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PAZO DO MAR VINEYARDS, RÍAS BAIXAS, SPAIN @CORA-JANEWYNNE - SEPTEMBER 2018


A Family Winery: V I N E YA R D S & C E L L A R S

A

s part of our ongoing series of articles about our family of wineries, Lynne Coyle MW speaks with Matteo Ascheri, Winemaker at Ascheri Vineyards and Cellars about the history of the winery, and it's winemaking philosophy. LYNNE: How long have your family been growing grapes and making wine in Piedmont?

LC: What unique and special aspects of your area do you think are most important in making your family's wines?

MATTEO: The Giacomo Ascheri Cellars

M: The definitive aspects of the area that

originated in La Morra, where a place called “Ascheri” still exists today, in the early 19th century the first vines were planted, and the first wines produced.

At that time in the Langhe, vine-growing and wine-making were still primitive and rudimentary. Wines were mostly sold in demijohns and they travelled for several days before reaching the selling points. However, a reliable account dating back to that period and concerning the “Ascheri” vine cultivation method even then was considered modern for its technical innovations. Since its very beginning, the Ascheri Winery stood out for its commitment and innovative methods. In that period, thanks to its geographic location, Bra had become the most important town for the distribution of Barolo, so in 1880 our winery was moved from La Morra to Bra, where it is situated today. Our cellars are the only ones left which can boast such an ancient and beautiful heritage.

make our wines “special” are basically three; The use of native varietals like Nebbiolo, Barbera, Dolcetto for the red wines and Cortese and Arneis for the white wines (together with a lot of other more rare ones). The second key point is that these varietals don’t produce great wines outside Piedmont, so it’s difficult, if not almost impossible to find good expressions of them in other areas.

Finally, the mono-varietal tradition that we have gives you less chances to produce great wines (compared to varietal blended wine), but in the end gives you much more opportunity to be unique among other great wines.

QUALITY WINE SHOULD BE A CLEAR EXPRESSION OF A PLACE...

LC: What is your farming philosophy? M: Our vineyards are managed

according to the principles of sustainable agriculture with a pragmatic approach to reduce all the chemical interventions – we are working with “The Green Experience” rules. For further information on the Green Experience, check out www. thegreenexperience.it

OUR VINEYARDS ARE MANAGED ACCORDING TO THE PRINCIPLES OF SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE LC: If you were to sum up your family winemaking philosophy what would it be? M: I like to produce wines with a natural concentration coming out from the vineyard and not from the winery, with a natural balance among all the grape components; fruit, alcohol, acidity and tannins and with elegance and finesse.


LC: When you talk about ‘acoustic wine making’ what do you mean? M: Quality wine should be a clear

expression of a place; where the vineyard is of a grape variety from which it is made and expressing the ideas of the producer. To achieve this, you must reduce the intervention to a minimum in the winery. It is important not to detract from the natural characters of the wine with too much technology, too much oak or too many additives so I try to honour our place, our land, our grapes and our philosophy to make an acoustic or if you want unplugged wine.

LC: What do you think about the natural wine movement? M: I don’t like the word “natural” to

define a category of wines, as all wines are natural products of the land. However, agriculture itself is one of the most “unnatural” things. Vines in nature are not trained like they are in vineyards today, they climb as high and as wide as they can to propagate themselves. We must respect nature but at the same time we must challenge it and agriculture is one of the biggest challenges. In the end the wine must be good and among other good wines they must be unique.

LC: What dishes would you serve with your Dolcetto? M:

It’s a wine that you can drink without thinking about it, so just for the pleasure.In Piedmont we mostly drink Dolcetto instead of Barolo and you should trust us as we know a lot about good wines and good food”. I like it with on-the-spit grilled red meats and lean starters, but we like it for the whole meal and we also drink it cool during summertime and matched with fresh water fish.

