Page 1

JAN’18

Ocala

DEAR DIARY A DOZEN WAYS TO WRITE IT DOWN

On Stage! A Winter Roundup Of Performing Arts

+

Everyday Geniuses The Faces of IHMC


Considering Ocala?

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Historic District Walking distance to downtown. Private 4 BR home perfect for entertaining, both inside and outside. Spectacular pool area, spa, separate conversation area with fire pit.


119 +/- Acres Close to Ocala Horse Park and Trails Perfect for any equine discipline or cattle. Enjoy fishing for large bass!

Gated Equestrian Community Private Parcels from 10.05 Acres to 12.79 +/- Acres Prices range from $375,000 to $440,000

Florida Greenways and Trails

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Parcel 7 10.05 +/- Acres $410,000

Entrance Gate

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well

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Guide: Bridle Trails Roads - 20’ Wide

Parcel 2 10.47 +/- Acres

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Parcel 1 11.44 +/- Acres

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Please note that this is an approximate diagram of the boundary lines and information.

well

120’ Turn Around Areas well

Refer to the survey for the exact dimensions and property lines.

SW 123rd Place

If you’re considering buying or selling, give us a call today!

For these and other properties, visit JoanPletcher.com for information, videos and more choices. 352.347.1777 | Cell: 352.266.9100 | 352.804.8989 | joan@joanpletcher.com Due to the privacy and at the discretion of my clients, there are additional training centers, estates and land available that are not advertised.


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2 18 Happy New Year!

Developing clean energy for our community reduces our carbon footprint and has a positive impact on the world! Being more energy efficient means fewer fossil fuels are needed to produce the energy we use. Take control of your energy choices! Make the invisible more visible. Sign up for myenergyplanner.com and see how much energy your home is using. Make a resolution this year to apply the actions needed to reduce your energy cost. Ocala Electric Utility is developing clean energy for our community because we care. We are your public power provider; this is our hometown, too!

For more conservation tips, please visit

ocalaelectric.org


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Weddings are golden here. From the moment you arrive on our property and see the lavish clubhouse, smell the fragrant rose garden surrounding our grand stairway entrance, you can be assured your hopes, wishes and dreams are in good hands with our professional planner and staff. Let your special occasion become momentous and memorable in our breathtaking indoor and outdoor settings.

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Gail was told there was no hope for her failing heart. At UF Health, she found a problem-solver who was up to the challenge.

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Contents

In Every Issue

JANUARY ’18

013THE BUZZ

The real people, places and events that shape our community. By Cealia Athanason, Laurel Gillum, JoAnn Guidry, Bonnie Kretchik, Melissa Peterson, Judge Steven Rogers and Sean Trapani

014 016 018 020 022 024

GOING PLACES HORSIN’ AROUND ARTIST CORNER BENCHMARKS BUSINESS BRIEFS OUT & ABOUT

029THE HIVE

Dedicated to enriching the lives of local families. By Kevin Christian, Laurel Gillum and Melissa Peterson

030 032 034

PA R E N T I N G P O I N T E R S CLASS ACTS SNAPSHOTS

Hey Style Insiders! Here’s your link to January’s giveaway. http://woobox.com/65tyop (Ends 1/15 at 12pm.)

055THE DISH

Our best recipes, restaurant news and culinary quick bites. By Laurel Gillum & Nick Steele

056 058 059 060

THE BIG DIPPER NAVIGATING THE MILKY WAY DINING GUIDE QUICK BITES

Photo courtesy of Martha Graham Dance Company

On The Cover

036 Make A Scene. Each January, Ocala Style Magazine rounds up some of the most promising, upcoming acts and entertainment for our readers to enjoy this season. Take a gander, buy some tickets and get inspired. › By Katie McPherson

063 THE SCENE

Your guide to what’s happening in and around Ocala. By Cealia Athanason, Ralph Demilio, Bonnie Kretchik, Laurel Gillum, Nick Steele and Ronald Wetherington

064 066 070

A ROUNDUP OF THE MONTH’S BEST BETS THE LOCAL SCENE THE SOCIAL SCENE

JAN’18

Ocala

DEAR DIARY A DOZEN WAYS TO WRITE IT DOWN

In This Issue

040 Jot It Down.

On Stage! A Winter Roundup Of Performing Arts

+

Everyday Geniuses The Faces of IHMC

Journaling is a way to get organized, explore emotions and capture memories. Read on to find out more. › By Cynthia McFarland

044 The Faces Of IHMC.

The Institute for Human and Machine Cognition in downtown Ocala may look nondescript from the outside, but what’s inside is anything but ordinary. › By Jim Gibson

JAN ’18 ›

09


Ocala

The Peacock Cottage Ocala’s New Plant Shop!

Magazine

• Unique Houseplants • Fun Classes

PUBLISHER

Kathy Johnson kathy@ocalastyle.com

Located in Chelsea Square 3243 East Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala 352-624-0116 • thepeacockcottage@gmail.com Like us! facebook.com/thepeacockcottage

OFFICE/PRODUCTION MANAGER

Cynthia Brown

cynthia@ocalastyle.com Editorial

www.dandypot.com

EXECUTIVE EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR

Karin Fabry-Cushenbery Melissa Peterson

karin@ocalastyle.com melissa@ocalastyle.com

TAX TIME!

ASSOCIATE EDITOR & SOCIAL MEDIA SPECIALIST SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Vianca Torres

Cealia Athanason vianca@ocalastyle.com

cealia@ocalastyle.com

Stephen C. Yager

FOOD & LIFESTYLE CONTRIBUTOR SOCIAL SCENE EDITOR

Robin Fannon Ronald W. Wetherington ronald@ocalastyle.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Angelique Anacleto Brett Ballantini Kevin Christian Jim Gibson Laurel Gillum JoAnn Guidry

Fairy • Garden Gifts Gardens • Supplies

Bonnie Kretchik Cynthia McFarland Katie McPherson Judge Steven Rogers Nick Steele Sean Trapani

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o: 352.732.0073 › f: 352.732.0226 › 1007 E. Fort King St., Ocala, FL 34471 ocalastyle.com OCALA STYLE MAGAZINE / JANUARY 2018 / VOL. 20, NO. 1

Published monthly by Ocala Publications, LLC. All contents © 2017 by Ocala Publications LLC. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature” denote a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements.

OCALA / MARION COUNTY

FONTS

OCALA / MARION COUNTY

CHAMBER & ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP

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MAIN FONT:

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JAN ’18 ›

011


TH E R E AL PE O PLE , PL AC E S & E VE NTS THAT S HAPE OU R CO M M U N IT Y

JAN

30

Competing For the Crown

the

B U Z Z

There’s no better way to kick off the new year than by competing for a chance to don one of the area’s top culinary crowns. The annual King of the Wing competition continues to see record attendance, prompting a move to the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion in 2018.

This year’s event will also feature a new judging system. The panel will be primed and ready to award top prizes to both professional chefs and amateur wing connoisseurs alike. And, of course, all competitors will be looking to earn the coveted “People’s Choice” title. The evening begins at 5pm, and ticket holders should come hungry, as each attendee will have the opportunity to sample some of the best birds in town. Proceeds benefit ARC Marion. KING OF THE WING

› Southeastern Livestock Pavilion › January 30, 5-9pm › mcarc.com or (352) 351-9048

page

13

A PI R ATE ’ S

LIFE

014

THE ART OF EQUINE

016

NEW ARTIST ON THE BLOCK

018

AT TO R N E Y FO R H I R E?

020

BUSINESS NOTES

022

FLORIDA FLIPS

024


THE

Buzz

AROUND TOWN

Land Ho!

Looking to take a day trip? Check out the 2018 Seminole Hard Rock Gasparilla Pirate Fest in Tampa this month. › By Laurel Gillum

Photo courtesy of Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tampa

The 2018 Seminole Hard Rock Gasparilla Pirate Fest celebration is on and better than ever before. With events lined up into March, we recommend you start brushing up on your pirate talk now. Arggh.

Children’s Gasparilla Extravaganza (Jan. 20)

Since 1947, families, friends and neighbors have enjoyed the Gasparilla Children’s Parade. This alcoholfree event celebrates the return of the Gasparilla Season to Tampa Bay. Events begin at 11am, with the children’s parade following at 3:30pm. Stick around for the fireworks at 7pm.

Seminole Hard Rock Gasparilla Pirate Fest (Jan. 27)

The 2018 Seminole Hard Rock Gasparilla Pirate Fest is a daylong event (9am-9pm) and one of Tampa’s most well-known festivals. This year will feature the 101st Gasparilla Invasion and Parade of the Pirates presented by Ye Mystic Krewe of Gasparilla.

Gasparilla Invasion Brunch

The Gasparilla Invasion Brunch at the Tampa Convention Center provides the best view in town of the historic Gasparilla Invasion. Watch as the pirates of Ye Mystic Krewe of Gasparilla sail up Seddon Channel aboard the Jose Gasparilla accompanied by a majestic flotilla before docking

014

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at 1pm at the Tampa Convention Center. Photos courtesy of Eventfest,Inc.

Gasparilla Parade of the Pirates

The 4.5-mile Gasparilla Parade of the Pirates begins at 2pm and winds its way along Hillsboro Bay into downtown Tampa. The parade will feature over 140 units, including 103 floats, three marching bands and more than 50 participating social organizations. For more information on any of the 2018 Seminole Hard Rock Gasparilla Pirate Fest events, visit gasparillapiratefest.com.

2018 Publix Gasparilla Distance Classic (Feb. 24-25) The Gasparilla Distance Classic Association, established in 1978, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising funds for charitable youth organizations and running programs in the Tampa Bay area. Visit

publix.com/gasparilla to register for the 15K, 5K, Half Marathon, 8K or Challenge events.

Gasparilla Outbound Voyage (Mar. 3)

Join your mates at Channelside Bay Plaza in Tampa to mingle with pirates, pose for photos ops and enjoy live music until the mayor kicks you scoundrels out of town and the YMKG pirates sail out of

Tampa to mark the closing of the 2018 Gasparilla season.

CLOSING EVENTS: 2-6PM: Live music by Marcello Mello Duo 4:30PM: Pirates arrive in Channelside Bay Plaza 6-10PM: Live music by Luna Blue 6:30PM: Pirates sail back out to sea with final cannon salute


THE SAVANNAH CENTER The Savannah Center is located in The Villages and is well known for the first class entertainment featured throughout the year. Acts such as Willie Nelson, Foghat, Merle Haggard, The 5th Dimension, The Drifters, Kenny Rogers, BJ Thomas and The Kingston Trio have played here.

Coming Soon... Blood, Sweat & Tears February 23rd | 5 & 8pm

The Guess Who March 12th | 5 & 8pm

Gift Card

1575 Buena Vista Blvd, The Villages, FL | 352-753-3229

Gift Card

Available Now! at any of The Villages Box Office locations.


THE

Buzz

HORSIN AROUND

The Language of the Horse Professional equestrian performer Sylvia Zerbini enchants with her multifaceted equine shows. › By JoAnn Guidry

S

ylvia Zerbini is multilingual. She speaks English, French and horse. Growing up on her family’s farm just south of Paris, France, Zerbini spent hours observing their horses in their pastures. She learned how they communicated via their body language. How the slightest movement, a shift in weight, a flick of an ear or eye contact, rippled through the herd. Soon Zerbini was using energy, voice, emotion and eye contact to speak horse. “As a child, I would travel with my parents when they were on tour in the summer,” says Zerbini, a ninth-generation animal trainer and performer. “Then I would come back to stay with my grandparents in France to go to school in the fall. I have been performing all my life.” Zerbini put her unique communication skills to good use. She became an equestrian performer with Ringling Bros. Circus and then with Canada-based Cavalia. Today, Zerbini operates from her own Williston-based Grande Liberte Farm. From January through April, she stages weekend performances at her farm while traveling to other venues the rest of the year. “My horses are trained through what I call their silent language,” says Zerbini. “We use no physical aids such as bridles or whips. All the training is about communicating with horses as they communicate with each other. It is very natural, and the horses respond to it.” Grande Liberte Farm is home to a new covered performance arena that seats 250.

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Zerbini describes it as “an equine theater with lights and music.” The 90-minute show features 20-plus horses, including Arabians, Andalusians, Warmbloods and Quarter horses. Zerbini notes that “many of my horses are rescues or adoptees whose strong personalities were too much for their previous owners.” And once they find a home with Zerbini, it is their forever home. “We open the show with a herd of horses at liberty communicating with each other,” says Zerbini. “Then I enter the herd and slowly move them into an equine ballet to music. We also add elements of aerialists, dancers and vaulting. We think our shows have something

for everyone, even if they are not necessarily horse people.” Zerbini never forgets that it is the horses who are at the center of the show. “There is a very strong emotional connection in the human and horse relationship,” says Zerbini. “My horses are not just performing for me; they are having as much fun as I am. And I think when people experience this, they come away feeling happy.”

LEARN MORE › Grande Liberte Farm › 18552 NE 81st Street, Williston › sylviazerbini.com › (941) 256-1063 › JanuaryApril: shows every Saturday & Sunday (3:30pm5pm) › General admission, $25 › VIP seating (wine, hors d’oeuvres & meet Sylvia): $40 › Children (4-12): $15


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THE

Buzz

AROUND TOWN

An Artist’s Take

Jordan Shapot’s art debut celebrates culture, identity and impressions. › By Cealia Athanason

O

rganized chaos are the two words that encapsulate the feeling, concept and even process of Jordan Shapot’s latest series of paintings. Native American photographs captured by the historically famous photographer Edward S. Curtis of the early 1900s are the inspiration behind Jordan’s series, First Impressions, which will be on display at Brick City Center for the Arts this month. His series title has multiple meanings and purposes, especially because this is Jordan’s first impression on the painting world. Jordan’s title also fits his paintings in a more tangible way. “At first glance, they look abstract, but something’s there,” Jordan says, explaining the first impression these paintings make before engaging the viewer to see more. Although it’s the first solo art exhibition of his art career, Jordan says the impact is more than an opening event for him as a talented artist in the community. He’s putting himself out there in a rich and raw display of cultural significance and astounding insight. Two years have gone into the 30 pieces of art that make up First Impressions, 22 of which were completed by late November.

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“Red Wing”

“War Party”

Jordan admits he was pushing it a bit leaving eight paintings to finish a month before the show, but his confidence wasn’t shaken in the least. He has planned every stroke of his brush and color of paint that’s splashed across his repurposed palette paper on wood panels. Once he gathers the meaning of the image he wants to portray, he can finish the painting in mere hours. “My style is ever-changing,” Jordan says. “I always need to keep it fresh.” First Impressions sends out abstract vibes despite Jordan’s background in a more realistic style of painting. It’s

as if he learned the rules and now chooses to break them, cracking the steadfasts and molding the absolutes, to form his own art. He holds up one of Curtis’ photographs next to one of the paintings in his series to demonstrate the abstract interpretation that subtly exposes the photograph’s image—all through the clever use of colors, textures and shapes. The opening reception for the month-long exhibition at The Brick on Friday, January 5—complete with Native American performances and demonstrations, a teepee, hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and live

music—creates more of a cultural festival mood than an art-show feel. But that was all part of Jordan’s vision. “I didn’t want a run-of-themill art show,” he says. “This is me finally presenting to the painting world.”

