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April2013

Vol15 No4

Features 30 Summertime Solutions (To Keep Your Kids Busy) p20 Soon that school bell will ring for the final time before thousands of Marion County kids lock away their books and binders for the best weeks of the year—summer break! Parents, don’t panic; there’s plenty of groups and gatherings around Marion County to keep ‘em active this summer. Here’s a list to get you started. BY BONNIE KRETCHIK ON THE COVER

p24

Monster Mutt Madness

Whether you have kids or are a kid at heart, Monster Jam is a pulse-pounding event you won’t want to miss.. BY MACKENSIE GIBSON Cover Truck Photo Courtesy of Feld Entertainment. Globe © leonello calvetti; Stars © Triff / Shutterstock.com. Photo Illustration by Jason Fugate.

Derby Days p26 The All-American Soap Box Derby draws kids who are ages 7 through 17 and located all over the country to Akron, Ohio, each year for the world championships. And since 2004, young drivers from Ocala have had the opportunity to participate in this national, time-honored pastime of decades past. BY BONNIE KRETCHIK

Education Without Boundaries p32 Six-year-old Danielle spent a good deal of first grade drawing pictures, waiting for the other students to finish each section of lesson work before the teacher could move on. That is, until her parents decided that a homeschooling program would allow their daughter to learn at her own pace. BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

Butterfly Bliss p38 Symbols of freedom, nature and even our very souls, butterflies capture our attention with their effortless flight and perfect beauty. Butterfly gardens, however, may not be the pictureperfect garden oasis you envision, but that unkempt look is exactly what these exquisite creatures want. BY MARY ANN DESANTIS

ocalastyle.com APR’13

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April2013 Vol15 No4

Departments The Buzz p9 The real people, places and events that shape our community. BY AUBREY BOOTH, KEVIN CHRISTIAN, MACKENSIE GIBSON AND BONNIE KRETCHIK

p14

p12

THERUNDOWN p10

Unplug for ultimate family fun. GIVINGBACK p12

Sustainable nutrition by Eat Up Ocala. GREATOUTDOORS p14

Kayaking, camping and zipping the outdoors.

The Pulse p43 Ideas to keep you fit and healthy all year long. BY JOANN GUIDRY & BONNIE KRETCHIK

LIVINGWELL p44

p44

Do you have the sitting disease? FEELINGWELL p50

Vertigo with a vengeance. THEDOCTORSAREIN p52

Dr. Oz and Dr. Roizen discuss staying smart for your heart.

The Dish p57 Our best recipes, restaurant news and culinary quick bites. BY KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY, AMANDA FURRER, MACKENSIE GIBSON AND CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

p70

p60

QUICKBITES p59

Coffee n’ Cream adds Friday night dinner and Olive Garden offers new healthy menu. DININGGUIDE p61

Our area’s finest dining establishments.

p50

The Scene p69 Your guide to what’s happening in and around Ocala. BY BONNIE KRETCHIK

AQUICKQ&A p71

Ocala Style revs up for the Leesburg Bikefest. SOCIALSCENE p78

Photos from our area’s most popular events.

p71 p58

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urc e: T he M 1 edia Audit 201

MA

Still

1 MAGAZIN S#

COUNT ON Y’ RI

E

So

April2013

Vol15 No4

ocalastyle.com

PUBLISHER

KATHY JOHNSON / kathy@ocalastyle.com OFFICE/PRODUCTION MANAGER CYNTHIA BROWN / cynthia@ocalastyle.com

EXECUTIVE EDITOR KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY karin@ocalastyle.com

MANAGING EDITOR MELISSA PETERSON melissa@ocalastyle.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JASON FUGATE jason@ocalastyle.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS CASEY ALLEN casey@ocalastyle.com

LIFESTYLE EDITOR BONNIE KRETCHIK

KRISTEN NETHEN

bonnie@ocalastyle.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS SHEILA HARTLEY

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS KEVIN CHRISTIAN kevin@ocalastyle.com

MARY ANN DESANTIS maryann@ocalastyle.com

AMANDA FURRER amanda@ocalastyle.com

JOANN GUIDRY joann@ocalastyle.com

kristen@ocalastyle.com

sheila@ocalastyle.com

JOHN JERNIGAN jernigan@ocalastyle.com

KRISTEN NETHEN kristen@ocalastyle.com ron@ocalastyle.com

CYNTHIA MCFARLAND cmcfarland@ocalastyle.com

deanjohnson@ocalastyle.com

mackensie@ocalastyle.com

ACCOUNTING LISA CONNOLLY billing@ocalastyle.com

COLLECTIONS DOREEN ROCKWELL doreen@ocalastyle.com

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Ocala Style Magazine, April 2013. Published monthly by Ocala Publications Inc., 1007 E. Fort King Street, Ocala, FL 34471. (352) 732-0073. All contents copyright 2012 by Ocala Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature” denote a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements.

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THE GREENEST OF DAYS A

PRIL 22 MARKS THE 43RD RECOGNITION OF EARTH DAY. THE FIRST EA RT 1970 AFTER A NEWLY HEAL H DAY TOOK PLACE IN BEGAN TO TAKE NOTE OF HI TH-CONSCIOUS SOCIET Y MAJOR CITIES. WHAT THEGH LEVELS OF POLLUTION IN UNDING MEMBERS HO D WOULD BE RECOGNIZED FO BY AT LEAST SOME OF THPE E POPULATION, BECAME AN UN FA TH OM AB LE SU CC ESS. OVER 20 MILLION AMERICAN PARADED AND PROTESTED S MARCHED, RALLIED, EARTH DAY. TWENTY YEARSIN OBSERVANCE OF OUR PLANET’S DAY BECAMELATER IN 1990, OBSERVANCE. THIS YEAR, BEAN INTERNATIONAL INVOLVED IN AREA EVENTS SURE TO GET IN SMALL UNDERTAKINGS TOAND TAKE PART KEEP EARTH LOOKING ITS BEST.

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The City of Ocala will host the MAYO R’S 20 SPRING CLEAN UP on April 20 from 8-11am. Individu als, organization businesses are en s and couraged to get involved and pick up litter around our com munity. All litter collected wi ll be taken to the corner of NE 8th Avenue an d NE 14th Street in conjunc tion with a household hazard ous waste and electronics co llection. To volunteer, co ntact the Sanitation Di vision (352) 629-2489 be at fore April 5. Source: greenliving .com Apr

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Buzz

THERUNDOWN

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BOARD GAME BONDING W

HEN YOUR 8 YEAR OLD KNOWS MORE ABOUT YOUR IPAD THAN YOU DO, YOUR TEENAGERS ARE TEXTING THROUGH DINNER AND YOU’RE CONSTANTLY CHECKING YOUR E-MAIL FROM YOUR PHONE, MAYBE IT’S TIME FOR AN OLD-SCHOOL NIGHT OF FAMILY FUN. TAKE A BREAK FROM ALL THE ELECTRONICS AND BREAK OUT THE BOARD GAMES. COMPLAINING AND OTHER SIGNS OF WITHDRAWAL MAY OCCUR SURROUNDING THE INITIAL POWER-DOWN PROCESS, BUT AFTER A FEW MINUTES OF PLAYING SOME OF THESE BRAND-NEW BOARD GAMES, PAIRED WITH FUN SNACKS AND LOTS OF GIGGLING, THEY’LL FORGET ALL ABOUT THEIR NOTIFICATIONS AND FOCUS ON FAMILY TIME.

TELESTRATIONS (AGES 12+) $29.99

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This hilarious game of miscommunication is a combination of Telephone and Pictionary. Four to eight players each have an erasable note pad where they write down and sketch an object from the drawn card, passing it to the right once done. The next player guesses what it is from the drawing, writes it down and passes it again, allowing the next player to draw the written guess. This continues until the notepad gets back to the original person’s drawing where everyone reveals the funny changes throughout the process. telestrations.com

This is another fun and educational game that allows players to make words from individual letter tiles. Sort of similar to Scrabble, this fast-paced letter game allows you to make as many words as makyou can by initially flipping three letters and mak ing words as players flip one tile at a time after that. To make it even more exciting, players can steal words from their opponents and up the competition factor. You don’t even have to worry about keeping score until all the letters are used up! uppityshirts.com/oneup.shtml

7 ATE 9 (AGES 8+) $9.99 This simple and easy-to-play card game is great for younger kids just getting the hang of math. By adding or subtracting one, two or three to the top card and playing cards that match that number as quickly as possible, kids are challenged while having fun.

Popcorn Trail Mix For a healthy and delicious snack for game night, try this popcorn trail mix recipe!

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MAKE ‘N’ BREAK PARTY (AGES 10+) $30.99 This three-to-nine-player game is a hands-on adventure, where players must work together to describe a structure or object on a card while another person tries to build it from the description using wooden blocks. Depending on which space players land on, they might have to act out clues or even try to build with a blindfold on. ravensburger.com

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GIVINGBACK

Tomato Plant © M. Unal Ozmen / Shutterstock.com

Buzz

the

FRESH PICKIN’S Interview by Bonnie Kretchik

F

ROM THE TIME FRESH PRODUCE IS PICKED, IT UNDERGOES EXTENSIVE TRAVEL, LAYING OVER IN TRUCKS, TRANSPORTED FROM ONE LOCATION TO THE NEXT UNTIL IT MAKES IT TO YOUR SUPERMARKET SHELVES. YOU BRING IT HOME, WHERE IT MAY SIT A FEW MORE DAYS, UNTIL YOU DECIDE TO EAT IT. BY THIS TIME, UP TO 45 PERCENT OF THE NUTRIENT VALUE IS LOST.

Locally grown, seasonal, fresh-picked produce is by far one of the healthiest ways to get your servings of fruit and vegetables. But realistically, who has access to a bounty of fresh produce? The answer—everyone! Thanks to a newly formed, non-profit group, EAT UP OCALA, residents will soon have to look no further than the world around them to have access to a bounty of fresh fruits and veggies.

WHAT IS “EAT UP OCALA”

KEEP KIDS COMING BACK FOR MORE

The group was founded in August 2012 by Kaycin Nickerson with the idea to turn people onto sustainable nutrition. “People are intuitively interested in nutrition; we just need to give them access to it,” she says. Basing the model off of other cities around the country that have adopted similar programs, the goal is to have different crops planted throughout Ocala that people have access to. “You can just walk up and pick what you want,” says Kaycin, who is excited about the level of enthusiasm the young program has already received.

Another one of Kaycin’s missions is to plant vegetable gardens in the schools to get kids involved in the process. “When kids are involved in the process of growing and preparing food, they are more likely to eat it,” says School Outreach Liaison Claudia Pache. “Many kids today don’t know where food comes from other than the store. We want to change that,” adds Kaycin, a mother herself.

EDUCATION WHILE YOU EAT Don’t know what grows when? That’s the whole point of Eat Up Ocala’s mission. “If you have to eat a pineapple from Chile, chances are that’s because it’s not in season,” says Board Member Julie Vaden. The produce planted in town will be seasonal, meaning it will pack the most nutritional punch. “We also want to teach people what to plant when and how to prepare it,” adds Kaycin. She intends to include recipes and information alongside each crop in the future.

EAT UP OCALA’S “WISH LIST” The program has been embraced by area businesses that have begun sponsoring some of the crops so far, but much more community support is needed for the program to really take off. “We need people to donate time and services,” say Kaycin, stressing the need for a graphic designer to create maps and guides of the crops. Not only does the project promote regional self-reliance, but it also beautifies the city. “There’s so much charm to the downtown area. This will only add to that charm and feed people as well,” she says, hoping that others feel the need to get back to nature, too.

WANT TO LEARN MORE? Visit Eat Up Ocala’s Facebook page or eatupocala.org. 12

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Huge selection of T-shirts, jeans, knitwear, golf wear, shoes, suits, accessories and much, much more!

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Huge selection of fashionable, trendy, even namebrand clothes for women. Why buy retail? Shop resale! A large majority of our items are gently used and in great condition. Don’t be surprised if you find items that have never been worn!

Food Drive Day

Collection 1st Sunday of the month

Humane Society of Marion County 3rd Sunday of the month

352.245.0809 7655 SE 126th Place, Suites 2 & 3 / Belleview, FL (0.2 Miles North of Market of Marion on 441) www.thegardenworshipcenter.com Donations: Please know that we are always in need of donations and are very appreciative of your generosity. Your donations allow us to continue our outreach program as well as provide affordable household items and clothing to the community. To schedule a pick-up on your large items, please call (352) 245-0809. We are happy to provide you with a receipt for your tax-deductable donation.

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PRING IS IN THE AIR. THERE IS NO BETTER TIME TO GET OUTDOORS AND EXPLORE OUR NATURAL SURROUNDINGS! WITH THE VARIETY OF TERRAIN THAT MARION COUNTY HAS TO OFFER, THERE’S NO END TO THE ADVENTURES THE WHOLE FAMILY CAN EXPERIENCE. TAKE A LOOK AT SOME OF THESE ACTIVITIES GOING ON IN THE GREAT OUTDOORS.

STAND UP AND… PADDLE! Not sure how? No problem! Take the paddleboard workshop on April 1 or May 24 (for ages 8-16) to learn the basics. Then, head to CARNEY ISLAND to test out your skills in a class, or take on one of the Rainbow River outings if you’re up for it. Carney Island classes: April 21, May 5 (all ages welcome) Rainbow River outings: May 3, 31 (Ages 17 and up), May 19 (Ages 10 and up) marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560.

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CRAZY ABOUT KAYAKING Sure, you can get a decent upper body workout in a gym or on a rowing machine, but there is nothing more invigorating than paddling your own kayak down one of Marion County’s pristine waterways. Whether you are a practiced paddler or don’t know the difference between a kayak and a canoe, there are plenty of options to try out. KAYAK 101 at Carney Island is an introductory class for those with little or no experience. Learn the basics of kayaking, including how to get into and out of that tiny little boat! Next classes: April 9, May 14 for ages 17 and up, April 6, May 11 for ages 10 and up

KAYAK AND COFFEE: Beginner kayak outing down the Rainbow and Silver Rivers for those interested in nature and wildlife viewing. Next outings: April 4, May 2 (Rainbow River) April 18, May 16 (Silver River)

SLEEPING UNDER THE STARS Unplug from the TV, tablets and technology that captivate our attention 24/7, and spend a night under the stars at CARNEY ISLAND. On April 20-21, the whole family (ages 8 and up) can spend the day together in nature. A nature hike, kayaking, night walk, crafts and meals are all included. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560.

KAYAK ADVENTURES for the experienced paddler. Next outings: April 14 (Juniper Run), April 28 (Ocklawaha River) April 26, May 10 (Rainbow River), April 13 (Silver River) marioncountyfl.org

or (352) 671-8560.

IT’S SIMPLY SUPER If you haven’t tried the zip line at CANYONS ZIP LINE AND CANOPY TOURS, there’s no better time to take the plunge.

The recently introduced “Super Zip” is the tallest and fastest zip line in the state. You’ll hit speeds of up to 50 mph as you whiz over treetops in the hang-glider harness. For those who would rather enjoy the view at a more conservative speed, the original zip line tours are as popular as ever and take you past cliff walls, pristine lakes and enormous canyons. You won’t find all of these natural wonders in one place anywhere else in the state. zipthecanyons.com or (352) 351-9477.


dream, and spy photo you’ve ever had. When you set out to improve upon greatness, you leave no stone unturned. Or in this case, ©2013 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Porsche recommends seat belt usage and observance of all traffic laws at all times. no component unimproved. Built from the ground up with 90% new or fundamentally revised materials, the next 911 redefines performance as we know it. Acceleration from 0 to 60 in an astounding 3.9 seconds* in the Carrera S. It’s even shed almost 100 pounds for added agility and improved efficiency. The next 911 is the sports car that turns all we know into everything you desire. The next Porsche 911. Forever the sports car.

See the next Porsche 911 at the auto show. New 2013 Porsche 911 Carrera $799 Lease Per Month Auto Show Name Here Month date to Month date, 2012 Auto Show Location Here ocala.porschedealer.com Porsche recommends 24 month lease with $5000 due at signing including $0 security deposit with approved credit through Porsche Financial Services. 5,000 miles per year allowed, 30¢ per mile thereafter. Lease excludes tax and includes tag, title, registration and dealer fee. See dealer for complete details. Offer expires month end.

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Buzz

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SHOW DOG W/ B R IT TA

ONE-ON-ONE

S

RS N Y LA N D E

A GIRL’S BEST FRIEND Interview by Cynthia McFarland

M

any teenagers have a dog. That’s not unusual. What sets Brittany Landers apart from the pack is not her love of dogs but the success she’s had showing them. A senior at Dunnellon High School, Brittany, 18, has been exhibiting her dogs at the Southeastern Youth Fair for five years. But in December 2012, she received an invitation, based on qualifying shows in previous American Kennel Club (AKC) shows, to participate in the AKC Eukanuba Junior Nationals, an obedience competition in Orlando. Brittany and her dog, Sampson, ended up in a three-way tie for first and walked away with reserve champion honors. At the Florida State Fair this February, the dynamic duo won all five classes entered: showmanship, obedience, rally, brace and agility. Brittany won the Overall Best Handler award, and the youth team she showed with won the team obedience class, culminating in winning the Senior High Point award. “In obedience, you have to complete a pattern and the dog follows your body. They’re judged on how well they do the pattern, which includes heel, sit and stay. You can only give one-word commands and are allowed only one word of praise,” explains

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Brittany, who praised her dog with the word “Good!” spoken with great enthusiasm. Her goal is to show Sampson, now 4, to his obedience title. In addition to Sampson, she also shows three other dogs: Bear, Chloe and Skittles—all Golden Retrievers. Brittany’s always been fascinated with that particular breed because of their intelligence and desire to please. She also loves their playfulness, including Sampson’s “obsession” with stealing hair scrunchies right off her head and then acting innocent. “The best thing about showing is seeing the looks on their faces, happy and wanting to please,” she adds, “plus seeing all the hard work pay off.” He may be a champion in the show ring, but Brittany admits that at home, Sampson sleeps on the bed like the beloved pet he is. Brittany got Sampson (full name “Sunbeam’s Mighty Sampson”) when he was just 8 weeks old. She had already trained him to sit by 10 weeks. “We have five goldens, and all of them are obedience trained,

but they don’t listen to me,” laughs Brittany’s mother, Karen Landers. “I tell them to sit and they look at me like I’m speaking German! Brittany’s the trainer.” Brittany takes her training seriously. She uses both praise and treats in training but says praise gets the best results. She’s a member of the Marion-Alachua Dog Training Association (MADTA) and enjoys helping younger kids learn to train and show their dogs. “We’re very proud of everything she’s accomplished,” says Karen, speaking for herself and Brittany’s dad, Warren, and two older brothers. “Traveling to the shows has kept us close as a family.” Brittany is also active in 4-H and FFA. In addition to dogs, she’s exhibited horses, pigs, lambs, chickens and rabbits. In what little

spare time she has, she’s active in cheerleading and weight lifting. Brittany plans to focus on equine studies once she starts college.


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Buzz

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CLASSACTS

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS AND DISTRICT NEWS THAT SHAPE MARION COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

BY KEVIN CHRISTIAN

CELEBRATION FOR SPECIAL ART

NEW TAGS IN TOWN You may see new car tags around Marion County thanks to a first-ever project held by the MARION COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR’S OFFICE. Students at 21 different schools created car tags, which were then judged by local officials. Now, 41 designs are available for purchase to adorn the front end of cars. Online purchases benefit the district’s art programs and can be accessed at mariontax.com. Tax Collector George Albright also presented a check to benefit art programs in the district worth $13,241.

Special art by special people—this is the idea behind VSA, or Vision and Strength through the Arts. VSA FL showcased student art in a “Hand ‘n Hand” exhibit at the Brick City Center for the Arts in Ocala. Made possible through a grant from Target, students from five local schools—Forest, Hillcrest, Oakcrest, Vanguard and the Department of Juvenile Justice—showed their works to local residents. Here, Forest student Javon Jenkins wears a T-shirt he designed and holds his self-created horse used as his design model. Teaching Artist Marlene Jacobowitz is pictured with Jenkins.

WINNING AT WESTMINSTER It may be the king of dog shows… now it’s the king of art shows, at least for one local artist. Robert Clark, a student at CTAE (Community Technical and Adult Education), painted several dog breeds on miniature porcelain tiles and then assembled those tiles into a collage. The art ended up being selected as the official poster for the 137th annual WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW in New York City.