ASCHERI WINE SELECTION ASCHERI LANGHE ARNEIS

ASCHERI DOLCET TO D'ALBA ST ROC

Dry, elegant and savoury

Bright aromas with a cherry freshness

€17.45

€17.95

ASCHERI BAROLO

ASCHERI LANGHE NEBBIOLO SAN G I AC O M O

Powerful and ages well

Intense concentrated red fruits

€35.95

€21.95

A S C H E R I M O S C AT O D ' A S T I

A S C H E R I G AV I D I G AV I

Slightly sparkling and honeyed

Hints of ripe peach

€14.45

€19.95


Grape Personalities: E

xploring the world of wine can be both an exciting and daunting journey. Exciting because there are so many styles and varieties: daunting for the exact same reason! In her book, Wine Grapes, Jancis Robinson lists 1,368 grape varieties, but there could be as many as 5,000 used in the production of wine globally and as with every individual person, each of these grape varieties have their own unique personality.

Tannat

The Tannat grape is regarded as one of the most tannic varieties commonly vinified and named for this characteristic. It is native to the Béarn and Madiran regions of the French Pyrenees, but has become Uruguay’s signature grape variety, where it makes up one quarter of all plantings. It produces deeply coloured wines with firm grippy tannin in their youth, marked by flavours of black fruit, liquorice and menthol. Tannat wines are capable of very long ageing: the best evolve a seductive bouquet of tobacco, spices and forest floor. Pair with heavy red meat dishes.

B O D E G O N E S D E L S U R TA N N AT

€16.95 Powerful & bold, from a top Uruguayan producer. Grippy tannins, black fruits & a long, savoury finish.

Lorcan O'Brien, Wine Communications & Content Manager, O'Briens Wine

That’s a daunting number of wine personalities to understand and to ultimately find a favourite wine. Fortunately, these wine characteristics fall in to some broad categories to help us narrow down the style we most appreciate. In red wines the broadest division of grape style is weight of body and tannin. Weight of body is how heavy the wine feels in our mouth when we drink it think of the difference between the texture of water and cream. The heavier the body, the more viscous the mouthfeel of the wine. Tannin is the mouth drying effect of a wine and comes from the skins, pips and

stems of the grape, as well as from oak in the winery. As most white wines are removed from their skins early in the winemaking process, tannin is primarily associated with red wines. The more tannic a wine, the more pronounced the mouth-drying effect, which is predominantly felt at the front of the gums.

HERE IS AN INTRODUCTION TO GRAPE VARIETIES THAT HAVE VARYING PALATE WEIGHTS AND TANNIN LEVELS, THAT WILL HELP YOU EXPLORE THIS INTERESTING ASPECT OF RED WINES.

Cabernet Sauvignon It would be hard to compile a list of red grapes based on tannin and not include Cabernet Sauvignon. The most planted wine grape in the world, Cabernet Sauvignon is the king of Bordeaux’s left bank and is the main component of the prestigious First Growths. The best Cabernet Sauvignon produces high-tannin, full-bodied wines that need many years’ cellaring to balance the tannin and fruit, but they are worth the wait: youthful flavours of blackcurrant, mint leaf and vanilla are joined by cedar wood, fresh tobacco and pencil shavings.

D O M A I N E N AT U R A L I S T E CABERNET SAUVIGNON

Outside Bordeaux the most noticeable examples of Cabernet Sauvignon come from the warmer climates of Napa Valley in California, Coonawarra and Margaret River in Australia and Maipo Valley in Chile.

THE MOST PLANTED WINE GRAPE IN THE WORLD....YOUTHFUL FLAVOURS OF BLACKCURRANT, MINT LEAF & VANILLA

SAINT JOSEPH LES LAUVES

WAS €19.95

€16.95 FOR OCTOBER

Scents of blackcurrant, cedar and vanilla. Firm tannins and a long mocha finish.

€29.95 Intense & aromatic with notes of violets & black fruits. Very long-lived wine.


