erin Quainton, a Forest High graduate, moves here from Greenway Elementary with 31 years as a district employee. Her bachelor’s and master’s degrees come from Florida State University and the University of South Carolina, respectively.


Arrow © Roman Malyshev; Girl © lstockyimages ; Notebook © Bodik1992; Doodles © balabolka \ Shutterstock.com

Code Of Conduct

All for One and One UNIF ORM for All wo more magnet schools join the ranks requiring student uniforms this year. School advisory councils adopted the idea after speaking with parents at each school. Options include plenty of color and style choices, though. Magnet schools and programs typically require uniforms readily available at local stores. School logos are optional. Oakcrest Elementary is an International Baccalaureate (IB) school developing lifelong learners, including additional language instruction in Spanish, inquiry-based learning, character education and international perspectives. Base uniform colors are solid and include blue, black, yellow, gold or white; bottom colors include navy, black, khaki/tan or jeans without embellishments or that are torn or frayed.

T

Reddick-Collier Elementary offers students entry into the Cambridge Program, emphasizing knowledge and skills to solve realworld problems. Shirts must have a collar and be solid maroon, black, white, yellow or gray; bottoms must be jeans, pants, shorts, skirts or skorts.

Greenway Elementary: Ha mmett Bowen Jr. First-time Principal Elementary: Teresa Forsyth LuAnn Clark takes over, but she’s no newcomer to the district. She graduated from Vanguard and joined MCPS 15 years ago. Her college degrees come from Saint Leo University.

moves here with 20 years of district experience under her belt, the last five years at BellviewSantos Elementary. Her college experience includes degrees from Saint Leo University and Nova Southeastern University. She also graduated from North Marion High School.

Two big changes are in store for students and parents this year when it comes to discipline. Although it briefly returned last year, corporal punishment (paddling) is once again omitted from this year’s Code of Student Conduct. School board members removed the discipline option altogether for this school year, so parents need not be concerned with this traditional form of punishment. The second major change involves cyber bullying. The action is more specifically defined this year and outlines discipline for students participating in this technological form of bullying. This includes use of any electronic means to harass or bully a student to the point where it interferes with or limits the victim’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities or opportunities offered by a school or if it substantially disrupts the education process or orderly operation of a school.

1 2

Farewell To The FCAT tudents no longer take the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) for reading, mathematics and writing. Students in grades five and eight will still take the FCAT Science exam, a paper-based test. Starting this school year, students take the new Florida Standards Assessments (FSA), English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics, measuring student mastery of the Florida Standards. Most of the FSA tests are now computer-based, and tests that are currently paper-based will eventually become computer-based.

S

Harbour View Elementary: With a rich

heritage in public education, Heather Guest is a first-time principal at this Southeast Marion County school. She joined the district 13 years ago and holds educational degrees from the University of South Florida. Guest graduated from Forest High.

Liberty Middle: Jennifer

Sibbald stays in secondary education and moves to the head of the line as the new principal here. With 18 years of district experience, Sibbald’s educational degrees come from the University of Florida and Nova Southeastern University. She is a Dunnellon High graduate.

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W hat Will Voters Sa y?

I

n November, Marion County voters will decide yes or no on funding an additional one mill to pay for art, music, media/library and technology needs throughout the district. The official ballot language reads:

“Shall the Marion County School District’s ad valorem millage be increased by a total of one mill, beginning July 1, 2015 and ending June 30, 2019, for the necessary operating expenses including reading, physical education, art, music, library/media and vocational programs; meeting class size requirements; and retaining State Certified teachers and paraprofessionals with oversight of these expenditures by an independent citizens financial oversight committee? YES or NO” Since 2007, more than $41 million has been cut from the district’s operating budget. This part of the budget pays for salaries, utilities, transportation, materials and supplies, plus other day-to-day operating costs. Maintenance and capital building projects are not part of this budget. As with any private business, salaries account for the largest part—nearly 80 percent—of the operating budget. State law requires the Marion County School Board to approve a balanced budget each year. Board members are working through the budget this month, determining priorities and deciding which funds will go where. Through a series of public work

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sessions, the Board will finalize a budget, initially presented by Superintendent George Tomyn, and vote on it early next month. If voters approve the additional one mill proposal on November’s ballot, the money will help restore art, music, library/media services and physical education programs and provide funds to pay for additional teachers to meet class size requirements. As well, voter approval means the district will improve its efforts to retain state-certified teachers and paraprofessionals. Finally, a committee comprised of local business owners and residents will regularly review and ensure the additional mill is spent exactly as promised in ballot language. The proposed increase would last four years and average an additional $125 annually for the owner of a $150,000 house in Marion County with state homestead exemption. This equates to 34 cents per day or about $2.40 each week.

Board Members & Ballots

Three seats on the Marion County School Board are up for grabs this month. Elected school board members serve four-year staggered terms. They meet twice monthly for live, televised meetings and additional non-televised work sessions. On Tuesday, August 26, voters will cast their ballots for the following three races. Winning each race requires 50 percent of the vote plus 1. If no candidate achieves this, the top two vote-getters in each race will appear on the November ballot.

District 3: Bobby James*,

Jane Moerlie, Jim Touchton, Ed Wilson

District 4: Chase Basinger, Jamie Bevan, Angie Boynton*, Diane L. Schrier

District 5: Ron Crawford*, Kelly King *incumbent

Each of these candidates were provided two minutes to explain to voters why they should be elected to serve on the Marion County School Board. You can watch these live-totape presentations on the Classroom Connection, airing all this month on the Marion Education Channel. For a weekly schedule, visit marion.k12.fl.us/ dept/tis/extra/file/ schedule.pdf.

icon head © VLADGRIN \ Shutterstock.com

C) Florida Standards The new end-of-course (EO ometry. EOC ebra 1, Algebra 2 and Ge Assessments include Alg SS) assessments ne State Standards (NGS Next Generation Sunshi All EOC 1, Civics and U.S. History. will continue for Biology -based tests. assessments are computer May and oughout March, April and thr ce Testing takes pla traditional ing skills instead of simple focuses on critical-think multiple choice answers.


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KATI

WR

E McITTEN BY PHER

JOHN

INTRODUCING

MARION COUNTY’S VALEDICTORIANS

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PHOTOS

B

SON

Y JERN

IGAN


AUDREY

VERO

BELLEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 5.0 UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

MAJORING IN BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

WHY ARE ACADEMICS IMPORTANT TO YOU? I’ve always wanted to do well in school, but it wasn’t until my sophomore year of high school that I got serious with my schoolwork. Academics are the base of our lives. We must do well in high school and college in order to get the jobs we want. Also, having more knowledge makes it easier for you to achieve your goals.

THE STUDENTS OF

MARION COUNTY’S CLASS OF 2014

HAVE TAKEN THEIR COMMENCEMENT WALKS, FRAMED THEIR DIPLOMAS AND BEGUN BUILDING THE NEXT PHASES OF THEIR LIVES. OF COURSE, SOME STUDENTS WENT THE EXTRA MILE IN THEIR FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL. THIS YEAR, THE EXTRA MILE WAS CROWDED WITH AMBITIOUS, INSPIRING STUDENTS. THESE VALEDICTORIANS ARE TALKING ABOUT HOW THEY MADE IT TO THE TOP OF THE CLASS AND PASSING ON ADVICE TO INCOMING STUDENTS ON HOW TO GET THE MOST OUT OF THEIR TIME IN HIGH SCHOOL.

WHAT’S SOMETHING NEW YOU WANT TO TRY IN COLLEGE?

JAMES W.

I wish I had branched out more and gotten to know my classmates better. In college, I want to join as many clubs as possible. At UCF they offer over 560 clubs, so I think it would be cool to join as many as possible as a way to meet a variety of new people.

COWAN BELLEVIEW HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 4.83

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

DUAL MAJORING IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

WHAT ARE YOUR TOP THREE STUDY TIPS? 1. Be confident. You’re taking the

class; why would you not be able to pass the test? Don’t make any one test bigger than it is. 2. Have a study routine. For big tests, I have coffee or an energy drink and eat dark chocolate the night I study and right before the test. 3. Wake up to study first thing in the morning; my physics and calculus teacher told me that you remember more. It’s not fun, but I always retained more information! If nothing else, it’s useful in a pinch.

WHAT’S ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL? Try. It sounds simple and cliché because it is. There is no valid reason not to try in high school. I’m not saying everyone should go home and hit the books immediately—not even I do that, but don’t make dumb excuses to avoid being productive.

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M A R I O N C O U N T Y ’ S C L A S S O F 2 0 1 4

CHLOE

COOK

DUNNELLON HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 4.72 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MAJORING IN MATHEMATICS

WHAT’S ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL? Everyone should attend as many high school functions as possible, such as prom, homecoming and football games, because these opportunities are once-in-alifetime events.

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED TO STUDY AND DO ASSIGNMENTS?

WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER AND WHY?

I realize that my grades will greatly impact my future, and I have always been very competitive. My goal since I was in ninth grade was to be valedictorian, which always motivated me to study and do assignments.

My favorite teacher is Mr. Ayton because he is always motivated and passionate about his job. I hope when I choose a career I am just as passionate about it as he is about teaching.

WHAT’S SOMETHING NEW YOU WANT TO TRY IN COLLEGE/ AFTER GRADUATION? In college, I would like to study abroad so that I can see different parts of the world and experience different cultures.

HOW HAVE YOU CHANGED IN THE LAST FOUR YEARS? As a freshman, I was shy and unsure of what I could accomplish. I was scared to make class presentations because I cared too much about what others thought about me. As a high school graduate, I am more confident in myself and have conquered my fear of public speaking by addressing my entire senior class in my valedictorian speech.

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON YOUR MAJOR AND WHERE TO GO TO SCHOOL? I have excelled in mathematics since I was in elementary school. As I began my search for careers in mathematics, I decided fairly quickly that I wanted to be an actuary because it involves analytical methods and mathematical skills. I chose the University of Florida because it is one of the top universities in Florida and has a program for students pursuing actuarial science.

JOHN C.

STABLER

FRANCIS MARION MILITARY ACADEMY GPA: 4.67 UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY AT WEST POINT MAJORING IN PHYSICS OR APPLIED MATHEMATICS

WHAT ARE YOUR TOP THREE STUDY TIPS? 1. Always get your homework done first thing when you get home from school before anything else (my favorite). 2. Always quiz yourself before a test so you can tell if you are proficient or not. 3. Do casual reading about random things to increase your general knowledge.

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED TO STUDY AND DO ASSIGNMENTS? I stay motivated to study and do assignments because I absolutely love to learn as much about the world around me as possible. It thrills me when I learn about something new or when I learn a trick to the inner workings of something.

WHAT’S ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL? One thing everyone should do in high school is be on a sports team and captain in that sport if possible. It is very important to know what it is like to succeed and fail as a team, because both will happen. Many life lessons are learned on the courts, fields, tracks and rinks of high school sports.

HOW HAVE YOU CHANGED IN THE LAST FOUR YEARS? In the past four years, Francis Marion Military Academy has transformed me from a greasy, snot-nosed little middle-schooler to someone who has the confidence to take on the world.

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON YOUR MAJOR AND WHERE TO GO TO SCHOOL? I decided that I wanted to be a physicist or a mathematician because I see the world around me as one huge mathematical equation. There is a way to solve each and every part of it. I was appointed and chosen to go to the United States Military Academy because it has a rigorous academic program and the top leadership and character training in the world.

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DANIELA CRISTINA

COBB

FOREST HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 5.0 RASMUSSEN COLLEGE MAJORING IN NURSING

WHY ARE ACADEMICS IMPORTANT TO YOU? Because I’ve learned that it can help take you far in life and give you the ability to succeed.

WHICH BOOK SHOULD EVERY STUDENT READ IN HIGH SCHOOL AND WHY? Rebecca, because it shows how nothing is what it seems and it is beautifully written.

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED TO STUDY AND DO ASSIGNMENTS? I’m always busy, so when I am doing an assignment, I try to finish it because I may not have time to do it later.

WHAT’S ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL?

really get to know him, and he really helped me throughout high school.

HOW HAVE YOU CHANGED IN THE LAST FOUR YEARS? I have not changed. I still want to work hard, I still want to achieve and I still want to do my best.

Everyone should join either a club or sport. It really allows them to show their school spirit and develop a close relationship with their classmates and impact the community.

WHAT DO YOU DO IF YOU’RE NERVOUS BEFORE A TEST?

WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER AND WHY?

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE YOUR MAJOR?

Mr. Maiman, because he was also my cross country coach and I was able to

ALEXIS

CAVAKISPEREZ LAKE WEIR HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 4.8

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MAJOR IS UNDECIDED

WHY ARE ACADEMICS IMPORTANT TO YOU? Academics enable people to expand past the world they know, making them knowledgeable, which allows them to be smarter and more considerate when it comes to their decisions.

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED TO STUDY AND DO ASSIGNMENTS? I stayed motivated for two reasons: my future and my mother. I knew that in order to get into a good college and put myself on the right track I had to buckle down and push myself. I believe all that hard work will pay off, and it is already beginning to. I was also motivated because I wanted to make my mother proud. She has worked so hard to raise my siblings and me, and it is the least I can do for her.

If I can, I try to listen to music or briefly look over my notes in order to reassure myself that I know the information. I decided on my major because I want to help people and be able to work in a medical office.