LAKE WEIR HIGH—BEST WITH THE BELT Student drivers at Lake Weir High captured “BATTLE OF THE BELT” bragging rights thanks to 97 percent of their students wearing seatbelts when leaving campus. That’s 7 percent higher than when they were initially surveyed earlier this year and significantly higher than the district-wide average of just over 87 percent. The program emphasizes safe driving and smart decisions behind the wheel and also comes with a $500 check compliments of Ayres, Cluster Law Firm.

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S-P-E-L-L-I-N-G CHAMP Aubri Minimi says she studied “some” for the MARION COUNTY SPELLING BEE but nothing outrageous. Whatever the case, she endured round after round to finish in the top spot, spelling “fluviatile” to capture the top title. The last two years, she finished as runner up. This 12-year-old eighth-grader from Fort McCoy School is the daughter of Ben and Tammy Minimi and went on to compete in the Orlando Sentinel Spelling Bee… results were not available at press time, though.

LAKE WEIR HIGH— DOWN VANGUARD’S “SWEET 16” WIN UNDER Thirty-two TV production students from Vanguard High traveled to LA to compete in the Student Television Network’s “SWEET 16” battle this spring. Students chose one word from a list of 16 and had 16 hours to produce a 16-minute video news show. “Devotion” was the catalyst that sparked the top-winning “Knightly News” broadcast. Students raised over $35,000 to pay their own expenses. This is the second time in three years Vanguard has walked away with top honors under TV Production Teacher Marc Rice’s tutelage. He himself holds two Emmy awards for his sharp shooting skills.

We’re not talking the Outback. Instead, we’re talking underwater exploration from students involved in Lake Weir High’s ROV (remote operated vehicle) team. They recently trekked to Dauphin Island in Alabama to compete against five other teams. Studying the connection between the deep sea and the Gulf coast, these students discussed, designed and built their underwater vehicles to hover, explore and retrieve items and conduct visual research. The team came in third overall and first with their PowerPoint presentation.


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(TO KEEP YOUR KIDS BUSY)

S

SOON THAT SCHOOL BELL WILL RING FOR THE FINAL TIME BEFORE THOUSANDS OF MARION COUNTY KIDS LOCK AWAY THEIR BOOKS AND BINDERS FOR THE BEST WEEKS OF THE YEAR—SUMMER BREAK! PARENTS, DON’T PANIC; THERE’S PLENTY OF GROUPS AND GATHERINGS AROUND MARION COUNTY TO KEEP ‘EM ACTIVE THIS SUMMER. HERE’S A LIST TO GET YOU STARTED. / Written & Compiled By Bonnie Kretchik

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1 MARION THERAPEUTIC RIDING ASSOCIATION Jun. 10-21

Two one-week sessions will be open to children 7-13. Campers will learn the basics of horsemanship and riding. Camp is limited to 16 campers and runs 9am-3:30pm with extended care available. mtraocala.org or (352) 732-7300.

2

UNCLE DONALD’S FARM

Wednesdays only Jun. 10-Aug. 14

Children ages 6-13 can gain hands-on experience with animals, crafts, nature studies and games. Camp runs 9:45am-3pm. Children need to bring a lunch. uncledonaldsfarm.com or (352) 753-2882.

3

OWL HOLLOW FARM

Weekly sessions in Jun. and Jul.

Children of all ages can learn various aspects of horseback riding and equine care. Riding sessions will take place in the morning hours, and swim sessions will take place in the afternoon. owlhollowfarm.net or (352) 237-4132.

Line Art © sbego; Upside Down Child © Subbotina Anna; Gymnast © Michael C. Gray / Shutterstock.com

30 30 SUMMERTIME SOLUTIONS

ALL ABOUT ANIMALS


4

EDEN FARM

Jun. 10-14, 24-28, Jul. 29-Aug. 2

Children ages 6 and up will learn the basics of horsemanship from a professional instructor. Camp runs 9am-3pm Monday-Thursday and 9am-noon on Friday. (352) 572-7658.

5

HIDDEN LARK FARM

Jun. 17-21, Jul. TBA

Camp is open to beginners through advanced riders. Learn basics, play games, improve your skills and much more. Camp ends with a horse show. Campers need to bring their own water bottle, helmet and lunch. hiddenlarkfarm.net or (352) 854-5151.

6

HAPPY ACRES RANCH

Weekly sessions through Jul.

Campers ages 7-13 learn the basics of horsemanship and horse care. Campers go on daily trail rides and compete in a weekly horse show. Swimming and horse-oriented games take place in the afternoon. ocalahappyacres.com or (352) 427-8870.

TUMBLING AND TWIRLING 7

BALCONY GYMNASTICS

Weekly sessions beginning Jun. 10

Each week, campers ages 5-12 take part in gymnastics, dance, karate, cheerleading, crafts, field trips and much more. A new theme is explored each week. Camp runs 7:30am-3:30pm with extended care available. balconysports.com or (352) 401-3663.

8 MARY ELLEN SCHOOL OF DANCE Jun. 10-13: Dance Camp/Mini Dance

GREAT OUTDOORS

Camp/Acrobatic Workshop Jun. 17-20: Princess Camp/Boys Camp Jun. 24-27: Dance Camp/Mini Dance Camp Jul. 8-11: Dance Camp/Mini Dance Camp/Acrobatic Workshop Jul. 15-18: Princess Camp/Boys Camp Jul. 22-25: Dance Camp/Mini Dance Camp/Ballet Workshop Jul. 29-Aug. 1: Princess Camp/Boys Camp Aug. 5-8: FOCUS Intensive

10

Mary Ellen School of Dance will host a variety of summer dance camps. Each camp has a different theme and is offered either from 9am-3pm or for 1/2 day depending on the camp.

Jun. 17-Aug. 10

maryellenschoolofdance.com or (352) 732-2030.

mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900.

9

12

THE DANCE FACTORY

Jun. 24-Jul. 26

Children ages 3 1/2 and up will have the opportunity to fine-tune their tap, jazz, ballet and hip hop dancing skills this summer. A ballet-intensive program will also be offered. Call for times. dancefactoryocala.com or (352) 368-7616.

DISCOVERY CENTER OUTDOOR CAMP Jun. 17- Aug. 10

This camp’s mission is to get kids ages 11-14 outdoors to explore the world around them. Each week follows a specific theme and includes fun and educational activities and field trips. Camp runs 8:30am-4:30pm. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900.

11 DISCOVERY CENTER ADVENTURE CAMP Each week, kids ages 8-12 will take part in a variety of fun and educational adventures centered around a different theme. Camp runs 8:30am-4:30pm.

SPORTS CAMPS AT COLLEGE OF CENTRAL FLORIDA Jun. 17-20: All Sports Camp:

Campers play a different sport each day. Jul. 15-18: Baseball Camp: Focus on baseball skills and games. Jul. 29-Aug. 2: Baseball Fun Camp: Baseball-type games, including wiffle ball, homerun derby, kickball and more. All camps take place at the College of Central Florida baseball field and include swimming. Camps are limited to 60 campers. gocfcamps.com or (352) 854-2322 ext. 1571.

13

CAMP PATRIOT CO-ED BASKETBALL CAMP Jun. 17-20, 24-27, Jul. 8-11, 22-25

Children ages 8-18 will participate in drills and play games to improve their basketball skills. Camp runs 9am-4pm at the College of Central Florida. gocfcamps.com or (352) 854-2322 ext. 1323.

14

PERRY’S SWIM SCHOOL

Throughout the summer

Perry’s swim school offers classes for infants through adults, beginners through advanced swimmers. Learn different strokes and improve your skill and technique. Private lessons also available. perryswimschool.com or (352) 732-5540.

15

SWIM AMERICA

Throughout the summer

Swim America offers classes of all levels. All coaches are certified through the American Swimming Coaches Association. Day and evening sessions are available as well as stroke classes. All classes are held at the Newton A. Perry Aquatics Center. ocalaaquatics.com or (352) 625-2804.

16

OCALA OUTDOOR ADVENTURE CAMP Jun. 16- Aug. 2

Operated through the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, camp consists of six one-week long sessions at the Ocala Conservation Center. Campers are dropped off Sunday afternoon and picked up Friday afternoon. Programs include fishing, hunter safety, hunting skills and wilderness skills. ocalaoutdooradventurecamp.com or (352) 625- 2804.

17 XTREME KIDS SUMMER CAMP Weekly sessions beginning Jun. 6

Campers ages 5-12 will take part in a variety of athletic activities as well as daily field trips and movies. Lunch and snacks provided. Camp runs Mon-Fri, 6:30am-6pm. (352) 861-9474.

18

SUMMER ENRICHMENT AT MONTESSORI PREPARATORY Weekly sessions in Jun. and Jul.

A number of different programs for children through fifth grade are available. This year’s theme is dinosaurs. Campers will learn

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about fossils, reptiles, amphibians and much more. montessoriacademies.net or (352) 351-3140.

19

OCALA TENNIS AND SWIM CAMP Jun. 10-Aug. 9

Nine weeks of tennis and swim camp will be offered at the Ft. King Tennis Center. Tennis instruction will be provided for beginner through advanced players followed by a recreational swim session. A tennis-only option is available. Camp runs 9am-1pm. (352) 629-8453.

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MARTIAL ARTS WORLD SUMMER CAMP Weekly sessions beginning Jun. 10

A daily martial arts class is followed by a variety of fun and educational activities, including field trips, picnics, movies, swimming and more. Sessions begin at 7am with pick-up as late as 6pm. mawocala.com or (352) 307-0014.

TEAM TENNIS

Jun. 10-Jul. 26

Sessions run either Tuesday/Thursday or Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday from 11:30am-1pm. A variety of drills and games will improve players’ abilities in match play. Sessions take place at the Ft. King Tennis Center. (352) 629-8453.

21

JUNIOR LIFEGUARD CAMP Jun. 17-22

Kids ages 11-15 can learn to become a professional lifeguard in a fun and safe environment at the Jervey Gantt Aquatic FUN Center. Camp runs 8am-1pm. Certain prerequisites required. ocalafl.org or (352) 624-2410.

22

PAD1 SEA1 TEAM PROGRAM Jul. 22-26

A Master Scuba Diver will host this fun pool-only experience that will teach kids ages 10-15 about the aquatic environment as well as introduce them to scuba diving. Camp runs 8am-1pm at the Jervey Gantt Aquatic FUN Center. ocalafl.org or (352) 624-2410.

23

OCALA KARATE DOJO SUMMER CAMP Weekly sessions throughout the summer

This award-winning camp draws participants from all over

22

ocalakarate.com or (352) 237-9076.

APR’13

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ARTS AND ACTING 25

SUMMER ART CAMP

Weekly camps beginning Jun. 17-Aug. 9

The Appleton Museum will host a number of camps this summer for young artists ages 7-12. Camps run either 9am-noon or 1-4pm. Art supplies are provided. There will be two camps for 4 to 6 year olds on June 24-28 and July 15-19 from 10am-noon. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455 ext. 1613.

26

OCALA CIVIC THEATRE

Multiple programs throughout the spring and summer

The Ocala Civic Theatre offers a wide variety of classes throughout the spring and summer for children of all ages. Classes in drama, comedy, musicals as well as auditions for performances are available. ocalacivictheatre.com or (352) 236-2274.

27

ART CAMP AT THE BRICK

7:30am-6pm at the E.D. Croskey Recreation Center.

Jun. 11-Aug. 2

ocalafl.org or (352) 401-3920.

Students will learn color, technique and more while they exercise their creativity over summer break. They will study water color, acrylics, glass mosaics, drawing and polymer clay. Camp runs 11:30am-3:30pm. Early arrival begins at 11am. (352) 867-9660.

OTHER FUN STUFF 28

COOL CROSKEY SUMMER CAMP Jun. 10-Aug. 9

This summer, kids can engage in many fun activities that build selfesteem and character. Each week includes team sports, arts and crafts, swimming, field trips and much more. Campers will love the imagination station! Camp runs

29

YMCA SUMMER CAMPS

Throughout the summer

The Marion County YMCA hosts several summer programs for children of all ages throughout the summer. For a complete list, contact the YMCA. ymcacentralflorida.com or (352) 368-9622.

30

OPEN RECREATION AT LILLIAN BRYANT Jun. 10-Aug. 16

A variety of fun and educational activities will keep kids’ minds and bodies engaged in a supervised environment. The program runs Mon-Fri from 3-7pm, and participants receive a T-shirt. ocalafl.org or (352) 629-8389.

Kids © Mandy Godbehear; Hand © Vladyslav Starozhylov / Shutterstock.com

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the United States. It includes training in karate, self-defense, anti-bullying and daily field trips. Register early. Camp runs 9am-5pm.


PERRY’S SWIM SCHOOL DELEE PERRY - OWNER/INSTRUCTOR

Offering classes for infants through adults, beginners through advanced swimmers. Learn the different strokes and improve your skill and technique.

PHOTO OF: NEWT PERRY

FOUNDED:

OF TEACHING SWIMMING IN FLORIDA

BY NEWT & DOT PERRY

352.732.5540 412 NE 17th Ave, Ocala

THE PERRY FAMILY IS CELEBRATING 90 YEARS

1955

VISIT OUR WEBSITE: WWW.PERRYSWIMSCHOOL.COM

Summer Sports

Fun!

Sports Camps Jun 17-20 Baseball Camps Jul 15-18 Baseball Fun Camps Jul 29 – Aug 1 Ages 6-12 9:30-4pm Daily Lunch, Awards, & T-Shirt Included

Marty Smith

Sports Campsq Camps 352-427-8372 / www.gocfcamps.com at

located at College of Central Florida baseball field

Come Visit A Real

FARM!

• Many Farm Animals To Feed & Pet • Enjoy The Cows On The Hayride • Wildlife Exhibit | Pony Rides | Picnic Area • Summer Day Camp On Wednesdays Starting July 10 Through August 14

UNCLE DONALD’S FARM 352-753-2882 • 2713 Griffin Ave. Lady Lake

www.UncleDonaldsFarm.com

Family Fun at Family Prices! Call for admission prices and hours.

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SUMMER HORSE CAMP PROGRAM

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Happy Acres RANCH 10051 SW 125th Terrace, Dunnellon / 352.489.8550 www.ocalahappyacres.com

SUMMER CAMP & GET 1/2 OFF REGISTRATION FEE

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Montessori Preparatory

summer enrichment program program Register NOW!

» Dinosaurs » Exploration of fossils » Classification of dinosaurs » Mammals, reptiles, amphibians and birds

ALL LEVELS: AGES 3 & UP

g dancers to b Inspirin e

Tap

Hip Hop

t h e be s t t h e y c a n b

e!

Debbie McCreight, Director

352.368.7616

dancefactoryocala.com / 3233 SE Maricamp Rd, Ocala

Language • Math • Science History • Social Studies Geography • Practical Life Sensorial • Spanish • Chinese Karate • Art • Music

2967 NE Silver Springs Blvd.

351.3140

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USE THE NEXT PAGE AS AN AUTOGRAPH PAGE WHEN YOU VISIT THE TRACK! I N T E R V I E W BY

MACKENSIE GIBSON

Weighing in at 10,000 pounds, standing 11 feet tall and expanding 10 feet wide, these mammoth

creatures reach speeds of 100 miles per hour as they fly through the air with the greatest of ease, crushing all lesser beasts in their paths. Whether you have kids or are a kid at heart, Monster Jam is a pulse-pounding event you won’t want to miss. Taking place at the Bubba Raceway Park, see four-time world champion Grave Digger, all-new Zombie, Grinder, Razin Kane, Ice Cream Man and this issue’s cover star Monster Mutt attempt to score straight 10s while keeping spectators on the edge of their seats. Ocala Style spoke with Whit Tarlton, the driver of Monster Mutt, to learn what it’s like to be behind the wheel of a monster truck. WANT TO GO?

ADVANCE AUTO PARTS MONSTER JAM SUMMER HEAT TOUR

BUBBA RACEWAY PARK, OCALA / APRIL 19-21 TICKETMASTER.COM

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HOW DID YOU BECOME A MONSTER TRUCK DRIVER?

A good friend of mine, Gary Porter, started in monster trucks back in ’85. He was up driving the Grave Digger and needed a driver. At the time, I drove The Ninja Turtle truck. He asked me if I wanted to be a driver, and I went and tested for him. I drove the Monster Mutt for two years, then the Spider-man for two years and now this is my second time back in Monster Mutt.

HOW DO YOU LIKE THE MONSTER MUTT?

I like it a lot. It’s got the ears, the tail and tongue. It’s like a magnet to the kids. That’s one great part of it. My kids are all grown up, and I can make some kids happy. That would be the biggest perk of driving the Monster Mutt—just making the kids smile.

WHAT’S THE CRAZIEST THING THAT’S HAPPENED TO YOU DURING A SHOW?

I guess it was the craziest and the worst, my truck caught on fire in Houston. That was probably the worst experience. I dislocated my shoulder one time and broke my collarbone, too.

DO YOU GET NERVOUS BEFORE OR DURING SHOWS? No, I guess it’s just like another day at the office. If I’m nervous about anything, it’s just about wanting the truck to stay together so I can put on a good show.

WHAT DOES IT FEEL LIKE TO RIDE IN THE MONSTER MUTT?

It’d be like operating a piece of heavy equipment on steroids. You’re just constantly trying to make decisions: how to maneuver the cars, when to turn, if I need to gear down. It just starts running away with you in a sense.

WAS IT DIFFICULT TO LEARN HOW TO DO ALL THAT?

It pretty much comes down to you’re either going to get it or you’re not. Thinking it out isn’t going to work because nothing ever goes as planned. It takes time to get the feel of the trucks. If you get the feel of how it runs, you can put on a good show.


ZOMBIE

GRINDER GRAVE DIGGER

MONSTER MUTT

RAZIN’ KAN

E

ICE CREAM MAN ocalastyle.com APR’13

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DERBY DAYS

WRITTEN BY BONNIE KRETCHIK / PHOTOS BY JOHN JERNIGAN

A

T A TIME WHEN THE CLOSEST RESEMBLANCE TO RACECAR DRIVING KIDS MAY EXPERIENCE IS VIA THE LATEST VIDEO GAME OR NEWEST APP, IT’S NO WONDER FEW ARE AWARE OF AN ALMOST 80-YEAR-OLD TRADITION THAT GRANTS KIDS THE OPPORTUNITY TO CONSTRUCT AND RACE THEIR OWN GRAVITYPOWERED MACHINES. THE ALL-AMERICAN SOAP BOX DERBY DRAWS KIDS WHO ARE AGES 7 THROUGH 17 AND LOCATED ALL OVER THE COUNTRY TO AKRON, OHIO, EACH YEAR FOR THE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS. AND SINCE 2004, YOUNG DRIVERS FROM OCALA HAVE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS NATIONAL, TIME-HONORED PASTIME OF DECADES PAST. What Exactly Is A Soap Box Derby? The idea for the original soap box derby arose from an Ohio news photographer in 1934. Myron E. Scott noticed a few boys racing engineless homemade cars downhill. Being a creative and progressive thinker, Myron asked the boys to return a week later with as many friends as they had to race for a “loving cup” as depressionera trophies were called. Nineteen boys returned to the designated spot with their homemade cars to vie for the cup. Intrigued by the number of participants that came out to race for a mere trinket of a trophy, Myron decided to expand the call and offer grander prizes. On August 19, 1933, an estimated 40,000 people came to watch 362 boys race with their makeshift

downhill cars. They brought cars constructed from everything you can imagine, including orange crates, sheet tin, wagons and other various objects with wheels, though interestingly enough, not one boy raced in an actual soap box. The event was such a success that several big-name sponsors,

AS MANY AS 70,000 SPECTATORS USED TO FLOOD AKRON, OHIO FOR THE ALLAMERICAN SOAP BOX DERBY including Chevrolet, Goodrich and Goodyear jumped on board, and a national championship race was scheduled for the following year in Dayton, Ohio. Thirty-four cities sent representatives to race that year and as soap box derby races grew in popularity, so did the

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sponsorships, prize-money and quality of the cars. The following year, the race was moved to Akron, Ohio where it remains to this day, only taking a brief hiatus during WWII. Over the early years of soap box derby racing, more rules came into play to equalize the field, including size and weight of the cars and ages of the participants. Girls were first allowed to compete in 1971, and the first girl to ever win the national championship was Karren Stead in 1975 at age 11.