Sangiovese

Syrah

The Latin name for Sangiovese, sanguis Jovis (Jupiter’s Blood), suggests it is an ancient grape variety. It is the emblematic Tuscan grape but is also grown in central and southern Italy. Best known for its role in Chianti, where the blend must contain a minimum 80% Sangiovese, it creates a medium-bodied, fruity wine with moderate tannins. The best examples are perfumed, brimming with dark cherry fruit and age worthy. As an ancient variety, there are several Sangiovese clones: the vines adapt slightly to their specific terroir over the years. The most notable clone is Brunello, which makes the eminent Brunello di Montalcino wines. Sangiovese takes well to the use of oak in the winery. In the New World Sangiovese is grown in regions with large Italian immigrant populations, most notably California and Australia.

Pinot Noir Pinot Noir is undoubtedly one of the great grape varieties of the world, with records dating back almost two thousand years. It is the prima donna of the wine world, being notoriously fickle to grow, susceptible to a range of vineyards pests & diseases and being very sensitive about the soil and climate in which it is grown. But planted in a favourable

SAN FELICE CHIANTI IL GRIGIO

WAS €22.95

€19.95 FOR OCTOBER

Wonderfully concentrated wine, boasting elegant Sangiovese black cherry character & supple tannins on the persistent finish.

Gamay

Syrah is inextricably linked to the Rhône Valley. It is one of 10 permitted red varieties in the Southern Rhône, but the only permitted red in the Northern Rhône appellations. Although these two regions share a commonality in their name, they make very different styles of Syrah. In the warm southern regions, such as Châteauneufdu-Pape and Gigondas it makes a full-bodied and high tannin wine, with the classic blend of GSM (Grenache, Syrah, Mourvèdre). But it is in the northern Rhône where Syrah has truly found its home. Standing alone (although some appellations allow a small amount of white grapes blended in), Syrah makes some of the most iconic wines in the world. The greatest come from Côte-Rotie, Cornas and Hermitage. Produced in small quantities compared to the Southern Rhône’s sprawling appellations, these regions produce wines of medium-body and high-tannin that continue to develop for years in the bottle. The most notable New World region for Syrah is the Barossa Valley in South Australia, where it is referred to as Shiraz.

location, by a good producer, Pinot Noir can create some of the most sought-after, fragrant, complex wines on the planet. The greatest example of a grape’s perfect marriage to terroir is Pinot Noir to Burgundy’s Côte d'Or. It is from this narrow hill that Burgundy’s famous Premier Cru and Grand Cru wines hail. The best will age for decades: in youth they are brimming with elegant aromas of red berries, roses and

DOMAINE BEGUDE PINOT NOIR

€16.95 Great value organic Pinot Noir from the Languedoc, packed with juicy red fruits and smooth tannins.”

At the opposite end of the scale to the tannic Tannat is the gentle Gamay - is a variety with low levels of natural tannin and best known as the grape of Beaujolais. Another ancient variety, its use was banned in Burgundy in 1395 by Philip The Bold as an inferior variety to Pinot Noir. And it is true that when left to its own devices this vigorous variety will produce large quantities of low-quality berries. However, when yields of the plant are controlled, Gamay can produce extremely elegant, fragrant and fresh reds. It is worth seeking out Beaujolais, with each Crus or village offering something different, ranging from the fuller-bodied and age worthy Moulin-à-Vent and Morgon to the delightfully fragrant and floral fresh Fleurie, these are high-quality wines.

With relatively low tannins and fresh acidity, Gamay is a wonderfully food-friendly grape.

spice, before gaining a savoury edge of undergrowth and game with bottle age. Pinot Noir is also one of the three main grape varieties in the Champagne region, where it brings a red berry crisp bite to some of the best-known brands. Pinot Noir is now grown across the globe, the most noteworthy examples are from Italy (Pinot Nero), Germany (Spätburgunder) & California.

