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FREE COMMUNITY EDUCATION FOR HEART MONTH

REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER BAYONET POINT RAO MUSUNURU, M.D. CONFERENCE CENTER

SATURDAY • FEBRUARY 15, 2014

ACCREDITED FULL SERVICE HOSPITAL

NATIONALLY ACCLAIMED HEART INSTITUTE

VERIFIED LEVEL II TRAUMA CENTER

Saving One Heart at a Time

Served 1685 Trauma Patients in 2013

MORE THAN 125,000 CARDIAC PROCEDURES SINCE 1989

MAKING A DIFFERENCE WHEN MINUTES COUNT

Top 50 in the Nation by U.S. News & World Report

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EXCEPTIONAL CARE, NO EXCEPTIONS Since 1981

PRE-REGISTRATION IS A MUST, FIRST COME FIRST SERVE Call 888-741-5119 or e-mail Kurt.Conover@ HCAhealthcare.com

PROGRAM: 9:00 A.M. Registration/Welcome 9:30 A.M.

Encounters of the Cardiac Kind: Effects of Daily Stress on the Heart. by Rao Musunuru, MD, FACC, FCCP, FACP, FAHA (American Heart Association National Physician of the Year 2005)

10:30 A.M. Affordable Health Care: Hope or Hype? by Shayne George, CEO

11:30 A.M. Lunch Rao Musunuru, M.D. Conference Center 14000 Fivay Rd. (At the back of the Hospital campus)

12:30 P.M.

Surviving Severe Trauma by Scott Norwood, MD, FACS

1:00 P.M.

Fire Arm Safety: Beyond Controversy by Tom Lawhorne, CFO

1:30 P.M.

Patient Centered Hospital Tour

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Patient Centered HEART Care “Involved In All Areas”

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30 Years New

Spring Hill

1984 - 2014

Our goal every day is to improve the quality of life of every patient, and to bring the most advanced heart care to Hernando County. Oak Hill is committed to providing patient centered care that is respectful of and responsive to each patient’s preferences, needs, and values. Patient centered heart care revolves around continually assessing our quality of care, allowing a patients to return to life at its fullest.

OakHillHospital.com


Good Hearing Lets You Stay Connected With Those You Love Most! BENEFICIAL HEARING CELEBRATES 30th ANNIVERSARY You’re Invited to Attend 2014 Advanced Technology Event February 10th thru February 14th

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Dr. Paraiso received his Bachelor of Science Degree from the University of Florida in Gainesville in 1995. He then obtained his medical degree from Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1999. In 2004, Dr. Paraiso completed his internship and orthopaedic surgery residency at Michigan State University/Genesys Regional Medical Center in Grand Blanc, Michigan. He received further advanced spinal surgery training during a 12-month spine fellowship at the Florida Orthopaedic Institute’s Center for Spinal Disorders in Tampa, Florida. Dr. Paraiso was specialty trained in and practices minimally invasive spine surgery using tried and proven methods.


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ocalahealthsystem.com


february 2 0 1 4

| vol. 1 no. 1 1

PHOTO © HURST PHOTO / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

features ON THE COVER

staying fit the fun way p36 Listen up ladies, if you think breast cancer is the No. 1 threat to women’s health, think again. You’re in the right vicinity, but it’s cardiovascular disease—not cancer—that is the leading cause of death to women in the United States each year. BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

is it genetic? p42

The science of genetics is an ever-evolving field that has fascinated both scientists and everyday individuals alike for centuries. Traits like tongue-rolling or eye color are fun to trace back through the generations. BY BONNIE KRETCHIK

STETHOSCOPE © CSABA DELI / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

weather woes p46

Check out what we discovered about how weather affects us and even a little whimsical folklore about weather. It just may change what you come away with from the next weather forecast. BY JOANN GUIDRY

FEBRUARY 2014

| healthylivingmagazines.com

7


departments

p30

13

HE ALT H Y

beat

p14

TRENDS | NEWS | PEOPLE

B Y J O A N N G U I D R Y, L E S L E Y J O N E S & K AT I E M C P H E R S O N

p14 From Ocala to Sochi on speedskates. p16 A pilot with a purpose. p18 Putting as-seen-on-TV products to the test. p20 How to grow a garden.

25

HE ALT H Y

p16

dose

INSIGHT | ADVICE | SOLUTIONS

B Y J O A N N G U I D R Y & K AT I E M C P H E R S O N

p26 All about anesthesia. p28 An explanation of the varicella virus. p30 What’s all the hype with hypertension? p26

51

HE ALT H Y

p52

body

NUTRITION | FITNESS | BEAUT Y

BY MARIE GLASS HARRINGTON, LESLEY JONES & K ATIE MCPHERSON

p52 Ready for combat. p53 Exercise with an electronic twist. p54 Give your body a biotin boost. p56 Inside The Chef’s Kitchen.

59

HE ALT H Y

balance

p62

MIND | SPIRIT | FINANCE

B Y L E S L E Y J O N E S & K AT I E M C P H E R S O N

p60 Much ado about mold. p62 How to have a happy workplace.

8

healthylivingmagazines.com | FEBRUARY 2014

p54


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ADVISORY

board HEALTHY LIVING MAGAZINE HAS BROUGHT TOGETHER A GROUP OF MEDICAL EXPERTS AND COMMUNITY LEADERS TO SERVE ON OUR ADVISORY BOARD AND SHARE THEIR EXPERTISE AND INSIGHT WITH OUR READERS.

MICHAEL HOLLOWAY, M.D.

physiciandirected weight management and medical aesthetics

NAVINDERDEEP NIJHER, M.D.

MICHAEL D. HEARD

plastic surgery

partner

RYAN GERDS, APR

account executive

OCALA PLASTIC SURGERY

SILVERTHORN COUNTRY CLUB, LLC.

CAROLYN REYES

senior solutions director

SUPERIOR RESIDENCES OF LECANTO

LIFEST YLE SOLUTIONS MEDSPA

ASHLEY CAUTHEN, M.D.

cosmetic and clinical dermatology

public information officer

pediatrics

GEORGE G. ANGELIADIS, ESQ.

partner

ANNE BLACK

director, marketing OCALA HEALTH

JAYANTI PANCHAL, M.D.

internal medicine and medical weight management

community relations coordinator

HPH HOSPICE IN CITRUS COUNT Y

BONNIE CLARK, ED.D.

provost

SPRING HILL CAMPUS OF PASCO-HERNANDO COMMUNITY COLLEGE (PHCC)

SUCCESS BY DESIGN

MARK JANK, M.D.

ophthalmology OCALA EYE

CRAIG ACKERMAN

public information officer FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH IN MARION COUNT Y

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healthylivingmagazines.com | FEBRUARY 2014

CARLA LOOPER

director of sales

FLORIDA INSURANCE BROKERS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

THE HOGAN LAW FIRM

CHILDREN’S HEALTH OF OCALA

SUZANNE SANTANGELO

MEDERI CARETENDERS

MUNROE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

MIDSTATE SKIN INSTITUTE

CHRIS OKONKWO, M.D.

TIKA KINSEY

SAM SHRIEVES

marketing president

CAPITAL CIT Y BANK FOR HERNANDO/PASCO

JENNIFER SIEM

adult member services and wellness director HERNANDO BRANCH OF THE YMCA OF THE SUNCOAST

KATIE LUCAS

public information officer NATURE COAST EMS

KATIE MEHL, APR

public relations coordinator CITRUS MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM

KATIE NELSON

LYNN VAN METER

owner and ceo

FIDDLEHEAD MARKETING ADVERTISING PUBLIC RELATIONS

VINCE VANNI

owner

VINCE VANNI AND ASSOCIATES, PUBLIC RELATIONS AND MARKETING

marketing coordinator

PATRICIA CROWLEY, IOM

president/ceo

GREATER HERNANDO COUNT Y HAMBER OF COMMERCE

THERESSA FOSTER

owner

WEST CENTRAL SOLUTIONS

OAK HILL HOSPITAL

JOSH WOOTEN

president/ceo

DOROTHY PERNU, APR

director of marketing and communications

SEVEN RIVERS REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

CITRUS COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


MARION | CITRUS | HERNANDO

healthylivingmagazines.com / 352.732.0073

publisher

Ocala Health welcomes

KATHY JOHNSON

kathy@healthylivingmagazines.com

office/production manager - marion county

CYNTHIA BROWN

art@healthylivingmagazines.com

production & billing - citrus & hernando county

TANYA HINEBAUGH

tanya@amazing-mediagroup.com

Angel M. Caban, MD Ocala Health Surgical Group

EDITORIAL executive editor

KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY

karin@healthylivingmagazines.com

Specializing in minimally invasive techniques for general and bariatric surgery.

managing editor

MELISSA PETERSON

melissa@healthylivingmagazines.com

contributing writers

AMANDA FURRER JOANN GUIDRY MARIE GLASS HARRINGTON BONNIE KRETCHIK CYNTHIA MCFARLAND editorial assistant

KATIE MCPHERSON editorial intern

LESLEY JONES

ART

art@healthylivingmagazines.com

creative director

JASON FUGATE

graphic designers

CASEY ALLEN KRISTEN NETHEN photographer

JOHN JERNIGAN

SALES

director of sales

DEAN JOHNSON

deanjohnson@healthylivingmagazines.com

Surgical Group

sales manager

SHARON MORGAN account executives

PEGGY SUE MUNDAY

4600 SW 46th Court Suite 220 Ocala, FL 34474 352-291-0239 352-291-0245 fax

peggysue@healthylivingmagazines.com

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administration/accounting - marion county

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Healthy Living Magazines, February 2014. Published monthly by Ocala Publications Inc. and Amazing Media Group, 1007 E. Fort King Street, Ocala, FL 34471. (352) 732-0073. All contents copyright 2014 by Ocala Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature” denote a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements. OCALA / MARION COUNTY

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FEBRUARY 2014

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W E G ET TO T H E

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© ROBERT KNESCHKE / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

HE ALT H Y

beat TRENDS | NEWS | PEOPLE

here’s to hearts February is all about hearts—and not the construction paper kind. Heart Month is the time to get educated on one of our body’s most important organs, so check out page 36 for our story on women’s heart health. Until then, consider these numbers:

Source: cdc.gov, heartcarecfl.com

• ABOUT 37 PERCENT OF ADULTS REPORT HAVING TWO OR MORE OF THE SIX RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HEART DISEASE. • EVERY YEAR, APPROXIMATELY 715,000 AMERICANS SUFFER A HEART ATTACK. • HEART DISEASE COSTS THE UNITED STATES AROUND $109 MILLION ANNUALLY IN HEALTH CARE SERVICES, MEDICATIONS AND LOST PRODUCTIVITY.