COURTNEY LYNN

news and broadcasting. Through TV production in high school, I realized that’s what I want to pursue, and the University of Florida has a great program for it. After graduation, I will have to adjust to living in an apartment in Gainesville and being on my own.

DUPREY LAKE WEIR HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 4.8

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MAJORING IN TELECOMMUNICATIONS

WHAT’S ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL? In high school I believe that everyone should try a sport. It’s a great way to stay active, involved and build great friendships.

WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER? My favorite teachers were my elective teachers Mr. Miller and Mr. Nat. Without them, my high school life wouldn’t have been nearly as enjoyable.

HOW HAVE YOU CHANGED IN THE LAST FOUR YEARS? Through the last four years, I have gained the confidence and knowledge to become a leader and step up in my community.

WHAT’S ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL?

HOW DID YOU CHOOSE YOUR SCHOOL AND MAJOR?

Dress up for Homecoming Week. You will not regret it. It is so much fun, and you will not want to miss out on the opportunity.

Ever since I was a child, I’ve had a passion for the Gators as well as

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M A R I O N C O U N T Y ’ S C L A S S O F 2 0 1 4

GRETA

GILLIGAN

felt I could shine. It always sparked a passion in me, even at 5 and 6, knowing I wanted to grow up to become an educator.

MARK

SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY

WHAT WERE YOUR BEST AND WORST SUBJECTS?

NORTH MARION HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 4.83

WHY ARE ACADEMICS IMPORTANT TO YOU?

English and literature were always my stronger areas. Math has always been the bane of my academic existence.

MEADOWBROOK ACADEMY GPA: 5.0

MAJORING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION, MINORING IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

YOUNG

I’ve been raised to do everything with excellence, especially academics. Plus, having never been very athletic, academics were an area where I

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

MAJORING IN MOTION PICTURE ARTS-PRODUCTION

HAVE ACADEMICS ALWAYS BEEN IMPORTANT TO YOU?

WHAT ARE YOUR BEST STUDY TIPS? 1. Most importantly, repetition.

Review, and review, and review—flip

Yes, I’ve always had good grades, but it’s also important to not stress over them so much or else you’ll get burned out. Academics are important because I know they are an important factor in being admitted into colleges and getting farther in life.

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED TO STUDY AND DO ASSIGNMENTS?

LOIS MARGARETTE

BURNS

Start with the stuff you know and work your way to the harder stuff. If you can’t figure it out yourself, Google it or ask friends and teachers. It also helps to take breaks and go run or something to get you moving and take your mind off of things.

OCALA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY GPA: 4.56 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MAJORING IN NURSING

HAVE ACADEMICS ALWAYS BEEN IMPORTANT TO YOU?

WHAT’S ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL?

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON YOUR SCHOOL AND MAJOR?

Get involved! Join a club! Do a sport! Just do something!

For as long as I can remember, I’ve been interested in movie production. As a kid, when we bought a DVD, I would watch all the special features that were available. I love how motion pictures can tell stories and give people an escape from reality. No matter what they’re going through, they can experience love, adventure, comedy and an endless amount of emotions. I chose FSU because their College of Motion Picture Arts program is one of the top-ranked film schools in the country.

WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER AND WHY? Mrs. Miller! I’ve had her all four years of high school for Web design and digital design. Not only is she a teacher but also the yearbook advisor and senior class sponsor. She knows how to have a good time but also gets the students to do their work. She is definitely one of the most inspirational people I have ever met, and she sets a perfect example for everyone around her.

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Absolutely! From elementary school through high school, academics have been something that I always strove to succeed in. My goal was to get straight As and then my goal turned into striving to be valedictorian.

WHAT’S ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL? Get involved, and make good friends! Get involved in your church, school and community! Sometimes it is not the most comfortable thing to go out and find good friends who will help build you up, but you will be most grateful for them later on.

HOW HAVE YOU CHANGED IN THE LAST FOUR YEARS? I think I have changed by learning to persevere when times are hard. When I did not want to study, I studied... or when I did not want to be kind to people that were not kind


through flash cards, create online quizlets or ask a family member to test you until you recall the information with ease and without any uncertainty. 2. Stay organized. While this isn’t directly related to gaining or retaining knowledge, it will ease your mind and relieve stress to help you accomplish more. 3. Stay motivated. I found a “rewards system” to be my best way of staying motivated. For every 30 minutes of studying, I’d give myself a 10-minute break. Food always worked as great motivation for

me, too. I was almost always eating while studying. It kept me alert and energized.

HOW DO YOU STAY MOTIVATED TO STUDY AND DO ASSIGNMENTS? I try to focus on the feeling of relief and freedom that hits once an assignment is completed and how that feeling is multiplied when it’s completed to the best of my ability.

WHICH BOOK SHOULD EVERY STUDENT READ IN HIGH SCHOOL AND WHY? The Giver by Lois Lowry. It’s not only a well-written, wonderful work of fiction, but it’s loaded with important morals and lessons. It’s the type of book that’ll make you want to go write a book.

WHAT’S SOMETHING NEW YOU WANT TO TRY IN COLLEGE? I would love to learn an instrument or another foreign language in addition to Spanish.

ERIK

HIGGINBOTHAM ST. JOHN LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 4.83 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA MAJORING IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

to me, I tried to because I knew that is what I am called to do.

WHAT DO YOU DO IF YOU’RE NERVOUS BEFORE A TEST? Pray, and remember that all the studying is over and all I can do is my best.

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON YOUR MAJOR AND WHERE TO GO TO SCHOOL? One of the hardest decisions I have had was choosing where to go to college. I really tried to seek what God’s will was for this part of my life. There were months and months of looking into each school, but after much praying, thinking and deliberating, I have decided to attend the University of Florida. I would like to become a registered nurse and work in the delivery room or the emergency room. I have even thought about being a helicopter nurse. I may also want to go further than nursing, but for right now, just nursing is the plan.

WHY ARE ACADEMICS IMPORTANT TO YOU? Academics are important to me because they help me achieve my goals. Everyone desires to be successful at some level, but not everyone is willing to put in the work. Through academics, I can be successful and be someone I’m proud of.

WHICH BOOK SHOULD EVERY STUDENT READ IN HIGH SCHOOL AND WHY? Every student should read Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. This novel shows the importance of education and original thought in life.

WHAT’S ONE THING YOU WISH YOU HAD DONE IN HIGH SCHOOL? I wish I would have been more involved in school sports. The sports I did play connected me with people I never thought I would be friends with and taught me invaluable leadership skills.

WHAT’S SOMETHING NEW YOU WANT TO TRY IN COLLEGE? Getting involved in student government. There was not a big program at my high school, and I have always wanted to get involved that way.

WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER AND WHY? My favorite teacher was Mr. Paul Heath. Although he did not teach one of my favorite subjects (AP literature), he made the class enjoyable and taught me that gaining valuable wisdom through life experiences is just as important as being successful.

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON YOUR SCHOOL AND MAJOR? My decision was a no-brainer. The University of Florida is one of, if not the best, school in Florida. I have always been a Gator and having alumni parents encouraged me to carry on the legacy. I decided on electrical engineering because the field is vast and growing continuously. Problem solving has always been a skill of mine, and I aspire to use that skill to solve some of the world’s puzzles.

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M A R I O N C O U N T Y ’ S C L A S S O F 2 0 1 4

ANDRES

MARIA

TRINITY CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 4.76

VANGUARD HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 5.0

CEDEÑNO

HYDE

UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

HAVE ACADEMICS ALWAYS BEEN IMPORTANT TO YOU?

WHY ARE ACADEMICS IMPORTANT TO YOU?

MAJORING IN SCIENCE, PRE-PROFESSIONAL (PRE-MED)

Yes, academics have always been important. They help me reach my goals of becoming a doctor. From a young age, my parents taught me the importance of getting good grades and always trying my best in everything that I do.

WHAT ARE YOUR TOP THREE STUDY TIPS? 1. Don’t study just the night before. If you study a couple days ahead, then you can break it down into parts and it becomes much easier. 2. Make

sure you go over everything and not just what you think may be on the test. 3. Get a good amount of sleep.

WHAT’S ONE BOOK EVERYONE SHOULD READ IN HIGH SCHOOL? Everyone should read Guns, Germs, and Steel. It’s a book that retells the history of the world in a fascinating way. “Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”- George Santayana.

WHAT IS ONE THING EVERYONE SHOULD DO IN HIGH SCHOOL? I wish I had gotten involved in clubs from the very beginning instead of waiting until halfway. Everyone should get involved in clubs or sports or any extracurricular activity really. It’s a great way to learn as well as meet new people.

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON YOUR SCHOOL AND MAJOR? As a child I was always sick and in the doctor’s office or hospital, but I had a wonderful pediatrician who always helped me feel better. I want to help other kids like she helped me. This made choosing my major easy. When it came to choosing a college, I wanted to go somewhere that had rigorous academics as well as a community aspect, and Notre Dame filled both of those requirements. When I was invited to visit Notre Dame, I was choosing between the University of Florida or Notre Dame. When I got there I saw how beautiful it was, how nice the people were and how they’re like a family, and I knew I had to go there.

MAJORING IN BIOLOGY

I believe that an education is one of the most important things to have. It is a part of me and something that no one can take away.

WHAT ARE YOUR TOP THREE STUDY TIPS?

WHAT DO YOU DO IF YOU’RE NERVOUS BEFORE A TEST?

Prioritize your tasks, don’t procrastinate and stay clear of social networking while studying.

If I get nervous before a test, I try for a relaxed state of concentration. I clear my mind of any doubts and lightly review key points of what I have studied.

WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER AND WHY? My favorite teacher was my 12th-grade English and theory of knowledge teacher, Mr. Carstenn. He always went out of his way to make learning an enjoyable and empowering experience. He encouraged us to challenge traditional ideas, which made us much more open-minded and accepting of others’ opinions.

VANGUARD’S ANA PAULA ARENAS MACKENZIE NICOLE BOWLIN WILLIAM ALEXANDER BROWN NIKHIL SUREXA CACODCAR ZACKERY MERRILL CALDER SHANNON MARIE DOMFORT CHRISTINA EILEEN FERGUSON JOHN HERBERT GHANNAM JASMINE SUMMER HENRY MARIA TERESA HYDE

HOW DID YOU CHOOSE YOUR MAJOR? This past year, I organized a charity 5K fundraiser, and with the help of 53 of my peers, we raised money to help underprivileged children in Vietnam. This experience made me realize that I want to become more involved in humanitarian work. By striving toward a degree in biomedicine, I hope to be able to help others live longer, healthier lives.

28 CO-VALEDICTORIANS ALEC NICHOLAS INMON MELISSA ANNE KAYS GITANJALI LAKSHMINARAYANAN

KIRA JASMINE LOWELL LISA SAN LY REENA LEELA MANOHAR SKYLER ALYSSE MCCAIN MADISON CARMEN MURVIN FAITH CHIAMAKA OBIMDIKE ENHID FAYE GUISALA PITAS

CHRISTOPHER FRANZ POLACK NISHA PRASAD NIKOLOFF RAMPERSAD LAUREN FAY ROBERTSON JUSTIN JAMES TAYLOR THOMAS LOUIS TRUCHEMENT CHANDLER WESCOTT YAP AMBAR ZAPATA *Editor’s Note: Maria Hyde was chosen to speak with Ocala Style based on voting among Vanguard’s group of valedictorians.


KAVELIN

RUMALLA WEST PORT HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 5.0 24 CREDIT GPA

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI KANSAS CITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

MAJORING IN BIOLOGY, MINORING IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND EARNING DOCTOR OF MEDICINE DEGREE (M.D.)

EMILY ANN

WHAT IS YOUR NO. 1 STUDY TIP?

SCOTT

It is absolutely essential in school to always accurately keep track of your to-do list and what you need to accomplish in a given day, month or semester.

WEST PORT HIGH SCHOOL GPA: 5.0

**All GPAs listed are weighted.

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON YOUR COLLEGE AND MAJOR? Six years ago, my perfectly healthy brother’s life took a turn for the worse. He has been through 20+ brain operations, complications from surgeries trying to cure the mystery condition and many flights and drives to famous hospitals up and down the East Coast. Now he is better due to the outstanding work of some special neurologists and neurosurgeons. I never truly understood the medical field until I saw my brother as a patient and how big a difference doctors can make on an individual’s life. I applied to the 6-year medical program at the University of Missouri Kansas City. On one of the most memorable days of my life, I was accepted to the program. I get to start my career early and start pursuing what I love to do.

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY MAJORING IN ENGLISH LITERATURE

WHAT’S SOMETHING NEW YOU WANT TO TRY AFTER GRADUATION? I would really like to read all of Dante Alighieri’s The Inferno. It is a classic I have been trying to read now for years but have never been able to finish.

WHO WAS YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER AND WHY? If I have to choose, I would say that my high school English teachers— Mr. Garcia-Suarez, Mr. Hester and Mr. Hunte—were my favorites. They had the most impact upon my life, nurturing the goal that I have set for myself: to be a writer. They have pushed me to think critically and creatively and to never be afraid to ask “why.”