C H ÂT E A U D E F L E U R I E

WAS €19.45

€15.95 FOR OCTOBER

Delicate floral & fresh red fruit flavours with moderate tannins: a wonderfully food-friendly wine


Lynne Coyle, Master of Wine, Wine Director, O'Briens Wine

T

here is no global certifying body for organic wine but regardless of where they are from, they must be made from organically grown grapes. In a nutshell, this means that for grapes to be considered organically farmed, the use of chemical pesticides, herbicides, fungicides and fertilisers are not permitted. Rather confusingly, even within the same country there are often a variety of certifying bodies. This has come about because, over the years, each country has developed their own set of rules for organic farming. These rules will take into consideration factors such as the geographical location, the climate, the existing legal regulations as well as the farming tradition and philosophy of the local grape growing farmers. In Europe, The International Organisation of Vine & Wine (OIV) are an intergovernmental science and technical agency which all grape growers and winemakers reference for

L E C I N S A U LT PA R C E L L E : L E J A R D I N

technical rules and regulations. In EU Resolution 460/2012, the OIV state that organic viticulture must look to maintain and protect ecosystems, soil fertility, natural resources, increase biodiversity and promote ecological cycles. Organic growers must also eliminate or minimise the use of chemical interventions in favour of using organic products and the use of genetically modified products is forbidden. Other countries, for example Chile, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa have similar over-arching rules if you are growing grapes organically and want to be certified. In the US, under The Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations, a wine can only be certified organic if the grapes and their conversion to alcohol is organic. So, for example, if yeasts are added these must be organic. Whilst the USDA note that wine naturally produces some sulfites, these can’t be added to this category of organic wine. There is a further category for organic wine in the US which is closer to the EU regulations. This category is

A L TA N O O R G A N I C

N AT U R A L

Of all the products that can be used to assist the grape grower and winemaker, the most discussed in wine circles is sulfites. That said, sulfites are probably the most misunderstood item you will see on a wine label and a quick Google search will turn up plenty of material that demonises their use in wine making. There are however some important points to note on this topic. Not least of these, is the fact that sulfites, in small quantities, are present in all wines because during a wines fermentation process they are produced naturally. So, no wine is sulfite free even if the winemaker has not added them. In the EU all wines which exceed sulfite levels of 10mg/litre must declare this on the label whether they are organic,

M I C H E L LY N C H O R G A N I C W H I T E

€17.45

€16.95 Purity of fruit

for wines ‘made with organic grapes’ and in this category, the grapes must also be certified organic. Yeasts and other agricultural ingredients aren’t required to be organic and sulfites may be added to these wines up to a maximum of 100 parts per million.

Vivid black fruits

ORGANIC

€15.95 Refreshingly zesty & citrus

ORGANIC


But what does it all mean when deciding what to buy? A simple definition might be helpful; Certified Organic wine are made from organically grown grapes and there are numerous certification bodies. Biodynamic wines are globally certified by Demeter and are grown from organically grapes. In addition there is a focus on soil health, biodiversity and the use of homeopathic plant teas to support vine health.

Grapes Harvest - Veneto, Italy 2017 @ LynneCoyle MW

biodynamic, natural or “no sulfite added” wines. Also, widely used in the food and beverage industry, as a preservative for dried fruits, soft drinks, pre-washed salads and processed meats, they can be identified on labels as the E220 to E228 numbers. Permitted quantities are often much higher than that used for wine preservation.

certainly organic as synthetic herbicides and pesticides did not exist.

Warning labels are important, allergies or sensitivity related to sulfites is reported in a small percentage of the population, although that percentage may rise if you suffer from asthma. But it is now widely believed that sulfites are not the cause of morning after headaches, and the importance of enjoying wine with a meal, consuming moderately and drinking plenty of water cannot be overstated. In defence of sulfites in winemaking, they can trace their use back to ancient Rome where their preservative properties were employed to extend the storage of wine without spoilage. In those days we can say for certain that vine-growing and winemaking was

With so much to ponder, it is always useful to take things back to basics and in truth if you ask any quality grape-grower/winemaker today organic or not they will tell you that their objective is to respect their vineyards and to use as little sulfite as possible during winemaking. But each year is different, so in the years where the weather has been kind, the grapes are healthy and without disease, sulfite reduction is most certainly an option. It is trickier in cooler climates or in wet humid years, so it follows that in general it is easier to grow grapes organically in warmer, less humid areas such as Sicily or the Languedoc and trickier in cooler wetter regions such as Bordeaux.