WANT TO GO? › Jordan’s art will be on display at Brick City Center for the Arts for the entire month of January. His opening reception is from 5-9pm on Friday, January 5.


NOW

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An Assisted and Independent Living Community

Offering a memory care program with memory care dining that is unlike any other in the area. For residents with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease and other memory challenges, we offer a comprehensive memory program. Our program enhances the lifestyle of those with early memory loss by giving them an opportunity to live an active and fulfilling life while enjoying continuity through Canterfield’s neighborhood concept with the same staff members day in and day out. Our goal is to focus on the dignity, safety and quality of life of each of our residents. Just the right amount of support is offered and adjusted whenever necessary. Given proper nutrition, programming and surroundings, we believe residents naturally function at a higher level at Canterfield as individualized “memory activities” are developed to stimulate, recall and deter additional memory loss issues.

Call today for a tour of our memory care facility and enjoy a complimentary lunch! • 21 Spacious Apartments in Memory Care • Independent Living Villas • Assisted Living • Memory Care • The Lifestyle YOU Earned! Call to learn about our grand opening specials

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THE

Buzz

BENCHMARKS

Hire Calling › By Judge Steven G. Rogers

Q: What’s the difference between a boxing referee and an attorney? A: The referee doesn’t get paid more for a longer fight.

W

hen faced with a legal issue, the decision to hire an attorney is an important— and often costly—one to make. Most attorneys perform legal services based upon either an hourly, flat-fee or contingency fee agreement. Many attorneys charge for their services at an hourly rate. The client agrees to pay for the time expended by the attorney at the rate agreed upon by the client. More skilled attorneys can demand a higher hourly rate with the understanding they will provide high-quality legal work in less time compared to attorneys with less experience. Retaining an attorney at an hourly rate is common in business litigation, real estate and family law cases. Some attorneys elect to charge a flat-fee for their services. Under flat-fee agreements, the client

pays the attorney a set fee to perform legal work regardless of the amount of time expended by the attorney to complete the work. An example would be estate planning lawyers who often charge a set fee to prepare a will or trust for a client. Watch 10 minutes of local television and you are likely to see a commercial with an attorney advertising “no recovery, no fee.” These contingency fee contractual agreements between the client and the attorney provide for the attorney to be paid based upon a percentage (usually 33 percent) of the amount the attorney “recovers” for their client through a settlement or verdict. If the attorney doesn’t obtain a monetary award for their client, then the client doesn’t owe the attorney anything for a fee. Watch 10 minutes of local Contingency fee agreements television and you are likely to are very popular in personal injury see a commercial with an attorney cases. However, the Florida Bar advertising “no recovery, no fee.” prohibits attorneys from entering contingency fee agreements in criminal or family law cases where the fee is based upon the outcome of the case. There are also contractual and statutory provisions that permit a party to recover payment of their attorney’s fees from the other party in the case. Many contractual agreements include a provision for a prevailing party’s attorney’s fees that may result from a lawsuit to enforce the terms and conditions of the contract. Florida Statute §627.428 (2017) authorizes the recovery of attorney’s fees if an insured person or business prevails in a lawsuit they filed against their insurance company seeking the benefits available to them under their insurance policy. Hiring an attorney is an important decision. Prospective clients should have candid conversations with the attorney about what they can expect to be charged for the attorney’s services. And the truth shall set your fee.

Judge Steven G. Rogers currently serves as a circuit court judge. He lives in Ocala with his wife, three children and an extremely spoiled Australian Shepherd.

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THE

Buzz

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Serving Our Community The Florida Municipal Electric Association (FMEA) recently honored the community service efforts of Ocala Electric Utility (OEU) by recognizing the municipal electric utility with the 2017 Building Strong Communities Award. Honored during the Building Strong Communities luncheon at FMEA’s annual Energy Connections Conference and Trade Show, OEU received the award for its commitment to enhancing its customers’ quality of life through various community improvement programs. “Being a part of the community is about more than making sure the lights are on,” says FMEA Executive Director Amy Zubaly. “The recipients of the 2017 FMEA Building Strong Communities Awards excel in not only taking an interest in seeing their communities succeed but also actively working toward making them better places to live.”

Give Me Some Sugar Andi Somers and Lisa Menz recently showcased their combined sugar art designs at the Sugar Art Dress Fashion Show of the International Cake Designers event in Orlando, along with some of the most prestigious cake artists from around the globe. Lisa Menz, owner of Cakes By Lisa, has been in the cake artistry business for over 25 years and is well recognized for her designer cakes. Andi Somers, owner of Dolls By Andi and Company, is the creator and designer of one-of-a-kind art dolls. She has donated many of her dolls to help raise funds for cancer patients and other charitable fundraising organizations.

Tee Up! The First Tee of Greater Ocala recently elected Chuck Rhoades to its Board of Directors. In the past, he has served on the boards of The American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association in Ocala. Rhoades has been serving as consultant and business manager for Jake Perkins Motorsports for the past four

Natural Florida

years and has been involved with The First Tee for the past three years as a volunteer instructor. The First Tee of Greater Ocala is a youth development organization focusing on Nine Core Values and Nine Healthy Habits. It is not a junior golf program, although the organization does utilize golf as a way to administer this important curriculum to young people ages 5 to 17.

Central Florida’s newest tourist attraction, GatorWorld Parks of Florida, recently opened its gates to visitors. Located in Sumter County, the 15-acre park features a scenic drive through a viewing area featuring more than 400 alligators in their natural Florida habitat. Entering GatorWorld Parks of Florida through the main gateway, visitors drive on a gravel roadway meandering through the park, providing views of the gators lounging in pools—behind protective fencing, of course. “We’re thrilled to open this unique adventure park that we’ve specifically designed to showcase one of Florida’s unique wonders,” explains GatorWorld Parks of Florida developer Don Buckner. “In addition to the entertainment aspect of our park, we’re proud to serve as a rescue and relocation facility for alligators.”

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PRO M OTI O N AL FE ATU R E

“I started performing balloon sinus dilation procedures in 2010,” Dr. Nadenik says. “Initially we utilized this wonderful technology in the operating room arena, but in the past several years, many patients have wanted this done in the office setting to avoid going to the operating room. The technology and advancements have definitely allowed me to provide this procedure for patients in the office.” Dr. Nadenik explains that in-office balloon sinus dilation also offers patients a much quicker recovery, and patients can typically return to work within a couple of days. “In my practice, every patient is treated as an individual,” he says. “Sinuses are very much like a fingerprint. Everyone’s anatomy is put together differently, so each patient requires

Sinus Issues: Solved

Dr. Scott Nadenik offers personalized, state-of-theart sinus care for his patients, including in-office balloon sinus dilation.

I

t’s all about individualized patient care and sinus relief for Dr. Scott Nadenik, DO of Ocala Sinus Solutions. “I’m very passionate about this,” he says. “I love helping patients find solutions to their sinus issues.” Dr. Nadenik has practiced as an ear, nose and throat physician in Ocala for the past 20 years, and he is on staff at all area hospitals. He graduated from Midwestern University/ Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1993 and completed his residency in otolaryngology and facial plastic surgery in 1998. Dr. Nadenik is board certified by the American Osteopathic Board of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology. The focus of Dr. Nadenik’s practice has always been caring for patient’s sinus conditions, and he offers a complete range of treatment options for patients who suffer from sinus headaches, pressure, congestion, poor breathing and recurrent sinus infections. In-office balloon sinus dilation is one of the exciting options available for patients suffering

from chronic sinus conditions. “Balloon sinus dilation opens the natural sinus passageways to allow the sinuses to function properly,” Dr. Nadenik explains. Dr. Nadenik uses local anesthesia to numb sinus tissue before inserting a small, deflated balloon through the nose and into the sinus passageway. The balloon is then expanded to open or dilate the natural sinus pathway. It only takes five seconds for the inflated balloon to restructure the sinus tissue. The balloon is then deflated and removed. The entire procedure will typically take between 30 minutes to an hour.

a very individualized approach.” Dr. Nadenik’s experience and passion are clearly evident. Since he began his practice in Ocala in 1998, he has performed thousands of sinus surgeries and balloon sinus dilations. Dr. Nadenik loves seeing the significant improvement in his patient’s health and comfort. Many of his patients have suffered for years with chronic sinus issues, and having the ability to improve their quality of life is extremely rewarding. “Having patients tell me that they no longer experience sinus headaches, pressure and infections is one of the most rewarding parts of my practice,” says Dr. Nadenik.

DR. SCOTT NADENIK, DO › Ocala Sinus Solutions › 2120 SW 22nd Pl, Ocala › (352) 353-8899 › ocalasinussolutions.com

JAN ’18 ›

023


THE

Buzz

OUT AND ABOUT

A Flippin’ Good Time The athleticism of world-class competitors. The grace of Broadwayesque choreography. The fervor of the hometown crowd. These are Friday nights at the O’Connell Center in Gainesville, courtesy of the UF gymnastics team. › By Sean Trapani

T

he 2018 UF gymnastics season begins in January and promises to be one of the most exciting seasons on the books, complete with new faces, new routines and lots of powerful competition battling the Gators on their home turf.

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Who To Watch

From freshman to seniors, the 2018 talent pool runs deep. Leading the team is an experienced senior class, anchored by decorated allarounders Kennedy Baker and Alex McMurtry. Combined, this duo account for nine Gator 10.0s since 2015. This pair went onetwo in the last two Southeastern Conference Championships’ all-around competitions, with Baker winning as a sophomore and McMurtry in 2017.

Photos courtesy of UF Gymnastics

McMurtry went on to win all-around at the NCAA Championships, a title claimed by a Gator five of the last six seasons. She is the reigning Honda Award winner for gymnastics, given to the top female athlete in 12 collegiate sports each season. But the team includes a number of standouts, including several candidates for the allaround lineup. “This preseason has been really exciting to see everything come together,” says UF Gymnastics


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Coach Rowland plans to introduce some bold new elements into the team’s routines that will help take them to a new level. Head Coach Jenny Rowland. “We potentially have eight athletes who could do all-around at any given time, which is a very healthy number.” Many athletes are poised for extending their greatness this season, including Rachel Slocum. A 2017 vault All-American, Slocum is making upgrades to her floor exercise routine.

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Adding All-America honors in that event as well is among Slocum’s goals. Newcomers such as Alyssa Baumann, Jazmyn Foberg and Megan Skaggs all bring international competition experience. This experience and talent will be critical as Coach Rowland plans to introduce some bold new elements into the team’s routines that will help take them to a new level. There will be new combinations on the uneven bars. Fans might see releases caught back to back, such as a Shaposh immediate Ginger and a reverse Hecht immediate Pac—moves that create a new level of excitement in the world of college gymnastics. Other advanced elements, such as the Yurchenko one-and-a-half (10.0 start value) vault, are going to be debuted at some point this season as well. Fans might not see them at first, but the faithful will have the opportunity to witness them toward the end of the season. “You’re going to see a few new unique skills that aren’t done on a day to day basis in NCAA gymnastics,” Rowland adds. “You’re going to see an Onodi (by Alyssa Baumann) on beam, which is a really beautiful skill. There are a few, but they’re few and far between done well.”

The Gators will be well served by their talent as they will face off against some of the most challenging competitors in the sport. Florida will host SEC rivals Alabama and Arkansas, not to mention a powerful Big 12 opponent, Nebraska, which looks to be a dynamic matchup. Of course, fans will be especially interested when the Gators take on both Oklahoma and LSU, the reigning and runnerup NCAA champions. Both of these matchups will happen on home turf, which means even more reasons for fans to keep their Friday nights open and plan a trip to Gainesville.

The Experience

If one has never experienced collegiate-level gymnastics in person, it is a dazzling display of sight, sound and knucklebiting precision. Pulsing music and a highly motivated crowd form the backdrop. Each routine seems to push the limits of physical possibility, evoking loud cheers from the crowd for the successful moves and shared groans for the near-misses. Young audience members are mesmerized. And the grown-ups will feel as if they are reliving some of their first experiences watching the sport. “It is always a great show,” says long-time fan Nancy Fuhs. “My husband and I both go, and then he invites all his friends from work. [Our friends] have little girls come who are just infatuated with the gymnasts; they get out there and want to start doing the jumps and leaps, and they want

to do cartwheels. It reminds me of when I was younger because I used to love Nadia Comaneci and Cathy Rigby.” As a special treat for the fans, each UF athlete also develops a unique routine in which they incorporate the beloved Gator Chomp. As the gymnast performs the Chomp, the crowd joins in, and there is the spectacle of thousands of people participating in the event. “When I’m leaving the auditorium I’m dancing,” Fuhs says. “My heart flutters every time I think about Friday nights.”

WANT TO GO? › To witness—

and Chomp along with— the UF team, purchase your individual or season tickets now by calling the UF Ticket Office at (352) 375-4683 or online at floridagators.com/tickets. Your Friday nights may never be the same!

Amanda Cheney


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D E D I C ATE D TO E N R I C H I N G TH E LIVE S O F LO C AL FAM I LI E S

ime Screeubne, T SnapChat. No

Minecraft, YouT e pretty doubt your little ones ar gate their well versed in how toarnatpviho ne or way through your sm iPad.

Source: cnn.com

ort has ice of their own. A new rep They may even have a dev tes Sta ited Un e children in the found that the amount of tim rs. yea rt sho r fou t has tripled in jus spend with mobile screens day a s ute min 15 nger spent about In 2013, children 8 and you sa now they spend 48 minute as on mobile devices, where And, . dia Me se by Common Sen day, according to the report n’t Do t. tha n much more time tha chances are, many spend en wh es rul e Establish screen tim let the screens take over! g din rea of nty encourage ple your children are young and and outdoor play.

STUDY SOLUTIONS

030

CLASS ACTS

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SNAPSHOTS

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THE

Hive

› PARENTING POINTERS

Teacher Tip!

Hit The Books

The transition from middle school to high school can be a challenging one for some students! So sharpen your pencil, and prepare to sharpen your brain—check out these valedictorianworthy study tips. › By Laurel Gillum

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.com

MATH: Remember that math is cumulative. Most math classes follow a natural progression—that is, each one builds upon knowledge you’ve gained and mastered from the previous course. With this being said, pull out your old math notes and review previous material to refresh yourself. If you remember how to solve past equations, you will understand new material faster. SCIENCE: In most science textbooks, new ideas and theories often relate to what you’ve read

in previous chapters. Make sure not to fall behind on your reading assignments. Better yet, make a point to read these chapters before they are lectured on. By doing this, you will already be familiar with the vocabulary and basic ideas the instructor is discussing, making it much easier to take notes when gone over in class. ENGLISH: Vocabulary pop quiz? No problem. Flashcards are one of the best ways to memorize vocabulary words. Write down the vocabulary word

on one side of an index card and the definition on the other side. You can quiz yourself or have someone else quiz you. If your exam tests your knowledge in literature, it is best to re-read the most relevant sections of the text you are to be tested on. Reviewing the chapter titles and the first and last paragraph of each chapter of novels can help refresh your memory about the specifics of the novel. HISTORY: Dates, names and places are among the most difficult details to remember.

Use mnemonic devices to memorize facts. For example, the first 10 presidents of the United States of America are: Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Adams, Jackson, Van Buren, Harrison and Tyler. The mnemonic device is: Watermelon And Jalapeños Made Me And Jack Very Happy Today. A Google search will reveal plenty of mnemonic devices for a variety of topics. Also, study early and frequently. The more frequently you read the material, the more familiar with it you become.