FEBRUARY 2014

| healthylivingmagazines.com

13


HE ALT H Y

beat people

skating into Sochi O cala native Joey Mantia currently resides in Salt Lake City, Utah. It’s much better suited to his sport of choice: long track ice speed skating. After just three years on the ice, Joey qualified in December for the 2014 Olympics in Sochi, Russia. So what does it take to be a top-tier athlete? According to Joey, it’s about hours on the ice, an unyielding work ethic and plenty of food. BY KATIE MCPHERSON

Joey started in-line skating at an Ocala rink circa 1993. “When I was a kid I liked to go to the skating rink public sessions. One powder, fruits and lately some dextrose to day, the session ended and I wouldn’t get off replace what I burn off in muscle use.” the floor,” Joey recalls. “The speed coach When he’s not training with the team, came in and said ‘let him stay out there and Joey pays it forward by training upcoming see how he does.’ He talked my dad into letskaters at educational clinics. ting me skate my first meet a “I was lucky to have a really few weeks later.” good coach growing up. She “He whooped up on ‘em in taught me all the fundamentals $20 skates,” says Joe Mantia, through her program. I didn’t Joey’s father and biggest fan. realize until I was skating other “Now, 20 years later, he’s on practices that other people the Olympic Team.” didn’t do that,” he says. “I really Of course, no one beenjoy teaching kids, and I’m comes an Olympian without happy I’m in a position to do so.” putting in the hours. A typical — JOE MANTIA This Olympian’s proudest day of training starts bright moment? and early at 7am. “My first individual world title in in-line. “Warm up is from 8-9am, and then we’re on the ice from 9-11am,” Joey explains. “Then I When I came across the line first, it was the best feeling ever. I’ve never really felt the get off the ice for recovery and some nutrition. same after winning.” Our second workout is usually around 2 or 3.” His father answered similarly, but Joe says his son has always been an remembered his son’s heart even better than overachiever, and spending six hours a day, five days a week at the oval means Joey burns his monumental achievement. “In his very first world competition, he plenty of fuel. won a gold medal on my birthday. He skated “As far as nutrition goes, it’s most to me with it and said ‘Happy Birthday, Dad. important I get enough calories in me to do I love you,’ and put it around my neck.” the workouts. I like to do shakes with protein

“He whooped up on ‘em in $20 skates, now 20 years later, he’s on the Olympic Team.”

WANT TO SEE JOEY IN ACTION? The 22nd Olympic Winter Games take place February 7 through 23. Although the Opening Ceremonies are held on February 7, official competition begins on February 6. You can catch the action during primetime on NBC. For a complete rundown of the 2014 Winter Olympic schedule, athletes and more, visit NBCOlympics.com or TeamUSA.org.

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healthylivingmagazines.com | FEBRUARY 2014


Now your shoulder pain can be the one that got away. We’ll help you get back to reeling in the fun again.

We believe the best way to live life is to do more of what you love. So whether you have shoulder, hand, hip, knee or foot pain, we have an orthopaedic specialist dedicated to getting you back to what matters most. With everything from diagnosis to recovery in one state-of-the-art facility, our team is with you every step of the way.

Take the next step, call 352-336-6000. We are Improving Lives - Everyday.

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Gainesville | Ocala | Lake City | Alachua FEBRUARY 2014

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15


HE ALT H Y

beat good deeds

flying with a purpose A pilot for 51 years, Ocala’s David Walker has been flying the past decade with a singular purpose. An Angel Flight Southeast pilot since 2004, Walker has logged 350-plus and counting flights getting people to urgent medical care. For his dedicated service, Walker was named the 2013 Angel Flight Pilot of the Year for the Central Florida East region. It’s an award that Walker also won in 2007 and 2011. BY JOANN GUIDRY

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healthylivingmagazines.com | FEBRUARY 2014

Leesburg, Florida-based Angel Flight Walker averages a flight a week, either as Southeast, which is a member of the Air the sole pilot for the trip or as part of a relay Charity Network, is a non-profit volunteer team of pilots getting a patient to a medical pilot organization that provides patients with facility. Usual destinations include Miami, free air transportation throughout Florida Jacksonville, Gainesville, Tampa, West Palm and the Southeast to medical facilities. Angel Beach and Atlanta. Flight pilots donate their time and personal “I like trips where I can fly into an airport, airplane, including fuel and maintenance. then get a courtesy car and drive the patient “The great thing about being an Angel to their appointment,” says Walker. “I wait Flight pilot is that I get to fly and help for them, then we drive back to the airport someone at the same and fly home.” time,” says Walker, During the flights, 79, a retired electrical Walker chats with the contractor who has lived in patients and learns about Ocala’s Leeward Air Ranch not only their medical since 1989. “For me, it situations but about doesn’t get much better their lives as well. It’s than that.” those stories that keep Walker caught the Walker flying. flying bug early on. He “Hearing people’s — DAVID WALKER was 28 when he got his stories makes me pilot’s license and bought appreciate my health and his first plane in 1960. how fortunate I am,” he Walker has been flying the same threesays. “I want to keep doing the Angel Flight passenger Beechcraft Bonanza for 41 years. work as long as I can. It’s a great way to His Leeward Air Ranch home’s garage also give back.” doubles as the plane’s hangar. “Most of the flights are scheduled ahead of time,” says Walker. “But there are times WANT TO KNOW MORE? where I get a call in the middle of the night. angelflightse.org And just being able to walk out to my plane in (352) 326-0761 the garage makes those times easier.”

“The great thing about being an Angel Flight pilot is that I get to fly and help someone at the same time.”


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1.49% APR is for members with a credit score of 720 or above who finance a new or used vehicle or, refinance their existing auto loan from another financial institution with Insight Credit Union. An additional 0.25% APR autodraft discount may apply when you autodraft your loan payment from your Insight Credit Union checking account. All new checking accounts must be verified and approved through ChexSystems to be eligible for the 0.25% APR autodraft discount. Loan subject to normal underwriting guidelines. Your actual rate will be customized based on your credit score. No other discounts may apply. Maximum term of 36 months at 1.49% APR. Terms 85-96 months require a $40,000 loan amount to qualify. Loan application subject to a $30 Application Fee. Approved refinance loans subject to a $74.75 Lien Recording Fee. Interest accrues from the date of contract. Existing Insight Credit Union auto loans are not eligible for refinance. Other restrictions may apply. Offer begins Jan. 2, 2014, and may be withdrawn at any time. Federally insured by NCUA.

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17


HE ALT H Y

beat test lab

the air curler E ver see an infomercial for a crazy product and think “now that I have to try?” Here in the test lab, i.e. my unsuspecting apartment, I’m trying out some of the weirdest food, health and beauty as-seen-on-TV products. This month is all about the Air Curler. BY KATIE MCPHERSON

the claims The Air Curler infomercial says it can “twirl a head full of curls in seconds,” creating the “perfect curl every time.” The final look should be “loose, luscious and trendy.” Because this gadget allows hair to be blown dry into a curl, it causes less heat damage. My favorite claim is that it will “spin hair like a cotton candy machine.” I’m not sure I want any part of that, but all aboard the as-seen-on-TV train.

the preparation Some disclaimers for anyone who purchases one of their own: Assembly is required, and read the directions first. Once this awkward contraption was put together, I realized it can’t stand up on its own because it’s so side-heavy. Also it’s the size of a half-gallon jug. As a college student with minimal space, it lost points with me for being impossible to store in my tiny excuse for a bathroom. As someone with naturally curly hair, it wouldn’t be fair to test the product my-

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healthylivingmagazines.com | FEBRUARY 2014

self. Instead, I drafted my roommate, Joanna, whose straight hair was the perfect medium for this gadget. We combed some water through her hair like the instructions recommended and set up shop away from a mirror—if she saw her hair halfway through I may not have been allowed to take pictures.

the experiment The ridiculousness of the product must have been palpable, because two curls in, Joanna let loose with an unprompted “this feels stupid.” Unfortunately, it looked pretty stupid, too. The Air Curler was easy to use—just grab a section of hair, drop it into the bucket and flip on the hair dryer. It certainly spun my roomie’s hair like cotton candy, but it even looked like a mass of fuzz. Did it change the texture of her hair? Yes, but in the most regrettable way imaginable. Five minutes of curling (and laughter) later, we called off the experiment.

the verdict From now on, we’re calling this bad boy the Air Tangler for the unspeakable crimes it perpetrated against my friend’s hair. This pink bucket of nightmares got her halfway to dreadlocks but nowhere close to the shiny spirals in the ad. Fortunately, they weren’t hard to brush out. To be fair, this product does what it claims to do: It spins your hair on low heat and forms “curls” quickly. The problem is that when we discovered it worked, we really wished it hadn’t.


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FEBRUARY 2014

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19


HE ALT H Y

beat the challenge

reap what you sow

I

t’s February and, in Florida, that means spring is right around the corner. So this month, we’re challenging you to slide into your rubber boots and get gardening. Sure, growing a vegetable garden requires a little elbow grease, but reaping its rewards makes it worthwhile. Besides saving a little extra green at the register and being an excellent source of nutrition for your family, growing your own vegetable garden also benefits your mental health.

WHY: Relaxation and stress reduction are, perhaps, gardening’s best health advantage. Think of it as shedding your stress into the dirt of your garden. By focusing on a specific task, such as pulling weeds or watering plants, it allows the mind to escape and let go of the built-up stress. It’s also an effective way to help reduce the risk of acquiring dementia, according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. If saving money, eating better and improving your mental health sound great to you, but you’re still feeling slightly hesitant about digging up your backyard unsupervised, it’s OK—we’ll walk you through it with tips from the University of Florida’s IFAS extension.

PICK AN IDEAL AREA FOR YOUR GARDEN. A good site

will receive more than five or six hours of full sun a day. It should be near a water source, in soil that is well drained and void of any tree roots.

PLAN YOUR CROPS. Having

a productive garden starts with good planning, so begin with a map. Label the crops, their location and their correlating planting dates. Keep the map of your crops for reference; it could come in handy when things start sprouting and you aren’t quite sure if it’s corn or cabbage.

THINK OUTSIDE THE ROW.

Not all backyard spaces are created equal. However, you can maximize its potential by using

space-saving options. Plant in blocks instead of rows, it’ll eliminate the unused space in between. Try interplanting; it incorporates short- and long-season vegetables together to save space.

PLANT YOUR GARDEN. After you’ve tilled the area, use a rake to make shallow furrows and sow the seeds. After sowing the seeds, rake lightly in the opposite direction so seeds are completely covered. Vegetables often require different watering and fertilizing needs, so research your plant varieties beforehand and care for them accordingly. When the seeds start sprouting, thin out the crop—the remaining plants shouldn’t have to compete for water and nutrients. Now that you’ve got the basics down, happy gardening!

STILL HAVE QUESTIONS? FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PICKING THE BEST VARIETIES AND MAINTAINING YOUR GARDEN, INCLUDING APPLYING PESTICIDES AND FERTILIZING, VISIT THE UF/IFAS WEBSITE AT edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

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Sources: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, edis.ifas.ufl.edu

THE CHALLENGE:

WOMAN © GOODLUZ; BASKET © AQUARIAGIRL1970 / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Each month we present our readers with a new challenge to improve their health and wellness. This month, we challenge you to grow your own veggies.