Derby Driving In Ocala

Soap box derbies reached their heyday in the 1940s, ‘50s and ‘60s but waned in popularity as more technologically advanced games and pastimes came on the scene. As many as 70,000 spectators used to flood Akron, Ohio for the AllAmerican Soap Box Derby, including big-name singers, actors and other celebrities. The Derby was even ranked one of the top five sporting events in terms of attendance at one point. Today, the event remains quite popular for racing fans and the All-American Soap Box Derby, still held in Akron, Ohio, draws approximately 500 participants from around the world. “It’s an honor just to go,” says Ralph Limberry of the Ocala Soap Box Derby Organization. Ralph, a soap box derby participant himself in the late 1940s has been involved with Ocala’s soap box derby since its inception in 2004. “It all started when the president of the Silver Springs Shores Kiwanis Club was at a conference in Kentucky and spotted a banner about a local soap box derby, Ralph explains. “He brought the idea back with him, and the rest is history.” A group of interested individuals made the necessary calls to the All-American Soap Box Derby Organization to request the information needed to start a group here in Ocala. After acquiring the car kits and building the starting

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ramps, the group held their first race in May 2004 along Silver Road in front of the Silver Springs Shores Presbyterian Church. Although everyone was excited, the event saw its share of first-year glitches. “We had a slight problem with the first race; the cars didn’t quite make it to the finish line,” Ralph recalls with a grin. After a few amendments to the course, the Ocala Soap Box Derby became quite a success. In recent years, it has grown in popularity, and the organization continues to purchase new cars. Today, they own 34 total, with each car sponsored by a local business or organization.

The Newest Generation

Although the earliest generation of derby drivers suited up to race downhill in everything from milk crates to garbage cans and searched through junk yards to salvage miscellaneous parts to be used on their racers, today’s drivers have far less of a hassle if they want to race. “We provide the car; you provide the child,” says Ralph. The Ocala Soap Box Derby Organization is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and is run and managed completely by volunteers who help the young drivers prepare their cars and arrange transportation. “I look at the faces of the kids when they get in their cars for the first time,” says Ralph, who explains that he and many of his fellow volunteers don’t have grandchildren residing close by. The Ocala Soap Box Derby allows them to interact with kids in an event many of them remember fondly from their own childhoods. Matthew Gajraj, 12, and his sister Kayla, 7, both compete in soap box driving, while many of their friends are unfamiliar with the sport. “I have a few friends at school who race, but not many,” says Matthew, who attempts to recruit more of his peers to give it a shot. Like most child athletes, Matthew competes in several events throughout the year and has traveled to races as far as Sanford, Tallahassee and Lakeland. He’s been racing since November

An Intro To Soap Box Racing RACES: There are two ways to qualify for the championships in Akron. The first is to win in the local qualifying race held in May, open only to area residents. The second is to compete in enough “rallies” to earn 180 points. Rallies are open to children from all over the country.

CATEGORIES: Races are grouped into three categories: stock, super stock and masters. Stock races are open to kids 7 to 13 years old, and the maximum weight of car and driver cannot exceed 200 pounds. Super stock races are open to 10 to 17 year olds with combined car and driver weight of 240 pounds, and masters races are open to 10 to 17 year olds with a combined car and driver weight of 255 pounds. Before racing, each car and driver are weighed with extra weights being added to meet the specified criteria.

THE CAR: Car kits and wheels are purchased through the All-American Soap Box Derby Organization and consist of a 2-inch-thick board, the body, steering wheel and brake pedal. Businesses, organizations or individuals can sponsor a car for $250 and will see their logo on the car for one year.


Ralph Limberry

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2010 and describes the short run downhill in one word: “exciting.” “You just get in and feel ready to go,” he says with a look of enthusiasm in his eyes. And his own excitement has rubbed off on his younger sister, who only just began racing this year and has taken over Matthew’s former car. “Something just told me I had to race,” says Kayla, though she admits that the first time she was “a little nervous going down the hill.” Matthew and Kayla prepare the cars, whose main bodies are already assembled, by cleaning the cars, testing the brakes and steering and oiling up the axels and wheels to prevent rust or dirt build-up. The two hope to make the trip to Akron, Ohio, for the championship in July.

Sources: assbd.org, womenspress.com

The Call For Kid Drivers

As a non-profit organization, the Ocala Soap Box Derby relies on the support of the community to keep this once-popular pastime alive for today’s youth. It costs the organization $6,000 each year to hold a championship qualifying race. Fundraising events such as trips, raffles, race fees and private donations help fund the organization. However, Ralph says he won’t turn a child away who wants to race. “If a family can’t afford the fees, we have alternatives. We do this for the kids; we don’t want to see them disappointed,” he says. This year, the qualifying race for the AllAmerican Soap Box Derby Championships in Akron will be held on May 4. Ralph expects the race to fill and encourages interested drivers to register early, as there are only 34 cars available. The winners will advance to the championships and financial assistance is provided for the trip north. “It’s just good, clean fun for the kids,” says Ralph, who profoundly enjoys the look of excitement on the young drivers’ faces. And perhaps in a time where kids’ eyes are often glued to computer screens for hours on end, a return to a simpler time of racing milk crates and sheet tin downhill is just what the doctor ordered.

Want to Learn More? For more information on the All-American Soap Box Derby, visit aasbd.org. For more information on the Ocala Soap Box Derby Organization, visit ocalasoapbox.com or contact Ralph Limeberry at (352) 687-1119.

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

Choosing a

COLLISION SERVICE

When an accident happens, choosing the right repair shop with years of experience and attention to detail is important.

That Works For You

A

s we go about our lives each day, we rarely consider the possibility of being involved in a car accident. Liles Collision Service understands how it can be an unsettling and frustrating event. For 35 years, they have been helping the community navigate the repair process. Established in the late 1970s, Liles Collision is a familyowned and-operated establishment whose promise is to provide honest and quality work. They specialize in collision repair on all makes and models. As our world enters into a technology-driven age, Liles Collision is on the cutting edge with their methods. When produced, vehicles are painted with varying types of paint and colors. Liles Collision applies the

same factory paint that the vehicle received during its production. To address the range of color and shades vehicles carry, they have a state-of-the-art paint “gun” as well as hundreds of samples cards for comparison. Combining these methods allows them to return a vehicle to looking its best. An important mindset each employee of Liles Collision has is, above all, quality before quantity, meaning that the amount of time it make take to refinish a vehicle should not dictate its quality. “We would rather have your vehicle an additional day to ensure it looks factory new then to send it home early, yet unsatisfactory,” says Gene, owner and operator.“We’ve had families who came to us 20 or 30 years ago for repairs, and today, their children bring their

vehicles,too. We strive to maintain a continual relationship with our community. Most of the people who walk through our doors come to us by word-of-mouth referrals.” Rory, who began working with his father nearly 10 years ago, adds that most importantly, they will work with insurance companies to help with the confusion of the claims process. “We’ve had good rapport with insurance companies for years. We’re here for our customers should they have an issue or a question regarding their repairs.” He notes that when you have your vehicle repaired at Liles Collision, you also have a lifetime guarantee, whether the repairs be small or large. There is a reason Liles Collision Service has been a

mainstay in the community for over three decades. Both Gene and Rory will take the time to ensure each customer is happy with their repair. By providing quality work with attention to detail, their customers are on the road again in no time.

Liles Collision Service, Inc. 4380 NE 36th Ave., Ocala Phone: (352) 732-7079 lilescollision.com

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EDUCATION WITHOUT BOUNDARIES BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

House © Artazum / Shutterstock.com

F

inished already?” the teacher asked.

“Yes, ma’am,” the first-grader replied, placing her pencil in the holder. “What should I do now?” This wasn’t the first—or second—time the teacher had noticed this particular student was easily completing her tasks well before her classmates. But letting this one little girl skip ahead to the next lesson would mean the rest of the class would still need to catch up. “I’ll bring you some paper,” said the teacher. “Why don’t you just draw at your desk until the rest of the children finish, OK?” And so 6-year-old Danielle spent a good deal of first grade drawing pictures, waiting for the other students to finish each section of lesson work before the teacher could move on. That is, until her parents decided that a homeschooling program would allow their daughter to learn at her own pace. Today, that eager-to-learn student is a 20-year-old who will graduate college as a dual biology and math major and will enter medical school in the fall.

“We tried public and private schools, ‘gifted’ programs and parochial schools, but none of them worked for one reason or another. The high cost of tuition at a private school would have been worth it if things were wonderful, but they weren’t,” recalls Danielle’s mother, Elise LaTorre. “Our kids were not being challenged; they were bored. The interest and motivation was being snuffed out of them.”

WHY HOMESCHOOL? The LaTorre family’s experience is one of the reasons that parents choose to homeschool, but it’s hardly the only one.

“We decided to homeschool because we adopted our children when they were older and found that with them in school and gone 30 hours a week, we had no time to really become a family,” says Joanne Greco-Akerman of Ocala, who runs ocalahomeschooling.com and has been homeschooling since 2004. “I thought we’d homeschool for a year or two to bond with our kids and really get to know them, but the benefits exceeded what I expected.

I ask them every year if they want to go back to school, but they say, ‘Why?’ They don’t want to go back into that box.”

In the past, the decision to homeschool was often motivated by faith and values. Parents didn’t agree with everything their children were being taught in public school and felt certain issues conflicted with the values they wanted to instill. “We used to hear this over and over, but (conflict of values) is no longer the primary reason for homeschooling,” says Trish Oliva, executive director of Florida Parent-Educator Association

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Najia Kurdi, and children, Musa, 1½, and Tasheem, 3

“HOMESCHOOLING SHOULD BE A CONSCIOUS, WELL-THOUGHT-OUT DECISION, NOT A KNEE-JERK

REACTION TO A BAD SITUATION.”

— TRISH OLIVA Kurdi Family

Yousef Elyaman and children, Adnan, 9, and Muhammad, 8

Photos by John Jernigan

(FPEA), a Melbourne-based organization created specifically to help homeschooling families in Florida. Oliva, who has homeschooled her own children for 17 years, said there are now several main reasons parents opt for homeschooling, including providing a better overall education, safety, bullying issues and special needs children. “Anytime there’s a national school violence incident, we see a national upsurge in inquiries about homeschooling because of safety,” she adds, referencing the tragic Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in December 2012. “I’ve seen many kids pulled out of public schools because behavior issues become a wake-up call for both student and parent and turn into great success with homeschooling. Sometimes, taking the child out of school takes the pressure off them, such as with a bullying situation, and they thrive in homeschool,” says Oliva. “Homeschooling should be a conscious, well-thought-out decision, not a knee-jerk reaction to a bad situation,” she emphasizes. “When it comes to safety or bullying, we make sure parents are truly grasping what’s involved in homeschooling.” Homeschooling requires time and dedication on the part of parents—much more so than traditional schooling. “It’s harder for parents to homeschool than to put their kids on the bus and send them to public school,” says LaTorre, the founder of florida-homeschooling.org, who left behind a well-paying executive job in 1999 to homeschool her three children. “But if you’re interested enough in your child to sign up for homeschooling, you’re going to make it work. Most parents are forfeiting an income to do this, so people don’t usually homeschool unless they’ve really thought about it and are committed.”


HOMESCHOOLING ALLOWS FLEXIBILITY

So what exactly is involved? States have certain basic requirements, of course, but there’s no “set-instone” method of satisfying those requirements. Flexibility is one of the most appealing aspects of homeschooling. For example, Florida law requires that public and private school students must regularly attend school for 180 days of school each year. Those daily or

“You always hear good things about schools that have fewer students and more time with the teacher, and that’s what you get with homeschooling,” says LaTorre. “Children get one-on-one attention and the ‘teacher’ (usually Mom), is totally invested in the child’s success. You tailor how to deliver the education according to how the child learns and can create unique lesson plans.” Another big advantage of home education is that you can

“Children are all so different; some learn through books, others through hands-on activities. I can adjust my lessons to match their specific intelligence and personalities,” says Najia Kurdi of Ocala. “They won’t fall through the cracks as they might in public school because they’re forced to conform to a specific mold in a large classroom.” Kurdi and her husband, Yousef Elyaman, a local doctor, were both homeschooled themselves, so it

“ONE OF THE GREAT THINGS ABOUT HOMESCHOOLING IS THE FREEDOM. MY DAUGHTERS HAVE FREEDOM THEIR SCHOOL FRIENDS — JOANNE GRECO-AKERMAN DON’T HAVE.” hourly attendance requirements don’t apply to students in a home education program. Oliva says that homeschooling is all about learning without boundaries. “You can structure a learning program child by child, year to year, family by family to meet each child’s needs wherever they are in that moment. Homeschooling takes away all the preconceived ideas, fences and boundaries.” “One of the great things about homeschooling is the freedom,” says Greco-Akerman, who is homeschooling daughters Jacqueline, 14, and Shawna, 17.

“My daughters have freedom their school friends don’t have,” she adds. “The beauty of homeschooling is that your children can pursue things they’re passionate about. My daughters are very active in horseback riding and volunteer two to three days a week at Stirrups and Strides, a therapeutic riding facility. When it comes to sports, our kids belonged to the YMCA for several years where they played soccer, basketball and flag football and really enjoyed it.”

create a schedule that works for your family. You aren’t locked into a set time frame. “You don’t have to homeschool Monday through Friday from 9am to 3pm,” says Oliva. “You can set your own hours that work for your family, say from 1 to 5pm four days a week, or you can go year-round and not take off for the summer to have more flexibility.” The amount of time required varies, depending on the child’s age. For example, homeschooling a kindergarten student may only require two hours a day, while a fifth-grader will typically put in about four hours daily. Once a student is at the high school level, he or she is often investing more time in school work than the parent, especially if they’ve been homeschooling from the start. Parents do need to realize that if they cannot dedicate a minimum of two to four hours a day, their lifestyle probably isn’t conducive to homeschooling. Oliva also adds that if there is an antagonistic relationship between the parent “teacher” and child, homeschooling probably won’t be a success.

only seemed natural to choose this option for their children, Adnan, 9, and Muhammad, 8. It will also be the choice for Tasneem, 3, and Musa, 1 and a 1/2. Kurdi formerly worked in the school system as a sign language interpreter. Although she met some great teachers working in many different schools and classrooms, she wasn’t eager to send her own children into that learning environment. “A lot of times in school, their curiosity just gets squelched,” Kurdi says. “The flexibility of homeschooling allows me to jump on real-life activities and develop them into learning opportunities that have meaning and will stick with them. Instead of forcing them to read a textbook just because this is what the curriculum says, we allow them to read on topics they’re interested in. Our children love to read; they beg to go to the library and Barnes & Noble. Often, even the books they read for pleasure are non-fiction books about animals or science, so they’re learning.” Kurdi takes the children to the Discovery Center weekly

(“it’s awesome!”), and local events become learning experiences. For example, knowing the Renaissance fair was coming to Gainesville, Kurdi created a whole series of studies around medieval times, including a trip to Medieval Times dinner theater in Orlando.

STAYING WITHIN THE LAW

Under Florida law, “compulsory attendance” applies to all children between the ages of 6 and 16, meaning they must be enrolled in either public school, private school, parochial school, a home education program or a private tutor program. The law also states that children being taught by a parent or guardian must have “sequentially progressive instruction,” which means following some form of curriculum. “Homeschooling laws vary from state to state. Some states, such as Texas, have no restrictions. Others, New York, for example, have so many restrictions and laws, it’s almost impossible to home school,” Oliva explains. “Florida is considered ‘homeschool friendly’ because the laws are not cumbersome to follow.” Under Florida statues, parents basically have three choices when it comes to home education and satisfying the state’s compulsory attendance laws. They can: • Register with the county by sending a letter of intent to the county superintendent’s office, maintaining a record of activities and work and filing an annual evaluation. • Enroll with a private noncampus-based “umbrella” school, which facilitates home education and offers curriculum and procedures for parents to follow. • Establish a private tutor program. (This option is not commonly chosen, simply because many families find it cost-prohibitive.) As of 2010, over 2 million U.S. children (approximately 4 percent of

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Photos by John Jernigan

Katey Post, 11

all school-age children) were being homeschooled, according to the National Home Education Research Institute. The last report on Florida home education statistics revealed that approximately 48,000 families (that’s 60,000+ students) are currently homeschooled, as of June 2012. If you add in the families that are homeschooling under an “umbrella school,” this increases the numbers by about 45,000 more families. “The option that is not talked about enough is that you can enroll with an umbrella school,” says LaTorre. Her site, floridahomeschooling.org, offers a listing of private schools that work with homeschoolers. “These schools will give you a lot of support and guide you with curriculum, which the county won’t do. You wouldn’t go to the IRS for financial advice, so going to the county for

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homeschooling advice is similar. The county is more like the law enforcer; not there to help you.” With an umbrella school (sometimes referred to as a “cover school”), a family wishing to homeschool enrolls at this school instead of registering as homeschoolers with their local school district. One benefit of this method is that the umbrella school generally helps select curriculum, although it’s up to the parents how to use it. Which brings up a very valid point… how does a parent teach a subject he or she doesn’t understand? “You don’t have to be good at everything. My daughter, who’s going to medical school, is a math major, and I’m not good at math,” says LaTorre. “My kids did a lot through Florida Virtual School, which is free;

it’s your tax dollars at work. (FVS is a public online school providing tuition-free middle and high school courses to Florida students grades six through 12). It’s all online, and you still do it from home. It’s a great option for the parent who doesn’t feel confident teaching certain subjects. This is the method we used as our children got older. Not only did they have teachers through Florida Virtual School, but they also had access to tutors.” When it comes to a subject the parent isn’t comfortable teaching, LaTorre says homeschoolers sometimes hire a private tutor for a period of time. They may also have someone else teach that particular subject. For example, a parent in your homeschool support group may be an electrical engineer and a whiz at math, so he or she can teach calculus to your child.


“With tough subjects like math and science, you can utilize many different methods,” says Oliva. “If a parent doesn’t feel capable, you can purchase curriculum that has CDs with a teacher teaching, so that teacher is actually doing the lesson and you have the teacher book to follow along. They also have customer service help where you can call and talk to someone if the student gets ‘stuck.’ “When it came to high school science, I didn’t want my children dissecting anything in my kitchen! I found a private school where my son could go take that one class and do labs, but do the rest of the assignments at home. Another option is using a retired teacher for a particular subject or forming a co-op where several families come together for certain classes and have parents who are good at certain subjects teach those classes.” The Internet has definitely made homeschooling easier. In addition to Florida Virtual School, you can also find plenty of free homeschool material online. Students can use a Kindle, or other e-reader device, to download books. They can “borrow” books from their local library or other online sites without spending a penny… or any gas. You can search online and find numerous sites such as freecycle.org where you can sell or swap curriculum items. You may also have luck contacting local homeschool support groups to see if they offer any used curriculum sales. Support groups are something parents don’t usually know about until they get into homeschooling, but there are plenty of these groups—here locally and across the country. They can help with field trip opportunities, curriculum items and more.

THE SOCIALIZATION MYTH

One of the biggest issues people have with homeschooling is the belief that children aren’t properly socialized. “Socialization is the most common misconception about homeschooling. It’s the ‘boogie man under the bed,’ but people who think

has met a lot of friends through the theatre and science center. We’re also looking into other performing arts activities in town.” Florida Statute 1006.15 requires that homeschooled students be given the same opportunity to participate in “inter-scholastic extracurricular activities” as public school

(“umbrella”) school, there are alternatives. The parent can award a diploma to the child upon completion of high school studies, or the child can take a General Educational Development (GED) test and will be given a Florida GED diploma with a passing score. A more exciting option is the

“HOMESCHOOLED KIDS ARE BETTER SOCIALIZED BECAUSE THEY’RE NOT JUST SOCIALIZING

WITH KIDS WHOSE BIRTHDAYS ARE THE SAME YEAR AS THEIRS.” — TRISH OLIVA

this have never homeschooled,” says LaTorre. “It’s actually the reverse; homeschooled kids are better socialized because they’re not just socializing with kids whose birthdays are the same year as theirs. You don’t have to have a school building to socialize. There are Boy and Girl Scouts, 4-H, volunteer organizations and activities through your community, church and neighborhood.” “You just have to offer other alternatives for school socialization and make sure your child is around other children,” adds Karen Mulhollem of Ocala, who has been homeschooling her granddaughter Katey Post, 11, since kindergarten. “Katey is very outgoing and precocious; she loves people, so we decided early on to put her in community classes so she’d have a way to socialize and learn outside the homeschool environment,” says Mulhollem. “At age 5, we enrolled her in acting classes and Ocala Civic Theatre, and at this point, she’s already appeared in three plays. Two years ago, we enrolled her in the Discovery Center program for hands-on learning activities. Katie

students and prohibits any requirements that would make participation less accessible for homeschooled students. “Homeschool students are allowed to participate in extracurricular activities, such as sports, band and chorus, at the zoned school they would have attended in their area,” notes Oliva. “Tim Tebow is a great example; this law came about because of him, actually. His success would never have come to fruition if he’d only played with a community football team.” Oliva says many homeschool families don’t take advantage of this opportunity unless they have students who may get a scholarship because of their skills in a particular sport. Speaking of scholarships, homeschooled students are still eligible for a Bright Futures Scholarship. Some also take dual enrollment courses on a postsecondary campus.