ETNICO

Bottom line is that the use of sulfites, whilst allowing for some gentle evolution with age, preserves the wine as closely as possible to how the winemaker wanted us to experience it.

URLAR SAUVIGNON BLANC

WAS €13.95

FOR OCTOBER

ORGANIC

There are many producers who farm organically but who choose not to certify. This may be because of the associated costs or ironically, many feel the organic rules regarding sulfite use are too liberal and many want the option to spray the vineyards in weather challenged years to save their crop of precious grapes. In the end we owe it to ourselves, our customers and our planet to work with quality focused producers who are trying to make the very best wine they can, as naturally as possible, whilst showing maximum environmental respect, in that given year. Our range reflects this philosophy and we would expect of all our grape growing / winemaking partners organic or not to be able to demonstrate that they follow these values.

M U S E L L A VA L P O L I C E L L A R I P A S S O

€17.95

€10.95

Multi-layered & lively

Natural wine has no legal definition nor any certifying body but typically the grapes would be organically grown and most natural wine-makers do not add sulfites. This means that the wine will often evolve much more quickly in the bottle and there is a possibility of spoilage so taste the wine before you buy and drink as soon as you can.

Pungent & grassy

ORGANIC

€21.95 Silky-smooth & rich

B I O DY N A M I C


Lorcan O'Brien, Wine Communications & Content Manager, O'Briens Wine

I

t’s nearly that time of the year again, when Irish wine lovers gather at Ireland’s largest wine event: the O’Briens Winter Wine Festival. The Festival will take place on Thursday November 15th in The Clayton Hotel Cork and Saturday & Sunday 17th/18th November in the Print Works, Dublin Castle, with all proceeds going to our charity partners, Jack and Jill Childrens Foundation.

With over 60 of the world’s best winemakers opening more than 300 wines from across the globe, our festival is a great way to reacquaint yourself with old favourites, as well as explore new regions and grape varieties in a casual, relaxed setting. You will have the unique opportunity to meet the producers of your favourite wines: from Bordeaux to Barossa, Mendoza to Marlborough and everywhere in-between. There will also be a suite of free masterclasses conducted by the winemakers.

So, if you want an in-depth look at Piedmont in Italy or Marlborough in New Zealand, you will have the opportunity to hear the winemaker talk about their specific region, grapes, soil and climate. It is a rare opportunity to taste the wines with the person who nurtured the wine from grape to glass. Purchase your tickets online at www.obrienswine.ie or in your local O'Briens store.


Simon Waghorn

The ever popular

who produces our classic customer favourite Astrolabe range, will be back again this year. Originally a marine biologist, Simon Waghorn and his wife, Jane, scoured the Marlborough region of New Zealand to secure the best vineyard sites. This has allowed them to blend their award-winning Sauvignon Blanc from over twenty individual vineyard locations.

are veterans of our Wine Festival at this stage and consistently have one of the busiest tables at the event. They are the sons of the 13th generation Pfalz winemaker, Rainer Lingenfelder, who also practices sustainable grape farming. The Wine Festival offers a great opportunity to taste through the Lingenfelder family’s wonderful range of aromatic German wines.

We are delighted to welcome back

Bruce Dukes of Domaine Naturaliste

from the Margaret River in Western Australia. This unique region is nestled south of Perth and has a climate influenced by the Indian & Great Southern Oceans. Following sustainable farming practises Bruce makes wines with a ‘sense of place’. Vine by vine and berry by berry he coaxes the very best from his remote vineyards.