Sources: howtostudy.org, uwosh.edu

If one of these methods works well for you, try it out in more than one class. We challenge you—straight As all semester long.


Montessori P R E PA R ATO R Y S C H O O L O F O C A L A

INFANT • TODDLER • PRESCHOOL • KINDERGARTEN • ELEMENTARY

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JAN ’18 ›

on

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THE

Hive

› BY KEVIN CHRISTIAN, APR, CPRC Committed To Leadership Take Stock in Children students Jasmine Weathers (West Port) and Dezirae Polk (MTI) recently received leadership awards from Florida’s Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart for their dedication and leadership qualities. Both students received accolades in front of the state School Board meeting in Leesburg. The awards honor students for succeeding despite personal circumstances beyond their control.

Ruby Cox

FOOD TRUCK WARS Hundreds of Golden Binder students at Osceola Middle enjoyed Food Truck Wars recently, showcasing food items all handmade by classmates. Culinary Arts students created the tasty treats and then served them up competition style to see which ones were most popular. The winner? The “Taco Truck!” Also popular were “Grilled Cheese, Please!” and “Let’s Pop,” a sweet birthday cake pop featuring confetti sprinkles on top.

Knitting For Need

Numerous students at Fessenden Elementary are sporting knitted caps, gloves, scarves and even slippers these days thanks to the generous spirit of local residents. Congregation members at St. Paul’s National Catholic Church in Belleview handmade the items to reward students for making great decisions. Each morning, the principal draws names for students to come to the office to make their choice!  

Madison Street Academy

Dr NH Jones

Blue Ribbon Schools

Dr. NH Jones Elementary and Madison Street Academy were recently named National Blue Ribbon Schools by the U.S. Department of Education. The prestigious honor showcases exceptional student learning, cooperative school environments and supportive school communities. This is the third time Dr. NH Jones has captured the honor and a first for Madison Street. Current and recent administrators received special plaques and flags at a recent School Board meeting.

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Susan Cunningham

Janny Gonzalez

Yoshiana Johnson

Jantzen Piner

School-Related Employee Of The Year Ruby Cox, a kindergarten paraprofessional at Reddick-Collier Elementary, is Marion County’s 2017-18 School-Related Employee of the Year. A district employee since 2013, Cox is working on her teaching certificate and M.B.A.! Other finalists this year included Susan Cunningham (Dunnellon Elementary), Janny Gonzalez (Hammett Bowen Jr. Elementary), Yoshiana Johnson (Howard Middle) and Jantzen Piner (Sparr Elementary). Cox’s colleague, Abel Garcia, captured the same honor in 2015 and was later named Florida’s School-Related Employee of the Year. Cox finds out this spring how she fared in the state-level competition.  


CITY OF OCALA

2018 Special Events DISCOVERY CENTER EXHIBITS WILD WEATHER FEB. THROUGH APRIL

AFTER DARK IN THE PARK MOVIES FRIDAYS POPCORN AND DRINKS AVAILABLE. DON’T FORGET YOUR CHAIRS OR BLANKETS! “THE REVENANT” | JAN. 26 | 7-9 P.M. FORT KING NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK | 3925 E. FORT KING ST. “SING” | FEB. 16 | 7-9 P.M. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. RECREATION COMPLEX 1510 NW FOURTH ST. “HOOK” | MARCH 9 | 7-9 P.M. TUSCAWILLA PARK 500 NE SANCHEZ AVE. “GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2” APRIL 13 | 8:30-10:30 P.M. JERVEY GANTT RECREATION COMPLEX 2200 SE 36 AVE. “THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE” MAY 11 | 8:30-10:30 P.M. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. RECREATION COMPLEX 1510 NW FOURTH ST. “BASQUIAT” | JUNE 8 | 8:30-10:30 P.M. TUSCAWILLA ART PARK 223 NE FIFTH ST. “WONDER WOMAN” JULY 6 | 8:30-10:30 P.M. JERVEY GANTT RECREATION COMPLEX 2200 SE 36 AVE.

FORT KING’S HAUNTED TRAIL AND HALLOWEEN MOVIE FORT KING NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK | 3925 E. FORT KING ST.

FRIDAY | OCT. 26 | 6-10:30 P.M.

TROPICAL ODYSSEY MAY THROUGH JULY

TUSCAWILLA SCULPTURE STROLL

OCALA ART FESTIVAL

SCIENCE OF PLAY AUG. THROUGH SEPT.

SATURDAY | MARCH 17 | 10 A.M.-2P.M.

MAD SCIENCE OCT. THROUGH DEC.

JANUARY DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. COMMEMORATIVE CELEBRATION

WREATH CEREMONY

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. MEMORIAL 500 BLOCK OF SW MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. AVE.

SATURDAY | JAN. 13 | 11:30 A.M.

THE MARCH

DOWNTOWN OCALA

MONDAY | JAN. 15 | 7:30 A.M.

A DAY AT THE PARK

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. RECREATION COMPLEX 1510 NW FOURTH ST.

MONDAY | JAN. 15 | 10 A.M.-4 P.M.

LUCKY DIAZ AND THE FAMILY JAM BAND TUSCAWILLA ART PARK | 223 NE FIFTH ST. SATURDAY | JAN. 20 | 2-5 P.M.

FEBRUARY

TUSCAWILLA ART PARK 223 NE FIFTH ST.

ENGINEERING DAY

SATURDAY | NOV. 10 | 1-10 P.M.

CITIZENS’ CIRCLE 151 SE OSCEOLA AVE.

SATURDAY | MARCH 31 | 2-8 P.M.

ARBOR DAY EARTHFEST YOUTH FISHING DERBY SIDEWALK CHALK ART MAYOR’S SPRING CLEAN-UP

“EDWARD SCISSORHANDS” DEC. 7 | 7-9 P.M. CITIZENS’ CIRCLE 151 SE OSCEOLA AVE.

CITIZENS’ CIRCLE 151 SE OSCEOLA AVE.

MOTOWN DOWNTOWN SATURDAY | MARCH 9 | 6-9 P.M.

TUSCAWILLA PARK 500 NE SANCHEZ AVE.

NOV. 10-DEC. 30 DAYS AND HOURS VARY

DECEMBER

TUSCAWILLA PARK 500 NE SANCHEZ AVE.

MONDAY | APRIL 30 | 9 A.M.-NOON

JULY RECREATION AND PARKS MONTH VARIOUS ACTIVITIES THROUGHOUT THE MONTH OF JULY

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK DOWNTOWN OCALA

FIRST FRIDAY OF EACH MONTH SEPT. 7-MAY 3 | 6-9 P.M.

SATURDAY | SEPT. 15 | 10 A.M.-2 P.M.

MARCH

SATURDAY | NOV. 17 | 4-9 P.M.

SPRING SENIOR FISHING DERBY

BOBA: BEGINNING OF BOLTED ART THURSDAY | FEB. 15 | 5-9 P.M.

DOWNTOWN OCALA

SATURDAY | APRIL 21 | 10 A.M.-2 P.M.

SATURDAY | FEB. 10 | 10 A.M.-4 P.M.

“BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (2017)” NOV. 30 | 7-9 P.M. TUSCAWILLA PARK 500 NE SANCHEZ AVE.

LIGHT UP OCALA

TUSCAWILLA PARK 500 NE SANCHEZ AVE.

END OF SUMMER BASH

TUSCAWILLA ART PARK 223 NE FIFTH ST.

TUSCAWILLA PARK 500 NE SANCHEZ AVE.

LET’S SKATE OCALA!

APRIL

SEPTEMBER

DOWNTOWN OCALA TO TUSCAWILLA PARK

NOVEMBER

BRICK CITY BEER AND WINE FESTIVAL

SATURDAY | JULY 28 | 10 A.M.-2 P.M.

CATTLE DRIVE AND COWBOY ROUND UP

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY OCT. 27-28 | 10 A.M.-5 P.M.

HARVEST FEST

SATURDAY | MARCH 24 | 9:45 A.M.-3 P.M.

E.D. CROSKEY RECREATION CENTER 1510 NW FOURTH ST.

.

DOWNTOWN OCALA

DISCOVERY CENTER 701 NE SANCHEZ AVE.

BACK TO SCHOOL BASH

“REMEMBER THE TITANS” SEPT. 21 | 8-10 P.M MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. RECREATION COMPLEX 1510 NW FOURTH ST.

“THE ADDAMS FAMILY” OCT. 26 | 7-9 P.M. FORT KING NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK | 3925 E. FORT KING ST.

KLEIN CONFERENCE CENTER AT THE COLLEGE OF CENTRAL FLORIDA 3001 SW COLLEGE RD.

FRIDAY | MARCH 16 | 10 A.M.-3 P.M.

“CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR” AUG. 3 | 8:30-10:30 P.M. JERVEY GANTT RECREATION COMPLEX 2200 SE 36 AVE.

“THE PURSUIT OF HAPPYNESS” OCT, 5 | 8-10 P.M. CITIZENS’ CIRCLE 151 SE OSCEOLA AVE.

PARADE OF SENIOR SERVICES

TUSCAWILLA PARK 500 NE SANCHEZ AVE.

OCTOBER

HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS DOWNTOWN OCALA

DAYS AND TIMES VARY DURING MOST NIGHTS IN DEC.

SANTA ON THE SQUARE DOWNTOWN SQUARE

TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS DEC. 4, 6, 11, 13, 18 AND 20 | 6-8 P.M.

A FIGHT FOR FREEDOM: THE ATTACK ON FORT KING

FORT KING NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK | 3925 E. FORT KING ST.

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY DEC. 1 AND 2 | 9 A.M.-4 P.M.

SANTA’S CALLING

OCALA RECREATION AND PARKS

WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY AND FRIDAY DEC. 5, 6 AND 7 | 6-9 P.M.

OCALA/MARION COUNTY CHRISTMAS PARADE

SATURDAY | DEC. 8 | 5:30 P.M.

OCALA CULTURAL FESTIVAL DOWNTOWN OCALA

SATURDAY | OCT. 6 | 10 A.M.-4 P.M.

FISH FRY AND CLASSIC CARS FUNDRAISER EIGHTH AVENUE ADULT ACTIVITY CENTER | 830 NE EIGHTH AVE.

FRIDAY | OCT. 12 | 5-7 P.M.

FOR ADDITIONAL DETAILS REGARDING ANY OF THESE EVENTS, PLEASE CALL 352.368.5517 OR GO TO OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.OCALAFL.ORG/RECPARK


THE

Hive

› SNAPSHOTS

THESE LOCAL KIDS KNOW HOW TO HAVE FUN! CHECK OUT THEIR PHOTO-WORTHY MOMENTS.

Cadwyn, 9, ringing the bell for the Salvation Army at Publix

Ivelisse, 7, Krystian, 6, and Solianna, 4, at a haunted trail at the Fort King National Historic Landmark

Starling, 5 months, is very excited to go shopping

Mackenzie, 12, plays for the Ocala Premier Travel Soccer team

Angela, 14, and Kyle, 13, looking for rocks at Veterans Memorial Park

Skylar, 3, rock hunting at Sholom Park Zhenn, 5, at a local salon waiting on Mom

Luke, 1 month, and Mark, 2, pose for a quick fall photo

Violet, 7, competing in the Starlight Pageant’s annual Candyland Pageant

Arabella, 2, posing with the Taylor Swift sculpture at Julia and Charles at the Polar Express Madame Tussauds Wax Museum party at the Marion County Public Library

WANT TO SEE YOUR KIDS ON THE PAGES OF OCALA STYLE? Send your photos from around town and local events to melissa@ocalastyle.com. Yours might just get picked! 034

› Ocala

.com

Wyatt, 5, visiting the Appleton Museum for the first time


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JAN ’18 ›

035


Scene Make A

By Katie McPherson

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What better way to spend an evening than watching two young co-workers fall in love on stage, seeing a Tony Award-winning play or hearing a rock ‘n’ roll legend sing your favorite hit? Each January, Ocala Style rounds up some of the most promising upcoming acts and entertainment for our readers to enjoy this season. Take a gander, buy some tickets and get inspired.

› Ocala

.com

Martha Graham Dance Photo courtesy of UF Performing Arts


Performing Arts Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune

Cabaret

Photo courtesy of UF Performing Arts

DECEMBER 22-JANUARY 11 Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages Known for touching moments and hilarious dialogue, this play follows the budding of a new relationship for two lonely hearts in 1987 New York City. Frankie is a waitress and Johnny is a line cook, but these two characters become more than just co-workers after a one-night stand. This sometimes hilarious, sometimes touching play is quite the love story.

thesharon.com, (352) 750-5411

Gentry at Ascot

Photo by Weber Photographics

Dirty Dancing: The Classic Story On Stage JANUARY 12-13 Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Whether Dirty Dancing is one of your favorite films or you’ve never seen it before, this live rendition is a certified crowd-pleaser. It features beloved songs like “Hungry Eyes” and, of course, “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life,” with sensational acting and choreography to boot. Dirty Dancing

Photo courtesy of The Sharon

I Love A Piano

JANUARY 11-FEBRUARY 4 Ocala Civic Theatre, Ocala Have you ever seen an antique and thought “man, if this thing could talk it would have some stories to tell?” This play tells the story of a piano with one faulty key as it moves through generations of players across American history and is told through the beloved songs of Irving Berlin. I Love A Piano is one of only two works authorized to use Berlin’s compositions and features a startling 64 of them over the course of the show.

ocalacivictheatre.com, (352) 263-2274

thesharon.com, (352) 750-5411

The Royale

JANUARY 12-FEBRUARY 11 The Hippodrome Theatre, Gainesville It’s the height of Jim Crow in 1905, and Jay “The Sport” Jackson wants to become an elite boxer—No. 1 to be exact. Inspired by the true story of Jack Johnson, the first African-American heavyweight world champion, this critically acclaimed work explores one athlete’s struggle for recognition in the context of an oppressive nation.

thehipp.org, (352) 375-4477

The Fox on the Fairway JANUARY 19-FEBRUARY 11 The Sonnentag Theatre at the IceHouse, Mount Dora

A comedic take on the inner workings of country clubs, The Fox on the Fairway centers on Bingham, president

of a private country club. He’s placed a pretty big wager on an upcoming golf game, and soon, a tangled web of over-the-top relationships and love interests will seriously complicate his winning scheme. Can he win the bet and get his life back in order by the time the curtains close?

icehousetheatre.com, (352) 383-4616

I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change JANUARY 26-FEBRUARY 18 Gainesville Community Playhouse, Gainesville

This show comments on modern love in every phase of life: the first date, getting married, having children and growing old together. It’s a comedic revue of the good and the bad, the highs and lows of relationships as told through beloved songs from all genres. I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change promises to have everyone in stitches as it speaks the thoughts about our love lives we never dared to say aloud.

gcplayhouse.org, (352) 376-4949

Cabaret

FEBRUARY 3 Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Gainesville At its core, this Tony Award-winning production is about sticking to your passion even when the world is in turmoil. Inside the Kit Kat Klub, a rowdy bunch of entertainers spend each night putting on a cabaret show and

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forgetting their troubles. What will happen as their lives in pre-WWII Germany become more and more uncertain?

performingarts.ufl.edu, (352) 392-2787

The Giver

FEBRUARY 15-25 Ocala Civic Theatre, Ocala Based on the 1993 dystopian young adult novel by Lois Lowry, The Giver tells the story of a 12-year-old boy names Jonas. He lives in a world of sameness, without emotion or memory, where everyone is prescribed a life role. When Jonas receives the role of The Giver, he will grapple with the depth of human emotion for the first time, and he has many tough questions to answer.

ocalacivictheatre.com, (352) 263-2274

Ripcord

MARCH 2-MARCH 25 The Hippodrome Theatre, Gainesville Set in the Bristol Place Assisted Living Facility, this hilarious show features two unforgettable characters and has been called “an expertly engineered comedy” by The New York Times. When grouchy Abby meets her new, annoyingly upbeat roommate, Marilyn, she has no choice but to get rid of her by any means necessary. The two then make an innocent wager that quickly spirals out of control and threatens to expose both of their deepest, darkest secrets. Ripcord is heartfelt, irreverent, inappropriate and absolutely worth saving the date.