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All have all joined our staff in the past few months. In addition, All Saints would like to welcome back

Philip Townsend, MD, Gynecologic Surgeon.

Dr. Townsend was on staff prior to last year, and All Saints is delighted to have him back.

All Saints Surgery Center prides itself in “patients first.� We welcome the opportunity to work with our new and returning surgeons in providing quality care for their patients. Again, WELCOME!

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Dr. Noroozi is board certified in foot and ankle surgery but has always had an interest in wound care as well. Dr. Noroozi was recently invited to join the MRMC Wound Care Center as the sole podiatrist, which has enabled her to have access to new, specialized wound care techniques, including negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). In addition, Dr. Noroozi utilizes dermal skin substitutes to help heal chronic wounds.

Sheila Noroozi, DPM, FACFAS Diplomate, American Board of Podiatric Surgery Board Certified in Foot & Ankle Surgery

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Carrol Dillon-Smith

Administrator/Owner

Megan Christine Forrest

Director of Operations


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HE ALT H Y

dose INSIGHT | ADVICE | SOLUTIONS

a caplet a day

Source: usatoday.com

Alzheimer’s is known for its incurability, but these days the Journal of American Medical Association is publishing studies saying otherwise. New research suggests that taking high doses of vitamin E can improve functional activities, like planning and organizing. Studies are still in their infancy, so experts say don’t up the dosage just yet, but who knows? Combating this disease may be as easy as taking your vitamins.

FEBRUARY 2014

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HE ALT H Y

dose

anesthesia:

negating pain

W

ithout anesthesia, medical procedures such as getting stitches, having a tooth pulled or undergoing major surgery would be less than desirable experiences. With Greek origins, the word anesthesia means to perceive loss of sensation. Anesthesia uses various anesthetic agents to induce numbness to unconsciousness, depending on the procedure you are having and your overall current health status.

There are four main types of anesthesia: Local: Numbs one small area of your body, such as when you have a tooth pulled, and you stay awake and alert. Conscious/intravenous (IV) sedation: Uses a mild sedative to relax you with pain medication. You remain awake but may not remember the procedure afterward. Regional: Blocks pain in a specific area of the body, such as an arm or leg. Epidural anesthesia, which is often used in childbirth, is a type of regional anesthesia. General: Affects your whole body and is generally used for major surgery. You go to sleep, feel nothing and have no memory of the procedure afterward.

the big one: general anesthesia General anesthetics, which are administered by a needle, intravenously or even inhaled, induce unconsciousness by affecting various areas of the brain and the central nervous system. Therefore, patients undergoing general anesthesia have to be carefully monitored for any potentially lifethreatening changes in breathing, pulse and blood pressure. The anesthesiologist, the doctor who administers the anesthetics, consults with the primary doctor and meets with the patient prior to the surgery. There is usually a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) present during the surgery as well. Medical procedures that typically use general anesthesia include those that cause a lot of blood loss, take a long time, affect breathing, induce anxiety or are too painful. Anesthetic drugs, usually a combination of intravenous and inhaled gases, are intended to induce analgesia (loss of pain), amnesia (loss of memory), immobility (loss of motor reflexes), relaxation of skeletal muscles and unconsciousness.

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ANESTHESIA©DIMITRIMANITA; REDHAIR©SUBBOTINAANNA;MACHINE©NERTHUZ/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

STAGES OF GENERAL ANESTHESIA INDUCTION: Patient can talk but slowly begins to lose

consciousness.

EXCITEMENT STAGE: Patient completely loses consciousness; there may be irregular heart rate and/or uncontrolled movements. SURGICAL ANESTHESIA: Patient’s skeletal muscles begin to relax and eye movement stops; patient is now unconscious and ready for surgery. OVERDOSE: If too much anesthetics have been administered, patient can experience severe brain stem or medullary depression, which can be fatal.

Sources: medicalnewstoday.com; mayoclinic.com; nlm.nih.gov/medline;howstuffworks.com

general anesthesia complication risk factors • • • •

Diabetes Smoking Obesity High blood pressure

• • • •

Heart conditions Sleep apnea Drug allergies Alcohol abuse

35%: Percentage of higher risk that elderly people who undergo general anesthesia have of eventually developing dementia than those who don’t, according to researchers at the University of Bordeaux (France) 2 In 1,000: Number of patients under general anesthesia who wake up during an operation, according to a German study Anesthesia Awareness: Patients under general anesthesia are aware of surroundings but do not feel pain. Unintended Intraoperative Awareness: Extremely rare incidences where people can feel pain during surgery but are unable to convey this to medical staff. This can lead to post-operative psychological issues, such as post-traumatic stress disorder. Oliver Wendell Holmes: Generally credited with suggesting the use of anesthesia

right dosage key:

THE ANESTHESIOLOGIST DETERMINES THE TYPE AND AMOUNT OF ANESTHETICS USED DEPENDING ON THE PATIENT’S SIZE (LARGER PEOPLE MAY NEED MORE), CERTAIN HEALTH CONDITIONS (SUCH AS DIABETES) AND TOLERANCE TO CERTAIN DRUGS.

redhead resistance:

A UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE STUDY SHOWED THAT REDHEADED WOMEN HAVE A HIGHER TOLERANCE TO BOTH LOCAL AND GENERAL ANESTHESIA. A LATER STUDY PROVED THE SAME FOR REDHEADED MEN.

knocked unconscious Before the advent of modern anesthetics, sometimes patients were knocked unconscious by a blow to the head! Ever wonder where the phrase “bite the bullet” comes from? Think about those old Western and war movies when the hero is shot, drinks whiskey and then bites down on a bullet while crude surgery is performed. Other alternative anesthesia methods included hypnosis, icing and acupuncture. Also used were herbs like mandrake, belladonna, jimsonweed, as well as marijuana and alcohol. Narcotics included opium and cocaine, which was the first local anesthetic. Indeed, undergoing any kind of major surgery was very risky, not to mention life-threatening. Dentists in the mid-1840s would be pioneers in the development of less risky anesthetics. In 1845, the American Medical Association and the American Dental Association endorsed Dr. Horace Wells as the first person to use nitrous oxide to pull teeth. In 1846, Dr. William Morton, a dentist, used a sponge soaked with ether to render a patient unconscious and then removed a tumor from his jaw. Afterward, the patient claimed to not feel any pain during the procedure or have any memory of the operation. Chloroform was also used in the 1840s by dentists as an anesthetic, but that practice was ceased in the early 1900s because chloroform is highly toxic. Today’s anesthetics are derivatives of these early substances. And thank goodness, no one has to be hit on the head anymore or bite the bullet!

FEBRUARY 2014

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W

various forms of varicella

hat’s something we all have in common? At one time or another, we all fall victim to varicella, the chickenpox virus. Most of us contract it during childhood, but there is a vaccine to protect the lucky few that were never exposed. So who should request this vaccine, and if shingles are a result of the same virus, how are these two connected? Here’s a little in-depth info on these well-known polka dots. The chickenpox rash is usually preceded by a fever, headache or sore throat. A day or two later, the trademark red spots make their first appearance. It’s an easy virus to give to others, and with an incubation period of 14 to 16 days, it will be awhile before they know. Once the pox spots have scabbed over, the worst has passed and kids can leave quarantine behind them. Nowadays chickenpox is 100 percent preventable thanks to the vaccine. Doctors suggest two rounds for kiddos age 1 and older to prevent infection in their later school or daycare years. For those who never caught the pox in school like everyone else, exposure later in life can be prevented by the same number

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of shots. Following a run-in with someone who is sick, an emergency shot of chickenpox antibodies or the vaccine can prevent a full-blown bout. Breakthrough infections following the vaccine are extremely rare, so it seems like a worthwhile trip to the family physician. What bumps the varicella virus to the next level? Post pox, it takes up residence in our nerve roots permanently. If it becomes active again due to a weakened immune system, it manifests as a painful shingles rash in strips or patches across the body. The elderly, those combating other illnesses and those with trouble fighting infections are all more susceptible to shingles than others. It has many other symptoms as well, which tend to appear in stages. Headaches with light sensitivity and flu-like fatigue are common complaints during onset. Pain, itching or tingling on a certain area of skin signals where the rash will surface. Dizziness, general weakness and changes in vision can occur with or following shingles’ signature blister breakouts, which take two to four weeks to heal. On the bright side, once the shingles are gone, they won’t be back again. Just like good ol’ chickenpox, our bodies develop antibodies for shingles to put up a strong defense against future viral invasions.

MAN© BLAJ GABRIEL/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

dose

Sources: webmd.com, nih.gov

HE ALT H Y


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FEBRUARY 2014

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natural nixes for blood pressure A

ccording to the American Heart Association, 28 percent of adults have high blood pressure but are unaware they’re one out of three Americans who will be diagnosed. Of course, medications can be beneficial, but there are some natural remedies to sidestep the unsavory side effects like dizziness, headaches and more.

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Those who took brisk power walks recorded their blood pressure decreasing as much as 8mmhg over 6mmhg. Show your heart some love with 30 minutes of cardio each day. Not only will your heart get stronger, allowing it to pump blood more easily, but those wonderful endorphins will leave you feeling energized as well. The extra workouts may also lead to you dropping a few pounds, giving your heart a lighter workload. A little dietary math is beneficial. Beware of processed foods, which is where most of the sodium in our diets hides. Subtract the salt, and add 2,000-4,000mg of potassium daily, which counters the effects of sodium. Some potassium-rich favorites include honeydew melon, orange juice, tomatoes, sweet potatoes and bananas. And now for the best tip ever: Consuming half an ounce of dark chocolate daily is known to reduce blood pressure significantly, according to some studies. If you’re going to drink, doctors suggest doing so in moderation. Of course, too much alcohol is detrimental, but research shows that light drinking—one drink daily for women and two for men—is better at lowering blood pressure than nixing alcohol completely. Invest in a wine that pairs well with honeydew or dark chocolate and that’s three items down. Turn on some soothing tunes to bring down blood pressure. Researchers at the University of Florence asked 28 adults with hypertension to listen to classical, Celtic or Indian music for 30 minutes every day while doing breathing exercises. After a week, their systolic readings had decreased by an average of 3.2 points and 4.4 after a month. Stress reduction is a different process for everyone, so try whatever works for you, whether it’s light exercise, a favorite hobby or a long bath. Involve the family in all these new healthy goals. Having a support system and accountability group makes sticking to new habits much easier. Besides, participating as a family boosts everyone’s health. When everyone is on the same page, the changes won’t seem so major. Certainly they won’t mind following the dark chocolate plan!