Charlie O’Brien will also be present with his range of elegant McLaren Vale Kangarilla wines. Coming from a family with Irish roots, these wines are made from grapes spread across multiple vineyard sites, each embracing the ancient South Australian geology. Farming sustainably, winemaker Kevin O'Brien uses small batch, hands-on techniques to give his wines a natural fruit expression, reflective of site and season.

Georg & Karl Lingenfelder

Nicolas Duffour may not have the range of wines of some of our other attending producers, but he will certainly have one of the most popular. Nicolas works side-by-side with his father to produce our perennially popular Domaine Duffour from Gascony. Using local grape varieties, his great value, modern, aromatic white wine is one of the most popular in our range.

Antoine Olivier, winemaker at Domaine Olivier is a must-visit table for the Chardonnay and Pinot Noir lover. Based in the village of Santenay, he produces some of our finest and most elegant Burgundian wines. Domaine Olivier makes pure stylish Chardonnay whilst Domaine Seguin Manuel make aromatic and lifted Pinot Noir.

THE CLAYTON HOTEL, LAPPS QUAY, CORK

THURSDAY 15TH NOVEMBER 6.00pm - 9.00pm in aid of Irish Guide Dogs for the Blind

TICKETS: €20 THE PRINTWORKS, DUBLIN CASTLE, DUBLIN 2

SATURDAY 17TH NOVEMBER 2.00pm - 5.00pm & 6.00pm - 9.00pm SUNDAY 18TH NOVEMBER 2.00pm - 5.00pm in aid of Jack and Jill Children's Foundation

TICKETS: €25

OVER 18’S ONLY. THIS EVENT IS NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN


ATHLONE ATHLONE

A couple of years ago with a group of colleagues, I travelled to Portugal to the Vidigal wineries (The home of Porta 6) and it was an amazing experience and great to meet the people who work hard to bring us such fantastic wines. Portugal is a beautiful country not only for its amazing city of Lisbon, but the scenery and landscapes were beautiful aswell as the excellent cuisine we enjoyed there.

Patrick McHugh, Manager of O'Briens Athlone has been working in the store since June 2006. “I am very passionate about wine, food and the arts. I love to meet and talk to customers about our amazing selection of wines and recommending interesting food matches. This passion and interest is shared by Assistant Manager, Graeme Hague and together they lead an enthusiastic and energetic team. “We have an fantastic range of wines, beers and spirits that help to bring quality to our customers at the right price. Our team is dedicated giving best advice and excellent customer service. Our store has a warm welcoming ambience and is a relaxed environment for our customers to shop in.”

MANAGER: PATRICK MCHUGH

The trips abroad are a great way to meet other members of our team and create new friendships and share our interests and stories about wine. Its also a great way to get first hand information to pass on to our team and customers.

“I see O’Briens as more than a business, it’s a family. All our teams in the stores work together with the same passion, flair, interest and goals in mind; to offer our customers the best wine advice, discover the wines that we love and want to share with them."

BLANCHARDSTOWN BLANCHARDSTOWN

I LOVE TO MEET AND TALK TO CUSTOMERS ABOUT OUR AMAZING SELECTION OF WINES FOR FOOD PAIRING OR SIMPLY TO ENJOY WITHOUT FOOD. Alex Markin started his career in O’Briens nearly 10 years ago in Sandymount, moving on to assistant manager roles in Ashbourne & Clontarf before being appointed the manager of O’Briens newest SUPER STORE in Westend Village Blanchardstown. The best thing about the new store he says is that ‘its away from the hustle & bustle of the main shopping centre with plenty of free customer car parking spaces outside the door creating a calm shopping environment for customers to browse the huge selection of products.’ And a huge selection it really is! Boasting over 800 wines, 200 craft beers and 250 spirits O’Briens Blanchardstown has one of the biggest product selections in the group! ‘I love that there is always so much more to learn, we have so many new and exciting products within the range and one of my favourite parts of the job