Bill Haley Jr. and The Comets

Photo by Stylish Images Photography

thehipp.org, (352) 375-4477

Martha Graham Dance Company

Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Gainesville MARCH 5 Martha Graham founded the Martha Graham Dance Company in 1926, and it has been a major influence on the world of contemporary dance ever since. This show unites the artful work of choreographers inspired by Graham and will create a new generation of dance enthusiasts.

Art Garfunkel

Photo courtesy of The Sharon

performingarts.ufl.edu, (352) 392-2787

Always, Patsy Cline

MARCH 16-APRIL 8 The Sonnentag Theatre at the IceHouse, Mount Dora Need an evening of working class, down-home humor and live country music? Always, Patsy Cline is based on the true story of Cline’s friendship with a fan, Louise Seger. The two met at a honky-tonk in 1961 and kept in touch until Cline’s plane crash in 1963. This musical recounts their unusual bond through some of Cline’s most famous tunes.

icehousetheatre.com, (352) 383-4616

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Concerts Art Garfunkel

JANUARY 16 Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages As a solo artist and half of the legendary musical act Simon & Garfunkel, he’s made a lasting mark on the music industry and created a body of work that will continue

to inspire fans for generations to come. He has released 12 solo albums, the most recent called Some Enchanted Evening in 2007. This show will delight lifelong listeners and turn casual concertgoers into devoted fans as well.

thesharon.com, (352) 750-5411


SoulBase Band

FEBRUARY 1 Appleton Museum of Art, Ocala SoulBase combines the talents of musicians from Chicago, New York, New Orleans, Miami and Orlando, and musical influences from rhythm and blues, funk, jazz, rock, reggae, hip hop and even gospel. They cover well-known and lesser heard songs in an unexpected, original way.

appletonmuseum.org, (352) 291-4455

Frankie Avalon

FEBRUARY 10 Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

Diamond Rio

SoulBase Band

Photo by Russ Harrington

Photo courtesy of Allison Giles

Frankie Avalon started his career as a teen idol in the ‘50s and shot straight to international stardom. His first song “De De Dinah” became an instant, smash hit, and his recording of “Venus” was one of the biggest selling hits of the decade. He also has a long list of film credits from classic beach movies of the era. Anyone who came of age or appreciates American rock in the ‘50s and ‘60s will love seeing Avalon in concert.

csculturalcenter.com, (352) 854-3670

The Shirelles

FEBRUARY 14 Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale When’s the last time you saw an act straight out of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame? The Shirelles were the first female group to ever sell 1 million records and are credited as the creators of the classic girl group sound. Rolling Stone ranked them No. 76 of the 100 greatest artists in rock ‘n’ roll history. This concert is your chance to experience history-making talent in person.

obopry.com, (352) 821-1201

MARCH 4 Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

Movie Music Spectacular Photo by Ralph Demilio

Bill Haley, Jr. and the Comets

JANUARY 27 Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala Bill Haley, Jr. and the Comets is a high-energy, five-man band performing songs first recorded by the legendary Bill Haley and the Comets, as well as popular tunes from the 1950s and ‘60s. This rock ‘n’ roll history show features Bill Haley, Jr. sharing insider stories and historical context behind the songs they perform. This group is all about authentic stories and authentic sound and is one not to miss for rock fans.

csculturalcenter.com, (352) 854-3670

Diamond Rio

Modern Vinyl Series: Kelsey Waldon JANUARY 27 Reilly Arts Center, Ocala

Waldon’s debut album came out in 2014, called The Goldmine. She grew up in rural Kentucky on a tobacco farm, and her upbringing has heavily influenced her music. Fans of old-school country music will love her sound, which features plenty of pedal steel and Telecaster. Anyone interested in exploring new musical talent will surely love this show—and this series.

reillyartscenter.com, (352) 351-1606

Diamond Rio is a pillar in the country music industry, and they’re coming to the Orange Blossom Opry to delight locals with their renowned talent. They released their 10th studio album, I Made It, and will perform some of those 11 new songs as well as their most popular hits.

obopry.com, (352) 821-1201

Movie Music Spectacular MARCH 24 Reilly Arts Center, Ocala

Beloved films will come to life in this show. The Ocala Symphony Orchestra will perform the scores to wellknown feature films while visuals play behind them. It’s a multimedia experience not to miss and one returning audience members always look forward to.

reillyartscenter.com, (352) 351-1606

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JOT IT DOWN Journaling is a way to get organized, explore emotions and capture memories. Read on to find out more. By Cynthia McFarland

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When I was 13, my brother confiscated my diary. I didn’t realize he’d done such a dastardly deed until he appeared in the doorway of my room, holding that cherished secret book in his hands and proceeded to read out loud from the page on which I’d poured out my heart, in the most flowery language possible, about my latest crush. I was mortified. And furious. After I managed to recover the diary—at that stage I could still out-wrestle him—I found a better hiding place for my little book. As years passed, writing in a diary segued into keeping a journal. For me, baring my soul on a blank page came easily—that’s what writers do, after all. But most people who keep a journal don’t make a living writing. Participants in a University of Iowa study found that when they journaled about stressful events, focusing on their thoughts and emotions combined (rather than just feelings), it helped them to better deal with the experience. Other benefits of journaling include:

Clarifies your thoughts Opens your mind to creativity Helps with organization and productivity Provides a way to remember experiences/ events/emotions ⊲ Serves as a source of inspiration ⊲ Can make goals/dreams more focused ⊲ May help solve problems ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲

Although the word “journal” tends to make one think of an actual book with blank pages, you can also keep a digital journal using your computer or device, if that’s more your style. To go the book route, you can buy a hardcover or paperback blank book at an office supply or home goods store, or purchase one online. A spiral-bound notebook may also work for you. If the current trend of journaling has intrigued you, let this serve as a general guide on the various ways you can put your inner world onto paper (or screen). A journal can be about anything you wish—that’s the beauty of it. If you’re searching for more specific direction, here are some of the more popular types of journals. Whether you write on a daily basis or not, be sure to date each entry. Simply find a style that works for you and get started.

DIARY STYLE Features the highlights and accomplishments of your day or week, depending on how

often you write. Write in any style you like, full sentences or not, as much or as little as you like.

DREAM JOURNAL Record your dreams as closely as you can remember, preferably right after you wake up. In some cases, therapists have used a patient’s dream journal to help diagnose serious health and/or relationship problems. You may choose to write down your dreams more for entertainment value than to delve into your psyche, but the more detail you include, the better.

GRATITUDE JOURNAL You get more of what you focus on, so why not focus on being grateful? One idea is to write down three (or whatever number you choose) things you’re grateful for that day. A gratitude journal is also a great way for kids to get into the habit of journaling.

FRE�STYLE JOURNAL You’ve no doubt heard of stream-ofconsciousness writing, in which you simply write whatever comes to mind for a set period of time or certain number of pages. People who keep this type of journal say the practice helps them express themselves better and frees their mind to be more productive and creative. You may choose to set a timer and write for 15 minutes or write a page (or two or three...). Don’t analyze or weigh your thoughts. Just write. When you read through your entries later, you may find intriguing patterns and surprising clarity. Or you may just be amused at where your mind wandered.

INSPIRATION JOURNAL It’s your journal, so feel free to note whatever brings you inspiration—uplifting quotes; lines from a song, book or movie; or something

profound a friend shares with you. If it made you smile or just stop and think, it’s worth jotting down.

MEMORY JOURNAL The idea behind this style of journaling is to create a keepsake that can be passed on to your family in the future. Record stories and experiences to keep them from being lost to history, keeping in mind that if these pages will one day be read by your children or grandchildren, some juicy details might not be appropriate. You may choose to let multiple family members contribute to the pages, making it a true story of your family.

TRAVEL JOURNAL As the name implies, this journal is dedicated to your travel adventures. You might think you’ll never forget the feeling of whitewater rafting on West Virginia’s famed New River, but details tend to fade as the years pass. A travel journal helps you revisit special places and moments. Along with recording your emotions and personal thoughts, inserting photos, mementos, ticket stubs, etc. will add depth and greater detail.

SKETCH ART JOURNAL Imagine having all the sketches, doodles and scribbles you’ve created over the years in one JAN ’18 ›

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place. Whether you doodle to relax your mind or sketch to release your inner artist, this type of journal becomes a visual record of your creative side.

RECIPE KITCHEN JOURNAL If food is a passion, why not start a recipe journal? A recipe journal is a place to dream, ponder and gather ideas. Keep track of favorite dishes, what you made for special events, recipes and even techniques you’d like to try. You can allow other family members to contribute if you like, adding their favorite recipes and cooking memories.

RELATIONSHIP JOURNAL This type of journal can become a useful communication tool between partners, as well as a place to record special moments and memories. You and your partner agree to use the journal to share thoughts and feelings, leaving the journal for the other to read and then add his or her entry to continue the “conversation.” This practice can be helpful for topics that need to be addressed but are tough to talk about without stirring up emotions. If you’re in therapy or counseling, such a journal may be helpful with that process. And if you have no “issues” you’re dealing with, both parties can simply use a relationship journal as a way of remembering the things that make your partnership uniquely wonderful.

PLAN�ING JOURNAL Researchers say that writing down goals makes it more likely you will achieve them. A planning journal gives you space to dream as big as you like because these pages are for you alone. Whether you’re planning a major business goal, toying with the idea of adopting a child, coming to terms with some weighty relationship issues or considering any type of change, putting it on paper gives you a place

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Photo by Susan Spransy

to work through your plans and hopes, and come up with ways to make them reality.

BUL�ET JOURNAL Photo by Kristy Taylor Speaking of planning, a bullet journal is the ultimate way of tracking goals, events and things to be done, utilizing straight-forward bulletpoint formatting. Ryder Carroll, a digital product designer, in Brooklyn, New York, founded the concept of bullet journaling, which has become a trendy way to curate and track your thoughts, to-dos, routines, wishes and more. Think of it as a diary, planner and to-do list all in one, your own personalized “command center.”

START YOUR OWN BUL�ET JOURNAL If you’re a list-maker or a planner, bullet journaling will probably come naturally once you learn the format. You’ll use four basic “modules” when setting up your blank book:

Index:

Basically, it’s a table of contents you can update along the way. These are the blank pages at the beginning of your journal where you add topics and page numbers.

Future Log:

Note things that don’t require immediate attention but should take place over the next few months. Events and long-term goals also go here. (OK, so it’s really a calendar.)

Monthly Log:

Include tasks you want to complete during the current month, plus anything from last month you didn’t get done.

Daily Log:

Jot down your to-dos for the day, plus any observations. You’ll use “Rapid Logging” to help you accomplish all these tasks and goals. This is simply taking short notes, which you mark with symbols so you can organize and keep track of them. You can use the recommended symbols on Carroll’s website (bulletjournal.com) or come up with your own. If you’ve seen any of the amazingly fanciful works of art that are bullet journals on Pinterest or Instagram, you may be thinking bullet journalism requires an art degree. Not so. Users swear the initial setup takes less than an hour. You don’t have to include artistic layouts in full color—unless you want to. For more details, including helpful videos, visit: http://bulletjournal.com/get-started. To get inspired by customized templates and watch helpful tutorials, just check out Pinterest (but, hey, we’re not responsible for how much time you spend there!).


the

FACES of IHMC BY JIM GIBSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN JERNIGAN

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T

he Institute for Human and Machine Cognition in downtown Ocala may look nondescript from the outside, but what’s inside is anything but ordinary. Inside, a group of scientific researchers assembled from around the world collaborate on projects ranging from predicting cyber attacks to helping patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) communicate with the world around them. The complicated nature of their research requires exceptional minds from almost every scientific field. Here, in Ocala, they have come together under one roof to help solve some of the most pressing problems facing mankind today. These gifted scientists and researchers walk amongst you every day. The next time you’re sitting down to lunch at your favorite restaurant, the man or woman sitting across from you could just be one of the brilliant minds from IHMC. Here are Ocala’s faces of the future.

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and, many times, foregoes driving a vehicle, biking instead to work from her home. “I used to be a marathoner, but I have switched to running track,” she says. “I joined a track team, and it’s awesome.” Bonnie also loves to scuba dive and frequently visits the island of Bonaire off the coast of Venezuela to explore the coral reefs that surround the island. “I love Bonaire. Everything there has to do with conservation, and the marine life is amazing,” she says. “We visit at least once a year.”

Yorick Wilks

SENIOR RESEARCH SCIENTIST

Bonnie Dorr

Bonnie Dorr

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SENIOR RESEARCH SCIENTIST “Ken Ford brought me here to IHMC in 2014 and asked me to put together a research team,” says IHMC Associate Director Bonnie Dorr. “The research we perform here always has the human at the center; it is called human-centered computing, and it’s an effort to enhance mankind’s abilities through the collaborative efforts of machines and humans. We presently have 10 different projects the team is working on, and they are primarily funded through government contracts.” Bonnie heads a 10-person team of scientists and researchers and leads the ELLIPSE project. “Ocala was the perfect place for us because it is a centralized location that allows us to liaise with all the universities in the state,” she says. “We collaborate with several university studies, and that makes this an ideal site for us.” Bonnie received her bachelor’s degree from Boston University and her masters and Ph.D. in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She co-founded the Computational Linguistics and Information Processing Laboratory at the University of

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Maryland and was a program manager at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), overseeing research in human language technology. An avid runner and cyclist, Bonnie competes in track meets whenever possible

Yorick was born in North London in 1939 to a working-class family. “In those days, there were scholarships to good grammar schools that let children attend for free,” he says. “I attended a very good grammar school and then received a scholarship to attend Cambridge University. This opportunity changed my life and basically allowed me to escape my upbringing.” While at Cambridge, Yorick studied math and philosophy, earning his Ph.D. in philosophy. While there, he became close friends with British linguist and philosopher Yorick Wilks


amateur acting groups here—I just might take on the right part if it came along.”