BLOODPRESSURE©AFRICASTUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

dose

Sources: mayoclinic.com, abcnews.com

HE ALT H Y


ice

A SERVICE OF FEBRUARY 2014 ISSUE www.ocalaice.com

LIMBSTITUTE

Women and vein care INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL EXCELLENCE

IME’s new addition is a woman


put ice on it. I N N O VAT I O N • C O M PA S S I O N • E X C E L L E N C E

“Women and men face similar risks yet their disease processes present differently, and the diagnostics and treatment they receive is specific to not just their medical history but to their gender.” — Dr. Asad Qamar

The hearts behind the giving

// INSTITUTE OF CARDIOVASCULAR EXCELLENCE //

Women and heart disease

Gender makes a difference

Valentine’s Day is a celebration of love and the exchange of the universal symbol of the emotion— the heart. On this day, hearts are given to others in every imaginable way. Hearts are on cards, balloons, made out of flowers and chocolate, drawn, painted, and etched. The universal symbol crosses borders and oceans, all the while maintaining its meaning. Although the symbol of the heart is not reflective of the anatomical heart, it, too, varies in size, shape and color. The sentiment behind Valentine’s Day is to show others they are loved, appreciated and admired. As I imagine the differences between how men and women celebrate the day, more often than not, women are the recipients of these expressions of love. I may not be able to explain the motive behind these differences but will stick to the physiological differences in the hearts behind the giving. By nature of size, a woman’s arteries and vessels are smaller and their heartbeat is 8-10 beats faster than a man’s at rest with the female hormone, estrogen being the main factor behind these biological differences. Women and men face similar risks yet their disease processes present differently, and the diagnostics and treatment they receive is specific to not just their medical history but to their gender. As we pay special attention to those we love this month on Valentine’s Day, especially the women in our lives, let us be reminded it is not just the emotional heart we care about, but the health of their hearts and bodies that mean the most.

Q: Heart Disease is the No. 1 killer in women. What factors contribute to this? Whenever you think of cardiovascular disease you think of men as the flawed, but on any given day in the ICE cardiac catheterization labs there are more woman than men. Risk factors are the same in both males and females regarding smoking, hyperlipidemia (too many lipids—or fats —in the blood), diabetes and high blood pressure. Women face an increased plaque burden, diffuse nature of arterial disease and smaller caliber of the peripheral and coronary

arteries. Additionally, there is more of an atypical presentation in woman than in men, whereas men typically present with angina. Peripheral arterial disease is also atypical in woman and can present as discomfort in the legs or in the heel that is present at rest or during exercise or may not be confined to the muscle.1

Q: Are there disorders that women are more susceptible to? If so, which ones and why? Microvascaular angina (chest pain caused by the small resistance coronary artery vessels that are

Yours,

42.9

million women are currently living with some form of cardiovascular disease (CVD)

Asad U. Qamar, MD FACC, FCCP, FSGC, FACP, FSCAI Cardiologist

Source: Go A S, Mozaffarian, D, Roger, V L, Benjamin E J, et al. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics 2014 Update

A D VE RT ISE M E NT


“I look forward to participating in my patients’ care for many years to come.” — Devin Di Scala Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner

not visible in a coronary angiography2) is more common in woman than men. Basically, the small arteries have the inability to dilate themselves and it is atypical angina but in the absence of any significant blockage in coronary arteries. Although incidence of diabetes is the same in women and men, women with diabetes do more poorly with CAD and PAD than men.

Q: What symptoms should women be aware of when recognizing and identifying heart disease? More important than symptoms, first of all woman should be aware of the fact that incidence of coronary and vascular disease is similar in woman and in men. Controlling lipids (cholesterol), diabetes, hypertension and smoking is important. The symptoms to be aware of include shortness of breath on activity, indigestion, any back discomfort with

activity (woman present more commonly with interscapular pain than men), numbness or tingling, and fatigue in the legs upon ambulation. Also, symptoms of palpitations, lightheadedness and dizziness are important for coronary artery disease and vascular disease in women.

Q: How can ICE help women to manage/prevent heart disease? We can do comprehensive cardiovascular evaluation focusing on risk factors and appropriate non-invasive imaging for early detection and treatment of coronary and vascular disease. The onset of heart disease tends to appear in women later in life than males, and this can also be complicated or go undiagnosed due to the fact of other comorbidities that have developed. Women should begin educating themselves early and address the risk factors to help prevent and identify the risks related to cardiovascular disease.

Hughes, Sue. “Peripheral Arterial Disease Affects More Women Than Men.” Medscape.24 February 2012. Web. 19 January 2014. Cannon RO, Epstein SE. “Microvascular angina as a cause of chest pain with angiographically normal coronary arteries.” Am J Cardiol 1988; 61:1338–43. 1.

2.

ADVER T ISE M E NT

// INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL EXCELLENCE //

From flight nurse to feet on the ground Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner Devin Di Scala knew instantly she wanted to join ICE’s Institute of Medical Excellence (IME). “Everyone was so accommodating and it felt like a family,” says Devin about her first experience with Dr. Qamar and his team. “I have always been drawn to making a difference in people’s lives, and I could tell the providers and team members at ICE felt the same, so it was a perfect fit.“ Devin brings a unique mix of aero-medical trauma and intensive care, internal and family medicine, ICU, and cardio-pulmonary experience to IME. Devin also practices as a registered flight nurse with Orlando Health’s Air Care Team where she implements emergent care to treat life-threatening complications. “I was promoted to a flight nurse within one year of working in the trauma room,” she says. “I was able to extend my critical care knowledge to a job that I truly enjoyed because I am helping people when it most counts.” Devin’s ability to think quickly on her feet will benefit her patients as she joins IME here on the ground. “I look forward to participating in my patients’ care for many years to come. As a flight nurse, I treat patients in an acute setting. I don’t get a chance to develop the long-term relationships I want,” she says. Devin sees patients in the Ocala, Summerfield, and The Villages offices five days a week. “I am intrigued by medicine and enjoy sharing my knowledge with my patients to help manage and prevent disease processes. The care I give is individualized and based on a personal connection.”


put ice on it. I N N O VAT I O N • C O M PA S S I O N • E X C E L L E N C E

Risk factors for varicose veins and venous insufficiency include: Older age • Being female (Hormonal changes from puberty, pregnancy and menopause can lead to varicose veins. Taking birth control pills or hormone replacement can also increase your risk.) • Being born with defective valves • Obesity • Pregnancy • History of blood clots in your legs • Standing or sitting for long periods • Family history of varicose veins

// THE LIMBSTITUTE //

Treating venous insufficiency can make your legs look and feel better

Source: www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001109.htm

There are many risk factors that contribute to leg pain and vein problems in patients today. Family history, a job requiring prolonged periods of standing or sitting, obesity, and more specific to women, pregnancy and the extended use of high heeled shoes are all risk factors for venous insufficiencies. The vein’s inability to return blood to the heart from the legs can become a chronic problem when the veins are blocked or blood is leaking around the valves of the veins.1 “Women, (and men) should pay attention to symptoms of vein disease such as swelling ankles, swollen feet and/or legs, heaviness, cramping, restless legs, achiness, tired legs, bulging veins, and early vein disease of spider veins,” states P.A. Tom Tran of The Limbstitute. With 12 years of experience, over 20,000 procedures done on veins, and a current research facility focused on the advancement of vein treatment options, The Limbstitute offers comprehensive vein care to help

patients suffering from symptoms of vein disease. P.A. Tran explains, “Patients are treated from the medical aspect while also addressing the cosmetic component of vein disease. Once treated, symptoms are relieved from the underlying vein problem, the added benefit of cosmetic vein procedures can make the legs look better, too.” 1.

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000203.htm

Tom Tran, PA-C, MPAS A SERVICE OF

ocalaice.com

ocalaice.com

limbstitute.com

Ocala 4730 SW 49th Rd. // 352.854.0681 Summerfield 10435 SE 170th Place // 352.233.4393 Tavares 2754 Dora Ave. // 352.259.5960 The Villages 1950 Laurel Manor Dr., Bldg 240 // 352.509.9295 The Villages 1050 Old Camp Road // 352.259.5960 Williston 412 W. Noble Ave. // 352.528.0790

VERT RTISE ISEM MEENT NT AADDVE


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is your heart healthy? what every woman needs to know about cardiovascular disease. B Y

L

C Y N T H I A

M c FA R L A N D

isten up ladies! If you think breast cancer is the No. 1 threat to women’s health, think again.

You’re in the right vicinity, but it’s cardiovascular disease—not cancer—that is the leading cause of death to women in the United States each year. The American Heart Association estimates that cardiovascular disease kills about one woman every minute in the United States, yet women are more likely than men to be both under diagnosed and under treated. When people hear the term “heart disease,” they tend to think of a heart attack, but it actually refers to multiple heart conditions. In this country, coronary artery disease is among the most common. It occurs when plaque buildup in the arteries leading to the heart

FEBRUARY 2014

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the same, but different

One out of every four deaths in the United States each year is attributed to heart disease, but it’s not always easy to diagnose. “Diagnosing heart disease in women can be tricky since it can have atypical presentation. Women often don’t have classic symptoms—such as chest pain—like men,” notes Premranjan P. Singh, M.D., vice president of Urban Cardiology in Ocala. “With females, the symptoms we more commonly see beside chest pain are weakness, shortness of breath, cold sweat, arm pain, fatigue and dizziness. A recent study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) showed 19 percent of female patients did not have chest pain during a heart attack. Because the symptoms are different from men, doctors sometimes miss diagnosing heart disease in women,” says Dr. Singh, who has been a staff cardiologist at both Munroe Regional Medical Center and Ocala Regional Medical Center. “Studies have shown that, in the past, doctors weren’t as aggressive

WOMEN © OZZON; STETHOSCOPE © CSABA DELI / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

causes blockage and/or constriction. This can cause arrhythmia, angina, heart attack and heart failure. Speaking of heart attacks, we’ve all seen the classic movie or television heart attack: the victim—usually a man— clutches at his chest, gasps, staggers and collapses. Although the image provides a dramatic visual that is great for viewers, in reality a heart attack is typically far different for women. In recognition of February being American Heart Month, we’re focusing on what women can do to have healthy hearts and prevent future problems.