HOW DID YOU DECIDE ON YOUR MAJOR AND WHERE TO GO TO SCHOOL? My Mom is an FSU alumnus, so Seminole Fever naturally runs in my family! Majoring in English literature is a natural decision. When I do not have pen to paper or my fingers typing away on a keyboard, my eyes are glued to a book. There’s a quote I really like by T.D. Jakes that says, “If you can’t figure out your purpose, find out your passion. For your passion will lead you right into your purpose.” And those words are some that I live by fiercely.

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE ENTIRE GRADUATING CLASS OF MARION COUNTY!

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08

2014

written by: Cynthia McFarland

BUILDING

A HOPEFUL

FUTURE

Local program helps Ocala youth make a difference... for others as well as themselves. 34

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It’s a beautiful thing when a plan comes together. When that plan keeps coming together, year after year, you know something special’s going on. That’s exactly what’s happening with Phoenix Rising YouthBuild. This award-winning program builds Habit for Humanity homes in West Ocala using a workforce of young adults determined to create new futures for themselves. On the national level, YouthBuild USA was incorporated in 1990 and now has 273 programs in 46 states, Washington, D.C. and the Virgin Islands. The U.S. Department of Labor is the current managing federal agency of the program, and grants are awarded on a competitive basis. Funds are distributed directly by the federal government to local community-based organizations that run YouthBuild programs in their neighborhoods. YouthBuild programs are


Blueprint © Kapreski; Nails © koosen; Tape Measure © INSAGO/Shutterstock.com Raising Walls, Hammering © Laura Byrnes, APR/CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion

Lifting the first wall in place: Career Coach Darren McGuinness, far right in yellow safety helmet, lends a hand.

also sponsored by local organizations, making for a unique public-private partnership. The beauty of this partnership is that lives are changed. Low-income young people, ages 16 to 24, participate in the program. (In our area, the ages are 18 to 21.) They learn valuable career skills in the construction field as they help build homes and also work to earn their GED or high school diploma. More than 120,000 YouthBuild students have participated in the program, building over 22,000 housing units since 1994. About 10,000 young adults take part in the program each year. Former Ocala Police Chief Samuel Williams was the driving force for making the program a reality in Marion County. In 2009, he came up with the idea of “Phoenix Rising,” hoping to help the city rebound during the struggling economy while benefiting area youth at the same time. When he heard that the national YouthBuild was already in existence, he knew this could be a funding source. “The bottom was falling out of the economy, the construction business was dying and Marion County had one of the highest foreclosure rates in the state,” recalls Williams. “I wanted to come up with a project for the construction industry and felt we could do better than just telling people to ‘buy local.’” Williams had a heart for struggling young people, as well. “In schools, all the attention seems to go to the A and B students,” he says. “I wanted to do something for the kids who were D and

F students. They’re going to be living in our community and raising families here. I don’t want it to be said that the government let them down. The idea was to teach them a trade. Building houses was on my mind at the time. I think we were way ahead of the curve. We were immediately able to do something and show people we were serious about it.” Williams retired in 2011 but continues to keep close tabs on Phoenix Rising YouthBuild. The Phoenix Rising YouthBuild partnership includes the Ocala Police Department, Habitat for Humanity of Marion County, the City of Ocala, Home Builders Institute, Marion County Public Schools, Howard Academy Community Center and CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion (formerly Workforce Connection), plus its youth services provider, Henkels & McCoy Youth Connections. “We’ve done lots of programs in the past where we’ve had partners come together. The reason this one has been so phenomenally successful is because each of the partners has been very dedicated to their piece of the pie,” says Kathleen Woodring, chief operating officer for CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion.

Woodring wrote the U.S. Department of Labor grant that resulted in the award of $1.1 million last June. “We help participants be more marketable in the labor force and also work on a career development plan for them,” she says. Participants are between the ages of 18 and 21 and must be income-eligible. Some, but not all, are minorities. Most participants are male, but the program is aggressively working to recruit more females.

Just who are these hardworking young adults?

Some participants already have a high school diploma, but many do not, and there’s a strong focus to recruit those individuals so they can also obtain their GED. In one way or another, participants are at-risk. They may be homeless, have dropped out of high school, be pregnant or already a parent. They may have come from a broken home or been part of the foster care system. What matters now is that they want to work toward a positive future, and YouthBuild is there for them. Because the program involves building a home, they must have an interest in construction. In addition to on-the-job training in the construction field, participants take part in classroom training to learn and develop workforce skills. The goal is not just to work on this project but to leave the program with talents and knowledge that will help them land future employment. If they never graduated high school, there is also the opportunity to earn their GED, along with industry-recognized certifications. Each participant receives a government stipend of $7.75 per hour. Additional bonuses Jake Caine, right, pounds a stake deep into the sand to help secure the support brace, while Tony Vazquez of Habitat for Humanity assists.

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grant, we’ve gone to two builds per year. It’s been a great project and has won national attention,” adds Nimmo. Phoenix Rising YouthBuild has earned recognition from the Florida League of Cities, National League of Cities and even Harvard’s School of Business. In 2013, it received Habitat for Humanity International’s highest honor, the Clarence E. Jordan Award for creativity and innovation in building homes and communities. Not including the current build, which was still underway at press time, the local YouthBuild has a remarkable 95 percent success rate, with 69 of 73 participates graduating from the program. This success rate is based on employment offers and college enrollment. One of those success stories is Derek Thomas, who graduated from Phoenix Rising YouthBuild this past January. Thomas, 19, was eager to find a job but had no idea what he wanted to do when he began the program. “After we started building the house, I was running wire and putting in switches and electrical and decided I wanted to do this,” says Thomas. “Now I’m working as a helper for Mid-State Electric in Ocala, and starting in September, I’ll be going to night school at CTAE for the electrical apprenticeship program. “I think it’s a good opportunity,” says Thomas. “I learned what I wanted to do with my life and to go for it. I think everybody took something away from it.”

Current participant Jackie Velez is quick to agree.

“The program is a great way to restart your life. Some of the kids, like myself, were told we’d never turn out as anything,” says Velez, 20. “This is a second chance to prove to yourself you can do it; you can finish your high school education, no matter how old you are. I dropped out of high school in 11th grade. I have a child who’s

LOOKING AHEAD The next Phoenix Rising YouthBuild project will begin early this fall. If you are interested or know of a deserving young adult who might be a good recruit for the program, please contact CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion at (352) 291-9550, ext. 1144 or 1238.

Screwdriver © zhu difang/Shutterstock.com

and incentives are offered if they meet certain criteria, such as earning their GED within the 20-week time frame. Career Coach Darren McGuinness is a key player in the local program and is familiar with each participant, having recruited them. “Before a program begins, we put the word out and invite everyone who’s interested to attend ‘Mental Toughness,’ which is two weeks of unpaid activities that familiarize them with what the program is all about,” says McGuinness. “This helps us better determine their general interest, and we make our selections from those participants.” Once the 20-week program begins, McGuinness works closely with the participants. Time is evenly split between actual home construction and classroom, with three hours and 15 minutes spent on each endeavor. “They work hand-in-hand with Community Technical Adult Education (CTAE) and have a GED instructor. They attend classes at Howard Academy, which is within walking distance of the worksite,” notes McGuinness. “It’s a pleasure and a privilege to help them improve their lives,” notes McGuinness. “This is a great program; it’s really geared to post-secondary enrollment, either college or vocational. I work closely with employers and get them interested, so by the end of the program, I try to have kids lined up for an internship or enrollment in a post-secondary of their choice.” The sixth YouthBuild began in March and wraps up this month. Graduation is set for August 21. “These young folks are getting a hands-on experience,” observes Brad Nimmo, CEO and president of Habitat for Humanity of Marion County, noting that the organization has already hired one past graduate of the program to work in their Ocala Habitat ReStore. “We started doing one build per year, but since we got the U.S. Department of Labor

almost 2 and want to be the best role model I can for my daughter.” For Velez, working in construction was not something she ever imagined herself doing, but she’s loving it and is proud to be earning her GED. “My dad has been a framer for over 20 years, so I knew something about construction but not a lot,” she says. “I was not a big ‘outside’ person. I was a receptionist and a hostess, and I would never have thought I’d be able to do this. It’s so much fun to learn what it’s like to work out in the field, not just behind a desk. To build a house for somebody who needs it and actually see this house standing in front of us, it’s real! “We’re learning the right and safe ways to do this,” says Velez, who especially enjoyed learning how to read blueprints. Ocala Mayor Kent Guinn has been a staunch YouthBuild supporter and has attended all of the “wall raisings,” house blessings and graduation ceremonies since the local program started. “The best part of this project is the success stories that come from taking kids that are at risk and giving them a second chance. It’s great that people are getting new homes through Habitat for Humanity, but the best part is to see the young people blossom,” says Guinn. “Sam Williams did an awesome job coming up with this,” adds Guinn, noting that Phoenix Rising YouthBuild is a great model of what communities can accomplish when public and private entities work together. “It’s all about the kids,” he says. “I like meeting with them and talking about where they are now and what their plans are. It’s exciting. I tell them I expect big things out of them.”

Group Photo © Laura Byrnes, APR/CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion

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valuable volunteers Volunteerism is a way to create meaningful memories while giving back to the community at the same time.

On a practical note, volunteering looks terrific on college applications, can be applied to required service hours for schools and scholarships, such as Bright Futures, and is an ideal way to gain professional references and life experience. For kids, volunteering is a great first step to discovering what they enjoy doing and find most rewarding. Having volunteer experience means applicable skills and experience for teens’ résumés, both workforce and college bound. And don’t forget that happy feeling unique to the experience of helping others. Talk to your kids and encourage them to volunteer, and don’t forget, adults can help too. If you can’t volunteer with your teens, then play the cheerleader and help them stay committed. Ocala has a plethora of opportunities for various interests, and there are a few teen-friendly options where students can earn hours for school and scholarships. Each organization does great things and has plenty of work to keep you busy. So find what’s closest to your home or closest to your heart, and volunteer your time. By Madeline Calise

humane society of marion county Who wouldn’t love to spend time with a furry, four-legged friend? Though we can’t adopt all the dogs and cats of the world—I know I would certainly like to—we can all do something to help, and the Humane Society, a no-kill animal shelter, is the purrfect place to start. The first step is an application and orientation. Orientations are held every second Thursday of the month and every third Saturday at 2pm. If under 18, volunteers must have a waiver signed by a parent or legal guardian. The minimum age is 14, and if under 16, the volunteer must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. Tracy Pettrey of the Humane Society describes the shelter as a place where there is “never a dull moment.” Their website has full descriptions of each position, which includes walking and training dogs, petting cats, assisting with special events, grooming, building fences, helping with clerical tasks, photography, outreach and education. Volunteers are also needed in the thrift store, the profits of which go to helping animals in need.

humanesocietyofmarioncounty.com (352) 873-PETS

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munroe regional medical center MRMC has an excellent program for teens in grades 9 through 12. Under the direct supervision of adult mentors, teens have the opportunity to interact with patients and learn about the medical field. Jennifer Wood, the executive director of volunteer and senior services, describes the program as “a great way to get a step into the corporate world.” Learning responsibility, compassion, accountability and a solid work ethic is valuable regardless of future career path. Teens learn about patient interaction, the gift shop, information desk and even working with computer data. The program tailors to what volunteers are most interested in. The program has been going strong, with many teens returning to volunteer year after year. “It really is a win-win for everybody,” says Wood. Each year, there are two programs, one that lasts throughout the school year and one for summer.

munroeregional.com (351) 617-2153

habitat for humanity of marion county Most of us have heard of Habitat for Humanity, an organization that provides housing and hope to families in need, so why not go ahead and get involved? Kids as young as 14 can volunteer,

but there are rules regarding where and when. The website makes it easy to set up a profile and search for age-appropriate volunteer sites nearby. Volunteers can even use the site to sign up. Those under 18 should look for landscaping, sod and painting days, as well as demolition days. Students can also earn hours by donating bulk items or providing lunch to volunteers, options ideal for those with already busy schedules.