Giacomo Benincasa RESEARCH ASSOCIATE

Giacomo Benincasa

Margaret Masterman and joined her Cambridge Language Research Unit, a group created to study machine translation and computational linguistics. While working on his philosophy and computing doctorate thesis, Yorick left Cambridge and went to Los Angeles where he performed research funded by a one-year Air Force research grant. “When the grant money ran out, I was still working on my thesis and needed money to pay the bills. I became a professional actor and supported myself by acting on television

shows,” he says. “I did two seasons of Playboy After Dark shows and got to meet some rather big Hollywood stars. I became friends with the late Hugh Hefner, and I found him to be very insightful and intelligent. I was a young fellow in my 20s, and I found it all to be rather exciting.” When not at IHMC, Yorick enjoys visiting some of downtown Ocala’s finest dining establishments. “I like visiting the Ocala Wine Experience, Mark’s Prime Steakhouse or La Cuisine and talking with friends,” he says. “I also like the

Giacomo attended the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy, where he received his BS and MS in computer engineering. He was an exchange student at The University of Sheffield in England in the computer science department. “I work on the DisService project. Its primary use is military, but it can be used anywhere,” he says. “It involves mesh networking. We use existing infrastructure such as cell towers and devices such as cell phones or radios to expand communications. Mesh networks allow different types of devices to piggyback signals like nodes in a network, with each device spreading the radio signal further than the one before it. It allows for local or regional network communication when the primary communication systems are inoperable, such as in a natural disaster or certain military situations. There are mesh networks out there now that are available to the public, such as goTenna. These networks are independent of ISPs, which allow for decentralized communications.” Giacomo also works on the SocialSim project, which is led by Kristy Hollingshead. “The SocialSim project allows us to perform social media behavior analysis based on online communications. We study how information spreads online,” he says. “The programs we create look for specific words, phrases or combination of words or phrases that can alert us to an impending cyber-attack.” Giacomo has worked at IHMC for eight years. “I love to play table tennis,” he says. “I belong to a club and play in tournaments. I also like to read or visit restaurants such as La Cuisine or Amrit Palace.” JAN ’18 ›

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“I run quite a bit, l love to walk and I swim at the YMCA. Another great thing about Ocala is that it is right in the middle of the state, so you can drive either way to find the closest beach,” she says with a smile. “I love driving, and I love the ocean. I have explored the eastern coast of the state from north of Jacksonville all the way to Miami.”

Micah Clark RESEARCH SCIENTIST

Archna Bhatia

Archna Bhatia RESEARCH ASSOCIATE

Archna performed her undergraduate studies in math at the University of Delhi and received her Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the lead researcher on the DESIPHER project, working alongside collaborators Kristy Hollingshead and Bonnie Dorr. “We are working in conjunction with the Tampa Veterans Administration Hospital to assist their patients suffering from ALS,” she says. “We are creating computer programs that can ‘listen’ to the voice of a person suffering from ALS and tell us two things: It can tell us exactly what they are saying, and it can tell us what level of progression the disease has reached. As this neuromuscular disease progresses, the person’s speech becomes slurred and less and less coherent. The patient’s mind is healthy, but their body is sick, and this can be very frustrating for them. It becomes very hard for us humans to understand them, but the computer’s speech recognition system we are designing will understand them and pass along their communication to us. Also, some of the tests the medical community uses to determine the stage of the disease are invasive and uncomfortable. If we can simply use speech

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to make this determination, then it will be much more comfortable for the patients. I find it very satisfying that we can help others in this way.” Archna loves Ocala.

Micah works with the Office of Naval Research in Washington, D.C. He has worked with the Navy since 2015. He received his undergraduate degree in computer science and philosophy and his Ph.D. in cognitive science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. “I am a program officer who oversees a portfolio of investments in basic and applied research, primarily focused on artificial intelligence and cognitive systems for human-machine teaming,” he says. “I read and review scientific proposals in this field and determine which ideas are viable enough to receive funding. At any given time, I may fund between 40 and 60 different projects. My job is to make an educated decision on which

Micah Clark with daughter, Abigail, and wife, Janelle


Adam Dalton RESEARCH ASSOCIATE

problems are worth solving and which people and techniques I think can really make the best progress in solving them.” Micah says that team interaction between humans and machines can be much more complicated than what it may first seem. “Humans can learn on-the-fly from instruction and from watching others,” he says. “Presently, that is a very hard thing for a machine to do, but the present scientific goal is to create robot and machine teammates who can use skill acquisition and rapid learning

Adam has been with IHMC for five years. In conjunction with his work in the fields of natural language processing and cyber security, he attends the University of Florida where he is pursuing his Ph.D. in computer science. Adam received his bachelor’s degree in computer science from McGill University in Canada and his master’s in modeling and simulation from UCF. Before coming to IHMC, Adam was employed by NASA where he worked at the Kennedy Space Center in human resources developing modeling and simulation to aid in the transition of the workforce when the shuttle and space station programs were being phased out and the program’s focus was being shifted to deep space exploration. He then assisted in the design and development of the command and control aspects of NASA’s next generation Launch Control System. He then moved into his present position at IHMC. “One of the projects I collaborate on is the ELLIPSE project, which deals with cyber security issues,” Adam says. “Our goal is to create programs that will detect certain online ‘signals’ that may indicate an upcoming cyberattack, which would then enable the target of the attack to take Adam Dalton with wife, Larissa, and sons Sam, Ted and Alex steps to prevent it.” Adam and his wife, Larissa, live through naturalistic interaction to do this a busy life with their three sons, Sam, 5, Ted, 3, very thing.” and Alex, 1. Micah, his wife, Janelle, and their 1-year-old “Between my job here at IHMC, working on daughter, Abigail, enjoy the community aspect my Ph.D. and having three kids at home, I don’t of Ocala. have a lot of time for hobbies, but I do enjoy “We are active in the Ocala Christian watching my children play sports, and I work Church and love family time,” he says. “We love out at CrossFit Iron Legion to help me stay in Ocala. It’s big enough that you’re not isolated shape,” he says. “I also love to travel with my or missing anything but small enough that you wife and children. We have a lot of friends and can really know the town. It’s such a beautiful family across the United States, and we love place with plenty of green space, and it’s so to visit them and experience all the different quiet and peaceful. It’s a wonderful place towns and cities.” to live.” JAN ’18 ›

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to a computer ‘Build a tall tower,’ through our work, the computer will understand just how tall tall really should be.” Jena received her B.A. in computer science and B.S. in biochemistry from Calvin College in Grand Rapids, MI, and her master’s and Ph.D. in linguistics and cognitive science at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Ian Perera RESEARCH SCIENTIST

Jena Hwang with son, Paul

Jena Hwang RESEARCH ASSOCIATE

Jena and her husband, Ryan Kooger, enjoy spending time with their two children, Paul, 2, and Liam, 1 month. She also loves cooking, riding her bike, walking… and crocheting. “In college, a friend of mine was working on a granny-square blanket. I watched her and thought it was fascinating. Instead of asking her to show me how to do it, I simply imitated her. I picked up a crochet needle and taught myself how to crochet. I made a few scarves, but that just didn’t interest me, so I began to crochet small toys and unique patterns for friends as gifts. I’ve been doing it ever since. I make up most of my own patterns, and I really enjoy it. I’ve even thought about selling them as a business, but that would take a lot of energy, and I haven’t quite gotten there yet,” she says with a laugh. Jena collaborates on the ELLIPSE and Communicating with Computers (CwC) projects. “The CwC project has many facets, and my work is on the language side where I work with the most basic aspects of language,” she says. “This work will enable a machine to grasp the nuanced meaning of human language. My job provides the nuts and bolts

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that supports other programs in the project. All the information we gather, collate and develop on the language meaning will be used in ‘higher-level’ programs to enable a machine to understand human language and respond appropriately. For instance, if we say

Ian loves to play video games, play the piano (anything from jazz to Chopin) and loves to paint abstract art. “My job here at IHMC revolves around language and comprehension through language. What I love about music and art is that it doesn’t have to involve language at all,” he says. “I can express myself in both with just emotion and feeling. When painting, my goal is to defy interpretation by description. I want the person looking at my painting to experience it and not limit it with words.” Ian obtained his BSE in digital media design from the University of Pennsylvania and his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Rochester. Ian Perera


Ursula Schwuttke

“While attending the University of Pennsylvania, I was selected for a summer research program at Johns Hopkins where undergraduate students were paired with graduate students and professors on different projects,” he says. “I realized then that research was something I was very interested in, and it was a much better fit for my talents than just programming video games.” Ian has worked at IHMC for four years. “I collaborate on a project called Communicating with Computers. Our goal is to have computers fully understand how we humans communicate with one another, thereby enabling us to communicate with them on that same level,” he says. “This communication with the machines will enable

us to take our creative human ideas and combine them with the computer’s ability to process large amounts of data to collaborate and solve whatever problem we are attempting to solve. What is our goal, what is the system’s goal and how can we simultaneously use both of our strengths to attain those goals?”

Ursula Schwuttke

DIRECTOR OF EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH “I love the outdoors,” she says. “I like wildlife photography, traveling, canoeing. My husband, Dave, and I canoe all over the state and also when we travel. We also have a sailboat. Our longest sailing adventure to date is a

one-month trip to Belize from Ft. Lauderdale.” Ursula graduated magna cum laude from Brown University earning a degree in electrical engineering with an emphasis on semiconductor technology, and she obtained her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California. “At IHMC, I am the director of educational outreach,” she says. “We have created community outreach programs designed to give children an enthusiasm for learning and exploration in science and robotics. These programs are possible because of generous sponsors like Cox Communications, Lockheed Martin and Ron and Phyllis Ewers. “Science Saturdays is a free program that meets on one Saturday each month during the school year from 9 to 10:30am and from 11am to 12:30pm. It is for students in grades three through five (but in December, we will start including some sixth-graders). We have a different presenter each month, and it’s a hands-on program that makes learning fun. “We also offer Robotics Summer Camp at introductory and intermediate levels. These four-day camps are for students in grades seven through nine, and it introduces children to the world of robotics. Students work in teams using LEGO Mindstorms robots to overcome increasingly difficult challenges. This day camp lasts from 8:30am until 3:30pm and costs $150 per child. Costs are covered by local sponsors for low-income students. “Any child interested in attending either program can call IHMC at (352) 387-3050 for more information or register online at IHMC.us.” Ursula worked previously at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California and is a successful entrepreneur and businesswoman. She was awarded the Exceptional Achievement Medal by NASA for contributions to the space program. JAN ’18 ›

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Kristy Hollingshead Seitz RESEARCH SCIENTIST

“Many of my colleagues here identify as scientists, and some have identified that way

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course. I did—and I loved it! I love puzzles, and programming is much like solving a puzzle.” Kristy became a technical writer for IBM and while there discovered a job opening for a speech-to-speech translation programmer. She wanted the job, but it required additional education. She returned to school and earned her Ph.D. in computer science from Oregon Health and Science University. Following this, she worked for the Department of Defense prior to coming to IHMC. Kristy is involved in several IHMC projects, including ELLIPSE and DESIPHER. “DESIPHER is the project that brought me to IHMC,” she says. “With DESIPHER, we have a twopronged approach to our research: Can we tell quantitatively the difference in the voice of a person with ALS and the voice of a person who doesn’t have the disease, and can we use that knowledge to adapt a speech recognition system such as Siri or Alexa so it can fully understand the speech of a person who has the disease as the disease Kristy Hollingshead Seitz progresses?” Kristy is a member of the Ocala since they were children. I do not identify Runners Club, and she competes in triathlons. that way—I am a bookworm. Language is She has run five marathons and enjoys my love and my passion,” Kristy says. “My running the sidewalks of Ocala. undergraduate field of study at the University of Colorado Boulder was creative writing with a minor in programming. My father is an engineer, and my mother is a programmer and a meteorologist; they told me that it was fine with them if I wanted to be an author, but that I must take at least one computer science


OCALA FAMILY MEDICAL CENTER 2230 SW 19th Ave Rd Ocala, FL 34471

Monday - Friday 7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

352-237-4133 Best General Practice Doctor’s! Best Local Healthcare Provider!

Carlos Rodriguez, MD

Robert Panzer, DO

Brian Pecoraro, DO

Adam Alpers, DO

Todd Panzer, ARNP-C

Mark Monical, DO

Anne Moyer, PA-C

Mimi Balch, MD

Robert Williams, MD

Allen Winston, DO

Salesia Alvarado, MD

Carly Carrion Olmeda, MD

Stacey Graham, ARNP-C Linda Bellows, ARNP-C Laurel Bryant, ARNP-C Karen Larsen, ARNP-C

Tyler Lindsey, PA-C

Brittani Lucin, ARNP-C

James London, MD

Corey West, ARNP-C

Amber Starling, ARNP-C Melissa Formella, ARNP-C

Family Practice Internal Medicine Cardiology Endocrinology Preventive Medicine Geriatrics Auto Accidents Full Service Lab Digital X-Ray Ultrasound 64 Slice CT 1.5 Open Bore MRI Stress Testing

www.ocalafmc.com OFMC Wellness Center • • • • Eduardo Cruz, MD

2131 SW 20th Place Ocala, FL 34471

Physiatry/Physical Medicine Interventional Spine Sports Medicine Regenerative Therapy PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) (outside referrals accepted)

• Physical Therapy • Balance & Gait Training • Vertigo & Incontinence (outside referrals accepted)

Nick Machupa, PT, OCS Deborah Main, DPT

Joseph Javier, DPT Claudia Guevara, PTA

OFMC Dermatology, Aesthetics & Women’s Health Center 2121 SW 22nd Place Ocala, FL 34471

• Dermatology • Mohs’ Skin Cancer Surgery (outside referrals accepted)

Kenneth A. Wallace, MD

• • • •

Facials & IPL Laser Botox & Fillers Recovery Treatments Pharmaceutical Grade Skin Care Products

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• Family Practice • Women’s Health

Collette Mercier, MD

• • • •

Women’s Health Well Woman Exams Pap Smears IUD Insertion & Removal

Evette Hearn, ARNP

*Ocala Family Medical Center, Inc. complies with applicable Federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.*


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2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU 115 NE 8th Ave 16910 S. Hwy 441, Ste. 204 Ocala, FL 352-351-0011 Summerfield, FL 352-245-3388

marybethelliott1@gmail.com

Breathtaking! This stunning SE home offers 4 spacious bdrms, 3.5 baths, and grand formal & informal spaces. Gourmet kitchen opens to 2nd fam rm. Large screened porch w/views of colorful landscaping & gardens. Redone & updated with custom touches throughout. Truly a must see! $1,195,000. ML#517879

Country Club of Ocala

El Dorado

4/3 pool home along 3rd fairway. Formal living & dining, kitchen & breakfast rm. Family rm leads to covered lanai and screen enclosed pool. Features include split bdrm plan, cathedral ceilings, skylights & pretty golf course views. $539,000. ML#528231

Situated on 1.29 acres, this 3 bdrm/2 bath/2 half bath pool home features formal living & dining, upgraded kitchen, spacious family rm & private den w/custom touches including beautiful transom windows, high ceilings & crown molding. $449,000. ML#520291

“Heart” of SE Ocala

Lovely Historic Home

Country Club of Ocala

Charming Mini Farm of 5 Acres

Gorgeous 3 bdrm, 3.5 bath w/office. Soaring vaulted ceilings w/extensive fixed glass windows, exquisite formal/informal living areas, finished full basement, 3 car garage, 1 bed/1 bath apt. & breathtaking pool/outdoor living area. $625,000. ML#517439

Generous sun-filled formal & informal spaces. 4 bdrms, 3 baths, 2 half baths. Gourmet kitchen. Well-manicured property faces 3 streets w/ front and back gates. Beautiful pool + pergola surrounded by high vine-covered walls. $929,000. ML#517676

Extraordinary 4/4 offers formal living & dining, spacious kitchen & 2 downstairs guest rms. 2nd level has club rm w/media area & wet bar. Master wing incl. study. Exceptional outdoor living w/pool, outdoor kitchen & cabana w/fpl. $1,600,000. ML#528061

Beautiful 4/3 home w/cozy front porch & large screened lanai. Home also features 1/1 guest apt w/kitchenette & living space, attached to home by 4 car garage & workshop. Close to FL Horse Park & Greenway Trails. Home is in impeccable condition. $549,900. ML#523047

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Source: foodnetwork.com

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› Purge your house of all sodas, fruit drinks and sweet teas. › Condiments like barbecue sauce or salad dressings with high fructose corn syrup have got to go. › Replace items like cookies and granola bars with healthier alternatives. › Fermented food and drinks reduce cravings for sugar. Yogurt, anyone? › Rather than snacking on chocolate, munch on naturally sweet fruit to cure cravings. And if you can’t stop chocolate cold-turkey, switch to dark chocolate— less sugar and less calories.