GRADUATION

Although homeschooled students in Florida don’t receive a diploma from the state unless they choose to homeschool through a private

graduation ceremony conducted each May by the FPEA at their annual homeschool convention. “During this two-day convention, we have over 130 workshops for parents and a graduation ceremony and activities,” notes Oliva. “The students choose their own caps and gowns, so it’s a sea of colors. This allows homeschool students to participate in a ceremony, and they get to throw their caps in the air—something that is not allowed at a public school graduation ceremony anymore. We typically have about 250 to 275 students from across Florida who participate each year and many graduate with AA degrees completed. Two years ago, Governor Scott handed out the diplomas.” “Homeschooling may not work for everybody, but the important thing—whether your child is in public school, private school or homeschool—is for the student to have a love of learning,” says Najia Kurdi. “It’s also important to have involved parents who know what’s best for their children so they can achieve their maximum potential.”

HELPFUL HOMESCHOOL WEBSITES

To find more sites, go to a search engine and type in “homeschooling in Marion County, Florida.” ocalahomeschooling.com / florida-homeschooling.org / iamhomeschooling.com / fpea.com / localhs.com/?Marion,FL / aheart4homeschooling.com

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B Y MAR Y ANN DE SA NTIS

BUTTERFLY

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Floating Butterflies © Ambient Ideas/ Shutterstock.com; Red Butterfly in Forest © Mary Ann DeSantis

Symbols of freedom,

nature and even our very souls, butterflies capture our attention with their effortless flight and perfect beauty. Butterfly gardens, however, may not be the picture-perfect garden oasis you envision, but that unkempt look is exactly what these exquisite creatures want.

T

he milkweed leaves are chewed around the edges… the once-lush parsley has been reduced to bald stalks… the lantana grows out of control… this describes my butterfly garden perfectly. But the unruly garden space outside my lanai attracts a profusion of butterflies, so I must be doing something right. “People who have butterfly gardens can’t expect them to be beautiful all the time. The purpose of the host plants is to be eaten,” explains Anna Williams, a Marion County Master Gardener whose specialty is butterfly gardening. “Butterflies don’t care what the garden looks like; in fact, they prefer it not to be picture perfect.” First-time butterfly gardeners should start with the easiest plants to grow. Williams recommends milkweed as a host plant where Monarch butterflies can lay eggs that will eventually become ravenous caterpillars. She says herbs, such as parsley and fennel,

also make good host plants where Swallowtails and other butterflies will lay eggs. Just as important are the nectar-producing plants, like Zinnias, which feed the butterflies once they emerge from the chrysalis. “The plant list provided by the county extension services is excellent,” says Williams. “We’re lucky because everything grows in Florida.” Two types of plants are needed for successful butterfly gardening. Eggs and larva need host plants; once butterflies emerge, they need nectarproducing annuals for food. And keep it simple. Williams says butterflies like plants that are uncomplicated and make it easy to get to the nectar. Many of the newer hybrid plants do not have scents to attract butterflies or have overlapping blooms, which make it harder for the butterflies to remove the nectar. She’s personally had good luck planting Zinnias, nectar-producing plants that offer lots of color. “A variety of plants offers you more chances to attract butterflies,” she says. “And remember, not every kind of butterfly comes every year.” She tells of her own personal experience with her Dutchman’s Pipeline Plant that Swallowtails would eat right off the trellis in past years. “This year, we’ve not seen one Swallowtail,” she says. “Butterflies

come in cycles. Monarchs may be plentiful one year, then not so much the next.” Most beginners, Williams believes, make the mistake of trimming the plants too often or pulling up milkweed that is missing its leaves. She tells people who want butterflies to let their gardens grow naturally. She also says be very careful about pesticides and insecticides—and not just the kind lawn services use but also common varieties that many gardeners spray around flower beds every day. “Chemicals will destroy plants and caterpillar eggs,” she says. “If the wind is blowing when chemicals are being applied, it can ruin a plant for the butterflies.” Williams became a certified Master Gardener with the University of Florida IFAS/ Marion County Extension Service after moving to Summerfield eight years ago. She had been a Master Gardener in Virginia for five years before retiring and loved the program so much that she decided to pursue it after her arrival in Florida to learn about the plants that grow here. She began specializing in butterfly gardening six years ago and now chairs the butterfly component for the Master Gardener series. Norma Samuel, who handles Urban Horticulture for the IFAS/ Marion County Extension Service, says the Master Gardener course is a vital part of the extension

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service. After completing a 13week course, Master Gardeners commit to at least 85 hours annually of volunteer service their first year. The primary purpose is educating the public about gardening in an environmentally responsible manner. “Our plant clinics are manned every weekday by Master Gardener volunteers,” says Samuel. “They also offer free workshops and youth programs.” The Master Gardener orientation class is held in May, but applicants are interviewed and approved before beginning the $160 course, which runs from mid-August until mid-November. “We want people willing to learn and then who will volunteer to give back to the community,” explains Samuel. Successful butterfly gardening begins with education and research, according to Williams. It’s important to know which plants require sunshine and which ones grow in the shade. And it’s also fun to see which plants attract a certain species of butterflies. For example, the Anise Swallowtail likes citrus, while the Black Swallowtail prefers parsley or fennel. Monarch caterpillars eat only Milkweed. Decide if you want to attract a specific type of butterfly, and consider the plants you need to lure them into your yard.

Caterpillars—or larva—are limited to the kinds of plants they can eat. A female butterfly must lay her eggs on a particular kind of plant, because caterpillars cannot travel far, and they cannot survive if they hatch on the wrong kind of plant. It’s also important to know which species are common to your area. Marion, Lake, Sumter and Citrus Counties are part of Region 3, according to the IFAS/ Marion County Extension Service. Although 100 species of butterflies can be found throughout Florida, not all of them will visit North Central Florida, no matter how many host plants are available. Among those species common to this area are Swallowtails, Monarchs, Checkered Whites, Orange Sulfurs, Cloudless Sulfurs, American Painted Ladies, Viceroys and Gulf Fritillaries. The Extension Service provides a complete list of species and their regions. If you need inspiration, a trip to one of Florida’s world-class butterfly houses is all it takes to catch butterfly-gardening fever. The Florida Museum of Natural History’s Butterfly Rainforest in Gainesville is a 6,400-square-foot screened exhibit containing a continuous population of more than 1,000 butterflies. The 60 to 80 species and the flowering plants change regularly, so every

Butterflies in Literature

“Literature and butterflies are the two sweetest passions known to man,” said Vladimir Nabokov, a 20th century novelist. Nabokov certainly would know. In addition to writing psychological classics like Lolita and Pale Fire, he worked as the curator of Harvard University’s butterfly collecting and classification program during the 1940s. His contributions to the field were so great that a species of butterfly—the Nabokovia—was named in his honor. From William Shakespeare to Charles Dickens, butterflies have made their way into some of literature’s greatest works. William Wordsworth, Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost all wrote several poems about butterflies, as have many other masters of prose. And lately, it seems butterflies have been an underlying theme in several best-selling novels. Popular author Barbara Kingsolver is currently topping the charts with Flight Behavior Behavior, a story about a young Appalachia mother who

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visit offers something new to see. When weather permits, live butterfly releases happen Monday through Friday at 2pm and on weekends at 2pm, 3pm and 4pm. For sheer numbers, Butterfly World in Coconut Creek is a magical paradise filled with more than 10,000 swirling butterflies and exotic plants. Established in 1988, Butterfly World was the first such butterfly house in the Western Hemisphere, and it remains the largest one in the world. “When we opened, we knew it was a huge risk,” said Founder and Owner Ron Boender. “We didn’t know if people would pay to see butterflies or not.” Throughout its history, Butterfly World has been more than an attraction. Boender’s on-going research and butterfly farming have been instrumental in saving America’s threatened and endangered butterflies, including the Schaus Swallowtail native to the Florida Keys. In addition, Butterfly World’s “Bring Back the Butterflies” campaign has encouraged private citizens, schools and businesses to

establish butterfly gardens. In Marion County alone, Master Gardener Williams estimates there are thousands of home butterfly gardens. “Everyone who putters in a yard likes to see butterflies,” she says. “Almost every other yard in my neighborhood has plants to attract butterflies.” Butterflies are important pollinators, so gardens are not only beneficial to the environment but also to people who love watching them. “Gardening is good exercise and gaining knowledge about different plants stimulates your mind,” says Williams, “but the biggest benefit is the joy and relaxation that comes as you watch these beautiful creatures flutter across your yard.”

discovers a “lake of fire” when Monarch butterflies mistakenly migrate to her Tennessee mountain instead of Central Mexico. Scientists, religious leaders and media spark the controversies surrounding climate change. A transformational journey across the United States and into Mexico is the subject of The Butterfly’s Daughter by Mary Alice Monroe. Protagonist Luz Avila is searching for the legend of las mariposas, the butterflies that fly more than 2,000 miles to their winter home in Mexico. The random characters she meets along the way from Milwaukee to Mexico add meaning and dimension to her life. The Blue Butterfly is based on the true story and biography of Canadian David Marenger, a terminally ill 10-year-old boy with one last wish: to capture the beautiful but elusive Blue Morpho. The 2004 movie stars Academy-Award winner William Hurt as an aging entomologist who reluctantly agrees to take the boy to Costa Rica on a journey of a lifetime.


Pink & Yellow Butterflies © suns07; Floating Butterflies © Ambient Ideas / Shutterstock.com; Firebush & Blanket Flowers © Norma Samuel; Black & White Butterfly © Mary Ann DeSantis

COMMON NAME

Trees

Eastern Redbud Dahoon Holly Chickasaw Plum Hog Plum Sparkleberry Walters Viburnum

Shurbs

Bastard Indigo Buttonbush New Jersey Tea Summersweet Garberia Firebush Inkberry Wild Azalea Florida Flame Azalea

SCIENTIFIC NAME

FLOWERING SEASON

Cercis canadensis Ilex cassine Prunus angustifolia Prunus umbellata Vaccinium arboreum Viburnum abovatum

Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring Spring

Amorpha fruticosa Cephalanthus occidentalis Ceanothus americanus Clethra alnifolia Garberia heterophylla Hamelia patens Ilex glabra Rhododendron canescens Rhododendron austrinum

Wildflowers False Foxglove Pink Swamp Milkweed White Swamp Milkweed Butterfly Milkweed Aster Florida Paint Brush Vanilla Plant Golden Aster Mistflower Dalea Purple Coneflower Elephants-foot Snakeroot Mistflower Joe-pye Weed Blanket Flower Coastal Vervain Narrow-leaf Sunflower Beach Sunflower Scarlet Hibiscus Redroot Blazing Star Cardinal Flower Snow Squarestem Hempweed Monarda Turkey Tangle Fogfruit Black-eyed Susan Yellow Coneflower Cut-leaved Coneflower Wild Petunia Salvia (Sage) Rosinweed Goldenrod Stokes’ Aster Ironweed

Agalinus spp. Asclepias incarnata Asclepias perennis Asclepias tuberosa Aster spp. Carphephorus corymbosus Carphephorus odoratissimus Chrysopsis spp. Conoclinium coelestinum Dalea spp. Echinacea purpurea Elepjantopus elatus Eryngium aquaticum Eupatorium coelestinum Eupatorium fistulosum Gaillardia pulchella Glandularia maritima Helianthus angustifolius Helianthus debilis Hibiscus coccineus Lachnanthes caroliana Liatris spp. Lobelia cardinalis Melanhera nivea Mikania scandens punctata Phyla nodiflora Rudbeckia hirta Ratibida pinnata Rudbeckia lanciniata Ruellia caroliniensis Salvia spp. Silphium asteriscus Solidago spp. Stokesia laevis Vernonia spp.

Summer-Fall Spring-Summer Spring Summer Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Spring-Summer Spring Spring

Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Spring-Summer Summer-Fall Fall Fall Fall Summer-Fall Fall Summer Summer-Fall Summer Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Fall Fall Spring-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Spring-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer-Fall Summer

Butterfly Plant List fo r North Central Florida Source: Butterfly Rainforest, flmnh.ufl.edu/butterflies

Larval Host Plants for Specific Butterfly Species:

Black Swallowtail Queen Anne’s Lace Fennel Parsley

Giant Swallowtail Hop Tree Hercules’ Club

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Black Cherry White Ash Green Ash

Zebra Swallowtail Pawpaw Woolly Pawpaw Dwarf Pawpaw Neeted Pawpaw Smallflower Pawpaw Slimleaf Pawpaw

American Painted Lady Purple Cudweed Wandering Cudweed Narrow-leaf Cudweed

Checkered White and Great Southern White Virginia Peppergrass

Gulf Fritillary and Zebra Longwing

Maypop (Passiflora incarnata) Corky-Stemmed Passion Flower Yellow Passion Flower

Monarch/Queen White Twinevine Swamp Milkweed Butterfly Weed Mexican Milkweed

Viceroy

Coastal Plain Willow

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S P E C I A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

F E A T U R E

Back pain?

Not ready for surgery?

See Dr. Zhou

a n d

A s s o c i a t e S

Back pain? Joint pain? Want to get rid of it? See Dr. Zhou and his associates! Finding new treatments and hope for chronic pain patients is a life-long interest of Dr. Zhou. In addition to many books and articles on pain management published over the last decade, Dr. Zhou of the Florida Pain and Rehabilitation Center (FLPNR) published two new research articles in the March issue of an international professional journal: Techniques in Orthopedics. In the first article, Dr. Zhou reported his own new technique to safely and accurately inject mediations (steroids) into the cervical epidural space to treat neck pain. In the second article, Dr. Zhou and Dr. Vu demonstrated new techniques on how to decrease radiation exposure during the spine injection procedures, protecting the patients as well as the performing physicians. Dr. Zhou and his associates at FLPNR always put quality and patient safety first. Over the last eight years, more than 34,000 interventional pain relief treatments (including spine injections) have been successfully offered to their patients without any major complications.

OUTSTANDING CREDENTIALS OF

YiLi Zhou, MD, PhD. Harvard Trained Pain Specialist Author of numerous articles and book chapters for pain management Distinguished Physician Award by Florida Medical Association 2004, 2006 Physician Recognition Award by American Medical Association 2003 Former Director of Jackson Memorial Hospital Pain Clinic, University of Miami TRIPLE BOARD CERTIFIED BY: American Board of Pain Medicine American Board of Interventional Pain Physician American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Many of Dr. Zhou’s patients feel very lucky to have such a top-notch scholar and practitioner in North Central Florida. Dr. Zhou’s philosophy of treating pain is not to put his patients on high doses of narcotics for the rest of their lives. His philosophy is to “find the cause and get rid of the pain.” Back pain can often be relieved at FLPNR with only one or two treatments. A previous patient suffering from severe headaches without knowing the real cause for many years was diagnosed and successfully treated by Dr. Zhou in the first visit. A patient crying with severe leg pain after cardiac catheterization found a cure at FLPNR. These are just few examples. Many of Dr. Zhou’s patients find there really is no need to return because they are pain free. However, they refer many of their closest family and friends to his practice. In addition to being a successful academician and clinician, Dr. Zhou also focuses on building a great team of experts. Dr. Warycha is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist. His area of expertise is nerve function study, and he excels at using ultrasound-guided joint injections. “This technique is more accurate and allows me to treat the exact pain site instead of the general area,” he says. Dr. Vu is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist and pain specialist. Together with other team members, Dr. Vu offers a comprehensive approach to treating pain using minimally invasive non-surgical treatment. Dr. Jollu is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist with fellowship training in minimal invasive treatment for spine and sports injuries. Just listen to what one of his patients has to say: “I am very pleased with the treatment and the results of the treatment I received in Dr. Zhou’s office. I can rest easier knowing there is a doctor who cares and can help me with the treatment. It is worth it to travel hundreds miles to see him. I will happily refer anyone I know that is having a problem with pain to Dr. Zhou’s office.” Consult with this outstanding team today, and learn how you can begin leading a pain-free life without surgery!

YOU DESERVE THE BEST! FLPNR never used any compounding steroid from the New England Compounding Pharmacy, which has been related to the recent outbreak of meningitis and stroke.

Left to Right: Sara Webber PA, Asha Vishnagara PA, Hoang Vu DO, YiLi Zhou MD PhD, Bohdan Warycha MD, Chayapathy Jollu MD and Heather McClendon PA


A Dizzying Diagnosis

When vertigo sends your life in to a tailspin p50

Say No To Sitting p44

Growing Gripes p46

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From Header Capsules pXX To Header Caplets pXXp48 Header Dr. OzpXX TalksHeader Tickers pXX p52

and more!

WHEN PARENTHOOD ALLUDES

A

Sources resolve.org, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Woman © Alis Leonte / Shutterstock.com

PRIL 21-27 IS NATIONAL INFERTILITY AWARENESS WEEK. EACH YEAR, MILLIONS OF LOVING COUPLES SUFFER THE PAIN OF BEING UNABLE TO CONCEIVE A CHILD. THE PURPOSE OF NATIONAL INFERTILITY AWARENESS WEEK IS TO SHED LIGHT ON THIS COMPLICATED AND EMOTIONALLY PAINFUL MEDICAL DISORDER THAT AFFECTS BOTH WOMEN AND MEN.

> FEMALE INFERTILITY can occur when ovaries don’t produce eggs or because of a complication with fertilized eggs. There are a number of reasons why this occurs including: » » » » » »

Autoimmune disorders Reproductive tract disorders Obesity Eating disorders/poor nutrition Diabetes Hormone irregularities

> MALE INFERTILITY

occurs when there is a decreased sperm count or sperm blockage. Reasons include: » Environmental pollutants » Being in high heat for prolonged periods » Heavy drug or alcohol use » Cancer treatments » Too much or too little hormones

A woman’s peak fertility occurs in her early 20s. By age 35, the chances for a woman to conceive without intervention begins to lessen. For healthy couples under age 30, the chances of conceiving in any given month are roughly 25-30 percent. Doctors suggest that couples attempt to conceive for one year before seeking medical treatment.

For info about National Infertility Awareness Week, visit resolve.org.

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SUFFERING FROM SITTING DISEASE? S

ITTING DISEASE IS THE CURRENT BUZZWORD PHRASE FOR OUR SEDENTARY LIFESTYLES. ACCORDING TO THE LATEST CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION STATISTICS, 50-70 PERCENT OF US SPEND SIX HOURS OR MORE A DAY SITTING, USUALLY AT WORK. THEN TACK ON THE FOUR OR MORE HOURS THAT 20-35 PERCENT OF US SPEND WATCHING TV AT HOME. A RECENT INSTITUTE FOR MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH POLL ESTIMATES THAT THE AVERAGE PERSON SITS 56 HOURS A WEEK. THE NUMBERS TELL A SCARY STORY—WE HAVE A SITTING DISEASE PROBLEM IN THIS COUNTRY. THIS FACT HAS EVEN LED TO A NEW AREA OF MEDICAL STUDY CALLED INACTIVE PHYSIOLOGY. HERE’S A LOOK AT SOME INTERESTING AND DISTURBING SITTING DISEASE RESEARCH RESULTS.

PROLONGED SITTING LEADS TO: » Metabolic slowdown/shutdown, which contributes to obesity, heart/kidney disease, breast/colon cancer » Enzymes that break down triglycerides (fat in bloodstream) switch off; bad cholesterol rises » Blood sugar builds up; for every two hours sitting per day, risk of developing type 2 diabetes rises 7 percent » Metabolic syndrome (high blood pressure, high bad cholesterol levels, high blood sugar) » Negatively affects spine and posture; supporting muscles weaken and shorten

N.E.A.T. TIPS

While health experts continue to promote 20-30 minutes of exercise five to six days a week, new research is proving that breaking up periods of prolonged sitting is the key to beating the negative effects of sitting disease. This program is called non-exercise activity thermogenesis—NEAT. Essentially it boils down to at least 10 minutes of physical activity per each hour of sitting.