W O M E N

&

C A R D I O VA S C U L A R

D I S E A S E

• More than one in three female adults has some form of cardiovascular disease (CVD). • Since 1984, the number of CVD deaths for females has exceeded those for males. • 64 percent of women who died suddenly of coronary heart disease had no previous symptoms. • 26 percent of women age 45 and older who have a heart attack die within a year compared with 19 percent of men. (In part, this is because women have heart attacks at older ages.) • More women (4.1 million) than men (3.7 million) have angina. • Each year, approximately 55,000 more women than men have a stroke. Source: American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

about treating heart disease in women. For the last 10 years, we’ve been focusing on the fact that the No. 1 killer of women is heart disease, and the medical profession is getting more educated,” he notes. “With women,

noscopies are recommended at certain ages, but there is nothing comparable when it comes to testing heart health. Obviously, there are ways to check the heart, but tests aren’t usually ordered by a doctor unless the patient

“women often don’t have classic symptoms— such as chest pain—like men.” —Premranjan P. Singh

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diagnosing is the problem, but once you diagnose heart disease, the treatment is the same as with men, which includes lifestyle changes, education, medication and revascularization (if needed).” It’s not at all unusual for women to explain away cardiovascular symptoms or think it’s something like the flu or acid reflux disease. For many women, it’s easy to do just that because there’s no recommended test to check for heart disease. It’s widely known that mammograms and colo-

is experiencing symptoms. Testing includes: Electrocardiogram (also known as ECG or EKG): Used to identify active heart attack, rhythm and other problems Echocardiogram (also known as an “echo”): A moving ultrasound of the heart able to detect heart muscle, structural and valve related problems Stress test: Can diagnose blockage in heart arteries Cardiac catheterization (also called cardiac angiogram): The “gold


H I G H

B L O O D

P R E S S U R E :

“ T H E S I L E N T K I L L E R ” Doctors emphasize the importance of keeping your blood pressure in a healthy range because this is the one most significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. According to the American Heart Association, high blood pressure is the leading cause of stroke, and death rates due to stroke are over 38 percent. Also known as hypertension, high blood pressure causes the blood to flow with greater force than usual. This puts pressure on arteries and can stretch them, even causing tiny tears. The body automatically tries to repair these areas by laying down scar tissue, but this scar tissue can trap plaque and white blood cells, resulting in blockages, hardened arteries and even blood clots. One in three American adults has hypertension, and it’s particularly common in African-American women. Unfortunately, high blood pressure has no symptoms, which is why it’s important to have regular checks. If not controlled, high blood pressure can cause kidney failure, stroke, heart attack and heart failure. Normal blood pressure is considered less than 120mmHg systolic and less than 80mmHg diastolic or <120/80. If your blood pressure is higher than normal, prescription medication may be necessary, but doctors also recommend lifestyle changes. For example, being overweight and/or physically inactive can both lead to hypertension.

You can fight against high blood pressure by adjusting your lifestyle to include the following: • Reduced sodium day for a man and one intake for a woman) • Heart-healthy diet • Avoid tobacco smoke • Regular exercise • Manage/limit stress • Maintain a healthy • Take medication if weight recommended by • Limit alcohol (no more your doctor than two drinks per Sources: cdc.gov, heart.org

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According the American Heart Association, a heart attack strikes someone about every 34 seconds. This happens because blood flow bringing oxygen to the heart is drastically reduced or completely cut off. Just like men, women often experience chest pain or discomfort when having a heart attack. This uncomfortable pressure may feel like squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of the chest, lasting more than a few minutes or going away and coming back. But women are also likely to have one or more other symptoms, including: • Pain in lower chest or upper abdomen • Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach • Pressure in upper back

• Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort • Breaking out in a cold sweat • Nausea/vomiting • Dizziness/ lightheadedness • Extreme fatigue Source: heart.org

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F I G H T I N G B A C K A G A I N S T H E A R T D I S E A S E Many people assume heart disease is hereditary, but there are significant steps you can take to lower your risk. For example, smoking cigarettes puts you at much greater risk, but if you quit, your risk drops by 50 percent just one year after stopping. Here are some tips to ward off heart disease.

• Don’t smoke. • • • • •

Avoid second-hand smoke. Manage blood pressure. Check cholesterol. Maintain a healthy weight. Eat healthy, and cut out processed foods, which tend to be high in sodium.

standard” in diagnosing any blockage in heart arteries Cardiac CT scan: A new, evolving, high-tech CT used to diagnose any blockage in heart arteries

risky behavior No one denies that there are both genetic and lifestyle components to heart health. “There’s no way to say how much percentage-wise is genetic and how much is lifestyle,” notes Dr. Singh. “Even though you may have a genetic component, you can modify your risks. Living a healthier lifestyle can give significant benefits. Exercise and diet can modify risk more than any pill out there.” One of the biggest risks of heart disease is diabetes, something doctors now see regularly in many patients. Diabetes is often prevalent among Hispanic women. Other major risk factors are obesity, high cholesterol, smoking, peripheral arterial disease and a family history of heart disease. “The more risk factors you have the more likely you are to have heart disease,” notes Dr. Singh. “Lifestyle changes have contributed to an increase in heart disease. Our lifestyles are completely different now than 100 years ago. People got heart disease then, but it wasn’t as prevalent as it is now.” Diet is part of the lifestyle that has changed radically over the past century. “So much of our food now is processed and genetically modified,” Dr. Singh points

• Keep blood sugar (glucose) at a healthy level. • Exercise regularly; strive for 150 minutes of moderate activity per week, or wear a pedometer and make it a goal to get in 10,000 steps each day. Source: heart.org, cdc.gov

out. “Animals are also given steroids and drugs, and we don’t know to what extent that affects the meat that we eat.” Certain illnesses, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Women of childbearing age need to be aware that some pregnancy complications have the potential to increase risk. This can include women who have preeclampsia, gestational diabetes or pregnancy-induced hypertension. Doctors are starting to look at women with pregnancy complications as if they had failed a heart stress test. For example, a woman with a history of preeclampsia has double the risk of stroke, heart disease and dangerous clotting in her veins for as much as five to 15 years after pregnancy.

better your odds

The good news is that you can take considerable steps to prevent and control heart disease. “A sedentary lifestyle is definitely a risk factor,” says Dr. Singh. “You should get about 30 to 45 minutes of aerobic exercise four to five days a week; walking is a good exercise.” A healthful diet is also important, but Dr. Singh has found many people are not educated as to how they should eat for heart health, and others don’t want to cut out favorite foods, even when they learn those items aren’t healthy.

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S I G N S O F A H E A R T AT TA C K I N W O M E N


“Most people would rather take a pill than change their lifestyle,” he adds. There are entire books written about how to eat a heart-healthy diet, and you might want to pick one up, but at least remember these basics. Your diet should include at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each day. Choose lean protein, and eat healthy fats, such as olive oil, black olives, fish, avocados, nuts and seeds. Cut out processed foods. Limit sodium, saturated fat and cholesterol and avoid trans fats completely. “Making little changes in diet, such as cutting down on soda, ice cream and trans fat, can have a significant positive impact in health and weight loss,” notes Dr. Singh. Become a label reader when you shop.

He recommends that women have their vitamin D levels checked with a simple blood test. If the results come back low, your doctor can tell you how much to take as a supplement. Many postmenopausal women are uncertain about the risks associated with hormone replacement therapy, also known as HRT. According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine, HRT does increase a woman’s risk of heart disease. This runs counter to what many doctors originally thought: that HRT not only helped treat symptoms of menopause but also other conditions, among those, heart disease. The study followed 162,000 postmenopausal women over a course of five to seven years. The women were separated

“making little changes in diet can have a significant positive impact in health and weight loss.” —Premranjan P. Singh Those nutrition labels are there for a reason, and if you take a few minutes to read them, you can make much healthier choices for your heart. You don’t have to be a nutritionist either. Just follow a few simple rules. Avoid foods containing hydrogenated oil (which is just another word for “trans fat”) and high fructose corn syrup. Look out for sugar in “healthy” foods like breakfast bars and cereals. Opt for choices that have the same amount of fiber as sugar, as fiber is considered a “healthy-heart ingredient.” And here’s an easy one: If you can’t pronounce or don’t recognize ingredients on the label, put the package down and walk away! Convenience and processed foods are filled with preservatives and fillers that you don’t need to consume. Speaking of diet, many women are low in vitamin D. “Low vitamin D levels are linked to an increased risk of heart disease,” says Dr. Singh. “You want to keep normal levels, as this helps with bone health and improves the immune system, as well as heart health.”

into groups taking a placebo, estrogen or a combination of estrogen and progestin. Results of the study, which was released in 2002, revealed that the women taking estrogen and progestin had higher risks of heart disease and breast cancer than those taking the placebo. Clearly, more research will be needed to further ensure the risks and benefits of HRT. If you are on HRT, before you pitch your pills in a panic, talk to your doctor. For women with severe menopausal symptoms, HRT can be beneficial. The general recommendations are to take the lowest dose possible to achieve relief and for the shortest amount of time possible. Doctors may advise women on HRT to begin “weaning off” estrogen at age 59 and be off it completely by age 65, if not earlier. “Whether to use HRT is an individual decision,” remarks Dr. Singh. “Each woman should receive sufficient information from her health care professional so that she can make a fully informed choice. Every woman on HRT should have her treatment evaluated for pros and cons annually.”

S P O T A S T R O K E

F. A . S . T.

Think F.A.S.T. to identify the warning signs of stroke. Get medical help immediately if you or someone experiences the following symptoms:

F

ace drooping: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop or is it numb?

A

rm weakness: Have them raise both arms. Is one arm weak or numb? Does one arm drift downward?

S

peech difficulty: Ask them to repeat a simple sentence such as, “The sky is blue.” Is it repeated correctly? Is speech slurred, hard to understand or are they unable to speak?

T

ime to call 9-1-1. If you or someone else experiences any of these symptoms—even if the symptoms disappear—call 9-1-1 and get to the hospital right away. Don’t

wait more than five minutes to seek help! Source: heart.org

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enetic? is it

B Y B O N N I E K R E TC H I K

H

ow many times have you been compared to a parent? You’ve got your “father’s height” or your “mother’s eyes.” And who hasn’t scrutinized a new baby, searching

for that one obvious characteristic that is “mommy’s” or “daddy’s.” The science of genetics is an ever-evolving field that has fascinated both scientists and everyday individuals alike for centuries. Traits like tongue-rolling or eye color are fun to trace back through the generations. But today’s technology has taken us miles beyond mere ear wiggling. Genetic testing has opened up a world of answers… and a world of questions.

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genetics 101 Perhaps you recall endlessly plotting traits on Punnett squares during your Genetics 101 class. Thanks to the original geneticist Gregor Mendel and his famous pea plants, we learned that traits are passed on genetically rather than being a product of environment. Here’s a quick refresher. A very basic example is hair color. One gene is responsible for the color of your hair. Each gene is comprised of two alleles, one inherited from your mother and one from your father. When those two alleles combine to form your hair color gene, one is expressed (dominant) while one is not (recessive). So, a blonde mother and dark-haired father would not produce a child with light brown hair. Rather, only one of those two alleles would be expressed. It can become quite complicated when you begin to factor in different traits, but in laymen’s terms, this is basically how it works. And this is true for many observable characteristics such as hairline, dimples and freckles. Other traits, such as attached earlobes, left- or right-handedness, hair texture and tongue-rolling, were once thought to be the product of a single gene, but more recent research has lead geneticists to believe a number of inter-related genes may be involved.

beyond the basics Single-gene traits are just the bare bones of understanding how genetics works. As with most fields of science, advancements in technology quickly led to a greater understanding of which traits might have been passed on from Grandma and Grandpa. “Tests for single-gene disorders have been around a while, and there are thousands of them,” explains Diana Moglia-Tully, a certified genetic counselor and manager of the Clinical Genetic Counseling Service at Ocala Health. Single-gene disorders are the result of a single mutated gene. In some cases, just one copy of a muted gene is necessary for a disease to develop, while in other cases, a child would need both copies of the muted gene, one from mom and one from dad, to exhibit the characteristics of a particular disease. There are approximately 4,000 single-gene disorders that geneticists know of, and that number grows almost daily.