FONDUE IT GOT MILK? DINING GUIDE QUICK BITES

OU R B E ST R E C I PE S , R E STAU R ANT N E WS AN D CU LI NARY QU I C K B ITE S

The main ingredient for Grandma’s famous cookies, and your husband’s favorite term of endearment— “sugar” has won over the hearts of many. Food containing high doses of simple sugars, however, can cause sudden increases in blood pressure and insulin, not to mention have a negative impact on body fat. Here are some ways to cut sugar from your diet and stop those cravings in their track:

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The Big Dipper

Often mistaken for Jay Gatsby’s party consultants, we at Ocala Style know how to throw an epic party. This winter season, fondue parties are all the rage, and we are here to guide the way. › By Laurel Gillum Hosting a fondue party is simple. Just follow our lead, and let the melted Gruyère or Asiago do the talking. Typically, there are three main types of fondue: melted cheese for starters, an Asian hot-pot where meat is cooked in either oil or broth for the main course and melted chocolate for dessert. From our party to yours, here are a few of our favorite fondue recipes.

Meat n’ Chili Vinegar Fondue Cheddar n’ Beer Fondue

1 pound shredded sharp cheddar cheese 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 3⁄4 cup lager beer 1 tablespoon minced garlic 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce 11⁄2 teaspoons mustard powder Mix cheddar cheese and flour together in a bowl. › Bring beer to a light boil in a fondue pot; add garlic, Worcestershire sauce and mustard powder, and stir. › Gradually stir cheese mixture into beer mixture. › Reduce heat to low; cook and stir mixture until cheese is melted, about 5 minutes.

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CHILI VINEGAR SAUCE: 3 tablespoons white wine vinegar 2 teaspoons sugar 1 garlic clove, grated 1 medium red chili, finely chopped Mix white wine vinegar, sugar, garlic and red chili together in a small bowl. › Set aside until desired. › The vegetable oil for meat fondue should reach 375°F. › For beef cut into 1-inch cubes, it should take 25-30 seconds for rare, 30-35 seconds for medium and 45-60 seconds for well-done meat. › When meat is fully cooked, dip into the chili vinegar sauce and enjoy.

Chocolate n’ Almonds Fondue

11⁄4 cups half-and-half 1 teaspoon almond extract 24 ounces semisweet chocolate chips 1⁄2 cup amaretto In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine half-and-half and almond extract. › Heat until bubbles begin to form at edge of cream. Do not boil. › Reduce heat to low, and stir in chocolate chips, stirring constantly. › Once all the chocolate is melted and incorporated, slowly stir in amaretto until combined. › Pour chocolate mixture into fondue pot, and serve with goodies for dipping.


Sources: thespruce.com, sheknows.com, allrecipes.com, winemag.com

Cheeeeese. Who doesn’t love cheese, right? For your cheesy fondues, try cubed bread or raw veggies like carrots and broccoli. By the way, stale or harder bread is traditionally easier, but soft bread is tasty, too. Cubed steaks and other meat are also yummy smothered in cheese.

Fondue Fun

Most of this party can be prepped before your guests even arrive. Cube the cheese and chocolate for your sauces ahead of time, and slice the meat, bread, fruit and other dipping foods to save time.

Where’s the meat? If you’re cooking meat at your party, thin strips or small cubes of beef, chicken, pork or shrimp are best for dipping. Once cooked, serve with dipping sauces. Horseradish cream, béarnaise and aioli are traditional sauces.

Shindig Set Up

Most fondue pots accommodate six skewers. Depending on how many guests you have, you may need a few pots. Use a different pot for each type of fondue you are cooking. Chocolate drizzle and melted cheese is bound to drip en route from pot to plate. Be prepared and cover your table with a cloth and provide plenty of napkins. Set the ambiance with a lit fireplace or candles. If you’re feeling especially festive, you can play Swiss music in honor of the birthplace for this dish. Where there is food, there should be drinks. Fondue is often paired with wine or beer. For little dippers under 21 (or party guests who are non-drinkers), apple cider is the drink of choice, especially with many of the cheese varieties. Here’s a couple of refreshing wine suggestions to put out for guests to sample with their plates. • With cheese: A Riesling or Chenin Blanc perfectly pairs with cheese rich in flavor. • With oil: Sip on a Spanish Cava or an Italian Prosecco. • With chocolate: Brachetto d’Acqui, a sweet sparkling red wine from Piedmont, Italy, is our favorite dessert wine.

Fondue Fiascos

The grand finale. For chocolate fondue, try dipping cubes of cake and marshmallows in the fondue to cure your sweet tooth. Strawberries, bananas and apples are other yummy alternatives.

Try out this “fondue punishment” as a game during the night. Every time the food someone is dipping drops into the pot, they must do something. Decide what you want this “something” to be ahead of time. For example, if your strawberry gets lost in the chocolate fondue, you must sing a song, answer any question or do a dare—just have fun with it.

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Navigating The Milky Way

Cow’s Milk

PRO: According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, “two cups of cow’s milk per day for young children (2-5) is sufficient to maintain adequate vitamin D levels and also maintain sufficient iron stores.” 058

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PROTEIN: Builds and repairs muscle tissue POTASSIUM: Helps maintain a healthy blood pressure PHOSPHORUS: Helps strengthen bones and restore energy VITAMIN D: Helps maintain heathy bone structure VITAMIN B12: Maintains the health of nerve cells VITAMIN A: Plays a vital role in bone growth, reproduction and immune system health RIBOFLAVIN: Helps the body break down carbohydrates, proteins and fats to produce energy NIACIN: Metabolizes sugars and fatty acids Children up to 12 years of age are recommended by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans to drink whole milk in sufficient amounts for the health of their bones and teeth.

Calcium and vitamin D really do do a body good.

Almond Milk

CON: Many people lack the enzyme to digest lactose. This is called lactose intolerance, which causes symptoms such as bloating, gas and diarrhea. Others worry about the saturated fat content of whole milk. Low-fat or skim milk contains less of this saturated fat. Then there’s the concern that cow’s milk might potentially contain antibiotics and hormones. Do your research, and if you do go with cow’s milk, purchase organic if possible.

CON: Although almonds are rich in nutrients, almond milk does not offer as much protein and calcium as cow’s milk or some other milk substitutes. You can, however, find some brands with added calcium.

Soy Milk

PRO: Soy milk is absent of cholesterol, saturated and trans fats. The FDA suggests that consuming soy milk may lower your risk for heart disease by supporting healthy lipid levels. CON: Some studies have indicated that a diet rich in soy lowers the sperm concentration in males.

PRO: Almonds are rich in nutrients such as protein, fiber, vitamin E, magnesium, zinc, potassium, iron, phosphorus, tryptophan and calcium.

Rice Milk

PRO: Rice milk is the most hypoallergenic of all milk products. People who are lactose intolerant cannot drink dairy milk, whereas people who are allergic to soy or nuts cannot drink soy or almond milk. Rice milk may be the way to go. CON: One cup of rice milk contains up to 33 grams of carbohydrates— three to four times the amount in dairy or soy milk. If you have diabetes, rice milk is not the most viable option.

,

› By Laurel Gillum

CALCIUM: Builds healthy bones and teeth

Sources: thespruce.com, independent.co.uk, fda.gov, health.gov, aap.org

We all know that milk is good for your bones. Beyond this fun fact, however, the specifics are a little sketchy. What about the other pros (and cons, for that matter) that come with drinking milk? Does it matter what kind of milk we are drinking? Read on.


› DINING GUIDE

Book your party at Tony’s today. Gift cards available.

Tony’s Sushi & Steakhouse 3405 SW College Road, Ocala › (352) 237-3151 › tonysushi.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p › Fri & Sat 11a-11p › Sun Noon-10p With abundant menu choices and over 100 off-menu rolls, you certainly won’t run out of options at Tony’s Sushi. If you can’t decide, the waitstaff is excellent at suggesting items you’re sure to enjoy. Every roll and sushi dish is made to order from the freshest ingredients. In the steakhouse area, highly trained chefs prepare a memorable meal as they cook on the tableside grills, preparing chicken, steak or seafood just the way you like it. Entrées include soup or salad and rice. Tony’s Sushi has a family-friendly, casual atmosphere, along with a full bar, including imported Japanese sake and beer selections.

Live Jazz, Friday 6-9p

Braised Onion 754 NE 25th Ave, Ocala › (352) 620-9255 Tue-Thu 11:30a-9p › Fri-Sat 11:30a-10p › Sun 11:30a-8p braisedonion.com

@braisedonionrestaurant

VIP room and patio available for private events. Kids eat free on Mondays. @latinosymasrestaurant @latinosymasrestaurant

Braised Onion Restaurant, where you’ll experience “Comfort Food with Attitude” in a fun, warm and colorful but casual atmosphere, is open for lunch and dinner. Our team of experts will be dishing out perfectly seasoned prime rib with creamy horseradish sauce on Friday and Saturday evenings. And don’t forget the dessert menu, which includes the prize-winning bread pudding and coconut cream pie. Don’t forget to make your reservations today for Valentine’s Day.

Latinos Y Mas 2030 S. Pine Avenue, Ocala › (352) 622-4777 › latinosymas.com Mon-Thu 11a-9p › Fri-Sat 11a-10p › Closed Sun Whether your event will be at our location or yours, Latinos Y Mas is the place to turn to for catered holiday events or parties. Our friendly staff is more than happy to help plan an extraordinary dining experience. You can choose from an assortment of authentic Spanish cuisine platters or order from the takeout menu. Try one of our delicious new entrées: Latinos Passion Chicken, Roast Beet Salad, Spinach Salad, Chicken Kale Wrap, Latino Plate, Pargo Rojo Frito (Red Snapper). You won’t be disappointed!

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Quick Bites

Local and regional restaurant picks you have to try. › By Nick Steele

Ice Cream For Everyone Outstanding Oils

Roasting Rewards Ken and Wendy Kebrdle started Dignity Roasters with a simple mission. “Our intent is to employ people [who] are considered unemployable,” Ken explains. “A lot of the folks working for us are either living in tents or their cars. We help them get out of those circumstances.” The Kebrdles conceived of a way for those individuals to reclaim some of their dignity through the sale of a universally loved beverage rather than through a handout. “We purchased a roaster and did a lot of testing before we got it right,” Ken recalls. “Then we trained our people. Now we’re roasting coffee beans, bagging and shipping them out.” he continues. “Our folks are paid the equivalent of $10 an hour. They do not get a paycheck. The money helps pay their rent, fines or car insurance—whatever their immediate needs are. We pay the landlord or whomever directly. We also provide a job reference, which enables them to get work elsewhere.” The coffee is roasted and packaged here in Ocala, using beans sourced from Brazil. “They are single origin.” Ken explains. “It’s fairtrade on their end and ours.” Both their ground coffee and whole beans are available through their website, retail location and Florida Local Exchange. “We also encourage people to subscribe,” Ken adds. “A weekly, biweekly or monthly subscription, to your home or business, allows you to receive a discount and helps create stability for those in need.”

Learn more › Dignity Roasters › dignityroasters.com › (352) 727-0239 060

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A den of deliciousness located within Market Street at Heath Brook, Simply Ice Cream has quickly established itself as a local favorite for handmade ice cream. Family owned and decidedly family friendly, they offer 24 distinct flavors in the form of scoops or shakes and feature weekly specials like half-off cones for kids on Wednesdays and a 10 percent discount for veterans on Thursdays. Visitors praise the wonderful customer service and cozy environment.

Learn more › Simply Ice Cream › 4414 SW College Rd., #420, Ocala › simplyicecreamocala.com › (352) 355-1085

A downtown destination for serious gourmets and home cooks alike, The Olive Oil Market has a tasting room where you can sample more than 50 varieties of extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar. They also have a vast assortment of fresh spices, herbs, rubs, seasonings, local honey, olives, jams, jellies and salsas, as well as gift baskets filled with gourmet treats. They recently added a selection of Himalayan salt lamps and olive-wood cutting boards and bowls. And check out their online olive oil and balsamic vinegar pairing guide, as well as some great recipes, ranging from Easy Bruschetta Penne with Roasted Asparagus to Blood Orange Extra Virgin Olive Oil Ice Cream.

Learn more › The Olive Oil Market › 16 S Magnolia Ave., Ocala › theoliveoilmarket.store › (352) 512-0177

A New Location

After developing a dedicated following at their successful Ocala outpost, this casual dining BBQ restaurant has staked out new territory in Citrus County. Locals are already obsessed with their dry rub beef brisket, pulled-pork tacos and fall-offthe-bone ribs. Diners also give high marks to their hoecakes and great sides.

Learn more › Hardwood Smokehouse › 508 North Citrus Ave., Crystal River › hardwoodsmokehouse.com › (352) 228-8840


› DINING GUIDE

Let Chefs of Napoli Cater your next event! We can accomodate small and large parties. FULL CATERING SERVICE Italian Toscani Style!

Award-winning menu available upstairs in the main dining room. Winner of 2017 Taste of Ocala “Best Taste” and “People’s Choice” as well as 2017 Taste of Class “Favorite Restaurant”. Buy $100 in gift cards and receive a $25 bonus card for yourself, while supplies last.

Trivia Night every Thursday, 7-9pm (Silver Springs Blvd. location) Mariachi band every Thursday at the 200 location, 6-9pm

THE BEST MEXICAN FOOD

Chefs of Napoli Ristorante Italiano 5400 SW College Rd. Hwy 200 (Heathbrook Commons Plaza), Ocala › (352) 857-8111 › Mon-Thu 11a-9p › Fri 11a-10p › Sat 12-10p › Sun 12-9p thechefsofnapoli.com Chefs of Napoli is proud to bring an authentic Italian dining experience to Ocala, featuring the restaurant’s fresh, delicious, made-to-order cuisine. From the walls to the ceilings, the atmosphere is designed to transport you to the sunny hills of Tuscany, where you can satisfy your taste buds with a Neapolitanstyle pizza pie or a chicken or veal entrée, such as the Pollo all Parmigiana or the Vitello all a Picatta. A vast selection of imported wines will complement your entrées perfectly. In the mood for seafood? Try the fresh seafood options at Chefs of Napoli, such as the Pescatore and Gamberi in Bianco. Come out and enjoy the ultimate Italian dining experience at Chefs of Napoli!