» Set a timer to go off on the hour

A 2011 CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION study utilized sit-stand workstations at a company for six months. When office workers utilized the sit-stand workstations, there was a reduction in sitting time by 66 minutes a day. There was also a 54 percent reduction in upper back and neck pain, as well as overall improved mood. In addition to sit-stand workstations, there are desk treadmills and steppers that fit under desks—all designed to reduce your chances of getting sitting disease.

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Number of minutes lean, non-regular exercisers moved a day more than overweight participants in a Mayo Clinic study.

GET N.E.A.T.

TREADMILLS AT WORK?

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Man © ollyy / Shutterstock.com

LIVINGWELL

» Walk around the room/office to kick-start your metabolism. » Take a 15-minute lunchtime walk. » Walk the dog after dinner. » Park on perimeter of parking lots. » Take the stairs. » Get a pedometer and aim for 10,000 steps a day (5 miles). » Have walking meetings at work; outside is even better. » If you work at home, go outside and do yard work. » Watch TV while on a treadmill.

Sources: juststand.org, mayoclinic.com, rd.com, webmd.com, usatoday.com, womenshealthmag.com

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GROWINGWELL

CHILDHOOD PAINS & SPURTS G

Boy © Gaby Kooijman / Shutterstock.com

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ROWING PAINS AND GROWTH SPURTS ARE OFTEN MISTAKEN FOR THE SAME THING IN CHILDREN.

“There was a time when people thought growing pains were caused by growth spurts,” says Dr. Humeraa Qamar, an Ocala-based pediatrician. “But growing pains are muscle aches experienced by young children at night and particularly after a day of physical activity. Growth spurts are specific time frames of development from birth to puberty. Because growing pains can occur during a growth spurt, parents often connect the two, but it is only a coincidence.”

> GROWING PAINS Usually experienced by preschoolers (3-4 years old) and preteens (8-12 years old), growing pains are achy, cramping muscle pains in both legs after a day of intense physical activity. This can include sports, as well as running, jumping and climbing. They often occur in early evening and can disrupt sleep, only to disappear during the daytime. Pain is generally felt in both legs, especially front of the thighs (quads), calves and back of knees. They can last for days, weeks, months or even years and can disappear for a few years, then come again. There are some studies that link growing pains to headaches and stomach pain. But growing pains do not cause limping or fever. See your doctor if your child experiences pain in only one leg, limps and/or has a fever.

WHAT YOU CAN DO » Do leg muscle-stretching exercises with child » Massage child’s legs » Apply heating pad or warm cloth to sore muscles

» Check with doctor about children’s formulas of over-thecounter pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen; never give a child aspirin, as it

can lead to Reye’s syndrome, which can cause brain and liver damage.

Growth and development differs from child to child, depending on a combination of genetics and birth size, as well as environmental factors. For example, a small newborn who’s going to be a big child will grow faster in the first two years than a big baby who’s going to be a small child. There can also be minigrowth spurts; children also tend to grow faster in spring/summer than fall/winter. Growth is triggered by human growth hormone (HGH), which while present during the day peaks at night. Thus, a good night’s sleep is important for a growing child.

HERE’S A LOOK AT THE FOUR PRIMARY GROWTH SPURTS, ACCORDING TO THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION: » Birth-12 Months: Infants add 10 inches in length and triple birth weight. » 12-24 Months: Toddlers add 5 inches and 6 pounds. » 2-10 Years: By age 2, growth in height continues at steady rate of

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approximately 2 1/2 inches per year until adolescence; weight increases by 6 pounds a year. » Puberty: Most rapid growth for both boys and girls. For girls, begins 10-11 years of age until 15; can grow 9 inches and gain

between 15-55 pounds; growth usually stops three years after first menstrual period. For boys, begins 12-13 years of age through teens; can grow 11 inches and gain up to 65 pounds.

Sources: parenting.com, kidshealth.org, webmd.com, cdc.gov

> GROWTH SPURTS


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SEEKING OVER-THECOUNTER RELIEF F

OR HEADACHES AND ACHES AND PAINS TO MILD FEVERS, THERE IS NO SHORTAGE OF OVER-THE-COUNTER MEDICATIONS MEDICATIONS. BUT THEY ALL DIFFER SLIGHTLY IN WHAT THEY ARE AND HOW EFFECTIVELY THEY TREAT WHAT AILS YOU. OTC MEDS THAT ARE FOR PAIN RELIEF ARE CALLED ANALGESICS, AND THOSE FOR FEVER REDUCTION ARE KNOWN AS ANTIPYRETICS; SOME COMBINE INGREDIENTS. TABLET, CAPLET, CAPSULES, LIQUID CAPS AND LIQUID FORMULAS ARE ALL EQUALLY EFFECTIVE. BUT LIQUID CAPS AND LIQUIDS ARE MORE QUICKLY ABSORBED IN THE STOMACH, THUS POTENTIALLY SPEEDING RELIEF. HERE’S ERE’S A CLOSER LOOK AT THE MOST POPULAR OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEF MEDS. DON’T FORGET TO CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR IF YOU ARE PREGNANT OR BREASTFEEDING BEFORE TAKING ANY MEDICATIONS.

ACETAMINOPHEN

SALICYLATES

NSAIDS

NAPROXEN SODIUM

(Tylenol)

(Bayer Aspirin, Bufferin, Excedrin, Ecotrin, St. Joseph)

(Motrin, Advil, Midol Liquid Caps)

(Aleve, Midol Extended Relief)

USES: For relief of headaches, sore throats, toothaches and to reduce fever. Acetaminophen is also present in Anacin-3, Percocet, Vicodin, Liquipin and various OTC cold and flu meds. RED FLAG: Acetaminophen overdose

is one of the most common poisonings worldwide and can cause liver damage. Do not take more than 4 grams (4,000mg) a day. Overdose symptoms include abdominal pain, appetite loss, irritability, jaundice, vomiting, sweating, nausea and diarrhea; can lead to convulsions and coma.

PRECAUTIONS: Avoid if taking the blood-thinning drug warfarin (Coumadin) or have more than three alcoholic drinks a day.

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USES: Pain reliever/fever reducer.

Also used under a doctor’s care for stroke and heart attack prevention.

RED FLAG: Do not give aspirin to children, as it can lead to Reye’s syndrome, which causes sudden brain and liver damage in children when they have the flu or chicken pox; most often seen in children 4-12. PRECAUTIONS: Allergic reactions include asthma, facial swelling, hives, ringing in ears. Drinking alcohol while taking aspirin can increase your risk of stomach irritation/bleeding. Thins blood, so if going to have surgery, including dental surgery, alert doctor if using. Taking aspirin with NSAIDS will make aspirin less effective for stroke/heart attack prevention.

USES: Generically known as ibuprofen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used for pain relief and to reduce swelling from conditions such as arthritis and muscle strains. FLAG: Talk to your doctor before taking NSAIDS if you have asthma, high blood pressure, a history of stomach/digestive tract bleeding, heart/kidney disease.

Pills © Swapan Photography; Doctor © R. Gino Santa Maria / Shutterstock.com

BEINGWELL

USES: Arthritis pain relief; menstrual cramps; back pain. FLAG: May increase risk of stroke/ heart attack if higher dosage taken over a longer period of time than label directions. PRECAUTIONS: Can thin blood; avoid prior to surgery.

PRECAUTIONS: Blood thinner, so alert doctor is you are planning on having any kind of surgery.

USING OTC MED TIPS Read and follow label directions. Use only as necessary; lowest dosage for least amount of time. Don’t use NSAIDS for chronic pain daily. Talk to your doctor.

Sources: nlm.nih.gov/medicineplus, emedicine.com, webmd.com

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FEELINGWELL

Man © Gemaav / Shutterstock.com

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THE SPIN ON VERTIGO T

HE KEY WORD WHEN IT COMES TO DESCRIBING VERTIGO IS SPINNING. VERTIGO IS A SENSATION ILLUSION IN WHICH YOU FEEL YOU (SUBJECTIVE VERTIGO) OR YOUR ENVIRONMENT (OBJECTIVE VERTIGO) IS SPINNING. DIZZINESS DIFFERS FROM VERTIGO IN THAT IT INVOLVES FEELINGS OF LIGHTHEADEDNESS AND/OR LOSING YOUR BALANCE, AS OPPOSED TO SPINNING. CONSIDERED A SUBTYPE OF DIZZINESS, VERTIGO CAN HAPPEN TO ANYONE OF ANY AGE AND MOST OFTEN IS ASSOCIATED WITH INNER EAR PROBLEMS. VERTIGO EPISODES CAN BE SPORADIC OR CONSTANT, LASTING MINUTES TO HOURS.

Known as

BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO, it is the most common form of vertigo and is caused by an inner ear disorder. Vertigo is triggered by sudden head movements, moving the head in certain directions or even getting up in the morning. Episodes can be mild to intense.

SYMPTOMS

TREATMENTS

In addition to a spinning sensation, other vertigo symptoms can include:

PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS:

» » » » »

Disorientation Nausea Vomiting Sweating Abnormal eye movements » Ringing in the ears » Hearing loss

CAUSES » Inflammation of the inner ear (viral/bacterial infections) » Head injuries (concussion) » Neck injuries (whiplash) » Migraine headaches » Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) » Meniere’s disease » Brain tumor » Brain hemorrhage » Overmedicating » Drinking too much alcohol » Mixing drugs & alcohol

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meclizine (Antivert); diphenhydramine (Benadryl); scopolamine transdermal patch (Transderm-Scop); diazepam (Valium); antibiotics (for bacterial inner ear infections)

CANALITH REPOSITIONING PROCEDURE: In-office

procedure performed by a doctor or physical therapist that involves a series of head movements to reposition particles from the inner ear into other areas of the ear to be reabsorbed. Each position lasts 30 seconds and is repeated until symptoms abate; usually effective after one to two treatments. At home, after treatments, the patient must avoid lying flat for one to two days.

CANAL PLUGGING SURGERY: Bone plug used to block portion of inner ear; 90 percent success rate.

Sources: emedicinehealth.com, mayoclinic.com, webmd.com

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PROTECTING YOUR PRECIOUS HEART VALVES BY

IZEN, M.D. ., O R L E A H C MI HMET OZ, M.D & ME

A

new report says sky-high levels of a nasty blood fat called Lp(a)—short for lipoprotein (a)—double your risk for severe heart-valve damage, boosting odds that you’ll need a replacement valve sometime between ages 60 and 90. Lp(a) stiffens and clogs the walls of valves and arteries, and the threat (and consequent need for surgery to repair it or install a new valve) is not rare. Baby boomers and their older friends and relatives are dealing with the problem. (A quarter of adults 70-plus already have signs of heart-valve thickening; more than half of the more than 5,000 openheart procedures at Cleveland Clinic now involve valve repair or replacement.) Fortunately, there’s plenty you can do now to safeguard your valves.

VALVE 101: The four valves in your heart control the flow of blood to your lungs and to arteries that feed every cell in your body. A stenotic valve (it doesn’t open wide enough or close properly) reduces blood flow, causing fatigue, shortness of breath and even heart failure. It also boosts your risk for clots that cause heart attacks and strokes. RISK FACTORS INCLUDE SOME THINGS YOU CAN’T DO MUCH ABOUT: age, genetics (that’s the cause for 10 percent of folks with the condition) and having had rheumatic fever (a common complication of strep throat before antibiotics became the go-to treatment in the 1950s). But there are other triggers—such as high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, diabetes, smoking and a double-wide waistline—that you can do something about.

A QUARTER OF ADULTS 70-PLUS ALREADY HAVE SIGNS OF HEART-VALVE THICKENING.

VALVE PROTECTION: Cleveland Clinic, where Dr. Mike works, routinely

measures Lp(a) levels and recommends statins when those levels are high. In one study at the hospital’s Preventive Cardiology Clinic, people with high Lp(a) levels who took statins erased excess risk for heart-related deaths. Now we think statins can help slash risk for valve problems. Studies have shown that in people with early signs of valve thickening, statins can cut the risk for serious valve harm by 36 percent. The trick? Start early, before your valves suffer damage. One way to discover if you’re beginning to get valve damage is to get an echocardiogram. But even if your valves seem OK, if your Lp(a) levels are high, ask your doctor about taking a statin. A bonus: They’ll provide protection against other heart-health risks and may cut your risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Here are other ways you can protect your heart and heart valves from damage:

KEEP A LID ON YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE. High blood pressure heats up your risk for damaged valves by as much as 74 percent. Eat less sodium (less processed and fast food), and get your fill of more blood-pressure-calming calcium, potassium and magnesium, found in low-fat or fat-free dairy, fruit, vegetables, beans and 100 percent whole grains. Watch your weight, and fit in a half-hour walk every day; your cholesterol levels will benefit, too.

KICK THAT HABIT. Smoking more than doubles your risk for severe

valve damage. Make a quit plan (check out our proven strategies at RealAge.com); talk with your doc about crave-controlling medications and counseling support. Then make it happen.

COOL OFF INFLAMMATION. Inflammatory compounds in your bloodstream have been linked to greater risk for stiff, calcium-speckled valves. So whittle your waistline, exercise regularly and decorate your plate with healthy foods such as fresh and frozen fruit and vegetables, beans and 100 percent whole grains. And do not forget the added benefit of the odd omegas: DHA omega-3 (900 mg a day from fish or supplements); ALA omega-3 (from walnuts, flax, chia or avocados); and purified omega-7. Already have stiff or damaged valves? Follow your doctor’s advice for avoiding infections, which pose an extra threat now. Get your vaccinations, and you may need antibiotics before dental work or before some invasive medical tests. And ask your doc about adding a low-dose statin medication to any current regimen, even if your cholesterol levels are normal. Stay smart for your heart.

Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of The Dr. Oz Show, and Mike Roizen, M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, visit sharecare.com. © 2013 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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Heart © pio3 / Shutterstock.com

Pulse

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MOVING OUR COMMUNITY FORWARD At the Y, we invest in our future leaders by developing our youth and teaching them the core values and life skills they need to be successful. We invest in families by providing activities and programs that allow parents and kids to spend time growing stronger together. We invest in adults and seniors by creating a sense of belonging and allowing them to thrive through volunteerism and giving back to others. Day in and day out, the Y makes our community stronger by investing in every individual who walks through our doors. And now, Frank DeLuca is investing in the Y. The community leader and philanthropist announced his $1 million gift, which will be applied to the YMCA’s $4.5 million capital campaign to renovate the existing building. “Giving back feels good and it’s the right thing to do,” explains Frank. “I am honored and extremely proud to be blessed to be in a position to support the Y and our great community in this way. I cannot think of a more worthy organization than the YMCA to support at this level.” At the Y, we are committed to nurturing the potential of kids, promoting healthy living and fostering a sense of social responsibility. The Marion County Y, now the Frank DeLuca Y, currently reaches 20,000 people in Marion County and serves 8,000 kids. Central Florida Y CEO Jim Ferber is encouraged by Frank’s investment in the Y’s mission. “Frank’s leadership is inspiring. It will hopefully encourage others to understand the Y’s role as a nonprofit organization committed to helping move people and communities forward." And with the help of Frank DeLuca and other community partners, the Frank DeLuca YMCA’s vision for the future is brighter than ever. With the capital improvements over the next three years, we are on track to serve more than 35,000 adults and children, allowing us to share the Y with everyone in Marion County. “The Marion County YMCA is not just a ‘gym,’” Frank says. “The Y builds character in our children and families and remains focused on addressing the changing needs of Marion County’s families and improving the overall wellness of our community.”

FRANK DELUCA YMCA 3200 SE 17th Street Ocala, FL 34471 352.368.9622 Facebook.com/MarionCountyYMCA Ymcacentralflorida.com/y-locations/Marion

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APRIL 2013 ISSUE www.ocalaice.com

Heart of the matter When I look at a patient, I look at her heart… not just the physical one beating in her chest; I look at the heart of her being because many times the physical heart mirrors the one that is the home of all this emotion. If she is sad or discouraged, then I know from my years of experience that this can affect her physical health and this can be prevented. This is why I am passionate about educating my patients and the community on staying heart-healthy. Learning to manage our emotions, eat healthy foods, get adequate exercise; these are all things that can help stop heart disease in its tracks. This month’s medical topic is iliac artery blockages, which are a form of peripheral artery disease. Blockage in the iliac arteries makes it so your legs are in pain when you are active and at rest. This creates a domino effect: when we ache, we are less likely to go for that run or walk and when we do not stay active, our fitness level declines — which, in turn, makes us feel mentally and physically worse. I encourage you to literally take strides to stay active and tune in to what your body is telling you… and do it with all of your heart. Yours,

Asad U. Qamar, MD FACC, FCCP, FSGC, FACP, FSCAI Cardiologist

Unlocking the truth on Iliac Artery Blockage Who knew that weakness in the knees could literally be related to an affair of the heart? But it’s not romance we are talking about — it is a condition caused by blockages in the arteries. The leg pain is merely a clue to what it’s missing: love in the form of oxygen. The aorta, the body’s main artery, originates in the heart. At the belly button, it branches out into two iliac arteries, which run through the pelvis and down the legs. In a healthy body, the iliac arteries deliver oxygen- and nutrient-rich blood to the legs, calves, and toes, and our legs love the oxygen that is needed to keep them strong and fit. But when plaque, made up of cholesterol

and fatty acids, builds up in the walls of our arteries, blood cannot easily flow and the arteries harden. This obstruction of the iliac artery is called aortoiliac occlusive disease, a type of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). What happens when the legs do not receive enough oxygen? When limbs don’t get the blood or oxygen they need, the tissue below the blockage dies. This is known as gangrene and in the worst cases, sufferers of iliac artery blockages could lose a limb. But before that happens, there are clear symptoms to look for including weakness in the legs during activities and pain and cramping when at rest. If

the legs seem pale and cool and a pulse is difficult to find, you should consider visiting ICE immediately for a careful examination. Remember, blockage in any artery puts you at risk of heart attack or stroke. If you smoke, have diabetes, high cholesterol or high blood pressure, are obese, or have a family history of heart disease, you may be at risk. Catching iliac blockages early will help when it is time to treat the problem. Surgical bypass might be necessary but stents can also be successful. Give your artery health a little love so you can be weak in the knees for all the right reasons.


FA S T FA C T S

Recognizing the symptoms Blocked iliac arteries can cause severe pain, numbness, and coldness in the lower body. If blood flow is completely restricted, lack of sensation and paralysis can occur. A significant reduction in blood flow can also cause “claudication,” a difficulty in walking characterized by muscle tiredness, cramps, and aching. Source: http://www.ehow.com/about_6698004_iliacartery-occlusion-symptoms.html#ixzz2O7YgSdSq

CASE STUDY

Vive Vivian! I was referred to Dr. Qamar when I began to experience heaviness in my legs while walking. I felt like I was carrying around bricks every day. I have also been a diabetic for the past twenty-five years. My first visit with Dr. Qamar went well and I was set up for diagnostic testing. The tests came back to show I had blockages in my legs. The blockages were a complication due, in part, to my diabetes. I could have completely lost the circulation in my legs, resulting in an amputation. The staff at ICE showed me my test results and pointed out the blockages so I could fully understand my condition and options. I have gone through a series of stents and have felt calm and cared for each time.

The ICE facility is wonderful and the nursing staff is the best. They have made my outpatient procedures and recovery as comfortable as possible. Dr. Qamar is a thorough doctor who cares and loves his patients; I put him on the top of the list. The staff is wonderful and I enjoy my appointments at ICE. I recommend Dr. Qamar to all my friends as they have seen me achieve life-changing results. Today, I feel 100 percent better. Not only is there a huge difference in my walking, I am even doing a water aerobics class three times a week! Aquasize is something I could have never considered before going to ICE. I am able to be active and I feel more energetic than I could have ever imagined!

Sock it to me!

Debbie’s deal

I have worked with Dr. Qamar for nine years when we only had thirty-three employees. Now I think we have tripled that number, or more. I get to see most of our patients when they leave, and there is one in particular that always brightens up my day. Mrs. Miller is 93 years old and she is always happy and energetic. One thing that stands out about her is that she wears special socks. Each time we see her, we get excited to see what pair she has on that day. Whether she thoughtfully brings cookies or flowers, or just stops by to ask me about my day, I look forward to seeing her every time.

I have worked with Dr. Qamar since September 2010 after retiring from twenty-five years of professional billing in New Jersey. As the billing supervisor at ICE, I work with a team of eleven people. My job is to help our patients better understand their insurance coverage and financial responsibilities for their medical care. I explain the payment options and work with patients that have fallen on hard times. The billing team works together in every way to ensure projects are on deadline and our patients receive the best customer service possible. We recognize that our patients come first, as without them, we would not have a job.