Alex is looking forward to enjoying rich robust red wine styles in the Winter months and tips the new Tenuta Novare Valpolicella Ripasso (now 16.95 down from 19.95 for Oct) as a great wine to try this month! MANAGER ALEX MARKIN

is trying new wines and developing my team so they can give the best advice and customers service!’ The team in Blanchardstown is seriously experienced, with Assistant manager, George Gaffney working with the company for 18 years and new trainee manager, Ross McGovern who recently joined the team from O’Briens Rathmines. Ross isin his second year of the O’Briens Trainee Manager programme. Over the three year programme Ross will combine working in our stores, completing a degree in retail management and attaining his WSET exams.

With such a large shop space Alex and the team have been working on a calendar of FREE WINE TASTING events for customers to drop in and enjoy, and even held a successful Craft beer festival in June. Upcoming tastings will include an Italian tasting in late October, a Portuguese winemaker evening in November and a Christmas wine & gifts event. The shop will stock the full range of gifts and will provide a full service for any business or individual looking to have their gifting problems solved!


I LOVE MALBEC FROM ARGENTINA BUT SEE IT FROM OTHER PLACES WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? Although synonymous with Argentina, Malbec has been grown in the Cahors region of France for centuries known locally as Côt Noir. It is also used in Bordeaux as part of blends and you will now see it from Spain, Chile, Uruguay to name a few others. Historically, when grown in Cahors the wines were tannic and dark coloured but Malbec itself is not especially tannic. However, if grown in cooler climates or indeed aged in oak the tannin profile can become powerful. From warmer growing areas expect juicy plummy fruits from light bodied through to intense and concentrated wine styles. From cooler regions such as Uruguay, a freshness of acidity is apparent along with less ripe tannins which can present firmer fuller bodied wine.

NEW MALBEC ON OUR SHELVES L I O N E L O S M I N L E C O N S E R VAT O I R E M A L B E C

WHAT WINES CAN I SERVE WITH A VEGETARIAN MEAL? My first rule of food and wine matching is that you should drink the wine that you enjoy with what you enjoy eating. There are no special rules for vegetarian food but if you have a hearty dish for example puy lentil based then match a more powerful full-bodied wine such as Corbières. For a more delicate dish then something lighter in terms of wine is more appropriate. For spicy dishes aromatic whites work a treat especially Riesling, Pinot Gris or Sauvignon Blanc and for salads and fresh vegetable dishes try a dry rosé such as Provence.

WHICH WINES CONTAINS THE LEAST CALORIES?

WAS €13.95

€11.95 FOR OCTOBER

" A perfect autumnal red - plummy, ripe, concentrated and long with a savoury note." - Lynne Coyle MW, Wine Director, O'Briens Wine C A S A D E U C O S A LVA J E M A L B E C WAS €19.95

€16.95 FOR OCTOBER

A wonderfully-perfumed Malbec, floral & spicy on the nose, with deep dark berry fruit on the palate.

Champagne & Sauvignon Blanc contains around 95 calories for a 120ml glass, Chardonnay around 112 and it is similar for reds or wines at 13% ABV. Sweet wines contain more calories, the amount is dependent on wine style. To reduce the calorie intake adding sparkling mineral water and ice to whites is a good option and large glasses can make your pour look tiny so make sure you measure.


Thanks to all the Irish writers who took the time to review and write about our wines. Below are some of our recent press reviews. THE IRISH TIMES 01.09.2018

GRANZAMY BRUT NV CHAMPAGNE NV

THE IRISH TIMES 25.08.2018

S & R DOURO DOC 2016 Ample Sweet/Sour dark plum fruits, with a touch of spice and a good dry finish. Try it with a good rare steak.