Eaton’s Beach Sandbar & Steam Shack 15790 SE 134th Avenue, Weirsdale (352) 259-2444 › eatonsbeach.com Mon-Sat 12-8p › Sunday 12-7p The Steam Shack at Eaton’s Beach is all about casual dining, a beachside atmosphere and fresh, delicious food. Sure, they have tasty sandwiches and appetizers, but the main focus is on the steamed shrimp, crab legs, crawfish and other seafood offerings. After spending a hot day on the beach or in the water at Lake Weir, guests can feel comfortable ordering in flip flops and a bathing suit. Or are you headed to Eaton’s Beach for an evening out with friends after work? Stop at the Steam Shack first for a drink and appetizer while waiting for your table.

El Toreo 3790 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala › (352) 694-1401 › 7 Days 11a-10p SR 200, Ocala › (352) 291-2121 › 7 Days 11a-11p New lunch specials include Taco Salad on Mondays, $5.45; Speedy Gonzalez on Tuesdays, $5.45; Quesadillas on Wednesdays, $7.95; Chimichangas on Thursdays, $6.95; and Burrito Supreme on Fridays, $5.25. New dinner options include Fajita Mondays, $10.95; Chimichanga Tuesdays, $8.95; Alambre Wednesdays, $9.95; and Tacos de Bistec Thursdays, $9.95. Plus $1.95 margaritas on Mondays. On Sunday, kids 12 and under can enjoy $1.95 children’s meals (takeout not included). Wednesday is Special Margarita Day, 99¢ all day. Saturday is 2-for-1 margaritas all day. Happy Hour daily, 3-7pm. Everything is 2-4-1 (exceptions may apply).

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Sky Fine Dining 3600 SW 38th Avenue, Ocala, FL 34474 › (352) 291-0000 ocalasky.com Mon- Thu 5-10p › Fri & Sat 5-11p

8-time Golden Spoon award winner Welcome all of our friends in the Horse Industry!

Sky Fine Dining restaurant located on the 6th floor of the Holiday Inn & Suites in Ocala. The eclectic gourmet cuisine & steak house concept is inspired from current trend & classic dishes like frest cut steaks, live Maine lobster, rack of lamb, fresh seafood, such as sea bass, lobster, salmon and shrimp. Sky Fine Dining is the place to be for a one-of-a-kind fine-dining experience. Our exquisite Panda Room (Private Dining Room) is able to accommodate up to 20 people for any personal or business event.

Crossroads Country Kitchen 7947 W Highway 40, Ocala › (352) 237-1250 Mon-Thur 6a-8:30p › Fri-Sat 6a-9p › Sun 7a-3p Located west on Highway 40 in Ocala, the Crossroads Country Kitchen is a must for anyone craving down-home, country cooking. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, menu items range from a wide variety of homemade soups and chili to prime rib, fresh salads, seafood, prime steaks and burgers. If you’re in the mood for a real treat, try the Prime Rib Dinner For Two for $26.95. Make sure to leave room for one of the tasty home-baked desserts! In the mood for a fresh fish fry? Tuesdays and Fridays are all-you-careto-eat catfish or whitefish. Enjoy an Italian special on Wednesdays. Big-screen televisions will allow you to enjoy your meal without missing one second of the big game or race.

Ivy on the Square 53 S Magnolia Ave, Ocala › (352) 622-5550 Sun & Tue 11a-2p › Wed & Thu 11a-8p › Fri & Sat 11a-8:30p › Closed Mon 106 NW Main St, Williston › (352) 528-5410 Sun-Wed 11a-2p › Thu-Sat 11a-8p › ivyhousefl.com New Location. Fresh Ambiance. More Great Food. We are excited to announce our new location on the downtown square! The Ivy House Restaurant will now be called “Ivy on the Square.” We have renovated a beautiful downtown location. Same great food with many new dishes, that are sure to become favorites. Come enjoy our new dessert bar, cocktail bar and our new posh boutique across from the restaurant. We still offer catering and invite parties to host events at our new location.

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Located at the Crossroads of NW 80th Ave. and Hwy 40 West. No matter what you have a taste for, Crossroads Country Kitchen is sure to become a new favorite. Former owners of “The Spiced Apple” restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale. We accept all major credit cards.

Opening in January 2018 We look forward to serving you in our new location!


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Flashback: Aaron Tippin performed at the Harvest Fest Music and Food Truck Festival at Tuscawilla Park on November 11.

Photo by Ralph Demilio

Q & A WITH MORGAN FREEMAN

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HONORING MLK

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Scene A Roundup Of The Month’s Best Bets › By Nick Steele

A Quick Q&A With

Morgan Freeman At 80 years old, Morgan Freeman is as active as he’s ever been. The versatile Oscar winner is currently starring in the buddy comedy Just Getting Started alongside such legendary talents as Tommy Lee Jones, Rene Russo and Ocala-native Elizabeth Ashley. He will also receive the SAG Life Achievement award during the Screen Actors Guild Awards, which will be simulcast on TNT and TBS on January 21 at 8pm.

What is Just Getting Started all about? It

takes place at a retirement resort. I play Duke Diver, this very outgoing, goodtime fellow that manages Villa Capri. They love him. He’s a ladies man. He has this attitude that the people who live there should live out the rest of their time having fun. So he does what he can to keep them energized. They send this beautiful woman down to take a look at the books and keep an eye on him, because he’s spending a lot of money on things they don’t understand. He feels like he might be in a little bit of jeopardy. But he thinks he can fix it—if he can seduce her. Along comes this

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soldier of fortune-type, and he has eyes for her, too. So the war is on, and then there’s this strange little development—I don’t want to give it away. It’s a nice little comedy. I had a great time. I think we all had a good time making this one.

You will be receiving the Screen Actors Guild’s highest honor in January. How does that make you feel, and what is it you love about movies? Anytime somebody

says ‘Well done,’ it is always the same feeling, thank you, I truly appreciate that. I grew up being a big, big fan of the movies from about the age of 6. The first movie I saw was King Kong. In this country, we’re probably among the luckiest because we have such an incredible entertainment industry. It keeps us sharp. It entertains. It instructs. It even enhances our spirituality.

A lot of people seem to dread getting older. What’s your attitude about aging? I don’t dread it! I will tell you that right now. The thing is to keep busy and just keep moving. Don’t sit down and say, ‘I’m too old for this; I’m too old for that.’ You’re only too old for it if you say you are.


Good Reads The Wisdom of Sundays By Oprah Winfrey

With

Keep It Local Belleview Chili Cook-Off January 6, 11am-3pm, Lake Lillian, (352) 245-2178

Bring a hearty appetite and check out what’s cookin’ at this fun event hosted by St. Theresa Catholic Church, featuring a panel of local judges, including former Marion County Chili Cook-Off winner Rick King. The $5 admission fee includes chili tasting and a chance to cast your vote for the “People’s Choice” winner.

Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemorative Commission hosts a series of free events from January 6 through 15 to celebrate the life and legacy of a man who changed the course of history through his determined fight for civil rights. Visit their Facebook page for more information.

MLK Youth Day, Howard Academy Community Center, January 6, 1pm-3pm, (352) 207-6036 MLK Youth Day is an event that encourages youth of all ages to celebrate the life and the impact of Dr. King, while promoting peace and togetherness. The afternoon will be filled with

performances, music, dance, food, drinks, games and fun.

MLK Wreath Ceremony, Martin Luther King Jr. Park, January 13, 11:30am The laying of a commemorative wreath in tribute to Dr. King with remembrance services that include prayer, song and dance performances.

MLK March, Ocala Downtown Square to MLK Recreation Complex, January 15, 8am-10am A march to honor the impact of Dr. King’s life and show support for the values he heralded. Assemble at 8am at the downtown square. The march begins at 9am and concludes at the Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Complex.

MLK Day in the Park, Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Complex, January 15, 10am-3pm The celebration continues at this family-friendly event with songs, speeches, dances, poems, prayers, music, food and vendors.

As someone who has spent decades exploring the complexities of human nature through conversations with some of the greatest thinkers, leaders and artists of our time, there is perhaps no one more qualified than Winfrey to curate a collection of life lessons and revelatory insights. Believing these insights can be transformative, she has compiled some of her favorite exchanges, from her Super Soul Sunday series, into this beautiful book. “I wanted to do something uplifting,” Winfrey explains. “It’s sharing wisdom in a way that opens people up to the best of themselves, to the heart of themselves, to a more purposeful life.”

Now That You Mention It By Kristan Higgins

Many books set their protagonists on a path to reinvention, often by way of making peace with their past. Nora is one such character, and her journey begins when her life nearly ends. After returning to her childhood home, she must explore some past darkness in order to move forward. Higgins provides a brisk and largely lighthearted read about a quirky young woman and proves that, sometimes, you can go home again.

JAN ’18 ›

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Downtown To-Dos January 5 › First Friday Art Walk, downtown Ocala, 6pm January 15 › MLK March, downtown Ocala, 9am

Concerts

Upcoming Events In The Villages January 14 › SkateTacular: Dreams On Ice, Savannah Center January 19 › Brownwood Colonial Days Festival, Brownwood

Shakira

Amway Center, Orlando

Jan. 9

A Night with Janis Joplin

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Jan. 9

Art Garfunkel

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Jan. 16

Jake Owen

Walt Disney Theatre, Orlando

Jan. 18

Miranda Lambert

Amway Center, Orlando

Jan. 19

Modern Vinyl Series: Kelsey Waldon

Reilly Arts Center, Ocala

Jan. 27

Air Supply

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Feb. 3

Market Square

Jacob Sartorius

House of Blues, Orlando

Feb. 4

February 23 › Blood, Sweat & Tears, Savannah Center March 12 › The Guess Who, Savannah Center

Paddock Square

January 21 › Cruise-In Classic Car Show, Spanish Springs Town Square

January 26 › Badfinger, Savannah Center February 6 › Mardi Gras Festival, Spanish Springs Town Square February 8 › Mardi Gras Festival, Lake Sumter Landing

Arts, Crafts and Culture Upcoming Exhibits At The Appleton › Mysteries of the

Tony Bennett

Tony Bennett

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Feb. 7

Rain: A Tribute to The Beatles

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Feb. 9

Amazon: Visionary Artwork of Pablo Amaringo and His Students will feature approximately 95 paintings by Peruvian artist Pablo Amaringo and his students from the collection of Scott Olsen, Ph.D., on display through January 14. On the Edge of The Florida Frontier: Perspectives on Life at Fort King includes artwork, archaeological objects, photographs and historic reconstructions of the fort. The exhibit will open on January 17 and run through April 8. Rembrandt and the Jews: The Berger Print Collection features a collection of 22 etchings by the Dutch master that explore the relationship between the artist and the Jewish residents of his Amsterdam neighborhood. The exhibit will open January 20 and runs through March 18. Rembrandt Revealed: Etchings from the Collection of Dr. Robert and Mrs. Mariann McClary features the meticulous prints from the McClary’s collection depicting Rembrandt’s world. The exhibit will be on display January 20 through March 18. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

Art Classes (January 11-12, 15-19) › The Rainbow Springs Artist

Cooperative will host two art class sessions this month. A glass mosaic garden stepping stone class will be held January 11-12, and an intermediate stained glass class will be held January 15-19. All classes run 12:30- 3:30pm. rainbowspringsart.com or (352) 445-8547.

Billy Joel

Billy Joel

Amalie Arena, Tampa

Feb. 9

The Petty Hearts: A Tribute to Tom Petty

Reilly Arts Center, Ocala

Feb. 23

Eric Johnson

The Plaza “Live” Theatre, Orlando

Feb. 23

Musical Performance at the Appleton (January 11) › The Appleton will host a musical performance by Tribe of Love from 5-8pm. The event is held in conjunction with the Mysteries of the Amazon: Visionary Artwork of Pablo Amaringo and His Students exhibit and is free for members and a pay-what-you-wish donation for nonmembers. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. Night at the Museum (January 12) › The Discovery Center will host a family-friendly event featuring hands-on activities for children Continued on p.68

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TICKETS ON SALE!

JAN

5

For the first time ever, Dave and Ted bring their highvoltage dueling piano show to the Circle Square Cultural Center! This is a piano show like no other! It’s a show chock-full of comedy, song and improv that will make for an unforgettable evening. Be prepared to clap and sing along at this musical comedy show where the audience is always part of the action! Visit WildPianos.com for a sample of what you can expect when they take the stage! Resident: $18-20 | Non-Resident: $20-22

JAN

JAN

12

20

HOLLYWOOD NIGHTS:

THE VAN-DELLS

A BOB SEGER EXPERIENCE HollywoodNightsband.com

Van-Dells.com

BillHaleyJrAndTheComets.com

Resident: $14-16 | Non-Resident: $16-18

Resident: $20-22 | Non-Resident: $22-24

FEB

MAR

BILLY MCGUIGAN’S MUSIC BY THE LEGENDS 50s, 60s & 70s

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MAR

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POP, ROCK & DOO WOPP LIVE!

KINGSTON TRIO LEGACY TOUR

16

FRANKIE AVALON

MAR

3

FEB

10

BILL HALEY, JR. AND THE COMETS

Resident: $14-16 | Non-Resident: $16-18

23

FEB

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27

NEW SHOW

MAR

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THE LETTERMEN

BillyMcGuigan.com

7BridgesBand.com

KingstonTrio.com

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TheLettermen.com

Resident: $16-18 | Non-Resident: $18-20

Resident $22-24 | Non-Resident: $25-27

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Resident: $25-27 | Non-Resident: $30-32

Resident: $25-27 | Non-Resident: $30-32

APR

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14

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FREE EVENTS Health & Wellness Expo.......... Jan 13 .... 10 AM - 2 PM

BENNIE & THE JETS

THE MYSTICS

BennieAndTheJets.com

TheOriginalMystics.com

Resident: $20-22 | Non-Resident: $22-24

Resident: $14-16 | Non-Resident: $16-18

Home Improvement Expo ......Feb 17 .......9 AM - 1 PM Hands Across the Highway ... Mar 10 .......9 AM - 1 PM

8395 SW 80th Street, Ocala, FL 34481 | (352) 854-3670 | CSCulturalCenter.com TICKET OFFICE HOURS: Mon-Sat: 11 am - 2 pm | Day of Show: 11 am - Showtime

ALL SHOWS BEGIN AT 7 PM & DOORS OPEN AT 6 PM (except as noted) Gift Certificates Available

Schedule and prices subject to change without notice. Reduced ticket prices are for residents of On Top of the World Communities and Stone Creek. (Resident ID required when purchasing at ticket office.) Ticket prices do not include sales tax. To arrange for handicap seats, call or visit the ticket office. *Online tickets subject to a convenience fee. ALL TICKET SALES FINAL.

#11856 - 1/18


The Local

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ages 5-9. Registration is $15 per child. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900.

Performing Arts Blue Man Group

Blue Man Group Theatre at Universal CityWalk, Orlando

Ongoing

Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Thru Jan. 11

17-18 Orlando Ballet Season

Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Orlando

Thru May 6

School of Rock

Straz Center for the Performing Arts, Tampa

Jan. 2-7

Dave & Ted, Deuces Wild!

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

Jan. 5

Marvel Universe LIVE

Amalie Arena, Tampa

Jan. 5-7

I Love a Piano

Ocala Civic Theatre

Jan. 11-Feb. 4

Hollywood Nights: A Bob Seger Experience

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

Jan. 12

Dirty Dancing

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Jan. 12-13

Riverdance

Straz Center for the Performing Arts, Tampa

Jan. 19-21

The Fox on the Fairway

Sonnentag Theatre at the IceHouse, Mount Dora

Jan. 19Feb. 11

The Van-Dells

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

Jan. 20

Amadeus

Straz Center for the Performing Arts, Tampa

Jan. 20

Bill Haley, Jr. & The Coments

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

Jan. 27

Gobsmacked!