— Jama Horn Check Out and Data Entry

— Debbie Tiesmeyer, CPC, CCS-P, MCS-P Billing Supervisor

The Villages

The Villages

Ocala

Williston

8489 SE 165th Mulberry Ln. The Villages, FL 32162 Office: 352.259.7900 Fax: 352.259.7966

1950 Laurel Manor Dr. Building 240 The Villages, FL 32162 Office: 352.509.9295 Fax: 352.509.9296

4730 SW 49th Rd. Ocala, FL 34474 Office: 352.854.0681 Fax: 352.854.8031

412 W. Noble Ave. Williston, FL 32696 Office: 352.528.0790 Fax: 352.528.0721


Welcome to

Carlton Arms of Ocala Redefining the Apartment Community

OPTIMIZE YOUR STUDENT’S POTENTIAL BY ORGANIZING THEIR WORKSPACE! Call us today for all your closet & storage solutions!

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WE TRAVEL THE WORLD TO FIND THE HIGHEST QUALITY STONE!

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OU C R SLA ONDI AIR B S TION HO ED IN OC WROO AL M A

Join Marion County’s premier apartment community. CARLTON ARMS OF OCALA offers our residents affordable country club living with outstanding services and value. Visit us today to select your apartment as your next home to live, work and play. CARLTON ARMS OF OCALA is located on 127 lush acres of wooded lakefront property. With beautifully landscaped grounds, peaceful woods and a freshwater lake, this community of 860 apartments offers country club living at affordable rental rates. • FREE Basic Cable TV Package • FREE Water Utility • FREE Poolside WiFi • FREE Valet Trash Removal • FREE Pest Control • Large Private Patios/Balconies • Rapid Response Maintenance • 2 Private Party Clubhouses • 2 Sparkling Pools • Fitness Center w/ Steam Showers • Lighted Tennis & Basketball • Fresh Water Fishing • Car Care Center

CARLTON ARMS OF OCALA

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THOUSANDS OF SLABS TO CHOOSE FROM! 20,000 SQ. FT. FULL INDOOR SHOWROOM AND STATE-OF-THE-ART FABRICATION EQUIPMENT REFER OCALA STYLE MAGAZINE AND GET 50% OFF ALL REMNANT INVENTORY AND FREE 18G STAINLESS STEEL SINK WITH PURCHASE OF 40 SQ. FT. KITCHEN

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cuttingedgegranite.com

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CarltonArmsofOcala.com

Effic/Studio from $503 • 1 Bdrm from $548 • 2 Bdrm from $740 • 2 & 3 Bdrm Twn from $784


Blueberry Goodness

the

‘Tis the season for pickin’ the blues p58

Quick Bites p59

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Freshly Squeezed Fun p60

Tasty Ocala p62

and more!

BALANCED BREAKFASTS D ESPITE CONSTANT REMINDERS THAT BREAKFAST IS THE MOST IMPORTANT MEAL OF THE DAY, MANY PEOPLE CONTINUE TO NEGLECT EARLY MORNING MEALS. ALTHOUGH THIS MIGHT BE AN ENGRAVED HABIT FOR MANY ADULTS, ALLOWING YOUR CHILDREN TO SKIP BREAKFAST COULD BE DETRIMENTAL NOT ONLY FOR THEIR HUNGER PANGS BUT ALSO FOR THEIR ATTENTION SPAN AND PERFORMANCE IN SCHOOL. STUDIES HAVE SHOWN THAT STUDENTS WHO EAT BREAKFAST

EVERY MORNING PERFORM BETTER ACADEMICALLY, STAY FOCUSED LONGER AND HAVE BETTER MEMORIES THAN STUDENTS WHO SKIP THE FIRST MEAL OF THE DAY. TO MAKE SURE YOUR CHILD IS GETTING THE BEST POSSIBLE FUEL FOR THE REST OF HIS OR HER DAY, PREPARE A BREAKFAST THAT HAS A LOW GLYCEMIC INDEX, MEANING THE CARBOHYDRATES IN THESE FOODS ARE PROCESSED SLOWLY, AND CONTAINS FIBER AND PROTEIN.

Sources: npr.org

Eggs © sevenke / Shutterstock.com;

WHAT’S ON THE MENU? Examples of well-balanced and quick breakfast choices for children include: • Whole-grain toast with peanut butter • Fresh fruit • Scrambled eggs • Oatmeal • Whole-grain waffles

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A PICKIN’ WE WILL GO

SUPER BERRIES S

TOP FEELING BLUE WITH SADNESS, AND START EATING BLUE BECAUSE THE RUMORS ARE TRUE: BLUEBERRIES ARE A SUPER FOOD. BLUEBERRIES DON’T WEAR AN “S” ON THEIR CHEST, BUT THEY REALLY ARE THE SUPERHEROES OF YOUR LOCAL FARM STAND AND GROCERY PRODUCE AISLE.

WHY GOING BLUE IS A DO CONSIDER THEIR SUPERPOWERS: Cancer Crusader: Antioxidants in blueberries consume cancer-causing free radicals.

Infection Fighter: It’s been demonstrated blueberries can fight urinary tract infections.

Memory Enhancer: Blueberries have been proven to improve memory.

X-ray Vision: Well, maybe not X-ray vision, but rumor has it the European variant, bilberry, improves eyesight.

Heart Stabilizer: Compounds in blueberries reduce bad cholesterol and promote cardiovascular health.

Blueberries play an important role in Florida agriculture, which is why THE FLORIDA BLUEBERRY GROWERS ASSOCIATION

(FBGA) makes it their mission to educate people on Florida blueberry varieties and get Floridians a pickin’ when fresh berries are in season. From March to May, u-pick farms invite everyone—with baskets and pails in tow—to pluck what they’ve sown and reap blueberries’ benefits. You can find local u-pick farm listings at pickyourown.org. To gather lush berries the efficient way, here are a few tips from the FBGA.

BROTHERS’ BLUES

Sheri Brothers’ first name may rhyme with “cherry,” but she’s been working in the blueberry biz for over two decades. After working as a farm and office manager for 15 years, Sheri went off on her own in 2006 and started planting acres of blueberries—with the help of her husband and two sons—at Blues Brothers Farm LLC. Blues Brothers grows 10 acres of blueberries as well as two acres of blackberries, peaches and grapes. Their berries are sold commercially, and then the farm is open to the public for u-pick. Between 6000-10,000 pounds of berries are picked a day; a blueberry plant produces 5-6 pounds of fruit. After winter, 30-60 crew members harvest the blueberries on the farm, which is all done by hand. From picking to selling, the entire operation takes five weeks.

• Keep those stilettos and tailored trousers home! Wear comfortable, loose clothing. • They don’t call us the Sunshine State for nothing! Wear a hat and sunscreen to be safe from exposure. • BYOC—as in bring your own containers. • Be picky! Try to select berries that are firm and ripe, i.e. the ones that aren’t green or red—they’re blue. • When removing a berry from its stem, try not to tear off the top of the berry. • Take it one section at a time; don’t jump from plant to plant and row to row.

“Farming is an ongoing process, in the winter months; we must keep the berries above 32 degrees or experience damaged fruit, making it unsellable,” Sheri says.  Ideally, Sheri hopes to harvest 60,000 pounds this season, “but of course, this is in a perfect world.” The delicate berries may endure freezes, fall victim to birds and insects, and contract diseases. The farm’s current threat is of the flying variety. “The cedar waxwing birds are protected but are very devastating to blueberry crops,” Sheri says. “They fly in flocks of thousands and eat the crop despite our cannons for noise, flags flying and anything else we can think of.” Looks like scarecrows are no match for these relentless birds. But rest assured—there will be plenty of berries to go around for us non-winged folks. Blues Brothers Farm will be opened to the public mid-May.

VISIT THE FARM Blues Brothers Farm, LLC

4290 NE 97 Street Rd, Anthony (352) 455-2714

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BERRY QUEEN

Go on a berry blitz with Gimme Some Oven blogger Ali Ebright’s blueberry recipes! Ali loves eating blueberries and adding them to her recipes. “Their sweet flavor can’t be beat,” she says. “They are a really versatile fruit and consistently bring great flavor to a recipe.”

BLUEBERRY MILK

Got blueberry milk? Ali says the drink was the result of a fun experiment and ended up being a tasty kid favorite. Move over strawberry milk; sip this blue juice, and cheers to good health!

Ali adapted this recipe from AllRecipes.com, but made it her own into a delightfully sweet dessert. Ali says you can use thawed frozen blueberries as well. She also recommends throwing in a few slivered almonds. Yum! Yields 12 bars 1

cup sugar (plus extra 1/3 cup for blueberries)

1

teaspoon baking powder

3

cups all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon salt Zest of one lemon 1

cup unsalted butter

1

egg

1

teaspoon vanilla extract

3

tablespoons cornstarch

4

cups fresh blueberries

Yields 1/2 cup syrup 1/4 cup syrup into one cup milk mix 1/ 1

cup blueberries, fresh or frozen

1/4 cup sugar 2/3 cup water 1

cup milk

In a small saucepan, heat blueberries, sugar and water over medium high heat until boiling. Reduce heat to medium-low, and let simmer for 10-15 minutes until it thickens slightly. Remove from heat, and strain through a fine-mesh strainer if desired. Refrigerate. Whisk together 1/4 cup blueberry syrup with 1 cup cold milk to serve.

Blueberry Pile © Volosina; Blueberry Bowl 0© witty food / Shutterstock.com;

BLUEBERRY CRUMB BARS

Blueberry Stem photo courtesy of Blues Brothrs Farm; Blueberry Miillk photo courtey of Ali Ebright

QUICK BITES

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Grease a 9×13-inch pan. In a medium bowl, stir together 1 cup of sugar, baking powder flour, salt and lemon zest. Blend in butter, egg and vanilla until dough is crumbly. Pat half of dough into prepared pan. In another bowl, stir together the remaining sugar and cornstarch. Gently mix in blueberries. Sprinkle blueberry mixture evenly over crust. Crumble remaining dough over berry layer. Bake in oven for 45 minutes or until top is slightly brown. Cool completely before cutting into squares.

WANT MORE OF ALI’S RECIPES? Visit gimmiesomeoven.com

Sources: floridablueberrygrowers.com, ushbc.org

Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Coffee n’ Cream in Micanopy added Friday night dinner to their repertoire as of February. The popular small town eatery is open from 9am-5pm daily, except for Fridays, when they’re open until 9pm. In addition to the regular menu, there are usually two specials on Friday evening. A recent example was Chicken & Beef Fajitas with homemade guacamole and Roast Tenderloin with garlic mashed potatoes and salad. Among the best sellers at Coffee n’ Cream is Aunt Sherry’s Chicken © Keko64/shutterstock.com Salad, available in a wrap, stuffed tomato or even in a cup to go. Kelly’s Famous Chicken N’ Dumplings are available on Thursdays. 201 NE Cholokka Blvd, Micanopy (352) 466-1101 micanopycoffeeshop.com

QUICK BITES

Roberto’s Italian Eatery offers traditional Italian fare in a cozy, elegant setting just north of the quaint town of McIntosh. The menu includes authentic Italian favorites, including pasta, beef, veal, chicken and seafood entrées. Patrons especially like the © Champiofoto/shutterstock.com Caprese (sliced tomatoes and imported mozzarella with fresh basil and balsamic reduction) or the Mediterranean Bruschetta for starters. Dessert options include Continued on page 60

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FROM PURÉE TO POUCH H

AVE YOU NOTICED HOW POPULAR THOSE LITTLE SQUEEZE POUCHES FILLED WITH FRUITS AND VEGGIES ARE TO KIDS THESE DAYS? SEEMS EVERY MANUFACTURER HAS JUMPED ON BOARD, MAKING THEIR OWN VERSION OF THE POPULAR TREATS.

SQUEEZE STATION

This compact unit allows parents to squeeze their freshly puréed creations into easy-to-store and ready-to-use pouches. And, it’s dishwasher safe! $24.99

STAY COOL

This stylish insulated bag will not only keep your baby’s pouches cold for hours but also has space for bottles, utensils, bibs and more. $19.99

Infantino, manufacturer of all things baby, has come up with a line of great products— appropriately named Fresh Squeezed—that enables moms and dads to concoct their own fruit and vegetable pouches from scratch in just a few quick steps. Apple strawberry, sweet potato apple, banana mango… the taste creations are only as limited as your imagination. And the best part? It’s homemade, so you know there’s no

added preservatives or sugars. Perfect for babies just learning to eat solids (the system includes adorable, attachable spoons for the pouches) to toddlers who are in need of a snack on the go. And guess what? Ocala Style is giving away the complete line, including a ton of must-have accessories! To enter to win, simply “Like” Ocala Style’s Facebook page and stay tuned.

STEAM & SMUSH

Step one in creating your own baby food is to steam and smush (yes, that’s a technical term!) your healthy ingredients. This all-in-one steamer/masher is BPA and phthalate free, not to mention dishwasher safe! $12.99

PEPPY PURÉE

Now that the food is steamed, this mini food processor quickly and easily whips up your steamed fruit and vegetables to create nutritious, homemade baby purées. An added bonus is the ability to select the purée’s texture, perfect for babies who are moving on to chunkier foods. $19.99

MIGHTY MILL

Dinner at a restaurant? No problem! Your baby can have what you’re having. This pint-sized Mighty Mill fits easily in your diaper bag and, with a few twists of your wrist, mashes up a variety of foods and textures. Yum! PS. You can use it at home, too. $12.99

Infantino’s Fresh Squeezed line is available locally at Walmart, Target, Sears and Toys R Us and also online.

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Squeeze Station & Infant photo courtesy of Infantino

Continued from page 59

homemade tiramisu and Sicilian-style cannolli. Relax and enjoy guitar music by solo guitarist Bob Brounley while you dine. Summer hours go into effect May 26 when they will be open Thursday-Sunday. Call for daily hours. 22050 US 441, McIntosh (352) 591-1145 robertositalianeatery.com

QUICK BITES

Bamboo Grill

opened in late 2012, bringing fresh Asian lunch options to the Williston area. Rolando Mananquil cooks up a variety of tasty entrées, available for eat in or take out, Monday-Friday. You’ll find Noodle Bowls, such as Lo Mein and Pancit, made with beef, chicken or tofu. Entrées come with rice and include such traditional dishes as Sweet & Sour and Teriyaki, as well as Smoked Beef Brisket, Smoked Salmon and © Stock Solutions/shutterstock.com more. For an extra $1.99, you can make it a meal and add a drink and egg roll to your choice. Open from 11am-2:30pm weekdays. 20 NE 3rd Street, Williston (352) 529-1019

QUICK BITES

La Cuisine French Restaurant is

now offering an unbeatable Early Bird Special ThreeCourse Menu. Patrons can enjoy the authentic French cooking in an atmosphere reminiscent of a Paris Continued on page 62


DININGGUIDE

Tony’s Sushi & Steakhouse 3405 SW College Road, Ocala / (352) 237-3151 / tonysushi.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p / Fri & Sat 11a-11p / Sun Noon-10p With abundant menu choices and over 100 off-menu rolls, you certainly won’t run out of options at Tony’s Sushi. If you can’t decide, the wait staff is excellent at suggesting items you’re sure to enjoy. Every roll and sushi dish is made to order from the freshest ingredients. In the steakhouse area, highly trained chefs make for a memorable meal as they cook on the tableside grills, preparing chicken, steak or seafood just the way you like it. Entrées include soup or salad and rice. Family-friendly, casual atmosphere, along with a full bar, including imported Japanese sake and beer selections. Like us

Book your party at Tony’s today. Gift cards available.

on Facebook!

Get the free mobile app at

http:/ / gettag.mobi

Asian Pop 2611 SW 19th Ave. Rd. Suite 400, Ocala / (352) 237-2666 / asianpopfl.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p / Fri 11a-11p / Sat 1-11p / Sun 3-9p The newest Asian restaurant to open in Ocala is Asian Pop. Sample the many flavors of Asia either dining in or by ordering online for a quick pick up. For lunch, the bento boxes are the way to go. Each comes with daily fruit, a spring roll, cream cheese Rangoon, miso soup, salad and rice. For dinner, try one of the chef ’s specials such as the Walnut Shrimp or Mongolian Beef. There’s also plenty of tempting appetizers, soups, salads, rice and noodle dishes and much more. And no Asian dinner would be complete without tempura ice cream for dessert!

Reservations for private parties and business dining available. Most credit cards accepted. Beer and wine available. Grand Opening Special - 10% off entire check.

ASIAN ASIAN CUISINE

POP

The Attic’s Cafe 801 N Magnolia Ave, Ocala / (352) 369-9300 Serving Lunch Mon-Sat 11a-4p Let’s talk about great food! Let’s talk about a unique and fun place! Let’s talk about the Attic’s Café! The Attic’s Café is located inside My Designer’s Attic. (You know, the “Not Your Average Furniture Consignment Store” located downtown.) Chef Andrew uses his culinary skills to create some of the best-tasting food around! Specializing in scrumptious galettes (savory crepes) and incredible dessert crepes, Chef Andrew also does a super job with his distinguished sandwiches, fresh salads and soups. Whether it’s his signature Roasted Veggie Galette with goat cheese, the Hot Night Club Sandwich or a fantastic lemon crepe, you can’t go wrong!

Located inside of My Designer’s Attic, in the heart of the old business district, 8 blocks north of the historic square! Don’t forget to explore the 8,000 sq ft of consigned furniture and estate pieces. You’ll never know what you’ll find at My Designer’s Attic, even the NEW Attic’s Salon!

The

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CROWD

PLEASER C

HEFS ARE DONNING THEIR WHITE HATS TO GIVE OCALANS THE BEST FOOD THEIR MENUS HAVE TO OFFER AT THIS YEAR’S TASTE OF OCALA, WHICH IS CELEBRATING ITS 25TH YEAR ON APRIL 6TH AT THE EWERS CENTER ON THE COLLEGE OF CENTRAL FLORIDA CAMPUS. LAST YEAR, OCALANS VOTED RESTAURANT MESA DE NOTTE AS THE CROWD FAVORITE. WE SPOKE WITH CHEF AND OWNER JOSE MORENO WHO WON THE COVETED PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD IN 2012. Interviews by Amanda Furrer

How many Taste of Ocala events has Mesa de Notte participated in? One. Last year. It was awesome! I had a great time. It was the kind of experience I was really honored to be a part of.

What was it like winning 2012’s Best Presentation and People’s Choice? It was marvelous to hear Mesa’s name last year! When we won People’s Choice it was… I can’t explain how beautiful it felt. It was amazing.

How do you prepare for Taste of Ocala? You have to prepare yourself mentally, physically and emotionally. We have our manager set up our table first; me and my sous chef do the food. The catering manager sets us up ahead of time. It’s just me, the sous chef and the catering manager. When you have everything ready to go, the rest is easy.

How do you make sure you don’t run out of food at the event? Don’t worry, and trust me—it won’t happen!

IN GOOD TASTE

Taste of Ocala is the primary fundraiser for the CF Foundation’s Taste of Ocala Scholarship. Recipients, like Hannah Deese, have used the award to further their college experience. In 2014, Hannah plans to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in business and organizational management. She shares how the award helped make this goal possible.

How did you feel when you received the scholarship? I was ecstatic upon receiving the scholarship. When I opened the letter from the college saying that I got into the Community of Scholars, I was speechless. I was excited to begin my schooling,

and I was so thankful for the extra funds to help me achieve all that I wanted to achieve.

How has the scholarship affected your life? The scholarship covered all my tuition and most of my books for each semester. This was not only helpful in my studies, but it kept me calm about my finances. Knowing that I was being rewarded for all my hard work made me want to work harder, not only in the school aspect of my life but also my family life and work life.

What else can you tell us about your college experience? My time at CF has been so inspiring and encouraging, but I could not have done it without this scholarship and the advice and guidance of Mr. Shuler and Mr. Kirk, who are both great assets to the college. They have both helped me pick courses that have been most beneficial to my studies and plans for the future. They encouraged me to keep trying and to keep my head up, even in the hard times.

WANT A TASTE?

Visit tasteofocala.org or call (352) 873-5808 for tickets and scholarship info.