"A stylish lightly creamy Champagne with subtle red cherries and strawberries. With lobster for a real splurge, but this would also go nicely with oysters and most seafood." JOHN WILSON

€29.95 down from €34.95 for the month of October

JOHN WILSON

THE IRISH INDEPENDENT 01.09.2018

WHITEHAVEN PINOT NOIR ROSÉ 2017 "With an enticing nose, this Pinot Noir rosé from New Zealand has ripe flavours of pink grapefruit, watermelon and strawberry, finishing with a touch of crisp tangerine. Creamy in texture, it has a refreshing acidity so will pair nicely with food." CORINNA HARDGRAVE

€16.95

€15.95 down from €18.95 for the month of October

THE IRISH SUN 08.09.2018

THE IRISH EXAMINER 10.02.2018

L'OSTAL CAZES ROSÉ 2017

ROMEO AND JULIET PASSIMENTO ROSSO 2015

My rosé of choice to celebrate the fading embers of a wonderful summer- but pink wine is not just good for good weather, and this is special. A blend of Syrah and Grenache, with plenty of soft, red summer fruit flavours, great freshness and balance. Simply marvellous wine.

"In fair Verona there is a wall filled with messages to Juliet, some taped on, others in graffiti as depicted on this wine’s label. This is a blend of dried (apassimento) and fresh corvina, croatina and merlot grapes with cherry and allspice aromas and lots of bright juicy cherry and forest fruit flavours.”

MATTHEW NUGENT

LESLIE WILLIAMS

€15.45

€12.95 down from €17.95 for the month of October

THE IRISH EXAMINER 08.09.2018

Our most recently reviewed wines

FINCA LA ESTACADA TEMPRANILLO 2017

THE SUNDAY TIMES 12.09.2018

URLAR SAUVIGNON BLANC 2016

This is only the second time I've encountered wine from Uclés but this new wine in O'Briens is exactly what I like about inexpensive Spanish red wine, brimming with bright juicy red and black fruits and soft berry flavours."

"Not from Marlborough, for once, but south of the North Island. Less exuberant than you may expect - and all the better for that." MARTIN MORAN

€17.95

LESLIE WILLIAMS

€9.95 down from €12.95 for the month of October THE IRISH SUN 15.09.2018

THE SUNDAY BUSINESS POST 18.08.2019

TANDEM INMUNE GARNACHA 2017 The Tandem winery in Navarra, Spain is one of my favourites- and Garnacha is a red grape variety for which I have had a fondness for many years. This is a warming wine, bursting with red berry fruit flavours, spicy notes and softening tannins crafted from old vine grapes. Enjoy with: Chicken with garlic, roast pork, or Camembert cheese. MATTHEW NUGENT

€ 12.95 down from €15.95 for the month of October

ASTROLABE PINOT NOIR 2015 THE SUNDAY WORLD 09.09.2018

DELHEIM CHENIN BLANC 2017 “Watch out for this super South African Chenin Blanc. The honey lemon flavour is neutral on the nose, but boy does it come alive in the mouth. Great with fish.” JEAN SMULLEN

"While New Zealand has become the modern benchmark for Sauvignon Blanc, the rise and rise of its red wine landscape is also unstoppable… This is a restrained style Pinot Noir, much more Burgundian than most, with a pleasing savoury character." TOMÁS CLANCY

€25.45

€ 11.95 down from €13.95 for the month of October

Athlone - Ashbourne - Ballybrack - Beacon South Quarter, Sandyford - Quinsboro Road, Bray - Vevay Road, Bray - Blanchardstown Carrickmines - Citywest - Clontarf - Carlow - Dalkey - Donnybrook - Douglas Court S.C., Cork - Drogheda Dun Laoghaire - Galway - Glasnevin - Greystones - Limerick - Lucan - Malahide - Naas - Navan - Navan Road Newbridge - Newtownpark Ave. - Nutgrove - Rathgar - Rathmines - Sandymount - Stillorgan - Templeogue - Waterford All prices correct at time of going to print and are subject to change. Please enjoy alcohol sensibly.

O'Briens WINE Magazine | Issue 7  
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