MTRA works to assign tasks that best suit a volunteer’s skills and interests, including administrative help, side walkers or maintenance assistance.

habitatocala.org Volunteer Coordinator Brittney Fish, (352) 351-4663

florida horse park

marion therapeutic riding association MTRA is a PATH Premier accredited therapeutic riding association that uses horses to heal those with physical or emotional disabilities. Volunteer Coordinator Karen Holmberg says, “It’s just a very rewarding, fun atmosphere.” Volunteers receive training and go through an orientation, the dates of which are included on the website. Anyone interested will also go through a level-two background check. Other than that, all that’s required is a willingness to learn and a desire to help others. Student volunteers don’t need to worry about school conflicts because many lessons take place after school in the afternoons and early evenings. The association has had volunteers ranging in age from 14 to 80.

mariontherapeuticridingassociation.org (352) 732-7300 volunteer@mtraocala.org

If you live in a major horse capital, why not work with horses? The Florida Horse Park serves as a venue for world- and Olympic-level disciplines, ranging from polo and dressage to cross-country. With thousands of spectators, you can bet they need plenty of volunteers. Volunteers must be 16 years old or have a parent or guardian’s consent to volunteer. No prior horse experience is required, and all volunteers will take part in a quick briefing and instruction course. Volunteer jobs depend on the day and event but may include general park help, including maintenance, tree trimming and office work, not to mention event help. Check out the website’s calendar of events to view volunteer positions, and contact the events eirector, Ellen Marie Ettenger, for more information.

flhorsepark.com (352) 307-6119 events@flhorsepark.com


hospice of marion county With compassion and care, Hospice of Marion County supports patients and families dealing with a terminal diagnosis. Volunteers must be 16 years old, and applications are available on the website. Now is an exciting time to get started, as Hospice officials have recently started on a special teen pilot volunteer program. The Volun-teen program began in June, with one volunteer shift a week during the summer months and twice a month during the school year. Director of Volunteer Services Connie Storms says, "I think it will enrich the lives of the teens and other volunteers in our thrift stores." Volunteers can work on various projects throughout the year, and help is also needed in five area thrift stores that help fund hospice care to patients in need. Students may also assist as receptionists or greeters and help out at the office answering phones.

hospiceofmarion.com (352) 873-7400 volunteer@hospiceofmarion.com

marion county programs Marion County itself has lots of volunteer opportunities, including Animal Services, The Public Library System, Veteran’s Services, Parks and Recreation and 4-H. Each department requires a background check and human resources application, which is conveniently located on the county website, marioncountyfl.org, along with more information on each department. With so many options, there’s something for everyone.

marion county animal services Marion County Animal Services takes in strays, lost pets and rescues, essentially, animals that could use lots of volunteer love and care. The shelter is open-admission and works with foster homes and rescue groups to give animals a healthy, happy

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life. During their stay, animals are provided care, safety and a clean environment, and it’s the volunteers that help make this happen. By playing with the animals, grooming them, teaching them manners and encouraging them to trust, volunteers help socialize the animals and get them ready for adoption. By getting to know the animals, volunteers can match adopters with their perfect pet. Volunteers must be at least 16 years old and submit a volunteer application form by mail or fax. Younger than 16? You can still help by hosting donation collection drives. In demand items include toys and blankets as well as handmade items like cat hammocks and catnip toys. You can find step-by-step instructions for making comfy kitty hammocks on the county’s website.

(352) 671-8700

“Each library division is a little unique,” says Jensen. “So there’s something for everyone.” Applications are processed throughout the year, and they receive a lot of teen applications, especially in the summer, as June and July are the busy months. Get that application in quickly because it takes a little time to be processed. The library always needs help in areas like circulation as well as with special programs such as readings and those in the children’s activities area. A great opportunity just for teens is YALLA, or Young Adults Leading Library Awareness, where teens gain leadership experience by helping to plan other teen-oriented programs.

(352) 368-4507

marion county veterans services Veteran Services, as the name implies, provides assistance to local veterans. Serve those who serve by cleaning and maintaining the beautiful Ocala-Marion County Veterans Memorial Park. In the past, teens and groups have done service projects that included raking leaves, sweeping sidewalks and washing monuments, plaques and benches. Those under 21 require adult supervision to volunteer.

(352) 671-8422

marion county public libraries “The library’s the place to be in the summer,” says Library Community Liaison Karen Jensen. With the summer heat, who could argue? The library has a strong volunteer program with eight locations to choose from. Teens 14 and up can volunteer, and applications are on the county’s website. Interested volunteers will be interviewed to determine availability and interests. New teen volunteers attend a short orientation to familiarize themselves with how the library works.

marion county parks and recreation The Marion County Parks and Recreation department provides outdoor programs and recreational opportunities to all area residents. As a volunteer, you can appreciate and help the parks near you by assisting the people who keep them up and running. Volunteers must be 16 years or older, and teen groups and organizations can work on specific projects or special events.

(352) 671-8560

marion county 4-H 4-H is all about participation in rural-based projects and teaching citizenship and valuable life skills. Traditional 4-H projects include gardening and raising a hog or steer, but there are also non-traditional projects like woodworking and bicycle safety. Volunteers can start at age 14, and interested teens should contact the 4-H office to learn more about current opportunities and programs.

(352) 671-8400


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8 reasons to give soda the boot p48

Avoiding InterferenceHeader p42 Sarcopenia pXX Header Slats pXX p44 Header Side Stitch pXX Solutions Header pXX p46

and more!

PUSH W THAT BODY

E ALL KNOW EXERCISE IS BENEFICIAL: IT HELPS LOWER MORTALITY RISKS AND STRESS, INCREASES ENERGY AND HELPS MAINTAIN WEIGHT. BUT HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH? CANADA’S YORK UNIVERSITY CONDUCTED A STUDY USING 129 ADULT VOLUNTEERS BETWEEN THE AGES OF 18 AND 64 TO DETERMINE JUST HOW MUCH EXERCISE WAS NEEDED TO MAINTAIN GOOD HEALTH. THE GROUP OF PARTICIPANTS WAS A MIXED GROUP OF DIFFERENT GENDERS, BODY MASS INDEXES AND ETHNICITIES.

Sources: plosone.org, cnn.com

© Goran Bogicevic / Shutterstock.com

The results showed that a majority of people had a misunderstanding of how much exercise they needed to maintain their health. Stepping onto the treadmills, the participants were instructed to walk or jog at a speed intensity of what they thought could be classified as light, moderate or vigorous. While the participants estimated light intensity correctly, the middle-aged participants had a better understanding of moderate and vigorous stages than that of the younger participants.

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LIVINGWELL WELL

HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS & DRUGS

INTERACTIONS

FYI:

depression, St. John’s Wort can reduce the blood concentrations of certain drugs, including cholesterol-lowering meds (Mevacor, Altocar), erectile dysfunction drugs (Viagra) and cardiovascular meds that treat congestive heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms (Lanoxin).

STINGING NETTLE: Used to treat allergies, stinging nettle can lower blood sugar and should not be taken with drugs for diabetes. If you are taking diabetic drugs, it’s best to also avoid fenugreek, Holy basil, turmeric and aloe vera as all lower blood sugar. KAVA: A natural calming herb, kava

shouldn’t be taken in combination with prescribed anti-anxiety medications. Other herbs to avoid are hops, valerian root, passion flower and St. John’s Wort.

GINSENG: Considered a wellness tonic,

this herb may increase risk of bleeding when taken with prescribed blood thinners, aspirin, ibuprofen or naproxen. Ginseng, combined with MAO inhibitors, (Nardil, Parnate) may cause insomnia, hyperactivity, nervousness and headaches.

FEVERFEW: A natural allergy remedy,

feverfew can thin the blood and should be avoided if on prescribed blood thinners, such as Coumadin, Plavix, Lovenox, etc.

PANAX GINSENG: Another wellness tonic,

panax ginseng is a blood thinner and should be avoided if taking over-thecounter anti-inflammation meds (Tylenol, Motrin, etc.) or prescription meds such as Celebrex. If taking any of these OTC or prescribed drugs, also avoid red clover, white willow and ginger.

GINKGO BILOBA: High doses can interfere

with prescribed seizure drugs, such as Tegretol, Equetro, Carbatrol or Depakote. Also avoid taking ginkgo biloba if taking OTC or prescribed meds for pain and inflammation.

HAWTHORN: Taking hawthorn, used

for improving circulation, with bronchodilators (albuterol, Singulair, etc.) may increase cardiac side effects, such as irregular heart rhythm.

For more information on herbal supplements you may be taking and their interactions with drugs, visit mayoclinic.org/drug-supplements or webmd.com/interaction-checker.

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Sources: fda.gov, webmd.com, mayoclinic.org

M

OST PEOPLE HAVE BECOME AWARE THAT CERTAIN FOODS INTERFERE WITH PRESCRIBED AND OVER-THECOUNTER MEDICATIONS. IN THIS CATEGORY, GRAPEFRUIT LEADS THE WAY AND ADVERSELY INTERACTS WITH A LONG LIST OF DRUGS. BUT MANY PEOPLE ALSO TAKE HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS ON A REGULAR BASIS, AND THESE TOO CAN CAUSE ADVERSE INTERACTIONS WITH MEDS. ALWAYS DISCUSS ANY HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS YOU ARE TAKING WITH YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER. HERE’S A LOOK AT POTENTIAL NEGATIVE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SOME POPULAR HERBAL SUPPLEMENTS AND MEDICATIONS.

ST. JOHN’S WORT: Often used to treat


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THE MYSTERY OF

MUSCLE S A RCOPEN

IA

LOSS

S

ARCOPENIA IS THE DEGENERATIVE LOSS OF SKELETAL MUSCLE MASS, STRENGTH AND FUNCTION. THINK IT’S AN OLD PERSON’S CONDITION? THINK AGAIN. AGE 30 SEEMS TO BE WHEN WE START TO GET A LITTLE FLABBY. THERE CAN BE A 3-8 PERCENT REDUCTION IN LEAN MUSCLE MASS PER DECADE, ESPECIALLY IN PEOPLE WHO ARE INACTIVE, AFTER YOU REACH THE BIG 3-0. AFTER 50, MUSCLE MASS DECREASES 1-2 PERCENT ANNUALLY; MUSCLE STRENGTH DECLINES 1.5 PERCENT BETWEEN 50 AND 60, THEN 3 PERCENT THEREAFTER.

According to a Journal of Nutrition study, loss of muscle mass has been linked to bone loss, obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and coronary artery disease. In older adults particularly, sarcopenia is a major cause of frailty and the increased risk of fall-related fractures.

30 50 45 Percentage of those 60 and older affected by sarcopenia

PROTEIN PROTOCOL Muscle mass is made up of proteins, and our body is dependent on two kinds: nonessential and essential. Our bodies, particularly until age 30, are very adept at making nonessential proteins. Essential proteins, though, must be obtained from outside sources such as beef, tuna and peanut butter. As we get older, our bodies lose the ability to produce nonessential proteins. And here’s the double whammy: As we age, we apparently need more protein to maintain our muscle mass.

Percentage of those 80 and older affected by sarcopenia

Percentage of U.S. population affected by sarcopenia.

TWO-STEP PREVENTION & TREATMENT PROTEIN POWER: Health experts recommend consuming 25-30 grams of high-quality protein at each meal to maintain good muscle mass. Our bodies use protein more efficiently if intake is spread out throughout the day. Protein at breakfast is especially important to kick-start muscle building after a night of fasting while asleep. Good sources of protein include: poultry, lean beef, salmon (28 grams per 4 oz); whey protein (24 grams per 1 oz); Greek yogurt (18 gram per 6 oz); boiled eggs (12 grams per 2 small eggs); beans (7-9 grams per half cup cooked); and walnuts/almonds (4-6 grams per 2 tablespoons/small handful).

SUSPICIOUS FACTORS AGING PHYSICAL INACTIVITY INSULIN RESISTANCE NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCIES CHRONIC DISEASES DECREASE IN SOME HORMONES, SUCH AS TESTOSTERONE, GROWTH HORMONE AND INSULINLIKE GROWTH FACTOR AGE-RELATED NERVE CELLS SIGNALING DECREASE

RESISTANCE/STRENGTH TRAINING: This can include any kind of exercise routine that increases muscle strength and endurance with weights and resistance bands. Research has shown that a progressive resistance training program can increase protein synthesis rates in older adults in as little as two weeks. A USDA study of elderly (70s and 80s) participants who did resistance training for 45 minutes three times a week for 12 weeks saw an average 32 percent increase of muscle fiber and 30 percent increase in strength.

*NOTE: BEFORE BEGINNING ANY DIET OR EXERCISE REGIMEN, CHECK WITH YOUR HEALTH CARE PROVIDER.

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Man © Ollyy; Magnifying Glass © Vitaly Korovin / Shutterstock.com

BEINGWELL

Sources: nih.gov, webmd.com, health.howstuffwork.com, prevention.com

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FEELINGWELL

STITCH Y

OU’RE OUT FOR YOUR MORNING RUN, EASING INTO THAT FIRST MILE, MAYBE YOU EVEN PICK UP THE PACE A LITTLE AND THEN SUDDENLY THAT STABBING PAIN IN YOUR SIDE HITS. OUCH! YOU’VE GOT A SIDE STITCH, AKA A DIAPHRAGM SPASM. IT HURTS LIKE CRAZY, AND YOU JUST WANT IT TO STOP. BEFORE YOU SWEAR OFF RUNNING, HERE’S THE SCOOP ON HOW TO DITCH THE STITCH.

STITCHY SUSPECTS » DECREASED BLOOD FLOW TO THE DIAPHRAGM FROM INTENSE EXERCISE » EATING TOO CLOSE TO EXERCISING » FOOD INTOLERANCE, ESPECIALLY TO WHEAT AND DAIRY

» DRINKING HIGH-SUGAR BEVERAGES JUST PRIOR TO EXERCISE » CONSTIPATION/GAS TRAPPED IN LARGE INTESTINE » SHALLOW BREATHING » POOR POSTURE/ CURVATURE IN SPINE

IF YOU GET A SIDE STITCH... Slow down to a walk, or even stop if you have to until the

pain subsides.

Exhale, making a grunting sound, as the foot on the

opposite side of the stitch strikes the ground; keep your exhales in sync with that opposite side until the pain subsides.

Massage area of spasm to relax diaphragm and

increase blood flow.

Push your fingers deeply into belly just below rib

cage on right side while pursing your lips tightly and exhaling as hard as you can.

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©

DITCH THE DISSECTING THE DIAPHRAGM The diaphragm is a sheet of muscle that extends across the bottom of our rib cage, separating the chest and abdominal organs. Ligaments attach our internal organs, including the liver, to the diaphragm. When we breathe, the diaphragm also helps force air in and out of our lungs. The faster we breathe, such as when running, the harder the diaphragm works. When we exhale, the diaphragm rises and tightens. One theory is that if, while running, you happen to exhale at the same time your foot lands during a stride, the liver gets yanked downward simultaneously and could cause the diaphragm to spasm. Side stitches usually occur on the right side and more often in beginner runners.