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Jan. 27

BalletBoyz

Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Gainesville

Jan. 31

Cabaret

Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Gainesville

Feb. 3

Romeo and Juliet

Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Orlando

Feb. 9-11

Frankie Avalon

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

Feb. 10

Cabaret

Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Feb. 12-13

The Lion King

Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Orlando

Feb. 14Mar. 11

The Phantom of the Opera Straz Center for the Performing Arts, Tampa

Feb. 14-25

The Giver

Ocala Civic Theatre

Feb. 15-25

Platinum Comedy Tour

USF Sun Dome, Tampa

Feb. 17

Dancing with the Stars: Live!

Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Orlando

Feb. 18

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Inspired Speakers Series (January 19) › The Appleton Museum will host Dr. Lisa DeBoer, scholar and author, who will speak on Rembrandt van Rijn as part of the Inspired Speakers Series. The event will begin at 6pm and is free for members and $10 for nonmembers. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. Appleton After Hours (February 1) › The After Hours concert series offers live music, special displays of artwork by the Ocala Art Group and tasty samplings from local restaurants. Cash bar available. Doors open at 5pm, and music begins at 5:30pm. The event is free for Appleton members and $15 at the door for nonmembers. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. Fine Arts Show (February 10) › The Visual Art Association’s Winter Fine Arts Show will be held at the Laurel Manor Recreational Center in The Villages from 9am-3pm. Over 65 artists will be in attendance. Admission is free and open to the public. (845) 807-7489.

Outdoor & Athletic Endeavors Group Bike Rides (Ongoing) › Brick City Bicycles offers group bike

rides throughout the week and weekend. brickcitybicycles.com or (352) 369-9400.

Audubon Bird Hike (January 6) › The Marion Audubon Society will host a free nature hike beginning at the Fort King Historic Site. The hike is one hour and begins at 8am. ocalafl.org or (352) 368-5535. Ocala Marathon (January 14) › The annual Ocala Marathon will begin at the Paddock Mall and is considered one of the most scenic marathons in the country. The event will also include a 1/2 marathon and 15K, 10K and 5K runs. The expo will be held at the Paddock Mall on January 13 from noon-6pm. ocalamarathon.com or (352) 637-2475. Nature Hike (January 20) › A guided nature hike through Silver Springs State Park will take place the third Saturday of each month through May. Each hike will start from a different location in the park and focus on different plants and wildlife. Free with park admission. silversprings.com or (352) 236-7148.

Pack Walk (January 28) › In partnership with Marion County Animal

Services, Silver Springs State Park will give volunteers the opportunity to walk dogs available for adoption through the park. The program gives the animals exercise and the chance to socialize with other dogs and people. Dog walkers must be 16 years of age, but all are welcome to join the walk. Pack walks will be held the fourth Sunday of every month at 10am. silversprings.com or (352) 261-5840.

Other Fun Stuff! Ocala Health Events › A diabetes support group will be held

January 3. A six-week healthful living class series with a focus on weight reduction will begin on January 9. The weekly classes will provide time for an optional inside one-mile walk followed by a discussion about the week’s topic. The program requires an eight-week commitment. An AARP Safe Driving seminar will be held on January 24. All programs will be held


at the Senior Wellness Community Center in Ocala. Advanced registration is required. ocalahealthsystem.com or (800) 530-1188.

A Night at the Casino (January 5) › The Ocala Civic Theatre will present a fundraising event held at the Ocala Elks Lodge. The evening will include Blackjack, Roulette, Craps, Texas Hold’em and slot machines. Limited dinner reservations will be taken prior to the opening of the casino at 7pm. Tickets are $10. ocalacivictheatre.com or (352) 236-2274. Design, Decorate and Discover (January 11) › The United Way of

Marion County’s Women’s Leadership Council, “Women of Worth,” will host their third event in the Design, Decorate and Discover series, “BLINGO, WoW’s game night” at the College of Central Florida’s Klein Center at 6:30pm. Tickets are $25 and include game sheets, food and beverages. All proceeds benefit the ReadingPals program, which provides mentors for at-risk kindergarteners to help them with their reading skills. mwmc.org or (352) 732-9696.

Ford and Mustang Roundup (January 13) › The 23rd edition of this

event will be held at Silver Springs State Park and includes a display of Ford and Mustang vehicles of various makes and models. The vehicles will be on display in front of the Twin Oaks Mansion Stage. The event will also include live entertainment and food and beverage vendors. silversprings.com or (352) 261-5840.

Health and Wellness Expo (January 13) › A special health and

wellness expo will be held at On Top of The World from 10am-2pm. The event will showcase the latest trends in health with health care providers and fitness instructors offering screenings, demonstrations and lectures. The event is free and open to the public. csculturalcenter.com or (352) 854-3670.

Community Task Force (January 25) › The Racial Harmony and

Cultural Awareness Task Force will host “REACH Across the Table,” a gathering of community members from 5:30-8pm at Silver Springs State Park. This event will provide information on community concerns that impact our ability to accept each other’s differences and come together as one. The theme for this inaugural community event is “trust.” reachocalamarion@gmail.com or (352) 368-5517.

Father Daughter Dance (February 2-3) › The 12th Annual Father Daughter Dance will be held at the Circle Square Cultural Center and will include a live DJ and dancing, crafts, snacks, photo booth and more. Three dances will be offered this year on February 2 from 6-8 pm and February 3 from 4-6pm or 7-9pm. Tickets are $20. father-daughterdance.com or (352) 694-1635.

Ocala Royal Dames Tiara Ball

Tiara Ball (February 24) › Join the Ocala Royal Dames for Cancer Research for their 32nd Annual Tiara Ball, the organization’s largest fundraising event, which raises money for cancer research and education in North Central Florida. The event will take place at Circle Square Cultural Center. ocalaroyaldames.org or (352) 622-7363. JAN ’18 ›

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A Chair-itable Event

Ninth Annual Chair-ity Event Hosted by the Ocala/Marion County Association of REALTORS › Written And Photographed By Ronald W. Wetherington

O

n a picture-perfect evening, 140 people attended the ninth annual Chair-ity Event hosted by the Ocala/Marion County Association of REALTORS. Artistic chairs created by the community were auctioned off, and over $31,000 was raised to benefit the Kimberly Center for Child Protection. A silent auction was also held. Local restaurants, Brick City Southern Kitchen and Infinite Ale Works, provided delicious barbecue food and craft beer to attendees. Platinum sponsors, Neighborhood Storage and Neighborhood Workspace, contributed to this highly successful event. OMCAR’s Young Professionals Network was tasked to organize and orchestrate this charitable evening. Year after year, committee members work hard volunteering their time to plan this fun night. The Young Professionals Network provides young professionals with a forum to greater understand community and real estate issues, develop leadership skills, build a stronger link with the real estate industry and expand networking and business opportunities—all while promoting OMCAR in Ocala and all of Marion County. The highlight of the evening was seeing and bidding on the whimsical and unique chair

creations. The Young Professionals Network also donated two hammocks, a fire pit, matching chairs and other camping essentials. Terry Thompson, 2017 vice president of the Multiple Listing Service for OMCAR, refurbished a handmade bench taken from the Silver Springs glass bottom boats. Bidding was also competitive for Re/Max Premier Realty’s donation of a “Life is better at the beach” chair that included a beach tent, beach bicycle, cooler complete with Yeti cups, gift cards and a threenight stay at a condo on the beach. Valerie Dailey, 2017 president of OMCAR says, “I am so proud and honored to be a part of an organization that gives back. I love seeing our community working together to protect, serve and advocate for abused and neglected children. It is crucial that we, as a community, strive to protect the most vulnerable among us by supporting organizations that help children at risk.” Likewise, Bryce Peek, vice chair of the Young Professionals Network, says, “The Young Professionals Network was excited to partner with Kimberly’s Center to put on this year’s Chair-ity event. We appreciate all the hard work and preparation the committee put in to make the event a success. It is a fun night supporting a worthy cause that addresses a desperate need in our community. I would encourage anyone who is unaware of the type of support that Kimberly’s Center gives to at-risk children to take a tour of their facility and potentially donate to their operation.” At Kimberly’s Center for Child Protection, it costs $150 for a forensic interview, $500 for a medical examination and $100 per therapy session. On average, the center spends about $1,000 per child. Kimberly’s Center cares for about 100 children per month and is governed by a volunteer board of directors. The center solely relies on grants and community donations to provide their specialized and compassionate care to its young victims.

Ronald W. Wetherington SOCIAL SCENE EDITOR

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Andy Ingram, Jennifer Kluepfel and Chris Dunham

Austin Kmieciak and Miranda Sullivan

Rissette Looney, Nancy Porter and R. Susan Smith

Staci King, Greg Kelly and Nancy Greiner


Steve Brown, Crystal McCall, Christi McCall, Nathan and Nina Irwin

Dawn Westgate and Victoria Smith

Tom McDonald and Clint Lewis

Carmen Murern, Karen and Randy Buss

Julia Sutton, Patrik Kanter and Talley Alliston

Carolyn Hammack, Chris Kortright and Larissa Certiz

Debbie Phillps, R. Susan Smith, Staci King, Molly White and Nancy Greiner

Bob Deichman, Peggy and Greg Pittas and Jacob Pittas

Mahaela, Bryce Peek and Chris Kortright

Nick Navetta, Jeannie Hicks and John Celebre

Jason and Ashley Yates, Holly and Brent Schmidt JAN ’18 ›

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Royal Dames Fundraiser

Written and Photographed by Ronald W.Wetherington @ Katya Vineyards Tasting Room

Funds were raised for cancer research thanks to the leading efforts of Royal Dames Bernadette Castro and Patricia Sokol, who co-hosted a wine-tasting holiday reception with their families. The reception was held at Katya Vineyards Tasting Room, owned by the Sokol family and located downtown. Every dollar raised from the celebration will be used for cancer research.

David Sokol, Katherine Sokol, Tony Deras and Patricia Sokol

Sally Crass, Connie Brown and Gail Tuck

Barbara Fitos, Bonnie Payton and Sharon Jank

David Austin, Bernadette Castro, Terri Keogh, Jon Austin and Bernard Austin

Cecilia Truesdale, Susan Hale and Diana Lammermeier

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Judy and Tom Green

Katherine, David and Patricia Sokol

Ed and Lois Johnson


THE

Scene

› SOCIAL SCENE

Magnolia Art Xchange Art Heist Photos by Crys Williams @ Ocala Union Station

Works of art, created and donated by local artists, were available to purchase or ‘steal’ at the recent Art Heist event, benefiting the Magnolia Art Xchange. To play the Art Heist Game, guests purchased tickets to enter into drawings for desired paintings. However, as an added twist, any winner could decide to keep their painting or steal one from another guest.

Algenard Simmons, Joe and Cristin Egizio

Hannah, Harry and Stacey Batten

Lena and Nina Camperlengo and Dean Wilsey

Lauren Walter and Gregory Slocumb

Joanne Dillard and Rich Schliecher Haley Britt

Angie Lewis and Jaye Baillie

John Jernigan and Renzo Seravalle Mary and Patrick Watson

Maureen Roberson and Sheila Hartley

Hector Gonzalez and Camille Ortiz

Renee Ware and Merrill Anderson Tom Dobbins and Matt Wardell JAN ’18 ›

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Wigs, Wine And Whiskey Photos by Crys Williams @ 302 Broadway

Sellstate Shares hosted its first annual Wigs, Wine and Whiskey charity event to benefit United Way’s Strong Families Program and Interfaith Emergency Services. Guests came wearing their best wigs and enjoyed hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and tastings.

Felecia and Skip Judge, Karla Grimsley and Angela Grace

Jackie Albright, Leah McDonald and Courtney Yancey

John and Deanna Cervellera

Chris and Tracie Wood

Michelle Smith, Raymond Andrews and Peyton Galbraith Curtis and Cheri Sayler

Natalie McComb and Nancy Vandeven

Kathy Holloway, Robin McBride, Bonnie Vorwera and Barbara Drake

Rissette and Charles Looney

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Tessa Stephens and Susan Beville

Amy and Lenny Ow, Mark and Lori Cornelius


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January 21, 2018 Doors open at noon | Event begins at 1:00 Tickets: $25 presale | $30 at the door | $15 Finale only Professional, amateur and Pro Am couples will come together to tap, twirl and waltz their way across the dance floor for a great charitable cause—the Marion Therapeutic Riding Association, an organization where people with physical, mental and emotional disabilities can connect with horses and nature. The Florida Fun Mini Match dance competition is an event filled with glamour, elegance and beauty. Organizer Mary Thomas founded Dance Dance Dance as a way to fuel her love of dancing and give back to the community. Now in its sixth year, make sure to save the date for the Florida Fun Mini Match. The vibrant costumes, energetic music and stunning dance moves make for a must-see spectacle. Presale tickets and can be purchased online at www.floridafunminimatch.com or by calling 904-362-7959. JAN ’18 ›

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Champagne Dreams Photos by Crys Williams @ Jumbolair

Transitions Life Center hosted its sixth annual masquerade party, complete with cocktails, dinner, live entertainment and both live and silent auctions. Proceeds from this event benefited TLC’s mission to support young adults with special needs.

David and Jackie Albright, Tracy Belcher and Daren Johnson

Kathy Chaffin, Cathy Dickmann, Johanna Costa and Kaylee Paglia

Kellie Hill and Rosalie Dace

Carlos Manresa, Mike and Aurelia Collins

Jean Paglia, Dianne Carrizzo, Jordan Smith and AnnMarie Smith

076

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Kylee and Michael Paglia and Thom Fleming


Jean Paglia, Maggie O’Keefe, Johanna Costa and Joanne Flood

Denis and Leta Moeder, Sue and Dave Layman

Peggy and Jessie Wright Darren Ritch, Lucy Johnson and Mayor Kent Guinn

Patsy and Justin Pellegrini

Marie and Harold Schinman

Elena Martinez-Lopez and Becky Torino

Lucy Johnson, Meg Dickens and Kathy Liverman

Daren Johnson and Jon Belcher

Darren Ritch, Jerry Adams and Cesar Pascual

Baylie and Devon Chestnut

Wendy Sprecher, Andrea Wright and Dee Beck JAN ’18 ›

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Seasonal Soiree

Written and Photographed by Ronald W. Wetherington @ The Ivy House Restaurant

Social Scene Editor Ronald W. Wetherington’s recent party was the place to be. It was the season to be jolly, and Ron’s guests joined him for a sumptuous dinner at Ocala’s own Ivy House. The attendees made for a dynamic grouping of Ocala/Marion County government and society.

Cindy and Bill Nassal

Miguel Reina and Helen Geller

Scott and Stacey Rollins

Lillian M. Wetherington and Shirley Bartley

Ronald W. Wetherington, Michelle and Frank DeLuca

Sandra and Kent Guinn, Ronald W. Wetherington, Michelle and Charlie Stone

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Kathy Dinkins

Helen Geller, Miguel Reina and Lydia Kutas


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Ocala Style Jan'18  

Ocala Style Magazine. Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.

Ocala Style Jan'18  

Ocala Style Magazine. Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.