“As more genes are discovered, so are more diseases and more tests,” says Diana.

it takes two… or two hundred Single-gene disorders would lead you to believe that identifying the risk of disease development was easy. However, that’s anything but true. “There is no simple answer,” says Diana in regard to inherited diseases. She explains that although it’s true that cancers are indeed the result of gene mutations, there are many factors that come into play when you look at such complex conditions. “Cancer is something people think is always hereditary, and some can be, but there are a number of factors to consider,” says Diana. For example, she points out that sometimes cancer is the product of the environment. A perfectly healthy individual with no family history of cancer can develop the disease based solely on exposure to toxins or cancer-causing agents. At other times, a person could have a family history of cancer and even have the genetic makeup that leaves them vulnerable to cancer, yet never actually develop the disease. So what do you look for if you think cancer may be a genetic trait? Diana says, “look for anything that makes you go ‘hmm’.” For example, if a person continuously develops new cancers, they may carry a gene that leaves them susceptible. If an individual develops cancer at a very young age, it may be due to genetics.”

nature vs. nurture? Have you ever been told “you’ve got your mother’s temper” or “your father was a clean-freak, too?” Psychological conditions like depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder are what Diana calls “multi-factorial.” “There is cross-over between genes and environmental factors,” she says. Yet determining the cause of a specific psychological condition is extremely complex. “You may inherit a tendency toward depression, but your environment may dictate whether or not

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you actually become depressed,” she says, noting that there isn’t a clear-cut answer. The same is true for conditions like obesity and various eating disorders; however, research is just in the beginning stages. “There are genes that are currently linked to obesity, but there are so many that can play a role,” says Diana. She adds that the specific genes for hunger and satiety and how they affect the brain are very complex and that a person’s environment also plays a role in one’s eating habits. “It’s proven that obese parents are more likely to have obese children, but is it because of genetics or because of food choices? There just isn’t a clear answer yet,” she says.

Break this phot little more for th

to test or not to test If the answer to the likelihood of developing a disease were clear-cut, the question of whether to undergo genetic testing would be simple. However, Diana explains that genetic testing is a complex process that not everyone is a candidate for. “Everyone looks at things differently. Some want to know their risk, and some don’t,” she says. She explains that although genetics is an exciting and ever-evolving field, sometimes even the experts are overwhelmed by the constantly changing information. “Even testers don’t fully understand what genes mean all of the time,” she says. “We can now test a whole panel of genes involved in a specific cancer, but determining how many and which ones to put on that panel is a difficult decision,” she says. And just because someone receives a positive test result doesn’t necessarily mean they will develop a disease. Similarly, a negative test result can’t predict that one won’t develop a disease in the future. Deciding whether to undergo testing is a personal decision with many factors to consider. Furthermore, understanding those test results can be a daunting experience. This is where Diana’s role as a genetic counselor comes into play.

decoding DNA “We are the translators between doctors and patients,” says Diana. She explains that as the field

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of genetics has evolved and the complexity and availability of tests has grown, the role of the genetic counselor has expanded. “It’s a very psychological and emotional experience for the patients,” she says. Genetic counselors are not long-term counselors; rather they usually meet with a patient just a handful of times. Diana refers to this process as “going on the whole journey” with them. The first step is a consultation. “We evaluate a family history to decide which tests may be appropriate and who in the family should be tested,” says Diana. She explains that the family history’s “puzzle pieces” can help determine if certain cancers along the lines were more likely due to genetic mutations or products of the environment. The second step is patient education. Diana explains that the answers aren’t always black and white, and counselors will help patients understand just what “positive” and “negative” results mean.


single-gene disorders can be: • AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT: YOU ONLY NEED TO INHERIT ONE MUTED COPY OF THE GENE TO EXHIBIT THE DISEASE. • AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE: YOU NEED TO INHERIT TWO MUTED COPIES OF THE GENE TO EXHIBIT THE DISEASE.

to up just a he gutter.

• X-LINKED DOMINANT AND RECESSIVE: THESE ARE DISORDERS CAUSED BY MUTATIONS ON THE X CHROMOSOME. • Y-LINKED: THESE ARE DISORDERS CAUSED BY MUTATIONS ON THE Y CHROMOSOME. BECAUSE FEMALES ONLY RECEIVE X CHROMOSOMES, FATHERS CANNOT PASS Y-LINKED DISORDERS TO DAUGHTERS. • MITOCHONDRIAL: THESE ARE DISORDERS CAUSED BY MUTATIONS IN MITOCHONDRIAL DNA. BECAUSE ONLY EGG CELLS CONTRIBUTE MITOCHONDRIAL DNA TO A DEVELOPING EMBRYO, ONLY WOMEN CAN PASS THESE GENE MUTATIONS ON.

Finally, the counselors discuss the treatment options or lifestyle adjustments available. Diana notes that counselors are not physicians, but patients often have so many questions that doctors simply don’t have the time to answer each one. “I’ve had patients ask what they could do with their three dogs while undergoing treatment because these are the kinds of questions they think about,” says Diana. By the way, she helped the patient find dog walkers.

the genetic journey Physical characteristics, personality traits and even diseases and disorders can often be traced back through the generations. As technology evolves, there’s no telling what our genes will uncover for us. For some, the need to know is all-important, while for others, personal and ethical reasons keep them from seeking out certain tests. There is no clear-cut answer as to who should or shouldn’t be tested, but for now, there are a few steps people can take if they are considering genetic testing. • Know your family history. • Pay attention to early-onset or recurring diseases; these may be genetic. • Talk to a counselor before you make any testing decisions.

examples of single-gene disorders include: • AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT : HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE, POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE, OSTEOPOROSIS • AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE: SICKLE CELL ANEMIA, CYSTIC FIBROSIS • X-LINKED DOMINANT: RICKETS • X-LINKED RECESSIVE: RED- GREEN COLOR BLINDNESS, HEMOPHILIA, BECKER MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY • Y-LINKED: MALE INFERTILITY • MITOCHONDRIAL: MATERNALLY INHERITED DIABETES AND DEAFNESS

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Woes WEATHER

C

hecking the daily weather forecast is something most of us do. We use it to plan our dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, decide if we need to take our umbrellas with us to work or haul out our best winter coat. But the weather also has a major impact on our bodies, from head to toe. Check out what Healthy Living discovered about how weather affects us, and even a little whimsical folklore about weather. It just may change what you come away with from the next weather forecast.

By JoAnn Guidry

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Joint Pain Meteorology

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We all know someone who swears their achy joints can tell them when the weather is going to change. Turns out they’re likely right, thanks to barometric pressure’s effect on our bodies. OK, here’s a quick tutorial on troublemaker BP. Simply put, barometric pressure, aka air pressure, is the weight of the atmosphere that surrounds us. High barometric pressure, which is what we have when there’s clear blue skies, pushes against the body and keeps the tissue surrounding our joints from expanding. But before an approaching storm, air pressure drops and allows those tissues to expand, aggravating surrounding nerves. In people with

conditions like arthritis or who suffer from old injuries, this causes pain and is a signal that stormy weather is on the way. Source: webmd.com, usatoday.com

Lightning Headaches A 2013 University of Cincinnati study published in Cephalalgia showed a strong correlation between lightning and headaches, including migraines. Participants with a history of headaches recorded their headache activity and the weather conditions in a daily journal for three to six months. The study showed that there was a 31 percent increased risk of a headache and a 28 percent increased risk of a migraine for chronic headache sufferers on days lightning struck within 25 miles of the study participants’ homes. New-onset headaches and migraines increased by 24 percent and 23 percent, respectively. Researchers suspect that lightning’s effect on headaches results from the electricity-charged atmosphere and change in barometric pressure. So if there’s a lightning storm nearby, it might be a good idea to take a preventive dose of your headache medication. Source: sciencedaily.com

The Nose Knows You’re miserable; you’re sneezing and have a stuffy nose. So you’re popping antihistamines like candy and getting no relief. What gives with that? The answer is that not all sinus problems are caused by pollen in the

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air. This is called nonallergic rhinitis, as opposed to allergic rhinitis, and can be triggered by sudden changes in temperature and humidity. Instead of antihistamines, those with non-allergic rhinitis can try decongestants, nasal irrigation with a saline solution or even a prescribed nasal steroid to shrink those swollen nasal passages. Remember, it’s important to get tested by a health care professional before embarking on any treatment. Source: webmd.com

More Headache Hurdles Sinus headaches can be triggered by a sudden drop in barometric pressure. (See Joint Pain Meteorology for more info on barometric pressure.) When the barometric pressure drops, such as just before a storm, it causes an air pressure imbalance in our sinuses and ears. The sinus pain we feel in our face and ears happens as the internal air pressure tries to equalize to the outside pressure. Bingo! You’ve got a sinus headache. And if you have chronic sinusitis or a cold, then it’s going to hurt even more. No fun at all. Source: ehow.com

Asthma Aggravations Breathing in cold air, especially while exercising,

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can provoke an asthma attack. The cold air causes the airway passages to swell, making breathing difficult. Dry, windy days or sudden wind just before a thunderstorm can also contribute to asthma. A recent study in the journal Allergy showed that wind picks up pollen grains on the ground and other surfaces, carrying them into the air we breathe. Then, when we breathe, the force of the wind drives them deeper into the airways and triggers an asthma attack. So if you have asthma, you can try to minimize your outdoor time on very cold and windy days; or try wearing a scarf to cover your mouth and nose. And, of course, always carry your medication with you in case of an asthma attack. Source: webmd.com

The Skinny On Your Skin & The Weather COLD: The low humidity and wind of cold weather dries out your skin, leading to redness, cracking and peeling. Some skin conditions, such as eczema, are also worse during dry weather. For dry winter skin, avoid taking long hot showers or baths and moisturize, moisturize, moisturize—especially after a bath or shower when your pores are open and your skin will absorb it better. HEAT: Heat and humidity will cause you to sweat more, which is your body’s mechanism to cool off. But all that sweat clogs pores and can leave you with pimples and blackheads. Use skin products with salicylic acid

to alleviate the oily buildup. Another hot weather skin problem is heat rash, which happens when the sweat ducts close up, trap moisture under the skin and cause bumps or blisters. For relief, use a product with zinc oxide, aloe vera and/or vitamin E. Source: health.howstuffworks.com

Cold Air Cardiac Issues More people die from heart disease/heart attacks during the winter months, and researchers may have found a reason why. In a recent study published in Cell Metabolism, mice exposed to cold weather had an increase in the growth of blood vessel plaque, leading to a greater risk of cardiac events. Extreme heat isn’t good for those with heart disease either, as the condition makes it harder for the body to regulate its core temperature. As the body works harder to cool off, the heart is stressed, and that can lead to heat exhaustion, heat stroke and even a heart attack. Sources: weather.com; webmd.com