BE SANS STITCH Do 10 minutes of core-strengthening

exercises, such as planks, donkey kicks, yoga, three times a week. Avoid eating, especially foods high in fat and fiber, one to two hours before exercising.

Don’t drink beverages high in sugar before

exercising.

Warm up with two to three minutes of brisk walking before starting to run. Breathe deeply and slowly, expanding the belly as well as the upper chest to warm up; then breathe faster, as in inhale for two steps, exhale for one step Build up your exercise intensity slowly over the course of several weeks. Add sprint intervals once fit to strengthen the

diaphragm with rapid, more intense breathing.

Sources: runnersworld.com, howstuffworks.com, running.about.com

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THIS IS YOUR BODY ON SODA Brain: A 12-ounce can of regular soda

SODA’S STEALTH SECRETS N

EXT TIME YOU REACH FOR A CAN OF SODA, REGULAR OR DIET, YOU MIGHT WANT TO READ THE INGREDIENTS. HERE’S A RUNDOWN OF WHAT’S INSIDE (AND NONE OF THEM ARE GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH): CARBONATED WATER, HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP, PHOSPHORIC ACID, CAFFEINE, CARAMEL COLORING, ASPARTAME, CITRIC ACID, POTASSIUM SORBATE, SODIUM BENZOATE, POTASSIUM CITRATE AND ASCORBIC ACID. NOW HERE’S A LOOK AT WHAT SOME OF THESE CHEMICALS DO TO OUR BODIES.

delivers about 10 teaspoons of sugar in the form of high fructose corn syrup. The American Heart Association’s daily recommendation of sugar consumption is 6 teaspoons for women and 9 teaspoons for men. A UCLA study found that consuming excessive amounts of sugar reduces the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. BDNF helps us learn, store memories and process insulin; low BDNF levels have been linked to depression and dementia. Artificial sweeteners in diet soda affect the addiction centers in the brain, making you crave more of the stuff.

Heart: Consumption of both regular and diet soda have been linked to an increased risk of heart disease. A University of Miami study reported that those who had a daily soda habit had a 61 percent increased risk of a cardiovascular event than those who didn’t drink soda. This is mostly attributed to caffeine and sugar in regular soda, which raises blood pressure, and other chemicals that leech vital nutrients from the body.

Teeth:

Soda’s high levels of phosphoric acid and citric acid corrode the enamel on your teeth, making them susceptible to cavities. And thanks to artificial sweeteners and preservatives, diet soda is even more acidic than regular soda.

Lungs: The preservative

sodium benzoate used in soda has been linked to asthma and COPD. The chemical increases the amount of sodium in the body while reducing levels of potassium. A contaminate in soda’s caramel coloring has been connected to lung cancer in mice. In 2011, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that caramel coloring is possibly carcinogenic in humans.

Kidneys: Phosphoric acid has been linked to kidney stones and other

renal problems; additional artificial ingredients in diet soda doubles kidney problems. Phosphoric acid binds to magnesium, calcium and zinc, and we end up flushing those vital nutrients down the toilet. In a Harvard University study, 3,000 women were followed for an 11-year period and showed significant kidney function decline in those who regularly drank two or more sodas a day.

Weight: Drinking one soda a day equates to consuming 39 pounds of sugar per year. A University of Minnesota study of 10,000 adults over three years reported that even just one soda a day led to a 34 percent higher risk of metabolic syndrome (high blood sugar, high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels) than non-consumption.

Digestion:

Soda’s carbonation causes gas, cramping, bloating and makes irritable bowel symptoms worse. Caffeine in soda can also worsen episodes of diarrhea and cause constipation in others.

Bones: That evil phosphoric acid, as well as caffeine, pulls calcium out of your bones and can lead to bone density loss and osteoporosis.

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Anatomy © Alexander Ryabintsev; Soda© YORIK / Shutterstock.com

EATINGWELL

Sources: experiencelife.com, healthyliving.msn.com, menshealth.com

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Back-To-School Bento Boxes

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Dish

A Caffeine Cover-Up p52

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OMEN’S HEALTH MAGAZINE RECENTLY CAME UP WITH A LIST OF FOODS THAT SHOULD NEVER BE REFRIGERATED. CHANCES ARE AT LEAST A FEW OF THEM ARE HANGING OUT IN YOUR FRIDGE RIGHT NOW. THINKING OF REFRIGERATING ONE OF THESE ITEMS? HERE’S WHY YOU SHOULDN’T: The texture and flavor of TOMATOES can be altered. MELONS lose antioxidants.

Source: foxnews.com, womenshealthmag.com

Bread © Nagy-Bagoly Arpad; Garlic © NinaM / shutterstock.com

POTATOES get gritty, as if we weren’t worried about the lumpiness before. ONIONS can become mushy and moldy. Yuck! COFFEE absorbs odors and loses its flavor. Who wants that in the morning? GARLIC can gets moldy and start to sprout. Science experiment, anyone? HONEY stored in the fridge will thicken and crystallize. Who doesn’t love crystals in their tea?

FOOD THAT FEARS THE FRIDGE

HOT SAUCE kept at room temperature can last up to three years. Besides, cold hot sauce? It just seems wrong! BREAD can become dry. Guess you wouldn’t have to use the toaster. Refrigerated BASIL will wilt and absorb odors. So sad.

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Dish

HAPPY

MEALS B

ROWN BAGS, CARTOON-PATTERNED TOTES AND PLASTIC TRAYS WITH CONGEALED CAFETERIA FOOD ARE THE STANDARD SCHOOL LUNCH FARE. BUT SOME CRAFTY MOMS—AND DADS—ARE STRAYING AWAY FROM THE TRADITIONAL PB&J WITH BENTO BOXES.

WHAT IS BENTO? You may be more familiar with the “grown-up version” of bento that usually has its own category on the lunch menu at Japanese restaurants. A bountiful tray of salad, soup, sushi and rice is just one iteration of the bento we know and love. Preparing a bento box for someone is a way to create “a vehicle for conversation between the maker and the eater,” in the words of webjapan.org. We agree; by calling forth your inner artist, you can create fun, delicious and—most importantly—nutritious meals for your kids. We interviewed mother and bento-maker Rebecca Wolfe, who dresses up her children’s lunches with Disney characters and the like. Rebecca authors her blog Bentos on the Bayou, which she updates with photos of her edible masterpieces.

BIBBIDDI BOBBIDDI

BENTO!

With Orlando close by, we thought it only natural to have Rebecca share her Disney-fied bento boxes.

Mickey & Minnie Bento: “I made this Mickey & Minnie bento to surprise my children when we were planning a trip to Disney World last fall,” Rebecca says. “Eric (Rebecca’s 5-year-old son) was especially excited about finding Hidden Mickeys in the park, so I was excited to include several of those in the bento. They both loved it, and this continues to be Eric’s favorite bento of all time (mine, too)!” Olaf Bento: We still can’t “let it go,” and why should you with lovable Olaf in your bento box? “As soon as we saw Frozen in the theater, we were hooked! We had all the songs memorized within days.” An impending snow storm inspired Rebecca to make this bento. “Olaf was the obvious choice,” Rebecca says, “as he was our favorite character!” Alas, there was no snowfall that day, but that didn’t stop the entire family from building four, albeit little, snowmen.   Maleficent Bento: “Hailey’s all-time favorite villain is Maleficent,” Rebecca says, referring to her 13-year-old daughter. “I made this bento on opening day to celebrate the movie release. Both Hailey and Eric were so excited when they saw it! This is Hailey’s favorite bento that I have made.” Later that day, Rebecca’s kids were in for another treat—seeing Maleficent at the theater!

Want To See More? For more bento ideas, visit Rebecca at bentosonthebayou.com.

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Biscoff / Amazon.com; Arrow©Nikiteev_Konstantin; Woman ©Piotr Marcinski;; Shake © artjazz ; Cherry© Vector; Straw© Dmitry Natashin/ Shutterstock.com

the


Here, Rebecca gives advice on bento making, including where to find and order handy-dandy bento equipment, how to get those creative juices flowing and why not playing with your food is a rule that is meant to be broken. WHAT DREW YOU TO BENTO?

I was first introduced to the concept of bento making when I saw a beautiful bento lunch on Pinterest in February 2012. I was immediately intrigued and made my first bento the following day. Since that time, creating these fun, healthy and waste-free lunches has become my passion. It brings me incredible joy to provide tasty and nutritious meals for my family, and I love sharing that passion with others through my blog. There is no doubt about it—cute food is fun to eat. WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR INSPIRATION FROM?

I seldom know what I’m going to make before I start preparing lunch each day, and I usually look at the food and ingredients I have on hand for my inspiration. That being said, there are often outside factors that influence what I “see” in those foods. Whether it is a new movie coming out, something my children have been very interested in or an upcoming vacation. For example,

when Despicable Me 2 was coming out, I saw corn on the cob in my refrigerator and immediately saw Minions. (Visit bentosonthebayou. com to see the Minions bento!) WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR BENTO TOOLS?

My absolute favorite place to get bento gear is an online retailer bentousa.com. Bento USA has a much larger selection of bento supplies than any other place I have seen, excellent customer service and flat-rate shipping. Most of my bento tools have come from Bento USA. Many grocery and craft stores are starting to sell bento tools or cake decorating items that can be used for bento.

IS BENTO TIME-CONSUMING?

Bento making can be as simple or as complicated as you want to make it. Many of my lunches take less than 10 minutes. My more detailed lunches take a bit longer (up to 30 minutes to make two). Planning ahead can be a huge time saver.   WHAT ARE KIDS’ REACTIONS WHEN THEY SEE THE INSIDE OF YOUR CHILDREN’S LUNCH BOXES?

We are a homeschool family, so our situation is a bit different. We do have lunch with other homeschoolers and friends often, and they love seeing the kids’ bento lunches. Hailey loves to post her lunches on Instagram for her friends to see, as well. The bentos are always a surprise for Hailey and Eric, too, as I do not allow them to see them before lunchtime. Several of our friends have started making fun, bento-style lunches for their children, as well. I love to give bento tools as gifts!

REBECCA’S BENTO TOOLKIT Rebecca uses the brand CuteZCute, whose products can be ordered online at Bento USA or Amazon. Below are some of the items in her bento toolbox.

MINI-CUTTERS: The next most important tools are mini-cutters for cutting vegetables, meats and cheeses into fun shapes. They come in sets and can be either metal or plastic.

BENTO PICKS: Bento picks are small decorative food picks that are reusable and quickly add a little fun to any box. They are inexpensive, and there are thousands of options.

QUICK BITES

HARDWOOD SMOKEHOUSE opened in June near Publix in Heath Brook Commons, bringing competition-quality BBQ to Ocala. The family-owned restaurant was founded by Pitmaster Rich Lucy who believes low, slow, hardwood smoking produces the most tender, tastiest meat. Classics include their BBQ pulled pork, BBQ chicken, smoked turkey, Angus ©David P. Smith /shutterstock.com beef brisket, baby back ribs and St. Louis-style ribs. Try their made-in-house sauces to find your favorite. Great sides include BBQ beans, apple slaw, macaroni and cheese, green beans, corn nuggets, okra and corn on the cob. Open for lunch and dinner Sunday-Thursday from 11am-9pm and until 10pm on Friday and Saturday. 5400 SW College Rd., Ocala (352) 732-3677 hardwoodsmokehouse.com

QUICK BITES

BENTO BOX: The most important item is a bento box. There are hundreds of options available, ranging in price from just a few dollars up to $50 or more. Bento boxes can be plastic, stainless steel, wood or lacquer.   

Bento Boxes Courtesy of Rebecca Wolfe, Bentos on the Bayou, bentosonthebayou.com, Girl © Patrick Foto; Cookie Cutters © keki/shutterstock.com

BENTO BUILDER Q&A

BARAN SHEETS: Rebecca also regularly uses silicone cups and silicone dividers called baran sheets to separate different types of food within the bento box. SMALL SCISSORS AND TWEEZERS: Rebecca personally uses a lot of nori paper, so nori punches or very small scissors and tweezers are essential to her toolkit.   COOKIE CUTTERS: Cookie cutters are a great inexpensive option for cutting sandwiches into fun shapes.  

BONJOE GOURMET POTATO CHIP COMPANY OF OCALA offers more than 50 different flavors of America’s ever-popular treat. Using the best Russet potatoes and pure peanut oil, owner Joe Trudel has been creating some of the tastiest chips around since 2004. You’ll Continued on page 52

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CHOCOLATE (AND CHOCOLATEFLAVORED PRODUCTS)

CAFFEINE A

CCORDING TO THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH, 200-300 MILLIGRAMS OF CAFFEINE CONSTITUTES MODERATE INTAKE, BUT IF YOU’RE WATCHING YOUR LEVELS, HOW CAN YOU BE SURE YOU’RE STAYING ON TRACK? EVEN DECAF COFFEE CAN STILL HAVE AS MUCH AS 20MG INSIDE, SO WHAT OTHER FOODS ARE HARBORING INCOGNITO CAFFEINE, AND MIGHT THERE BE HEALTHIER ALTERNATIVES TO DOWNING ANOTHER RED BULL?