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eatery for just under $20. Choose between three appetizers, three entrées and three desserts. This Early Bird Special menu is only available from 5:306:30pm Mon© Juraj Kovac / shutterstock.com day-Thursday. Enjoy live piano music on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. 48 SW 1st Ave., Ocala (352) 433-2570 lacuisineocala.com

QUICK BITES

Can you eat pasta and still eat healthy? Apparently so! Olive Garden Italian Restaurants recently incorporated a healthful twist to its menu, adding a variety of entrées under 575 calories and also incorporating gluten-free versions of some favorite dishes. Options in the gluten-free category include Penne Rigate Pomodoro, Renne Rigate with Marinara, Herb Grilled Salmon, Steak Toscano and more. If you’re just looking to eat lighter, Venetian Apricot Chicken, Herb Grilled Salmon, Capellini Pomodoro, Seafood Brodetto and Lasagna Primavera with Grilled Chicken all fall under 575 calories. 3363 SW College Rd., Ocala (352) 854-

© Bernd Jucrigens/shutterstock.com

0900 3680 Wedgewood Ln., The Villages (352) 259-0304 olivegarden.com


DININGGUIDE

Pavarotti’s Pizza & Restaurant 8075 SW HWY 200, Canopy Oak Center, Ocala / (352) 291-9424 Mon-Thu 11a-9p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun 11a-8p Pavarotti’s Pizza and Restaurant in Dunnellon is known for their famous old-fashioned pizzas, hand tossed and baked on a stone deck oven as well as their array of classic Italian entrées, fresh salads and subs and hearty pasta dinners. Their newest location in the Canopy Oak Center means Ocala residents can now enjoy Pavarotti’s famous fare. Veal or chicken is served Parmigiana, Marsala or Picatta style, and the seafood dishes are served fresh over linguini. Pizza lovers can’t get enough of the homemade pies, and don’t forget about the subs, stromboli and calzones!

Be sure to check out the new bar area and expanded dining room. Pavarotti’s also caters.

PAVAROTTI’S Pizza & Restaurant

Tilted Kilt 3155 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 351-5458 / tiltedkilt.com Mon-Thu 11a-11p/ Fri-Sat 11a-Midnight / Sun 11a-10p Looking for some fun with a great meal? Besides our great service, hospitality and delicious food, you’ll feel at home watching your favorite HD sporting events on the big screen TVs or enjoying live music on the patio. From poker to cruise-ins, there’s always something happening at the Tilted Kilt. Big or small, celebrate your next party or special occasion with us. Our menu features an array of options, from snacks to full meals, plus a complete bar, all served by beautiful lasses in kilts. You’ll want to make us your hometown pub. The Tilted Kilt – where a cold beer never looked so good!

Scan the code to view our complete menu and calendar of events. Or go to our website: ocala.tiltedkilt.com

Get the free mobile app at

http:/ / gettag.mobi

Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill 2711 SW 27th Ave., Ocala / (352) 390-8188 Mon-Thu 4p-2a / Fri-Sun 11-2a Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill is the place for hungry sports fans to go. With 32 high-definition televisions lining the walls, including a 133-inch and a 70-inch, 3-D screen, airing every televised game, you won’t miss a minute of the action. A great menu and an incredible selection of 40 beers on draft means Tony’s can cater to any appetite. Not into the big game? Not a problem. With a pool table, dart boards and video games, patrons are sure to find plenty of entertainment. Visit Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill and Tony’s Sushi within 48 hours and receive a free domestic beer when you show the receipt.

Happy Hour 2-4-1 all day, everyday. Along with other drink specials.

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DININGGUIDE

Bamboo Bistro 700 North Hwy 441 (In Front of Target), Lady Lake / (352) 750-9998 Mon-Thu 11a-9:30p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun Noon-9p Dim Sum Hours: Mon-Sat 11a-4p; Sunday-All Day Chef Wu and co-owner Jian Daniels have created a wonderful new Asian fusion dining experience in town that manages to be both elegant and casual.

Celebrating two years in business! Experience the unique and unforgettable taste of Bamboo Bistro in The Villages! Offering Asian dishes from China, Japan, Vietnam and Thailand along with a full sushi bar, Chef Wu incorporates the best variety of authentic Asian ingredients while using an array of cooking techniques. Our specialties include Peking Duck, Pepper Seared Filet Mignon and Seafood Delight, along with other seafood choices. Many wok entrées and noodle dishes are available as well. A variety of Asian beers and the extensive wine list will complement any meal.

The Ivy House Restaurant The Ivy House

917 E. Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala / (352) 622-5550 Sun 11a-2p / Tue 11a-2p / Wed & Thu 11a-8p / Fri & Sat 11a-8:30p / Closed Mon 106 NW Main St, Williston / (352) 528-5410 Sun-Wed 11a-2p / Thurs-Sat 11a-8p / ivyhousefl.com For more information on catering, please contact Waica Huggins or Evelyn Nussel at wmhivyhouse@yahoo.com. No reservations are required, but a courtesy call for parties of more than 10 is appreciated.

Tucked comfortably in the heart of Williston and with a new location in Ocala, this family-owned establishment is a pleasure to visit. The restaurant has been named by Florida Trend as one of the “Top 500 Best Places to Eat in the State” for several years now. Specials include Southern Fried Lobster, delicious steaks and their famous Baked Krispy Chicken, along with a complete full menu that includes Homemade Desserts.

Braised Onion 754 NE 25th Ave, Ocala / (352) 620-9255 Tue-Thu 11a-9p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun 11a-8p Enjoy great drinks with Bob & Jason at the bar who will be mixing for you! Also Friday 6:00pm Happy Hour and Jazz Night with Rudy Turner!

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Betty and Raoul Lemieux, Nicole Lassiter, and Marge and Loring Felix welcome you to Braised Onion, where you can experience a fun, colorful meal in a casual atmosphere as your taste buds dance away with the many exciting flavors of our “comfort food with attitude.” Stop by every Wednesday at 6pm for happy hour featuring two-for-one call and premium drinks all evening! While you’re there, stay for Martini & Jazz Night with smooth jazz by Rudy Turner. Chef Felix was recently the winner of Culinary Combat Iron Chef 2012-2013!


DININGGUIDE

Blanca’s Café Ocala Palms Golf & Country Club / 5000 N US Hwy 27, Ocala / (352) 867-0001 Tue-Sat Lunch & Dinner 10:30a-9p Tucked in among the rolling greens of the Ocala Palms Golf & Country Club, Blanca’s Café is a gem of a find for diners looking for excellent food served in a warm, friendly environment. Italian dishes and delicious homemade desserts are the café’s specialty. Patrons enjoy a full service bar and live entertainment weekly as well as spacious seating for up to 150. Try one of the weekly dinner specials Blanca’s offers, or schedule catering for your next event through the café. Whether you’re a newcomer in town or a local looking for somewhere new to dine, Blanca’s Café offers something to please every palate.

Entertainment. Each Friday, we are offering 1 ½-pound Maine lobster. Reserve lobster by Wednesday. Homemade pizza served daily. Lunches now feature Beef on Weck & Monte Cristo Sandwiches. Weekly entertainment, call for details.

Ipanema Brazilian Steak House 2023 South Pine Avenue, Ocala / (352) 622-1741 / ipanemaocala.com Lunch Fri 11a-2:30p / Dinner Tues-Thu 5-9p, Fri & Sat 5-10p, Sun 4-9p Brunch Sun 12-3p / Happy Hour Tue-Fri 5-7p / Closed Mon A Churrascaria (Portuguese for barbecue) is a dining experience where roaming Gauchos slice and serve fire-roasted meats from skewers in a continual fashion. Ipanema Brazilian Steak House boasts 12 of the finest cuts of meat complemented by an opulent salad and vegetable bar, delectable desserts, and delicious wines, beers and cocktails. Brazilian native and Executive Chef Ortencia DeAlmeida invites you to embrace the flavors of her homeland and experience the magnetism of Ipanema for yourself. Become a fan of Ipanema on Facebook at facebook.com/ipanemasteakhouse.

Visit our new website at ipanemaocala.com! Keep in touch with our events and promotions! Taste Brazil! Happy Hour Tues-Fri 5-7pm, Wed 2-for-1 Caipirinhas all night!

Cody’s Original Roadhouse 2505 SW College Road, Ocala / (352) 237-8182 / codysamerican.com Doors Open at 11a. Serving Lunch and Dinner Daily. “Where Quality and Value Come Together!” Hand-cut, USDA Choice, certified Angus steaks, rotisserie chicken, BBQ baby back ribs, chops, fresh fish, half-pound burgers, salads and more! Kids eat free Mondays and Tuesdays. Buy One Get One Free Fajita Wednesdays, $11.98; Steak-Out Thursday with steak specials starting at $9.98! Daily 2-4-1 happy hour, 11am-7pm, includes draft beer, wine and all liquors (top shelf, too). Lunch from 11am3pm, and early bird from 3pm-6pm Monday-Saturday. Sunday after-church specials starting at $8.99 with free dessert. Hand-cut steaks and “Just Plain Good Food” made from scratch...daily!

Join us for Mother’s Day! Take-Out Service Available. Locations also in Gainesville at 3100 SW Archer Road and The Villages at 1041 Lakeshore Drive at Lake Sumter Landing, and our new location in Tallahassee.

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DININGGUIDE

Hilton 3600 SW 36th Ave., Ocala / (352) 854-1400 / facebook.com/hiltonocala Arthur’s serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily and the best Champagne Brunch in Ocala on Sundays. The Starting Gate Lounge is open daily until midnight and features a wide selection of vodkas, bourbons, micro-brew beers, wines and other cocktails.

There’s always something special going on at the Hilton. On Thursdays, sample some of our signature martinis at “Tinis and Tapas,” and every Friday night, celebrate the start of the weekend with live music at “Party on the Patio.” Saturday nights, get ready to relax to the sounds of live jazz music to accompany your dinner or drinks at the bar. And as always, Arthur’s serves up delicious cuisine in a relaxed, beautiful and newly renovated atmosphere every day of the week.

Charlie Horse Restaurant & Lounge 2426 East Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 622-4050 Mon–Sat 11a–1:30a / Sun 11a–11p Live music daily from 7p-11p and Sundays from 2p-6p.

A well-known nightspot for many years, Charlie Horse has come into its own as a first class eatery. So what makes Charlie Horse so popular? The wings, the half-pound burgers, the 14-ounce, melt-in-your-mouth T-bones, the salads, the fajitas, the more than two dozen appetizers, the cold beer and cocktails -— the list goes on and on. Meals start at $5, up to about $20. But it doesn’t matter how little your meal costs, because no one leaves hungry! Dining is casual and comfortable, but come 9pm when the Karaoke starts, you can whoop it up and have a blast till 1:30am, seven nights a week. Charlie Horse — the place for great food and even greater times!

Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant 2463 SW 27th Avenue, Ocala / (352) 237-3900 / kotobukiocala.com Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30a-2p Dinner: Tue-Thu 4:30-9:30p / Fri & Sat 4:30-10:30p / Mon & Sun 4:30-9:30p Happy Hour daily 4:30-6:30p Check out our full sushi bar. Celebrating 26 years!

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For an authentic Japanese meal in an award-winning restaurant that has been serving Ocala since 1986, try Kotobuki. Enjoy traditional Japanese favorites like tempura, teriyaki and broiled seafood and vegetables. For a memorable experience, gather around the hot grill and watch as your chef prepares steak, chicken and seafood favorites right before your eyes.


DININGGUIDE

Crossroads Country Kitchen 7947 W Highway 40, Ocala / (352) 237-1250 Mon-Thu 6a-8p / Fri-Sat 6a-9p / Sun 7a-3p Located west on Highway 40 in Ocala, the Crossroads Country Kitchen is a must for anyone craving down-home, country cooking. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, menu items range from a wide variety of homemade soups and chili to prime rib, fresh salads, seafood, prime steaks and burgers. If you’re in the mood for a real treat, try the Prime Rib Dinner For Two. Make sure to leave room for one of the tasty home-baked desserts, too! In the mood for a fresh fish fry? Tuesdays and Fridays are all-you-care-to-eat catfish. Big screen televisions will allow you to enjoy your meal without missing one second of the big game or race.

Located at the crossroads of NW 80th Ave. and Hwy 40 West. No matter what you have a taste for, Crossroads Country Kitchen is sure to become a new favorite. Former owners of “The Spiced Apple” restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale

La Cuisine French Restaurant 48 SW 1st Ave., Ocala / (352) 433-2570 / lacuisineocala.com Tue-Sat Lunch 11:30a-2p / Dinner daily starting at 5:30p / Happy Hour Fri-Sat, 5:30p-7p Ask about our Early Bird Special on Mon-Wed from 5:30p-6:30p. Looking for a romantic escape, a quiet spot for business lunch or dinner, a cozy place for a friend or family reunion? Or simply craving good, hearty, quality food and dedicated service? Located at the heart of beautiful downtown Ocala, La Cuisine, with its unique French bistro atmosphere alongside world-class food, full liquor bar & extensive selection of wines, is definitely worth a closer look! Our specialties include Escargots in Garlic Butter, Traditional French Onion Soup, Beef Bourguignon, Pork Shank in Honey Sauce, Orange Duck, Blue Crab Stuffed Filet Mignon, Ratatouille and our genuinely authentic Creme Brulée, to mention just a few!

Enjoy our live piano bar on Tuesdays at 6:30p-9p and Thursdays from 6p-9p. Bring this ad for a FREE glass of our Champagne Kir Special (Restrictions apply).

El Toreo 3790 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 694-1401 / 7 Days 11a-10p SR 200, Ocala / (352) 291-2121 / 7 Days 11a-11p Happy Hour Daily 4-7p New lunch specials include Taco Salad on Monday, $3.95; Speedy Gonzalez on Tuesdays, $3.95; Quesadillas on Wednesday, $5.45; Chimichangas on Thursdays, $4.95; and Burrito Supreme on Fridays, $3.95. New dinner options include Fajita Mondays, $7.95; Chimichanga Tuesdays, $6.95; Alambre Wednesdays, $6.95; Tacos de Bistec Thursdays, $6.95; and Enchilada Fridays, $6.95. Don’t miss Margarita Mondays with $1.95 margaritas. On Tuesdays, kids 12 and under can get 99¢ children’s meals (takeout not included). Wednesday you can get 99¢ margaritas and $1.95 for domestic and imported beers. Saturday is 2-for-1 margaritas all day.

Join us every day for happy hour from 4-7p and get 2-for-1 wells or drafts. Whether it’s delicious food, great drinks or a festive atmosphere, there are more reasons than ever to visit either El Toreo location today.

THE BEST MEXICAN FOOD

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A Motorcycle & Music Mashup

The 17th annual Leesburg Bikefest offers more than just motorcycles p71

Chili, Cars & Family Fun p70

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A BOOM-ING GOOD TIME!

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and more!

Apr

20-21

N JUST A FEW WEEKS, THE QUIET TOWN OF DUNNELLON WILL BE BUSTLING WITH ACTIVITY. THE ANNUAL BOOMTOWN DAYS FESTIVAL BRINGS TOGETHER AREA RESIDENTS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES SHOWCASING THEIR PRODUCTS AND SERVICES WHILE CELEBRATING THE CITY’S PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE. THE QUAINT STREETS WILL BE LINED WITH MERCHANTS, LOCAL MUSICIANS, BANDS AND SINGERS, AND LITTLE ONES WILL HAVE A CHANCE TO STRUT THEIR STUFF IN THE ANNUAL LITTLE MISS AND MISTER PAGEANT. AND MAKE SURE YOU COME HUNGRY, BECAUSE THERE WILL BE PLENTY OF TASTY TREATS FROM THE BEST EATERIES IN TOWN! DUNNELLONCHAMBER.COM OR (352) 489-2320.

A FESTIVAL WITHIN A FESTIVAL Apr

20

If you’re making your way to or from Boomtown Days, be sure to stop in

at the AMERICANA MUSIC FESTIVAL AND BBQ to benefit the Boys and Girls Club

of Dunnellon. The festival will be held at Swampy’s Restaurant on the beautiful Rainbow River from 1-4pm. There will be bluegrass and folk music, and even the mayor of Dunnellon himself will be performing. So save room for some great BBQ or just sit back and enjoy the show!

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DELICIOUS DINING THE GREATER FAMILY DINNER to benefit Brother’s Keeper will take place at Trinity Catholic High School. Guest will enjoy premium grass-fed beef dinners, live entertainment, a pie-baking contest and auction, and more. The event is BYOB and begins at 6pm. Register early—only 200 steak dinners and 100 hamburger dinners available. (352) 622-3846.

Apr Apr

6

CHILI COOKS AND CLASSIC CARS Like chili? Like cars? Then this is an event you just can’t miss. THE SWAMP FOX SPRING FLING will take place at the Ocala Shrine Club. Sample some of the best chili around, enter a team in the chili competition or check out a slew of classic cars at the car show. There will also be a kids’ game area with plenty of activities to keep the little ones entertained and even a chance to win a car! Proceeds benefit Francis Marion Military Academy. swampfoxevents.com or (352) 843-7790.

Apr

12

FUNKY FASHIONS The On Top of The World Lions Club presents their first annual RECYCLED “TRASHY” FASHION SHOW at the Hilton Ocala. Designed to both entertain and educate the audience on “going green,” this event will feature a cash bar opening at 5pm and unique culinary creations prepared by Chef Randall White. The fashion show and silent auction will begin at 6:30pm. Tickets are $30 per person, $55 for a couple and $275 for a party of 10. otowlionsclub.org or (352) 861-0820.

Apr

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TIME TO GET QUACKIN’ It’s that time of year again! Tuscawilla Park is about to be overrun by ducks—rubber ducks that is—at the forth annual DUCK DERBY to benefit the Children’s Home Society. Come cheer on your ducky, and take part in all the fun activities going on for all members of the family. You may even win a prize! This year’s event will feature Florida United Promoter’s Series Super Late Model driver Jake Perkins with his No. 59 car. The derby takes place from 1-4pm. chsduckderby.com or (352) 816-2394.

START YOUR CYCLES (APRIL 13) Bicycle through the scenic roads of Marion and Lake Counties at the annual TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN CYCLING FOR SUCCESS event. Together with the Public Education Foundation, Take Stock in Children raises funds for college scholarships for deserving students. The ride begins at Lake Weir Middle School and offers both a 35- or a 63-mile course. Breakfast, lunch and a goody bag with T-shirt are all included. Registration is $40 before April 7 and $45 after. pefmc.org or (352) 671-4167.

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Apr

27

SING OUT Nashville recording artist and song-writer DAVID LEVI will be releasing a CD and invites the whole town to celebrate with him. Winter is When Things Grow will be David’s third album, and to celebrate, he’ll be hosting a free concert and launch party at the First Presbyterian Church in Ocala. The fun begins at 6:30pm. (352) 629-7561 or (352) 895-0090.

THELOCALSCENE CLASSES AT THE MANOR (ONGOING) The Artist Hub of Ocala will host a variety of classes throughout the month. Visit their website for specific classes, times and dates. Pre-registration is required. thecherishedbride.com or (352) 390-6801. UPCOMING EXHIBITS AT THE APPLETON MUSEUM (ONGOING) Out of Abstractions: Divergent Directions in Late 20th Century Art presents the multiple pathways of art that emerged from American Abstract Expressionism. It will be on display through June 2. Victorian International showcases examples of 19th century English and American art. The exhibit will be on display through June 19. New World Treasures: Artifacts from Hernando De Soto’s Florida Expedition features artifacts discovered

A QUICK

BEST OF THE BIKES

Q& A JOE SHIPES

Interview by Bonnie Kretchik

T

HE LEESBURG BIKEFEST BEGAN AS A ONE-DAY EVENT. FOUR VENDORS SHOWED UP, A FEW GARAGE BANDS AND ABOUT 5,000 MOTORCYCLISTS. TODAY, THIS THREEDAY EVENT TAKES UP OVER 20 CITY BLOCKS IN DOWNTOWN LEESBURG, THE GATOR HARLEYDAVIDSON AND SEVERAL OTHER BUILDINGS THAT COME ALIVE IN THE NIGHTTIME. BIKEFEST IS MAINLY ORGANIZED AND COORDINATED BY THE LEESBURG PARTNERSHIP AND REQUIRES YEAR-ROUND PLANNING. JOE SHIPES, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF THE LEESBURG PARTNERSHIP, TOOK A FEW MINUTES FROM HIS BUSY SCHEDULE TO TELL US A LITTLE MORE ABOUT THE EVENT.

What biker-specific events will be going on? We’ve got everything. There’s a Rats Hole Custom Motorcycle Show, drill teams, poker runs, biker games, demonstrations and over 250 vendors. National manufacturers like Yamaha and Suzuki are also there.

What about events for the non-biker? This will be the 17th year of the event. The first Bikefest took place in 1997.

There’s over 50 concerts, lots of food, tons of vendors and indoor and outdoor entertainment venues that stay open until 2am on Friday and Saturday nights. There’s so much to see and do.