Feeling Moody? In studying the weather and our moods, researchers in the Netherlands looked at eight weather variables—hours of sunshine, precipitation, temperature, wind direction, humidity, change in

barometric pressure and absolute barometric pressure. The element that had the most impact on people’s mood was humidity. When there was high humidity, study participants reported feeling sleepier, having less energy and difficulty concentrating. The opposite, including an increased overall sense of well-being, was reported during low humidity conditions. Another group of European researchers studying more than 1,200 participants found that windy, cool and darker days seemed to have a slight negative effect on mood. So next time you’re in a bad mood, blame it on the weather! Sources: psychologytoday.com; healthyliving.msn.com

Chill Out Hothead! An Iowa State University study showed that higher summertime temperatures can make people cranky, irritable and increase human aggression. Many studies have shown that crime and violence do rise in hot weather. A recent Florida State University study found that, over two years, violent crime consistently increased in Minneapolis, Minnesota, as temperatures rose toward the 80s. But the rate of violence begins to decline as temperatures rise into the 90s. Apparently then it’s even too hot for the bad guys! Sources: theweek.com; nationalgeographic.com


Here in Florida, high humidity is a fact of life, and it affects our bodies in myriad ways. Humidity is the amount of moisture in the air, more specifically measured as relative humidity. This is the amount of moisture in the air as a percentage of the most moisture that can be present at a certain temperature. On an average Florida summer day, the relative humidity is high, usually 85-90 percent. Then there’s the heat index factor to consider. This comes into play when high relative humidity is above 30 percent and makes the temperature feel higher than it actually is. For example, if the relative humidity is at 65 percent then 95 degrees is going to feel like 117. All in all, high relative humidity causes all kinds of physiological problems. DEHYDRATION/HEAT EXHAUSTION/HEAT STROKE: The moisture in the air prevents the sweat on our skin from evaporating and cooling us off. HEART TROUBLE: Heat increases the heart rate as the body works harder to regulate body temperature. Those with heart disease are at increased risk of cardiac events. RESPIRATORY ISSUES: High humidity promotes the growth of fungus and molds, as well as increases the amount of dust mites in the air. People with asthma, sinusitis and allergies suffer more on high humidity days. Sources: theweatherprediction.com; science.howstuffworks.com

Summer fog for fair, A winter fog for rain. When the air is cooled to the point where it can no longer hold water vapors, condensed water droplets form fog. In the summer, the night sky must be clear for the heat of the day to radiate into space, thus allowing the air to cool. If it’s a cloudy night, the clouds act as a blanket and trap the hot air. So if you see fog on a summer morning, it usually means the day will be fair.

Tails pointing west, Weather’s at its best. Tails pointing east, Weather is least. The tails in question here are animal tails, more specifically horses and cows. And since Ocala/Marion County is an agricultural area, you shouldn’t have any trouble finding these weather predictors! Horses and cows apparently don’t like the wind blowing in their face, so will usually stand with their backs, and therefore their tails, to the wind. Keep in mind that westerly winds usually mean continuing or arriving fair weather and easterly winds typically indicate arriving or continued unsettled weather.

When the dew is on the grass Rain will never come to pass. When grass is dry at morning light, Look for rain before the night. If the night was clear without any clouds, then dew was able to form on the grass overnight. But if the night was cloudy, the day’s heat doesn’t dissipate and dew doesn’t form. The assumption is that if the night skies are clear, the following day will be as well.

Source: farmersalmanac.com

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WEATHER PREDICTION BY RHYME

High Humidity Havoc

Pollen Partners In Crime For anyone with allergies, here are a couple of weatherrelated conditions to be aware of that can increase your misery. RAIN: The good news is that heavy rain can reduce pollen in the air for hours. The bad news is that plenty of springtime rain leads to

greater grass growth and then more grass pollen in late spring and early summer; lots of fall and winter rain contributes to high tree pollen counts in the spring. MILD WINTER: A mild winter causes trees to pollinate earlier than normal and triggers a premature

start to allergy season. WIND: Windy conditions create greater pollen and mold distribution; hay fever sufferers are especially affected by dry, windy conditions. Source: weather.com

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HITS Coming to Ocala March 29-30: the HITS Triathlon Series. Registration is open now for all five race distances, so rookies and veterans alike can sign up anytime. HITS guarantees a distance for every caliber of runner and kicks off the weekend with a fitness expo, too. For details on registration and the various courses, visit HITSEndurance.com.

FEBRUARY 2014

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body

catching up with combat ready S uspects beware—the Marion County Sheriff’s Office is raising the bar with its new Combat Ready training program. This intense training program is designed to improve the abilities of MCSO officers so they can be ready for whatever comes their way. Here to give us the lowdown is SWAT Team Leader Sergeant Ryan Robbins of the MCSO’s training division. INTERVIEW BY LESLY JONES & KATIE MCPHERSON

TELL US ABOUT THE PROGRAM. Combat Ready establishes a more intense and spontaneous training environment for the sworn deputies of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office. The term “Combat Ready” simply means deputies should be ready at all times to perform at their best in situations unique to law enforcement. The goal of the MCSO training division is to have shorter but more intense training sessions while having contact with each sworn officer throughout the year to maintain more consistency and muscle memory with the specialized training, such as firearms and defensive tactics.

CAN YOU DESCRIBE SOME OF THE TRAINING EXERCISES ON THE OBSTACLES COURSE?

The obstacle course is a half mile in distance, and it has 16 job-related obstacles such as a 4-foot wall to climb, a cattle gate, a chain link fence, a ladder and a window to go through. We have a sled pull to simulate an officer being drug out of a dangerous situation.

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WHAT TYPES OF TRAINING ARE INVOLVED IN THE COURSE, AND WHAT IS THE EXPECTED FITNESS LEVEL AFTER TRAINING? I would say that the half mile is the cardio portion. None of the obstacles take a lot of strength, but the sled pull does require some muscle. It’s a good mixture of everything. The sheriff’s goal is to run the course quarterly for deputies and sworn officers. Right now, we’re getting everyone familiar with it, and later, we’ll build in some accountability. They will have eight and a half minutes, and we’d like to see them complete the course in that time.

HOW WILL THIS PROGRAM BENEFIT OUR COMMUNITY? We have about 800 employees and 600 of them are sworn, so all of those officers are being required to participate in the Combat Ready training throughout the year. The new training will have a long-term benefit to the community by increasing the expectations of deputies’ skills

at a reasonable rate. Increasing the physical fitness level of sworn officers will provide more professionalism and increase the health of employees, which provides safer, more effective workers.  

WHICH PART OF THE PROGRAM DO PARTICIPANTS ENJOY MOST?

So far, employees have expressed they appreciate the individualized training that allows more attention to details specific to their personal proficiency in each training session.

CAN THE PUBLIC WATCH?

Training is not open to the public on a daily basis, but there are programs like the MCSO citizen academy that allow insight into the training division and gives citizens the opportunity to see what we do firsthand.

WANT MORE INFO? Marion County Sheriff’s Office marionso.com / (352) 732-8181


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body

work(out) hard, play harder

EXERG

AMES

groovy gear

S

Sources: motionfitness.com

ince the 1970s, active play among children has decreased by 50 percent. Today’s kids and teens spend much of their time interacting with technology, whether for school, communication or entertainment. Of course, too much screen time can lead to too much inactivity. At the Frank DeLuca YMCA Family Center, they know the importance of a healthy, active lifestyle and how new technology complicates the issue. So they have introduced Exergames, a cutting-edge program that combines games and exercise to benefit the health of local youth.

Exergames technology by Motion Fitness combines the best of video games with the best of physical fitness, and the result is engaging exercise that motivates the young’uns to keep movin’. And one more reason to get excited: The Frank DeLuca YMCA is the only fitness center in Florida to house Exergames equipment, currently located in the Rob McCoy Center for Teens. The goal is to create healthy people by making fitness fun and getting every child their recommended 60 minutes of activity every day. Physical activity during developmental years provides a laundry list of benefits, including reduced obesity, increased memory function and higher chances of lifetime fitness. Some unexpected perks come up as well, like better sleep and memory function as well as longer life expectancy. Here are a few of these arcade machines turned exercise equipment.

Ever played Dance Dance Revolution on a gaming system? Imagine one of those measly home mats turned giant and you have the iDance 2. Break it down by stomping the arrows underfoot that correspond with those on the screen. Up to 32 players can participate simultaneously in varying skill levels, so there’s no excuse for anyone to be standing still.

kickin’ cardio

FOR SOME QUALITY CARDIO, THE 3KICK FLOOR GAME IS A SAFE BET. THREE TOWERS OF TARGETS LIGHT UP AND SOUND OFF, AND THE PLAYER CAN KICK, JAB OR SLAP THEM OFF. USERS CAN UP THE WORKOUT INTENSITY BY USING A MEDICINE BALL TO STRIKE TARGETS, AND THE FASTER THEY’RE HIT, THE MORE POINTS ARE EARNED. PLAYING AGAINST FRIENDS ADDS TO THE FUN, TOO.

pedal to play The Exerbike GS is a stationary bike equipped with an Xbox. The catch is that in order to power the game the rider has to pedal, pedal, pedal. A builtin heart monitor ensures kids stay in the optimal heart rate zone throughout their ride. This “gamercize” technology keeps kids mentally engaged in the games they enjoy but still gets their hearts pumping.

FEBRUARY 2014

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body

breaking down

biotin B

iotin, or vitamin H, is a nutrient that forms a part of the B complex group. Biotin helps your body transform food into energy. It also helps metabolize fats, carbs and amino acids, which help build necessary proteins. Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that isn’t readily stored in your body, so eating biotin-rich foods or taking supplements can help you avoid a biotin deficiency.

WOMAN © RACORN; FOODS © KUDRYASHKA / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

HE ALT H Y

Because there isn’t a reliable laboratory test for the detection of biotin deficiency, it’s usually diagnosed by its symptoms, including thinning of hair; a rash around the eyes, nose and mouth; depression; exhaustion; tingly arms and legs and hallucinations.

healthy hair & nails

Many vegetables and fruits contain biotin. A cup of raw cauliflower can provide up to 4 micrograms (mcg), while avocados can provide up to 6mcg. A cup of raspberries can contain up to 2mcg. Soybeans, black-eyed peas and beans also contain biotin.

IN DAIRY AND EGGS. Cheddar cheese contains 0.4-2mcg of biotin per ounce. Cooked eggs offer a whopping 1325mcg of biotin. However, beware of raw egg whites, which contain a protein that prevents the absorption of biotin, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

IN YEAST, GRAINS AND NUTS. Nutritional and Brewer’s yeast are good sources of biotin. A 7g packet of yeast can provide 1.4-14mcg. Whole wheat bread contains between 0.02-6mcg of biotin and almonds, peanuts, pecans and walnuts are other sources of biotin.