EASY SUBSTITUTES Nix this for that and get your daily dose of energy the healthy way.

INSTEAD OF COFFEE, TRY TEA. A cup of tea packs just as much caffeine as a cup of joe, and studies show the energy buzz from tea lasts longer. Once the coffee high is over, you can feel even sleepier on the backside than you did to begin with. For sustained energy without the depressive effects, opt for tea instead. White, green, black and oolong teas are all caffeinated.

INSTEAD OF ENERGY DRINKS, TRY ENERGY WATER. Drop the Monster and reach for a Vitamin Water sparkling energy drink. It’s still flavored and carbonated but has half the sugar, half the carbs and no sodium at all. They also boast 60 percent of your daily value in vitamins B2, B12 and B5, all known to boost energy.

INSTEAD OF CANDY, TRY FORTIFIED SNACKS. A sugar rush will only end in a crash, but many foods are being amped up with ingredients like guarana to provide energy and a satisfying snack. Try Perky Jerky, SumSeeds Energized Sunflower Seeds or even Jolt Energy Gum.

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ICE CREAM Chocolate and coffee are two of the most popular ice cream flavors and harbor their fair shares of caffeine thanks to what flavors them. Most brands with coffee flavors weigh in between 30 and 45mg per half cup. Chocolate ice cream won’t throw you off track too much with just 3mg.

NON-COLA SODAS Unless they print “caffeine-free” on the can, then yes, even light colored sodas have some caffeine hiding beneath the carbonation. Sunkist has about 41mg per can, and Barq’s Root Beer isn’t too far behind at 23. Rule of thumb: Don’t assume it’s caffeine-free without seeing it in writing.

PAINKILLERS Over-the-counter painkillers are prime culprits for sneaking caffeine into our systems, but to be fair, studies show small amounts can ease headaches. Extra strength Excedrin packs a whopping 130mg in the suggested two tablets, so don’t take more than recommended.

WEIGHT-LOSS PILLS Caffeine has no effect on weight or waistline, so there’s some confusion as to why these caplets are so full of it. One popular brand has over 1,200mg in a daily dose. Many speculate the crazy amounts of caffeine make users feel more energetic and attribute the feeling to their weight loss. Check the nutrition label before purchasing.

find traditional flavors along with innovative flavors, such as apple & caramel, biscuits & gravy, spaghetti, hot wings and Oreo cookie. ©Gayvoronskaya_Yana /shutterstock.com Of course, you can also get lunch to go along with those great chips. The menu isn’t extensive, but you’ll enjoy such items as a meatball sub, grilled chicken breast sandwich, shrimp boat with fries and slaw and more. 9360 S US Hwy 441, Ste. 5, Ocala (352) 693-5808 bonjoegourmetchips.com facebook.com/bonjoechip

QUICK BITES

Sources: health.com, cbsnews.com, vitaminwater.com

COVERT

If it’s made with cocoa powder, it’s packing some sweet, energy-boosting effects. Caffeine occurs naturally in cocoa beans, and the darker the candy bar the more stimulant it houses. One Hershey’s Special Dark Chocolate Bar has 31mg, about as much as a can of soda.

Candy©vipman; Mustache©nito;Jerky©Edward Westmacott; tea©Fotofermer/shutterstock.com

Continued from page 51

STREET BISTRO has been known for delicious, eclectic fare at catered events and just opened a brick-and-mortar location in July. The mother-daughter team of Kim Smith and Colby Bennett moved to Ocala from Maine and ©farbled /shutterstock.com have developed a following at equine events. The duo has broadened their horizons with the new shop, along with farm-to-table dinners, girls’ nights out, wine tastings, weddings and private parties. The menu is always evolving but tends to have a European flair. Foodie Continued on page 54


DININGGUIDE

Tony’s Sushi & Steakhouse 3405 SW College Road, Ocala / (352) 237-3151 / tonysushi.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p / Fri & Sat 11a-11p / Sun Noon-10p With abundant menu choices and over 100 off-menu rolls, you certainly won’t run out of options at Tony’s Sushi. If you can’t decide, the waitstaff is excellent at suggesting items you’re sure to enjoy. Every roll and sushi dish is made to order from the freshest ingredients. In the steakhouse area, highly trained chefs prepare a memorable meal as they cook on the tableside grills, preparing chicken, steak or seafood just the way you like it. Entrées include soup or salad and rice. Family-friendly, casual atmosphere, along with a full bar, including imported Japanese sake and beer selections. Like us

Book your party at Tony’s today. Gift cards available.

on Facebook!

Get the free mobile app at

http:/ / gettag.mobi

World of Beer 2751 W Torch Lake Drive, The Villages / (352) 633-9519 / worldofbeerusa.com Sun-Fri 11a-Midnight / Sat 10a-Midnight Attention local beer enthusiasts, serving 38 varieties of beer on draught and an additional 525 types of bottled beer, World of Beer in The Villages doesn’t skimp on selection. Join us on Tuesdays for trivia or Wednesdays for beer-bingo. Show up on a Friday or Saturday and enjoy live music while trying a new brew and munching on delicious appetizers like their soft German pretzel, crispy beerbattered onion rings or Guinness bratwurst sliders. Plus, this month, join us for several beer tastings: RJ Rocker on August 14 and Oyster Bay on August 28—don’t miss them!

All month long, the purchase of certain Samuel Adams beers will qualify you for the World of Beer National Contest where you could win a trip for two to the Great American Beer Festival in Boulder, Colorado. The in-house winner will receive a 5-gal Sam Adams home brew kit.

Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant 2463 SW 27th Avenue, Ocala / (352) 237-3900 / kotobukiocala.com Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30a-2p Dinner: Tue-Thu 4:30-9:30p / Fri & Sat 4:30-10:30p / Mon & Sun 4:30-9:30p For an authentic Japanese meal in an award-winning restaurant that has been serving Ocala since 1986, try Kotobuki. Enjoy traditional Japanese favorites like tempura, teriyaki and broiled seafood and vegetables. For a memorable experience, gather around the hot grill and watch as your chef prepares steak, chicken and seafood favorites right before your eyes.

Happy Hour daily 4:30-6p Check out our full sushi bar. Celebrating 28 years!

Get the VIP treatment and join today! Text MYSUSHI to 40518 and get exclusive offers, promos & coupons. Check out our specials!

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YOU SAY TOMATO,I SAY

“TOMAHTO” N

O MATTER HOW YOU SAY IT, THE HUMBLE TOMATO—BOTANICALLY CLASSIFIED AS A FRUIT BUT WIDELY CONSIDERED A VEGETABLE—HAS BEEN IDENTIFIED AS HIGHLY NUTRITIOUS. NOT ONLY ARE THEY HIGH IN FIBER AND LOW IN CALORIES, THEY’RE PACKED WITH VITAMINS, MINERALS AND BENEFICIAL CAROTENOIDS, INCLUDING LYCOPENE, WHICH HAS PROVEN ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTI-CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS.

The list of tomato benefits is impressive. According to the Singapore Medical Journal, the antioxidants in tomatoes help stop the damage to heart arteries that precedes plaque formation. And although raw tomatoes are tasty, cooking them releases even more of their antioxidants. In fact, it’s the unique antioxidant lycopene in tomatoes that is so powerful. LYCOPENE is credited with helping reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Regularly eating tomatoes and tomato products (think pasta sauce) is associated with a 15 PERCENT REDUCTION in the risk of PROSTATE CANCER. The antioxidants in tomatoes may even help PROTECT BONES from damage that can lead to low bone mass. All good reasons to eat more tomatoes, but if you need another one, consider that tomatoes have a very strong local connection. “If you buy a fresh tomato in January anywhere in the country, there’s over a 90 percent chance it came from Florida,” notes Dan Sleep of the Florida Department of Agriculture.

Woman©Dmitry Lobanov; Tomatoes©Natalia Klenova/shutterstock.com

Continued from page 52

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And there’s an extra good chance that tomato originated from DiMare Fresh, one of the biggest tomato producers in the United States and one of the top three producers in Florida. With 10 repacking plants across the country in 10 different states, the business farms about 3,500 acres in several South Florida counties. The company is owned by Jim and Sheila DiMare, who have long been a part of Marion County’s Thoroughbred business. Their Rising Hill Farm has been in Ocala since 1985. But they’ve been a major player in the produce world—specifically, tomatoes—far longer. “From mid-October to mid-June, there are 100 to 200 loads of tomatoes going out of Florida every day, and each load is 40,000 pounds. That’s a lot of tomatoes,” says Jim, who has been in the business since 1960. “Tomatoes are one of the biggest sellers in the produce section,” adds Jim. “They’re a very diversified product that has many uses.”

Appearance: Look for a blemish-free, deep red tomato without bruises or any discoloration.

Read the label: If you’re not buying at the farmers market, look for a label that states the tomato is “vine-ripened.” This way

you’re sure you aren’t buying a tomato that was picked green and later sprayed with ethylene gas to cause ripening. Squeeze test: Go ahead, give it a gentle squeeze. What you want is dense firmness. If it’s too soft, it’s not fresh. As a rule of thumb, the more dense it feels, the more juicy it will be when you cut into it.

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Take a whiff: OK, so you might feel a little funny smelling your produce in the grocery store, but scent is a great indicator of freshness and flavor. Smell the tomato near the stem. A good tomato will smell “earthy” and have a strong “tomato aroma.” If you can’t smell a thing, pass it up. The lack of scent indicates a lack of flavor.

Sources: quickanddirtytips.com, cnn.com, seafoodwatch.org

PICKING PERFECTION So how can you know you’re buying a tasty tomato? Here’s what to look for.

favorites include their escargot poppers, Asian fusion rice bowls and red velvet pancakes with maple cream cheese. Open Monday-Friday from 10:30am-4pm. 3622 NE Jacksonville Road, Ocala (352) 208-1557 facebook.com/ StreetBistro streetbistrochefocala.com streetbistrofoodtruck.com

MELODIA LATIN CUISINE opened in May next to Winn-Dixie in the Cedar Shores Plaza. Partners Kevin Hudson and Erik Gonzalez serve Latin fare with Puerto Rican, Cuban and Mexican roots. Patrons are already raving about the generous portions and authentic flavors. You’ll find every©Nitr/shutterstock.com thing from tacos, burritos and quesadillas to popular main entrées such as chicken with rice, chicken, beef and steak enchiladas and braised pork chops plus several American dishes. There’s also a daily buffet. Kids’ menu and take-out available. Also serving beer and wine. Visit the website to learn about special events. Open at 11am seven days a week. 3535 SE Maricamp Rd., Ocala (352) 450-8226 melodiarestaurant.com


DININGGUIDE

Smallcakes, a Cupcakery 4701 SW College Rd., Suite 106, Ocala / (352) 484-1127 facebook.com/smallcakesocala / smallcakescupcakery.com Mon.-Sat., 10a-8p / Sun. 12-6p Ocala just got sweeter, thanks to the opening of Smallcakes, a Cupcakery. With over 150 flavors and the franchise cranking out new flavors every month, there is something for every sweet tooth. Smallcakes features 12 daily flavors with a rotation of two to four specialty flavors. The most-asked-about flavors are key lime pie and strawberries n crème. Smallcakes also caters events, such as weddings and other parties, and if you don’t see what you’re looking for in the shop, the talented staff of decorators can create customized orders just for you with advance notice. Come in-store for pick up and share the sweetness today.

Start your week off right with Mini Mondays, featuring mini cupcakes by the dozen, and Toddler Tuesdays—free mini cupcakes for children under 5 with another purchase. And coming soon: cupcake milkshakes!

Tilted Kilt 3155 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 351-5458 / tiltedkilt.com Mon-Thu 11a-11p/ Fri-Sat 11a-Midnight / Sun 11a-10p Looking for some fun with a great meal? Besides our personable service, hospitality and delicious food, you’ll feel at home watching your favorite HD sporting events on the big screen TVs or enjoying live music on the patio. From poker to cruise-ins, there’s always something happening at the Tilted Kilt. Big or small, celebrate your next party or special occasion with us. Our menu features an array of options, from snacks to full meals, plus a complete bar, all served by beautiful lasses in kilts. You’ll want to make us your hometown pub. The Tilted Kilt – where a cold beer never looked so good!

Scan the code to view our complete menu and calendar of events. We have a cruise-in every third Saturday of the month. Or go to our website, ocala.tiltedkilt.com.

Get the free mobile app at

http:/ / gettag.mobi

Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill 2711 SW 27th Ave., Ocala / (352) 390-8188 Mon-Thu 4p-2a / Fri-Sun 11-2a Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill is the place for hungry sports fans to go. With 32 high-definition televisions lining the walls, including a 133-inch and a 70-inch 3-D screen airing every televised game, you won’t miss a minute of the action. A great menu and an incredible selection of 40 beers on draft means Tony’s can cater to any appetite. Not into the big game? Not a problem. With a pool table, dart boards and video games, patrons are sure to find plenty of entertainment. Visit Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill and Tony’s Sushi within 48 hours and receive a free domestic beer when you show the receipt.

Ask about our 1/2 off Happy Hour specials.

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DININGGUIDE

Don Chepe’s Café 2506-A SE 17th St, Ocala / (352) 622-1300 Mon-Thu 7a-5p / Fri & Sun 7a-7p / Closed Sat

When you order breakfast you also get a FREE cup of coffee!