How have you seen the event evolve over the years?

Tell me a little about the Featured New Artist Battle.

It started out as small one-day event that has grown into one of the largest three-day motorcycle and music events in the world.

The Featured New Artist program highlights our strong support of original music and is a way of giving back to the music community that has been so supportive of us. Each year, we provide a talented new artist or group tremendous exposure by highlighting them in our media efforts, using their original music in marketing collateral and having them play live in front of thousands on the main stage just prior to the coveted and popular Ms. Bikefest hot body contest. The Leesburg Bikefest Featured New Artist Rock Battle is the vehicle used to select that artist.

How many years has the Leesburg Bikefest been going on?

Why do you think Bikefest has become so popular? There’s a real no-hassle attitude. It’s a very relaxed atmosphere with a great support system, and it’s extremely well organized. The police department and staff are friendly and helpful, and it’s more than an event for motorcyclists; it’s a music festival as well.

WANT TO GO?

Apr

26-28

LEESBURG BIKEFEST

Downtown Leesburg / (352) 365-0053 / leesburgbikefest.com

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CONCERTS

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TICKETMASTER (800) 745-3000 / TICKETMASTER.COM ALL DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE, SO PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM VENUE LISTINGS.

WHO

WHERE

WHEN

Maroon 5

Jacksonville Veterans Mem. Arena

04/01

Funk Fest

Tinker Field, Orlando

04/06

Taylor Swift

Amway Center, Orlando

04/11-12

Sister Hazel

House of Blues, Orlando

04/13

The Offspring

JetBlue Park, Fort Meyers

04/14

Third Day

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

04/14

Rihanna

Tampa Bay Times Forum

04/19

Taylor Swift

Tampa Bay Times Forum

04/20

Carrie Underwood

Jacksonville Veterans Mem. Arena

04/20

Alice In Chains

Tampa Bay Times Forum

04/26

98 Rockfest

Tampa Bay Times Forum

04/26

Willie Nelson

Germain Arena, Estero

04/30

REO Speedwagon

Germain Arena, Estero

05/01

Smashing Pumpkins

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

05/02

Styx

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

05/03

A Day to Remember

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

05/03

Funshine Music Festival

Florida State Fairgrounds

05/03-05

Crosby, Stills and Nash

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

05/05

Bob Dylan

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

05/05

Crosby, Stills and Nash

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

05/07

Olly Murs

House of Blues, Orlando

05/07

Olly Murs

The Ritz Ybor, Tampa

05/08

Clutch

State Theatre, Tampa

05/09

Justin Moore

Rock Crusher Canyon, Crystal River

05/11

Tim McGraw

Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

05/11

Aaron Carter

The Ritz Ybor, Tampa

05/16

Alan Jackson

St. Augustine Amphitheatre

05/17

Crosby, Stills and Nash

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

05/17

Jamey Johnson

House of Blues, Orlando

05/18

Bryan Adams

The Peabody, Daytona Beach

05/19

Sunset Music Festival

Raymond James Stadium, Tampa

05/25

Sevendust

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

05/26

Rosanne Cash

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

05/31

Fall Out Boy

House of Blues, Orlando

06/04

The Postal Service

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

06/05

Fleetwood Mac

Tampa Bay Times Forum

06/07

Jason Bonham

Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

06/18

98 Degrees/NKOTB

Amway Center, Orlando

06/21

Brad Paisley

Florida State Fairgrounds, Tampa

06/22

Sunset Music Festival

Raymond James Stadium, Tampa

05/25

Rosanne Cash

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

05/31

Fleetwood Mac

Tampa Bay Times Forum

06/07

APR’13

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THELOCALSCENE / Continued from page 71 in Marion County and will be on display through December 31. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST (ONGOING) The “It Starts In The Park” student photography contest invites middle and high school students in Marion County to take part in a free photography contest. All photos must be taken in a park in Marion County. The contest began March 1, and entries must be submitted by May 15. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900. SWEET ADELINE’S CHORUS REHEARSALS (ONGOING) Women interested in singing with the Sweet Adeline’s Chorus are invited to attend a Monday rehearsal from 1-3:30pm. Rehearsals are held at the First Baptist Church of Belleview. (352) 624-2887. DRESS AND TUX DRIVE (ONGOING) The Pink, Pearl and Lace Cancer Awareness Group is holding a gently used prom dress and tuxedo drive for students wishing to go to the prom. The drop-off location is at the Howard Academy front office. (352) 512-5130. KAYAKING (ONGOING) The Marion County Parks and Recreation Department will host a variety of kayaking classes and outings over the coming months. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560. FREE ENGLISH CLASSES (WEDNESDAYS) Free ESL classes will be held each Wednesday at 6pm at College Road Baptist Church. (352) 854-6981. APPLETON AFTER HOURS (APRIL 4) The Appleton Museum will host its after hours social

featuring live music, dancing and refreshments. Doors open at 5pm, and music begins at 5:30pm. Admission is free for members and $8 for non-members. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. MASTER GARDENERS’ LECTURE (APRIL 4, 18) The Marion County Master Gardeners will present two lectures this month. The topic is “Growing Roses in Florida.” Presentations are free. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 438-2500 or (352) 438-2570. PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT (APRIL 5) The Discovery Center will host Parents’ Night Out from 6:30-9:30pm. Children ages 6-12 are invited for an evening of games and activities. Limited to 25 participants. $15 per person. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900. TASTE OF OCALA (APRIL 6) The 25th annual scholarship fundraiser will take place from 6:30-10pm at the College of Central Florida. The event will feature samples from some of Ocala’s top restaurants, live entertainment and a silent auction. Individual tickets are $100, and couples’ tickets are $150. tasteofocala.org or (352) 873-5808 ext. 1352. YARD SALE (APRIL 5-6) La Leche League will host a yard sale at 2205 NE 8th Street in Ocala from 8am-1pm. Proceeds benefit the League’s outreach project through Munroe Regional Medical Center. (352) 216-1435. BOOK SALE (APRIL 5-6) The Friends of the Belleview Library will host a book sale from 9am5pm. All proceeds benefit the Belleview Library. (352) 245-2767 or (352) 438-2500.


AFRICAN VIOLET SHOW AND SALE (APRIL 6-7) The Pioneer Garden Club will host a plant show and sale. There will also be an educational section. The show runs from 10am-5pm on Saturday and 11am-3pm on Sunday. Admission is free. (352) 237-3308 or (352) 342-0363.

FIRST SATURDAY CHILDREN’S ART PROGRAM

(April 6) The Appleton Museum will host a children’s art education series from 1-3pm. Children will partake in a hands-on art project with instruction. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. BLUEGRASS IN THE PARK (APRIL 6) The sixth annual Bluegrass in the Park will take place at the Silver River State Park. There will be three Bluegrass bands, and hotdogs and soda will be available. The event is rain or shine and begins at 5pm. Tickets are $10 for adults and free for kids under 16. thefriendsofsilverriver.org or (352) 895-0300. LOVE FOR LANDON 5K (APRIL 6) A 5K benefit run will take place at Marion Technical Institute at 7:45am. Registration begins at 7am and is $20 for adults and $18 for 17 and under. (352) 369-0217.

COMMERCIAL FOOD HANDLER CERTIFICATION TRAINING AND EXAM (APRIL 9) The Marion County Extension Office will host a certification training class and exam at its office from 8:30am5pm. Registration is required three days before the exam and is $110 for the class and exam and $165 for the class, exam and textbook. marioncountyfl.org or (888) 232-8723. OCALA HORSE PROPERTIES 3-DAY EVENT (APRIL 11-14) An event consisting of dressage, cross country and show jumping will take place at the Florida Horse Park. Competition begins at 8am daily. equiventures.com or flhorsepark.com or (352) 307-6699. JOHNNY MELLO SHOW AND DANCE (APRIL 12) Have A Heart For Companion Animals presents a Johnny Mello Show fundraiser at the Spruce Creek South Clubhouse from 5-9pm. There will be live entertainment, prizes and more. Tickets are $15. haveaheart.us or (352) 687-1776. FABULOUS “FUN RAISER” FESTIVAL (APRIL 13) Victory Academy will host its first annual “Fun Raiser” festival at the Bible Baptist Church from 10am-2pm. There will be games, face painting, cupcake wars and more family activities. Rib dinners must be purchased in advance. (352) 622-4410. GOLF TOURNAMENT (APRIL 13) CenturyLink will host a golf tournament to benefit the

United Way. The tournament will be held at the Ocala Municipal Golf Club beginning at 8am. Entry deadline is April 5. uwmc.org or (352) 368-8825.

focuses on nutrition, exercise, medication and other topics. The group meets at Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist Chruch from 2-3:30pm. (352) 629-3782.

MEL TILLIS FISHING TOURNAMENT (APRIL 13) The Riverside Resort in Homosassa will host the seventh annual Mel Tillis and Friends Fishing Tournament. The tournament will begin at 7:05am and end at 4pm. Awards will follow at 6pm. Proceeds benefit Shriners Hospitals for Children. fishingwithmel.com or (352) 362-6691.

GOLF TOURNAMENT TO BENEFIT OCALA CIVIC THEATRE (APRIL 19) The 22nd annual Golf Tournament to Benefit the Ocala Civic Theatre will take place at the Candler Hills Golf Club. The tournament begins at 1:30pm, and registration is $75 per person. (352) 236-2851.

MARION CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY (APRIL 14) The Marion Chamber Music Society will host the Kim-Crawford-Kreeger Trio at the Queen of Peace Catholic Church at 3pm. Admission is free. marionchambermusic.com or (352) 361-7700. CENTRAL FLORIDA MASTER CHOIR (APRIL 14, 21, 28) The Central Florida Master Choir will present To The Moon and Bach! For a complete list of locations and times, visit cfmasterchoir.com. WALL STREET COFFEE CLUB (APRIL 17) A monthly meeting will be held the third Wednesday of each month at 9am in the Ewers Century Center at CF. The meeting will include refreshments, guest speakers and roundtable discussions on the economy. (800) 443-4368. DANCE PARTY (APRIL 17) Dancin’ Around Studio will host a dance party at 7pm. Admission is free for students and $10 for guests. Refreshments will be served, but BYOB. danceocala.com or (352) 690-6637. DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP (APRIL 18) For adults with type 2 diabetes, this free discussion group

SCRAPBOOK FOR BREAST CANCER 2-DAY EVENT (APRIL 19-20) Bring your scrapbook or any craft to the Marion County Extension Auditorium from 6pm until the last person leaves. Admission is $25 in advance or $30 at the door. There will be vendors, prizes and food. (352) 732-5982. HELPING HANDS 5K RUN (APRIL 20) Helping Hands of Ocala presents its inaugural 5K run and 1-mile walk at the Baseline Road Trailhead of the Florida Greenway. The run takes off at 8am ,and the walk begins at 8:05am. A kids’ fun run will take place at 9:15am. helpinghandsocala.org or (352) 732-4464. EASTER PICNIC AND BUTTERFLY AND BALLOON RELEASE (APRIL 20) Erwin’s Farm will host an Easter picnic and butterfly and balloon release to remember the children we have lost. There will be a dedication with special music and a motivational speaker. Compassionate Friends will provide food; bring a finger food to share. (352) 369-6665. SPRING FESTIVAL (APRIL 20) First UMC of Reddick will host its annual Spring Fling Festival beginning at 3pm. There will be plenty of family activities and a fish fry at 5pm. Dinners are $10 Continued on page 74

ocalastyle.com APR’13

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Scene

PERFORMING ARTS WHO

WHERE

APR’13

the

WHEN

The Producers

Charles R. Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala

04/04-14

Sex Please, We’re Sixty

Ocala Civic Theatre

04/04-12

Miss Nelson Has A Field Day

Shakespeare Theatre, Orlando

04/0405/05

Hair

Phillips Center, Gainesville

04/08

Voca People

Phillips Center, Gainesville

04/11

Orlando Ballet: Carmina Burana

Bob Carr Perf. Arts Centre, Orlando

04/12-14

The Little Mermaid

Bob Carr Perf. Arts Centre, Orlando

04/13

Weird Al Yankovic

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

04/16

Marion Ballet Theatre: Cinderella

Ocala Civic Theatre

04/19-04/21

The Addams Family

Pensacola Saenger Theatre

04/24

Terry Johnson’s Flamingos

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

04/27

Celtic Woman

Times Union Center for Perf. Arts, Jacksonville

05/02

Celtic Woman

Bob Carr Perf. Arts Centre, Orlando

05/04

Nehemiah: In The Hand Of God

College Of Central Florida, Ocala

05/04-05

The World Has Talent

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

05/11

Green Day’s American Idiot

Times Union Center or Perf. Arts, Jacksonville

05/14-15

Guys and Dolls

Ocala Civic Theatre

05/1606/09

Disney on Ice: Rockin’ Ever After

Tampa Bay Times Forum

05/16-19

Cirque du Soleil: Quidam

UCF Arena, Orlando

05/18

A Tribute To Bob Seger

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

05/18

The Dancers Pointe

Bob Carr Perf. Arts Centre, Orlando

06/08

Kevin James

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

06/09

Margaret Cho

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

06/09

FAIRY TALES AND TEAS

Apr

19-21

Children of all ages will enjoy the classic tale of CINDERELLA and her evil stepsisters performed by our very own Marion Ballet Theatre. See Cinderella arrive in an authentic carriage, and be mesmerized by this innovative and entertaining version of a classic fairy tale. And princes and princesses of all ages are invited to attend a very special tea party. Wear your finest royal finery, and be escorted on stage by a cast member to hear Cinderella’s story while enjoying cookies and juice. Only a limed number of tickets will be available. Teas take place at 12:30pm on April 20 and 21. ocalacivictheatre.com or (352) 236-2274.

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THELOCALSCENE / Continued from page 73 for adults and $5 for children and must be pre-ordered by April 14. (352) 591-1930. FLOWER SHOW (APRIL 20-21) The Pioneer Garden Club will host “Pascua Florida” from 1:305:30pm. There will be multiple displays, including an educational exhibit. The show is free and open to the public. (352) 236-1879. BLESSED TRINITY CHURCH 130TH ANNIVERSARY (APRIL 21) Blessed Trinity Church will celebrate 130 years with a special mass followed by entertainment, food and much more. Mass begins at 11am. (352) 629-8092. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE WORKSHOP (APRIL 24) The Ocala Police Department will host a domestic violence workshop. The workshop will take place from 3-5pm. RSVP by calling (352) 369-7134. CHARITY PICNIC (APRIL 26) Highland Memorial Park will host a charity picnic to benefit the Relay For Life/American Cancer Society. The picnic will run from 11:30am-1pm, and the menu will consist of smothered chicken, red smashed potatoes, Cesar salad, brownies and drinks. Tickets are $10. (352) 266-6612.

at 8am. marchforbabies.org or (352) 629-7555. HUNTER/JUMPER SHOW (APRIL 27-28) Horse Shows in the Park will hold a horse show at Longwood Farm. A dressage show will be held on Sunday. Admission is free. The show begins at 8am. horseshowsinthepark.com or (321) 693-5551. YOGA (MAY 4) A free yoga class will take place in Sholom Park at 9am. (352) 854-7950. POSICALA FESTIVAL (MAY 4) Oakbrook Center for Spiritual Living will host this first annual festival to recognize the people and places that make Ocala wonderful. There will be artists, musicians and vendors, and the day will end with the Halo awards. The festival runs 10am-4pm. oakbrookcsl.org or (352) 629-3897. COPS, KIDS AND FAMILY FUN DAY (MAY 4) The Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Complex will host this free family event from 10am-1pm. There will be games, demonstrations and food. (352) 368-5517.

IMPROV SHOW (APRIL 26) The Brick City Players will perform an improv theater show at the Insomniac Theatre. The show is family friendly with lots of audience interaction. Admission is $10. Show begins at 8pm; doors open at 7:30pm. insomniactheatre.com or (352) 897-0477.

To have an event considered for Ocala Style Magazine’s The Scene

MARCH FOR BABIES (APRIL 27) A 6-mile walk will take place at the Cross Florida Greenway to benefit the March of Dimes. Registration begins at 7am; the walk begins

Send a short description (and a color photo, if possible) 60 days in advance to: email: calendar@ocalastyle.com fax: (352) 732-0226 mail: Ocala Style Magazine The Scene, 1007 E. Fort King St., Ocala, FL 34471


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ocalastyle.com APR’13

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Scene

the

THESOCIALSCENE

20th Anniversary Cosmopolitans of Ocala, Inc./ Scholarship Recipient Dinner

Alfred & Enid Cox

HOLIDAY INN

Members of the Cosmopolitans of Ocala, Inc. celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Winston Brown Scholarship for Academics. In the last 20 years, the group has awarded $80,000 in scholarships PHOTOS BY SHEILA HARTLEY

Janet Griffin

Gwendolyn Bailey and Deborah Winston Annette Brown, Lachetta Snowden and Lois Lilley (President) Alfred & Phyllis Nisbett

Sheila Adams and Jane Jackson Past recipients of scholarship- Markesio Simmons, Ike Butler, Vernon Joseph, Ivan White and LaRue Pierce

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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Phyllis Nisbett and Gertha Williams Terry Farmer, Lois Lilley and Dennis Farmer


Scene

the

THESOCIALSCENE

Medical Expo INDIA ASSOCIATION CULTURAL AND EDUCATION CENTER

The 13th annual Medical Expo of North Central Florida was held on January 26 at the India Association Cultural & Education Center. The largest medical expo in Ocala, over 400 physicians, PAs, nurses and medical personnel attended to educate and network. Guests were greeted with refreshments and entertainment, and proceeds benefited local charities and non-profits.

Dr. J. Panchal and Dr. R. Balaraman

Candee Walker and Dr. Asokan

PHOTOS BY SHEILA HARTLEY

Dr. Lowell, Steve Purves and Dr. S. Nijher

Dr. J. Panchal, Chris Blair and Suresh Patidar

Anju Singh, Dr. Murthy, Dr. P. Rumalla and Pravina Cacodcar Liz Bradley, Dr. Nardandrea and Christina Mohammed Dr. Jagalur and Dr. Srisha Rao

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Dr. Anil Gogineni, Dr. M. Shetty and Dr. P. Rumalla Steve Purves, Dr. Velisetty and Dr. Raju

ocalastyle.com APR’13

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Vienna Waltz Gala of Ocala HILTON OCALA

On New Year’s Eve, area residents joined a 30-piece symphony orchestra as they rang in the new year with the Vienna Waltz. The gala was held at the Hilton Ocala, and guests were treated to a three-course dinner prepared by Chef Randal White. The evening also included a special guest solo performance by Hannah Falestiny and a midnight champagne toast.

Ralph & Harriet Scicchitano, Claire & Sal Bianco

Bill Bowen, Elizabeth Bon Tesmar, Marilyn Pineau and Bill Odon

PHOTOS BY RONALD W. WETHERINGTON

Marcel, Kathleen & Hannah Falestiny

Lorraine Owner and Jamie Hampy

Father Pat Sheedy and Bernadette Rowen

Deacon Karen Murphy, Pat & Don Raymond

Dr. Richard & Cecilia Truesdale

Ricardo Luna and Kathleen Falestiny

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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APR’13

ocalastyle.com

Dr. Dane, Nancy & Taylor Myers

Rick & Jennifer Muhlig, Jamy Webb, Meghan Niebla, Tim Pigeon and Hunter Cole Alexandra, Jaquelyn & Charlene Sexton


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THESOCIALSCENE

Children’s Home Society GATEWAY BANK

On December 6, the Children’s Home Society presented Bob Kassi with the Child Advocate of the Year award. Bob is a long-time advocate for children and has worked diligently over the years to meet the needs of neglected, abused and abandoned children in Marion and Alachua County. A reception was held in his honor at Gateway Bank.

Jennifer Anchors, Bob Kassi and Becker Holland

Sally Lazo, Kent Guinn and Julie Riegler

PHOTOS BY SHEILA HARTLEY

Justa Thomas, Bob Kassi and Ellen Boczarski Ellen Boczarskie and Jennifer Anchors

Jeff Barnes, Mr. Bob, Hunter, Kathy Dugan, Barbra Lightbody and Emily Carey

Sherry Gonzales and Alissa Rockower

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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Kent Guinn, Bob Kassi, Dennis Baxley and Dr. Mike Jordan

Alicia Martineau, Jessica Maier, Shanna McCoy, Jim Robertson and Barbra Lightbody


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Ocala Style Apr'13  

Ocala Style Magazine. Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.

Ocala Style Apr'13  

Ocala Style Magazine. Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.