IN MEAT AND FISH. Three ounces of cooked liver contains 27-35mcg of biotin. If you can’t stomach the thought of eating liver, other, less significant sources include cooked salmon, sardines and pork, which have between 2 and 5mcg.

IN FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND LEGUMES.

swallow the pill BIOTIN IS ALSO AVAILABLE IN PILL FORM AS A

SUPPLEMENT AND IN A VARIETY OF OVER-THE-COUNTER SHAMPOOS, SPRAYS AND SERUMS. OUIDAD, A HAIR PRODUCT COMPANY, OFFERS A REPARATIVE HAIR SERUM THAT USES BIOTIN AS ONE OF ITS KEY INGREDIENTS. SHAMPOO AND CONDITIONERS IN THE ORGANIX THICK & FULL LINE ALSO BOAST BIOTIN IN THEIR PRODUCTS. A QUICK INTERNET SEARCH WILL YIELD PLENTY OF OTHER RESULTS AS WELL!

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Sources: webmd.com, livestrong.com

Although it’s commonly understood that biotin is good for hair and nails, it’s commonly misunderstood what it actually does for said hair and nails. Contrary to popular belief, biotin won’t make nails or hair grow faster. However, some studies do show that it can help strengthen them. When you strengthen otherwise brittle nails, they’re less likely to break. Preliminary studies also suggest biotin is effective in treating hair loss. So how do you get the recommended daily value of biotin? From fruits to fish, biotin can be found in an assortment of natural sources, according to the Livestrong Foundation.


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body the chef’s kitchen

I Each month, local chef and culinary expert Marie Glass Harrington cooks up something special to tempt your taste buds.

strawberry pie

will never forget the huge, delicious strawberry pies from Hess’s department store in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Sadly, the store closed in the ’90s, so the only way to get one now is to make your own. I believe my version is as good as, if not better than, how I remember the Hess’s iconic version. I use 8 pounds of fresh strawberries to make one pie! Some are cooked, strained and thickened in to a glaze and spooned carefully over a mountain of stacked strawberries. Although the Hess’s original pie had mountains of whipped cream on top, I prefer to omit the whipped cream and focus on the delicious, healthy strawberries.

Yields one 9-inch pie 1

prebaked 9-inch pie crust

¼

cup orange juice

¼

8

pounds strawberries

cup cornstarch

1

cup water (to cook strawberries)

1 ½ teaspoon pectin

1

cup sugar

½

cup water (for cornstarch pectin mixture)

Wash and hull 8 pounds of strawberries. Measure out 8 cups whole hulled berries to make the sauce. Reserve the others to stack in the pie. In a large saucepan over medium heat, heat water, sugar and orange juice with 8 cups whole hulled strawberries. Stir, and mash with a potato masher for about 10 minutes until strawberries are the consistency of oatmeal. Pour mixture into a fine strainer or sieve, and push through with a spoon capturing the juice into a bowl. (The remaining seeds and pulp are a tasty snack but aren’t needed for the pie.) Return the strawberry juice to the saucepan. In a small bowl, whisk cornstarch, pectin and water together. Whisk this mixture into the strawberry juice, constantly whisking over medium heat until juice boils, about 5-10 minutes or until the juice becomes clear and thick. (The juice will darken and appear cloudy first.) To assemble pie, brush bottom of the prepared pie crust with a tablespoon or two of the strawberry glaze. Carefully arrange strawberries, cut “stem-side” down, into the pie shell. Pack them together tightly. Once you have the bottom layer full, spoon strawberry glaze over that layer of berries. Continue stacking and fitting layers of berries into the shell, mounding them up slightly higher in the middle of the pie. Spoon the remaining strawberry glaze over all. Place pie in refrigerator to set for 1 hour.

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PIE © DANIEL PADAVONA / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

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balance MIND | SPIRIT | FINANCE

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FEBRUARY 2014

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m ld must-knows M

old is a common fungus that grows in just about any environment where moisture is present. Outside, mold assists in the breakdown of dead materials and can be found on organic matter such as soil, foods and plants. Mold releases millions of microscopic mold cells, called spores, which then become air-, water- or insect-borne and can easily slip into our homes. Once inside, the spores act like seeds and form new growths called colonies, creeping behind walls, sprouting under drippy sinks and spreading through moist areas. But, mold shouldn’t be treated as just another furry friend in your home; it can make you and your family sick and should be removed immediately. In fact, some molds produce toxic agents known as mycotoxins, which can cause disease and sometimes death. Mold could be the perpetrator behind cold-like symptoms, rashes, sinus inflammation, eye irritation and aggravation of asthma, according to the Florida Department of Health. Less specific symptoms like fatigue or the inability to concentrate can also stem from a mold problem. In most cases, the symptoms will disappear once the mold is removed. Those who are at the highest risk of the negative health effects caused by mold are people with allergies, sinusitis, asthma or other respiratory conditions. Infants, children, elderly people, pregnant women and those who have a weakened immune system are also at higher risk of developing symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. All mold is bad mold, but some species are associated with more severe health problems.

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black mold

WALL © 3D PICTURES; MOLD © DANI VINCEK; HAND © SINGKHAM; BOTTLE © AFRICA STUDIO; VAN © TAMAGURAMO; MOLD BALL © ALBERT ZIGANSHIN / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

balance

When people talk about black mold, they’re referring to Stachybotrys chartarum, a greenish-black mold that commonly grows on water-damaged or moist drywall, sheetrock, ceiling tiles or wood. This type of black mold produces dangerous mycotoxins that can be lethal. It’s less common than other molds, but it isn’t considered rare. The black mold that appears on bathroom tiles is usually not S. chartarum but is commonly misidentified as the toxic black mold.

green mold Green mold grows in citrus-growing regions, such as the areas of Florida where orange groves are common. Green mold, scientifically named Penicillium digitatum, is used to produce penicillin products. However, simply eating green mold to cure infections is not medically advised. This type of mold isn’t as deadly as black mold but can nonetheless cause unwanted symptoms, such as breathing problems and allergic reactions. Green mold is commonly found in refrigerators, under sinks, under wallpaper and in air-conditioning units.

Sources: airgle.com,epa.gov, edis.ifas.ufl.edu, cdc.gov

HE ALT H Y


getting rid of the growth Address mold as soon as it’s discovered. Ultimately, it will save you time. Make sure to wear gloves and goggles while cleaning the affected area. If you notice symptoms of exposure or suffer from allergies, don’t attempt to clean it yourself—enlist help. Also, be certain to consult a physician before handling mold if you have health issues. Small areas can be cleaned using soapy water, mildew or mold cleaner. Bleach and other chemicals aren’t necessary in most cases. If you do use bleach, don’t mix it with ammonia cleaners or acids because it can form a hazardous chlorine gas. Even dead mold can pose health risks, so use caution when handling used materials. After scrubbing the area clean of mold, throw away any sponges or rags that you’ve used and dry the area. Mold that returns is an indicator of an underlying issue, such as a water leak. The mold will continue to return until the underlying problem is resolved, so tend to the source first.

got mold?

call in the pros

Sampling the air for mold can be expensive and unnecessary, according to the Florida Department of Health. They recommend that all mold be removed, regardless of the type. Inhaling high levels of any type can result in illness, so it’s important to locate and remove any growths quickly. Use these tips to help identify mold problems in your home.

Some mold problems are simply too big to be handled alone. If the mold extends to more than 10 square feet, call a professional or consult the Environmental Protection Agency’s mold remediation guide at epa.gov.. If you decide a contractor is needed to remove the mold, make sure they are experienced with mold removal. Ask for references, check reviews and make sure the contractor follows the EPA’s guidelines on mold removal.

• SEARCH FOR VISIBLE MOLD. VISIBLE MOLD USUALLY LOOKS LIKE A STAIN OR HAIRY GROWTH ON FURNITURE OR WOOD MATERIALS. • • LOOK FOR SIGNS OF MOISTURE OR WATER DAMAGE THROUGHOUT YOUR HOME, SUCH AS WATER LEAKS, STANDING WATER AND WATER STAINING. • CHECK AROUND AIR HANDLING UNITS FOR

STANDING WATER. ROUTINELY INSPECT THE EVAPORATOR COILS, DRAIN PANS AND DRAIN LINERS. INSPECT AREAS THAT HAVE A MUSTY ODOR FOR SIGNS OF MOLD OR STANDING WATER.

NEED MORE INFO? For more information on the health risks of mold and more information on its removal, visit epa.gov.

FEBRUARY 2014

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61


in the business of bliss B

elieve it or not, time on the job could become much more enjoyable in 10 simple steps. A few alterations to the office can increase morale, and remembering the small things like saying “thank you” can do wonders, too. Here are some easy-to-implement ideas to make any workplace happier:

1

FLEX THE SCHEDULE. People holding down 9-to-5s are three times more likely to stick around if their employers offer flexible hours. When workers design their own clocks, they can choose to work at their most efficient times and use the rest to recharge with the fam or a hobby.

2

JUMP AROUND. Employees who get moving throughout the day increase their physical health, and a little stretch during lunch offers mental relief as well. Company gym memberships never hurt, but make sure to snag some time out of the chair each day.

3

DON’T HOVER. Is there anything worse than a micromanager? When workers feel competent, they tend to be more invested in their work. Giving employees freedom in decision-making lets them show their creativity, boosting morale as a result.

4

CUT OUT CUBICLES. Organizational psychologists encourage shared offices among employees of a given department. Cubicle walls breed isolation, but a more open floor plan fosters beneficial relationships between co-workers.

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© ODUA IMAGES / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

balance

5

LET EMPLOYEES BE PICKY. When people are able to choose tasks related to their interests, it follows that their products will improve. The sense of autonomy that comes from choosing assignments will likely increase overall satisfaction as well.

6

SHOW SOME INTEREST. When officemates exhibit a genuine interest in each others’ personal lives and achievements, everyone benefits. Chatting about hobbies promotes positive interaction and feelings of approachability.

7

SAY “THANK YOU.” It takes two to tango, a village to raise a child and an entire team to run a business. Any job would be harder without the help of others, so be sure to show those others a little appreciation from time to time.

8

FURNISH FOR SUCCESS. There is no reason for uncomfortable chairs or ancient desktops. If a piece of office property causes discomfort or makes efficiency impossible, seriously consider replacing it.

9

RULE RESPONSIBLY. If new rules or guidelines must be set, set them for the majority trying to succeed in their position, not the bad apples that caused trouble in the first place. Laying down martial law is unfair and makes everyone feel reprimanded.

10

TRY AN OFFICE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT. If the budget allows, give everyone $10 to improve the office in some way. Not only will the office look dashing, but employees will feel their perspectives matter enough to bring change.

Sources: govexec.com, digitaljournal.com, learnfizz.com

HE ALT H Y


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Healthy Living Magazines Feb'14  

Inspiring A Healthier, Balanced Lifestyle.

Healthy Living Magazines Feb'14  

Inspiring A Healthier, Balanced Lifestyle.