Craving a new cuisine? Don Chepe’s Café serves a variety of authentic Latin American dishes created by El Salvador native Jose Moreno. Breakfast is served all day and includes familiar food as well as authentic Latin American breakfast options, like the Desayuno Centro Americano, containing fried eggs and beans, Salvadorian cheese, plantain, carne asada and rice. Creating a comfortable atmosphere with casual food, Don Chepe’s also serves sandwiches and entrées made from fresh ingredients such as pupusas from El Salvador, churrascos from Argentina, and arepas from Columbia and Venezuela.

The Ivy House Restaurant 917 E. Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala / (352) 622-5550 Sun 11a-2p / Tue 11a-2p / Wed & Thu 11a-8p / Fri & Sat 11a-8:30p / Closed Mon 106 NW Main St, Williston / (352) 528-5410 Sun-Wed 11a-2p / Thurs-Sat 11a-8p / ivyhousefl.com Southern comfort food the whole family can enjoy! Enjoy the new Thai Chicken Salad. Reservations recommended for parties of 10 or more. Make Reservations Today! We have catering and gift certificates.

“Come on home, it’s supper time!” is our motto. We want you to feel you have come to our house to eat. The family-owned Ivy House Restaurant now has two locations, Williston and Ocala. The restaurant has been named by Florida Trend as one of the “Top 500 Best Places to Eat in the State” for several years. Specials include Southern Fried Lobster, delicious Hand-Cut Steaks and our famous Baked Krispy Chicken. Trying our delicious homemade desserts like the Key Lime Pie and Chocolate Midnight Cake is a must when dining here. Like us on Facebook!

Latinos Y Mas 2030 S Pine Avenue, Ocala / (352) 622-4777 / latinos-mas.com Mon-Thu 11a-9p / Fri & Sat 11a-10p / Sun Noon-9p

VIP rooms available for private events. Daily lunch specials Mon-Fri, 11-3pm. Gift certificates and party platters available for any special occasion.

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Whether you’re on a date, meeting for business or grabbing a casual lunch, look no further than Latinos Y Mas! It’s the only place to dine for contemporary Latin fusion cuisine. Begin your dining experience with a refreshing Dragon Berry Mojito or perhaps an exotic Passion Fruit Caipirinha. Follow that with our delicious seafood zarzuela and Baja style tacos (pictured). Order any entrée from paella to bandeja paisa and end your evening with traditional Spanish flan—you won’t be disappointed.


DININGGUIDE

El Toreo 3790 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 694-1401 / 7 Days 11a-10p SR 200, Ocala / (352) 291-2121 / 7 Days 11a-11p New lunch specials include Taco Salad on Monday, $4.45; Speedy Gonzalez on Tuesdays, $4.95; Quesadillas on Wednesday, $6.45; Chimichangas on Thursdays, $5.95; and Burrito Supreme on Fridays, $4.95. New dinner options include Fajita Mondays, $8.95; Chimichanga Tuesdays, $7.95; Alambre Wednesdays, $7.95; Tacos de Bistec Thursdays, $7.95. Plus $1.95 margaritas on Monday. On Sunday, kids 12 and under can enjoy 99¢ children’s meals (takeout not included). Wednesday is Special Margarita Day, 99¢ all day. Saturday is 2-for-1 margaritas all day.

Happy Hour daily, 4-7pm. Everything is 2-4-1 (exceptions may apply).

THE BEST MEXICAN FOOD

Ipanema Brazilian Steak House 2023 South Pine Avenue, Ocala / (352) 622-1741 / ipanemaocala.com Lunch Fri 11a-2:30p / Dinner Tue-Thu 5-9p, Fri & Sat 5-10p, Sun 4-9p Brunch Sun 12-3p / Happy Hour Tue-Fri 5-7p/ Closed Mon A Churrascaria (Portuguese for barbecue) is a dining experience where roaming Gauchos slice and serve fire-roasted meats from skewers in a continual fashion. Ipanema Brazilian Steak House boasts 12 of the finest cuts of meat complemented by an opulent salad and vegetable bar, delectable desserts, and delicious wines, beers and cocktails. Brazilian native and Executive Chef Ortencia DeAlmeida invites you to embrace the flavors of her homeland and experience the magnetism of Ipanema for yourself. Become a fan of Ipanema on Facebook at facebook.com/ipanemasteakhouse.

Happy Hour Tue-Fri, 5-7p. $5 premium cocktails, $3 house wine, 2-4-1 beer and $5 tapas. We are bringing back Winesday Wednesday for a limited time - Half off any bottle of wine in our inventory!

Pavarotti’s Pizza & Restaurant 8075 SW HWY 200, Canopy Oak Center, Ocala / (352) 291-9424 Mon-Thu 11a-9p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun 11a-8p Pavarotti’s Pizza and Restaurant in Dunnellon is known for their famous, old-fashioned pizzas, hand-tossed and baked on a stone deck oven as well as their array of classic Italian entrées, fresh salads and subs and hearty pasta dinners. Their newest location in the Canopy Oak Center means Ocala residents can now enjoy Pavarotti’s famous fare. Veal or chicken is served Parmigiana, Marsala or Picatta style, and the seafood dishes are served fresh over linguini. Pizza lovers can’t get enough of the homemade pies, and don’t forget about the subs, stromboli and calzones!

Be sure to check out the new bar area and expanded dining room. Pavarotti’s also caters. “All You Can Eat” Mon - Spaghetti & Meatballs $6.99, Tues - 16” Cheese Pizza $6.99, Wed - 10 Chicken Wings $4.

PAVAROTTI’S Pizza & Restaurant

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HEADING TO SCHOOL IN STYLE Aug

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ELIEVE IT OR NOT, JUST WHEN EVERYONE HAS SETTLED INTO SUMMERTIME MODE, IT’S TIME TO START THINKING OF SCHOOL BELLS AND HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENTS AGAIN. WITH SCHOOL RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER, HEAD BACK WITH ALL THE NECESSARY GEAR. THE ANNUAL BACK-TO-SCHOOL BASH WILL TAKE PLACE AT THE MARTIN LUTHER KING RECREATION COMPLEX ON AUGUST 9. Kids can stock up

Africa Studio / Shutterstock.com

on pencils, pens and paper and even pick out a new backpack. Stop by between 10am and 2pm for free health screenings and physicals, tasty snack ideas to avoid lunchtime boredom, fun entertainment and activities, and of course, lots of free school supplies! The event is free and open to the public. Children must be accompanied by a guardian. Supplies are limited, so don’t delay—the first day of school is just around the corner!

WANT MORE INFO? Visit ocalafl.org or call (352) 368-5505 for additional details.

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RIDE ON OVER

Bring your bike down to the first annual OCALA BIKE FEST. Friday’s kickoff event at Harley-Davidson of Ocala will feature live music, catered dinner, beer and vendors. Saturday’s schedule starts with a poker run and leads to a barbecue cook-off, special guest appearances by the Swamp Brothers and more all happening at ARC Marion. Enter raffles to win a new Harley-Davidson Street Glide or an Indian Chief Vintage. All proceeds will benefit ARC Marion, and only 599 raffle tickets will be sold, so this is a raffle (and a weekend) not to miss. ocalabikefest.com, mcarc.com, or (352) 387-2210.

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DOGS, DOO-WOP AND PLENTY OF PASTA! Whether you like to boogie or have a soft spot for needy dogs and cats, the HAVE A HEART SPRUCE CREEK PASTA-FEST FUNDRAISER is an event you just can’t miss. The Spruce Creek South Community Center will host the famous Johnny Mello show to benefit Have A Heart for Companion Animals. There will be music, dancing, door prizes, free pasta and meatballs from Pasta-fest and much more. Doo-wop fans can dance the night away to seven performers crooning out some of their favorite oldies. The event is BYOB and runs from 5-8pm. Tickets are $15 per person or two for $25. haveaheart.us or (352) 687-1776.

GLOBAL GOLFING?

UNCORK FOR KIMBERLY’S COTTAGE

Want to be a part of something huge? Take part in the WORLD’S LARGEST GOLF OUTING right here in Ocala! This fourth annual

For lovers of great wine or those 14 who simply enjoy a good party, THE CORKSCREW WINERY will host a benefit event for KIMBERLY’S COTTAGE at their location on the downtown Ocala square. 100 For 100 Strong will feature signature hors d’oeuvres from Latinos Y Mas, a silent auction, plenty of wine including custom-labeled bottles for all attendees and much more! The event runs 6-8pm, and tickets are $30 in advance or $50 at the door. (352) 288-9800.

event benefits the Wounded Warrior Project and takes place at the Ocala Golf Club. The simultaneous golf extravaganza will take place at 120 Billy Casper Golf-managed courses in 28 different states. All players are welcome regardless of ability. Last year, over 10,000 golfers participated, raising more than $725,000, and this year promises to be even better. worldslargestgolfouting.com or ocalagolfclub.com or (352) 401-6917.

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Parents start celebrating! The kids are back in school, and the Discovery Center will start up their popular PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT program once again. Let the pros entertain your kids with an evening of educational films and fun while you enjoy a night on the town. You could hit up the First Friday Art Walk and check out what area artists are creating in their studios, or enjoy some of the hot spots downtown Ocala has to offer. The parental outing options are endless! The program is open to kids ages 6-12, and each evening runs from 6:30-9:30pm. The September feature film is Tangled and will be followed by plenty of fun activities. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900.

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Bike © Margo Harrison; Dog © Eric Issele; Wine © Boule; Globe © Eastimages; Couple © bikeriderlondon; Bus © Carlos E. Santa Maria / Shutterstock.com

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A QUICK

Q& A SUZANNE MCGUIRE

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T’S THE TIME OF YEAR AGAIN WHEN KIDS AND PARENTS ARE SCOURING STORE SHELVES FOR BACK-TO-SCHOOL SPECIALS. HOWEVER, NOT ALL FAMILIES ARE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO BE ABLE TO STOCK UP ON EVERYTHING THEIR CHILDREN WILL NEED FOR SUCCESS IN THE CLASSROOM. THAT’S WHERE OPERATION: STUFF THE BUS COMES IN. THE ANNUAL EVENT SUPPLIES KIDS IN NEED WITH ALL THE SCHOOL ITEMS THEY’LL REQUIRE. PROGRAM MANAGER SUZANNE MCGUIRE TOOK SOME TIME TO TELL US A LITTLE MORE ABOUT THIS WORTHY CAUSE. Tell us a little about the event.

Stuff the Bus is an opportunity for the community to help our most needy students go back to school prepared. We take a school bus around the county to local retailers and ask people in the community to donate. The program is funded through federal and district dollars, so 100 percent of every dollar donated goes directly to the program.

How well has the community supported the event over the years?

This program would not be successful without community support. We have a lot of regular supporters, including

Marion County Board of Commissioners, Community Bank & Trust of Ocala, Wells Fargo, Ocala Marion Board of Realtors and numerous churches. This year, we added Mojo’s as well.

How can families access these donations?

The school supplies are sent to every school’s guidance office. We don’t send backpacks to a school if they don’t need them. Families who need assistance can go to the guidance office when they get the supply list. The counselors keep items there and let me know when I need to re-stock. No one has to drive anywhere to pick up the items.

What kinds of items do you collect?

Traditional school supplies, new sneakers and clothing and hygiene items.

WANT TO HELP? UPCOMING BUS STOPS INCLUDE: Aug

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Marion County Board of County Commissioners Community Bank & Trust

Can people still donate? Yes, we collect all year.  

Wells Fargo Mojo’s Grill

Are there other volunteer opportunities? We need volunteers in my office during the year to help sort, organize new donations and also fill requests for assistance. We can also use clerical assistance.

Kmart in Belleview

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Ocala/Marion County Association of Realtors

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Wal-Mart in The Villages

The bus will be at all stops from 9am-5pm. For other volunteer opportunities, contact Suzanne McGuire at (352) 671-6847.

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THELOCALSCENE

CONCERTS

UPCOMING EXHIBITS AT THE APPLETON (ONGOING) The Appleton will host works by some of the best Florida artists with the 2014 biennial Outside the Box exhibit. The pieces will be on display through October 19. A Creative Life: Gladys Shafran Kashdin features a selection of paintings, collages and drawings by Dr. Gladys Shafran Kashdin and will be on display through November 2. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

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ALL DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM VENUE LISTINGS.

WHO

WHERE

WHEN

ROBIN GALLO’ S TRIBUTE TO REBA MCENTIRE JESSE MCCARTNEY: IN TECHNICOLOR TOUR

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

8/02

House of Blues, Orlando

8/05

CROSBY, STILLS AND NASH

Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, Orlando Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

8/07

KEYSHIA COLE TED NUGENT SLIGHTLY STOOPID’S SUMMER SESSIONS 2014 KARMIN

House of Blues, Orlando

8/11

House of Blues, Orlando

8/12

Cocoa Riverfront Park, Cocoa

8/15

CFE Arena, Orlando

8/21

URBAN MUSIC FEST

CFE Arena, Orlando

8/22

MOTOWN MAGIC

8/09

KAYAKING (ONGOING) There will be several kayaking opportunities available throughout the month for all experience levels. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560.

Fan of urban music? If so, this event is for you! Orlando’s URBAN MUSIC FEST is slated for August 22 and will feature some of the top urban musicians in the country. Headlining performer R&B superstar Anthony Hamilton will be joined by the likes of Lyfe Jennings, Jazmine Sullivan and Mali Music. Comedian Kevin Simpson will have guests rolling in the aisles with his original routines and antics. It’s a night music fans just can’t miss. The festival takes place at the CFE Arena and begins at 8pm. Tickets are available via ticketmaster.com or at the CFE Arena box office. cfearena.com. BLAKE SHELTON 3 DOORS DOWN ACOUSTIC: SONGS FROM THE BASEMENT JOHN MCCUTCHEON: JOE HILL’S LAST WILL LITTLE TEXAS LILY ALLEN FITZ & THE TANTRUMS DEMI LOVATO: WORLD TOUR TOM PETTY AND THE HEARTBREAKERS HAWTHORNE HEIGHTS & RED JUMPSUIT APPARATUS GARTH BROOKS TRIBUTE SHOW WITH SHAWN GERHARD RISE AGAINST MARC ANTHONY A DAY TO REMEMBER

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Amway Center, Orlando

8/30

House of Blues, Orlando

9/03

Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Gainesville

9/03

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

9/06

House of Blues, Orlando

9/10

CFE Arena, Orlando

9/11

Amway Center, Orlando

9/15

Tampa Bay Times Forum, Tampa

9/12

House of Blues, Orlando

9/23

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

9/27

House of Blues, Orlando

10/04

Amway Center, Orlando

10/05

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

10/10

© vierra / Shutterstock.com

AN URBAN EXPERIENCE

DISCOVERY CENTER EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS (ONGOING) The Discovery Center’s children’s programs combine fun with learning. Several programs are available for children of all ages. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900. MARION COUNTY CHILI COOK-OFF REGISTRATION (ONGOING) Registration is now open for the 33rd Annual Marion County Chili Cook-off. This year’s event will take place on November 8 at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion. Registration is $60 per team until September 5 and $70 until October 5. Space is limited. marioncountychilicookoff.com or (352) 895-1648.

GALLERY AT EGGS OVER BASELINE (ONGOING) Eggs Over Baseline will host a gallery event featuring the works of local artists. There will also be an all-day cruise-in the fourth Friday of each month. (352) 351-3447. GUY HARVEY EXHIBIT (ONGOING) The artwork of internationally renowned marine wildlife artist Guy Harvey is

currently on display on the second floor of Gateway Bank. All artwork is for sale, and Gateway Bank will donate all portions of its share of the sales to the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation. Exhibit hours are 9am-5pm Monday through Thursday and 9am-6pm on Friday. guyharvey.com or (352) 368-3756. CUTTING FOR CANCER (AUGUST 2) Those interested in donating hair for cancer victims can do so between the hours of 9am and 2pm on the downtown square. There will be entertainment, activities and food. (352) 843-0859. MURDER MYSTERY DINNER (AUGUST 2) The Seven Sisters Historic Inn will host a murder mystery event from 6-9:30pm. The evening will feature a four-course dinner along with a murder mystery plot for guests and community actors to participate in. Reservations are $65. The doors open at 6pm, and dinner is served at 7:30pm. sevensistersinn.org or (352)433-0700. FREE YOGA (AUGUST 2) A free yoga class will take place the first Saturday of each month at 9am at Shalom Park. Class runs May through September. (352) 854-7950. FIRST SATURDAY ART PROGRAM (AUGUST 2) The Appleton Museum will host a children’s program from 1-3pm. The program is free for members and included in admission for non-members. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. SUNSHINE STATE OF MIND HAIR SHOW (AUGUST 3) This annual hair show will feature a fashion show, live entertainment, comedy routines, salon vendors Continued on page 64


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Scene

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WHO

WHERE

WHEN

ALL SHOOK UP CHAMBER ORCHESTRA SUMMERFEST 2014 THUNDER AT THE FORUM: ROUND 2

IceHouse Theatre, Mount Dora

7/18-8/03

Phillips Center for Performing Arts, Gainesville

8/15

Tampa Bay Times Forum, Tampa

8/22

EARFILMS

Squitieri Studio Theatre, Gainesville The Hippodrome Theatre, Gainesville

8/25-8/29

CRAZY FOR YOU ORLANDO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA: CASA DE MEXICO

Ocala Civic Theatre, Ocala

9/04-9/28

Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, Orlando

9/06

LES MISÉRABLES

Orlando Shakespeare Theater, Orlando

9/10-10/12

ARSENIC AND OLD LACE

IceHouse Theatre, Mount Dora

9/12-10/05

AFRO BOP ALLIANCE

Phillips Center for Performing Arts, Gainesville Phillips Center for Performing Arts, Gainesville Phillips Center for Performing Arts, Gainesville CF Klein Conference Center, Ocala Bob Carr Performing Arts Center, Orlando Phillips Center for Performing Arts, Gainesville Orlando Shakespeare Theater, Orlando Phillips Center for Performing Arts, Gainesville CF Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala

9/19

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

10/25

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

10/26

CLYBOURNE PARK

RIBAB FUSION CAMELOT ALACHUA GUITAR QUARTET KEVIN JAMES UF SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA THE BEST OF ENEMIES CYPRESS SPRING QUARTET MOTHER HICKS JAMES GREGORY ANJELAH JOHNSON

9/03-9/28

9/27 10/03, 10/05 10/0410/05 10/05 10/09 10/15-11/16 10/19 10/2510/26

chair massages and more. (352) 817-8279.

FLICK N’ FLOAT (AUGUST 8) Jervey Gantt Aquatic FUN Center will host an evening of family fun. A film on the big screen will be presented from 8-10pm over the pool for those wishing to swim. Concessions will be available. ocalafl.org or (352) 368-5517.

BENEFIT CONCERT (AUGUST 10) A benefit concert for Transitions Life Center will be held at the West Port High School Center For Performing Arts. Lola and the Saints will perform from 3-5pm. Tickets are $15, and doors open at 2:30pm. tlcocala.org or (352) 861-0252.

GLO WITH THE FLO 5K (AUGUST 9) A 5K run will take place in Downtown Ocala to benefit the Marion County Children’s Alliance and The Drayton Florence Foundation. Registration opens at 6:30pm at Citizens’ Circle. Swag bag with neon accessories guaranteed to the first 300 participants. glowiththeflo5k.itsyourrace.com. GIRLS ALL NIGHT OUT YOGA SLUMBER PARTY (AUGUST 9-10) Kinetic Motion Fitness in Ocala will host an all-night yoga event at their studio. The event will feature several yoga classes throughout the evening and is open to women 21 and over. The party begins at 8pm and ends at 8am the following morning. Tickets are $50 in advance or $75 at the door. kineticmotionfitness.com or (352) 509-6002.

and more. Doors open at 5pm at the Hilton Ocala. sunshinestateofmind.eventbright.com or (352) 426-4208.

for guests. Light refreshments are provided, but the party is BYOB. danceocala.com or (352) 690-6637.

STAND-UP PADDLE BOARDING (AUGUST 9, 17) A paddle boarding class will take place at Carney Island on August 9 at 9am, 10am and 11am for a $5 fee. A paddle board outing will launch from the KP hole at 9am on August 17 for a fee of $20. Both fees are in addition to park entrance. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560.

DANCE PARTY (AUGUST 6, 22) Dancin’ Around Studio will host a social dance party from 7-9pm. The evening will feature a number of music genres and is open to the public. Admission is $5 for enrolled students and $10

MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER KICK OFF (AUGUST 7) A kickoff event will take place at the Marion Theatre in downtown Ocala from 6-8pm. The pep rally-style event will serve as a kick off to October’s

COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR (AUGUST 10) A health fair will take place at Jervey Gantt from 9am-1pm. There will be free school physicals for the first 40 attendees along with dental hygiene education, exercise demonstrations,

THELOCALSCENE / Continued from page 62

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DOWNTOWN SUMMER JAMS (AUGUST 15) A free concert highlighting talented area musicians will be held at Citizens’ Circle from 6-10pm. Food trucks will be available for concessions. (352) 368-5517. SCRAPBOOK FOR BREAST CANCER (AUGUST 15) Bring your favorite craft to the Marion County Extension Auditorium and raise money for Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. Each month features a different theme, and admission is $5. Doors open at 6pm. (352) 732-5982.

YOGA ROCKS BRICK CITY PARK

(August 16) Tranquil Yoga with Kaycin presents this family-friendly yoga event at Brick City Park. There will be yoga classes, Zumba, a potluck lunch and much more. Bring a dish to share. Tickets are $5 per person or $15 for a family of four. The event runs 10am-1pm. (352) 509-6002.

Yoga © Nina Buday; Ball © Alex Staroseltsev / Shutterstock.com

PERFORMING ARTS

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk. (352) 629-4727.


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TAMPA BAY RAYS Aug. 1 Aug. 2 Aug. 3 Aug. 4 Aug. 5 Aug. 6 Aug. 8 Aug. 9 Aug. 10 Aug. 11 Aug. 12 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug. 15 Aug. 16 Aug. 17 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 21

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MIAMI MARLINS Aug. 1 Aug. 2 Aug. 3 Aug. 5 Aug. 6 Aug. 7 Aug. 8 Aug. 9 Aug. 10 Aug. 11 Aug. 12 Aug. 13 Aug. 14 Aug. 15 Aug. 16 Aug. 17 Aug. 19 Aug. 20 Aug. 22 Aug. 23 Aug. 24 Aug. 25 Aug. 26 Aug. 27 Aug. 29 Aug. 30 Aug. 31

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7:10p 7:10p 1:10p 7:05p 7:05p 7:05p 7:10p 7:10p 1:10p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p 7:10p 1:10p 7:10p 12:40p 8:40p 8:10p 4:10p 10:05p 10:05p 10:05p 7:35p 7:10p 5:10p

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Scene

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THESOCIALSCENE

Grace Christian School

Brittnie Sanders and Jill Fore Carolyn & Tyler Scott, Kevin Camp

NATIONAL PARTS DEPOT

Grace Christian School held its 21st Annual Auction on Saturday, April 12 at the National Parts Depot. With roughly 250 people in attendance, the money raised will benefit Grace Christian School and its mission. PHOTOS BY RONALD W. WETHERINGTON

Amanda Stem, Debra Palmire and Catherine Vasquez

Eleanor & Gary Simons

Allison Blankenship, Paul & Cathy Clark Don Raymond, Amanda & Jon Miller Chuck & Matt Baker, James Bailey

Mary Baines, Father Don Curran, Gail & Scott Cross

Ryan & Ashley Owen, Nancy Abshier Amber & Jesse Clements

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

Melissa & Bill Simmons, Sharon & Will Whitehouse Jennifer & “Cooper” McGraw

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deanjohnson@ocalastyle.com or 817-3636 or 732-0073

ocalastyle.com AUG’14

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Scene

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THESOCIALSCENE

Mark Dickerson, Tammy Fakhoury and Sherrie Cebert

A Night in Central Park TRINITY CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL

Ocala’s Trinity Catholic High School courtyard was transformed on Saturday evening, April 26, into a scene reminiscent of New York City’s Central Park. There was a buffet dinner, live entertainment, caricature artists, street vendors as well as wonderful silent and live auction items. Well over a hundred guests turned out for the “A Night in Central Park” gala to support the tuition assistance program at Trinity Catholic High School.

Mark Schiefer, Paula & Scott Ryan

Cassie Sombat, Shelby Cebert, Grace Evangelista and Emily Young

Ronda & Toots Banner

PHOTOS BY RONALD W. WETHERINGTON

Walter & Terri Czuryla, Bonnie & Joe Vorwerk

Mike & Mary Taccetta, Jennifer & Rob Zylis Mark & Penny Baird

Julie & Thad Boyd

Tamara & Buzzy York, Nancy Myers Jennifer Muhlig and Lauren Williams

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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AUG’14 ocalastyle.com

Cassie Sombat, Grace Evangelista, Rick Muhlig and Shelby Cebert Chrissy Gourley, Katie Paraiso and Vicki Ehlers


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THESOCIALSCENE

The Centers Benefit Party

Emma Luetgert, Stephanie Cortes, Jill Fore, Leila Baker and Jodie DeSantis

HOME OF CHRISTOPHER AND EMMA LEUTGERT

On April 26, Christopher and Emma Luetgert hosted a “Party With a Purpose—Derby Style” at their home in Ocala’s Historic District. Guests learned about The Centers and heard from children and adults whose lives have been changed by the organization. More than $22,000 was raised, primarily for long-term residential addiction treatment scholarships. Guests were treated to delicious food and a beautiful evening thanks to the generosity of Ipanema, Latinos y Mas, Stella’s, Party Time Rentals and Audio Excellence.

Linda & Sal Farina

Bo & Sally Williams, Joe London, Beth & Frank Cannon

Meghan Shay and Tim Cowart

PHOTOS BY RONALD W. WETHERINGTON

Emma & Christopher Luetgert Jennifer & Marc Rogers, Kristi & Scott Goldstein

Allen Musikantow, Maryann & Kevin Donohue

Mike Luetgert, Hannah & Ed Poremba Andrea Pizzuti and Jennifer Bass

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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AUG’14 ocalastyle.com

Ryan Beaty, Jack & Tracy Chappall and Brian Fennelly

Mayor Kent & Sandra Guinn


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Profile for Magnolia Media Company

Ocala Style Magazine Aug'14  

Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.

Ocala Style Magazine Aug'14  

Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.